09/08/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


09/08/2017

Victoria hears from people having surgery to stop themselves needing the loo when out because of a lack of accessible disabled toilets.


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Hello, it's Wednesday, it's 9am, I'm Victoria Derbyshire,

:00:07.:00:08.

Our top story today - tensions escalate as Donald Trump

:00:09.:00:11.

threatens North Korea with "fire and fury like the world has never

:00:12.:00:14.

seen" and the state retaliates by threatening to strike

:00:15.:00:17.

He has been very threatening, beyond the normal state,

:00:18.:00:30.

and, as I say, they will be met with fire, fury and frankly power

:00:31.:00:33.

the likes of which this world has never seen before.

:00:34.:00:44.

TRANSLATION: Pli plans would be met with an all-out war, wiping out all

:00:45.:00:51.

the strongholds of enemies including the US mainland.

:00:52.:00:54.

We'll look at what could happen next.

:00:55.:01:02.

People are having surgery to stop themselves needing the loo while out

:01:03.:01:08.

and about because of a lack of toilets.

:01:09.:01:13.

I'm so much healthier because, in general day-to-day,

:01:14.:01:15.

at university, I used to dehydrate myself.

:01:16.:01:17.

I wouldn't drink all day, because I'd need the toilet.

:01:18.:01:26.

Paralympian Anne Wafula Strike who was forced to wet herself

:01:27.:01:28.

on a train when she couldn't find a loo has an exclusive report

:01:29.:01:31.

The Fire Service has drafted in 60 councillors to help treat

:01:32.:01:40.

traumatised firefighters who are struggling to cope with the after

:01:41.:01:47.

effects of battling the Grenfell Tower fire. We'll bring you the

:01:48.:01:50.

story after 10am. Hello and welcome to the programme.

:01:51.:01:56.

We're live until 11am. Today is exactly ten years

:01:57.:01:59.

since the credit crunch hit the UK, leading to the global financial

:02:00.:02:02.

crisis and forcing many of you out of your jobs,

:02:03.:02:04.

your home, your business. This morning, we'll look at how

:02:05.:02:13.

people have recovered. Do get in touch and share your

:02:14.:02:15.

experiences this morning. Use the hashtag Victoria

:02:16.:02:18.

LIVE and if you text, you will be charged

:02:19.:02:20.

at the standard network rate. A group of French soldiers on patrol

:02:21.:02:33.

in a western suburb of Paris have been hit by a car.

:02:34.:02:37.

Six of them were injured. Four seriously. A search is under way for

:02:38.:02:42.

the vehicle and the driver. The local mayor said he had no doubt

:02:43.:02:47.

that it had been a deliberate act. Those are all the details we have at

:02:48.:02:51.

the moment. Six soldiers injured after being hit by a vehicle. Four

:02:52.:02:56.

of those soldiers are said to be seriously injured. The local mayor

:02:57.:03:01.

saying he had no doubt it was a deliberate act. As soon as we have

:03:02.:03:04.

more details, of course, we will bring them to you.

:03:05.:03:09.

Tensions between the US and North Korea have

:03:10.:03:11.

President Trump has warned Kim Jong Un that if he goes

:03:12.:03:15.

on threatening America, his country will face

:03:16.:03:16.

"fire and fury, like the world has never seen".

:03:17.:03:19.

North Korea says it is considering carrying out missile strikes

:03:20.:03:21.

on the American territory of Guam, an island in the Western Pacific.

:03:22.:03:24.

Suzanne Kianpour reports from Washington.

:03:25.:03:32.

North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States.

:03:33.:03:45.

They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.

:03:46.:03:48.

Unprecedented language from an American president.

:03:49.:03:50.

Donald Trump officially escalated the US stand-off with North Korea

:03:51.:03:53.

North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States.

:03:54.:04:00.

A report by US Intelligence officials saying Pyongyang has

:04:01.:04:04.

produced a nuclear warhead small enough to fit inside its missiles -

:04:05.:04:07.

that much closer to the capability of striking the United States.

:04:08.:04:11.

The President's angry response could throw a wrench into hopes

:04:12.:04:13.

After a rare unanimous vote in the UN Security Council to slap

:04:14.:04:20.

strong sanctions on the regime - a move meant to bring

:04:21.:04:22.

North Korean State News says Kim Jong-un is already weighing

:04:23.:04:29.

a plan to strike the US Pacific territory of Guam which appears

:04:30.:04:32.

to have been in place before Mr Trump's remarks.

:04:33.:04:35.

President Trump often criticised his predecessor,

:04:36.:04:38.

Barack Obama, for not sticking to his red lines in foreign policy

:04:39.:04:41.

when he was here in the White House, but now, Mr Trump has drawn a red

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The question is - what happens if North Korea crosses it?

:04:45.:04:53.

Let's go to our correspondent Yogita Limaye, who's in Seoul.

:04:54.:04:58.

Well, the Government here have said that it remains vigilant to the

:04:59.:05:11.

threat from North Korea. What they've also said is they are

:05:12.:05:16.

strengthening their defence capabilities, their joint defence

:05:17.:05:20.

capability with the US. The president has reportedly said that

:05:21.:05:22.

the defence system needs to be overhauled in light of this threat,

:05:23.:05:29.

but what South Korea has been doing is following a two-track policy.

:05:30.:05:34.

While it is strengthing its defence policy, but it said it is open to

:05:35.:05:37.

talks with its northern neighbour. It is an offer that the president

:05:38.:05:44.

had made some time back. It was an offer reiterated by the country's

:05:45.:05:47.

Foreign Minister. North Korea has not responded. If you go out on the

:05:48.:05:51.

streets of Seoul and you talk to people. It is a mixed reaction. Some

:05:52.:05:54.

of them aren't really that bothered by the news that's coming out

:05:55.:05:58.

because they say they've they'reed these threats so many times from

:05:59.:06:02.

Pyongyang, that they are almost used to it and they think North Korea

:06:03.:06:08.

could be bluffing. There are others who are worried. A woman I met who

:06:09.:06:11.

said she was concerned and she wishes everyone would just live in

:06:12.:06:14.

peace. The fact is that, it is true of the this is what people here have

:06:15.:06:18.

heard for a long time. But in the current context, there is also now a

:06:19.:06:23.

leader in the US who is using extremely strong language and when

:06:24.:06:27.

that comes together, you know, this war of words is intensifying more

:06:28.:06:31.

than perhaps we have seen in recent years.

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Thank you very much. Thank you.

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Let's remind you of the breaking news from Paris where a police

:06:40.:06:45.

operation is under way after a group of patrolling soldiers were hit by a

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vehicle. Six soldiers are reported to be injured. Two of them, we're

:06:51.:06:54.

told, seriously injured. The police are searching for the vehicle

:06:55.:06:57.

involved. The local mayor says he has no doubt it was a deliberate

:06:58.:07:03.

act. "It is anodious act of aggression. ." The car in question

:07:04.:07:08.

who hit the soldiers was a BMW. So a police operation is under way in

:07:09.:07:12.

Paris after a group of soldiers was hit by a bflt MW as they were on

:07:13.:07:18.

patrol in a western suburb. Six soldiers are reported to be injured.

:07:19.:07:24.

Two of them seriously. And obviously an operation is under way to find

:07:25.:07:26.

the vehicle and the driver. Joanna Gosling is in the BBC

:07:27.:07:30.

Newsroom with a summary A British Paralympian who was forced

:07:31.:07:41.

to wet herself on a train tells us the lack of accessible toilets for

:07:42.:07:47.

disabled people is unacceptable. She says despite a Government promise

:07:48.:07:51.

that it would never happen again, she exposed examples of others who

:07:52.:07:56.

found themselves with no other option but to urnnate on themselves

:07:57.:08:00.

during a train journey. You can watch her film coming up shortly.

:08:01.:08:10.

500 new medical school places will be made available in England

:08:11.:08:13.

next year as the Gvernment attempts to boost the number of home-grown

:08:14.:08:16.

The target is to increase the total number of training places

:08:17.:08:20.

by a quarter by 2020, to help ease staffing pressures.

:08:21.:08:22.

The British Medical Association says it won't address

:08:23.:08:24.

Children's services are being "pushed to breaking point" due

:08:25.:08:28.

to increased demand and cuts in council budgets according

:08:29.:08:30.

The LGA says three-quarters of English councils overspent

:08:31.:08:33.

on child social care by a total of more than ?0.5 billion.

:08:34.:08:36.

A Government spokesman said councils would receive around ?200 billion

:08:37.:08:38.

This programme has learned that the fire service has drafted

:08:39.:08:49.

in 60 counsellors to help treat traumatised firefighters

:08:50.:08:53.

The figure is more than ten times the number who normally

:08:54.:09:00.

We'll be hearing from the London Fire Authority

:09:01.:09:03.

Those who commit cruelty against animals "are getting away

:09:04.:09:06.

with it" due to the "leniency" of UK courts, according to a report.

:09:07.:09:10.

Of the nearly 14,000 people found guilty of animal cruelty in England

:09:11.:09:12.

and Wales from 2005 to 2015, more than 92% avoided

:09:13.:09:17.

prison, the Centre for Crime Prevention says.

:09:18.:09:19.

It has called for the maximum sentence for offenders to be

:09:20.:09:21.

increased from six months to five years.

:09:22.:09:24.

The Government says it is reviewing the matter.

:09:25.:09:29.

It's exactly 10 years today since the start

:09:30.:09:31.

It started with a warning from French bank BNP Paribas

:09:32.:09:37.

about US housing loans and ended with a global credit

:09:38.:09:40.

crunch as governments around the world propped up banks that

:09:41.:09:43.

Here banks including Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds TSB had to be

:09:44.:09:52.

rescued with billions in taxpayers' money.

:09:53.:09:59.

The AA says seven out of ten drivers avoid parking spaces that

:10:00.:10:02.

It says motorists, especially the older ones,

:10:03.:10:05.

prefer to pay with cash, even if the meters

:10:06.:10:07.

The AA says that many are put off by administration fees and voice

:10:08.:10:11.

Kenya's incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta has taken a strong lead

:10:12.:10:15.

as votes are counted after Tuesday's election.

:10:16.:10:18.

With more than three-quarters of results in,

:10:19.:10:23.

Mr Kenyatta has a lead of close to 10% over his rival.

:10:24.:10:26.

However, the opposition coalition has rejected the figures,

:10:27.:10:28.

and has accused officials of publishing fake results.

:10:29.:10:31.

Tributes have been paid to the American country music star,

:10:32.:10:35.

Glen Campbell, who has died after what his family called

:10:36.:10:37.

a "long and courageous battle" with Alzheimer's.

:10:38.:10:39.

He was famous for hits including Rhinestone Cowboy

:10:40.:10:59.

Dolly Parton said he had "one of the greatest voices of all time".

:11:00.:11:15.

Let's go to Paris and talk to Johnny Diamond. A police operation Sunday

:11:16.:11:24.

way. What can you tell us? This is as a result of attack that took

:11:25.:11:28.

place just under an hour, maybe an hour ago now. A man or a woman, we

:11:29.:11:34.

don't know, a driver drove into a group of soldiers in the north

:11:35.:11:40.

western suburb, it is 15 minutes drive in the BBC bureau in the

:11:41.:11:44.

centre of Paris. The car injured six of the soldiers. Two of them

:11:45.:11:52.

seriously. Now, those soldiers were part of Operation Sentinal that's in

:11:53.:12:02.

place since 2012, since the attacks on the magazine, Charlie Hebdo. The

:12:03.:12:06.

mayor said it was an intentional attack. As I say, two soldiers

:12:07.:12:12.

seriously injured and four lightly injured. Perhaps of greatest concern

:12:13.:12:16.

after those injuries is the fact that the driver and the vehicle are

:12:17.:12:21.

still at large. There is a large and very serious police operation going

:12:22.:12:25.

on throughout Paris to try and track down the driver and the vehicle

:12:26.:12:28.

whilst investigations are carried out the site itself. You mentioned

:12:29.:12:35.

the Charlie Hebdo attacks, but France has seen numerous attacks

:12:36.:12:38.

like this in recent years, hasn't it? In recent years, in recent

:12:39.:12:43.

months. In fact, there has been, I think, you might call it an

:12:44.:12:48.

uncharacteristic lull in the three months since the presidential

:12:49.:12:51.

election here. An election campaign that was marked by a number of, what

:12:52.:12:57.

you might describe as relatively low level attacks. There have been

:12:58.:13:04.

shootings at police officers in the Champs Elysees a couple of minutes

:13:05.:13:08.

walk from where I am here. There was an attack on a group of soldiers who

:13:09.:13:13.

were on guard outside the Louvre, the great museum, one of the most

:13:14.:13:22.

visited museums in the world. Four Parisians, for the inhabitants of

:13:23.:13:25.

cities around France, the state of alert is a reality because there

:13:26.:13:28.

have been attacks large and small really coming in the last few years

:13:29.:13:34.

in a fairly unseizing flow, whether it has been of the terrifying scale

:13:35.:13:38.

of that of Nice were more than 80 people were killed when a man drove

:13:39.:13:43.

a truck through celebratory crowds or whether it is isolated attacks, a

:13:44.:13:50.

French priest having his throat cut in his own church, in a fairly

:13:51.:13:54.

isolated country church, this has become a normal state for France and

:13:55.:14:00.

this is why this operation is in place, both to reassure the

:14:01.:14:03.

population with high-profile patrols, but also to dissuade and

:14:04.:14:06.

deter those who might carry out the attacks. The risk obviously is that

:14:07.:14:11.

the operation itself becomes a focus for attacks and that appears to have

:14:12.:14:17.

been the case this morning here in the city of Paris, in the suburb of

:14:18.:14:21.

the city of Paris, 15 minutes drive from the centre. Thank you. I know

:14:22.:14:26.

you will be back with us as soon as you have more information. We will

:14:27.:14:28.

keep you updated throughout the morning.

:14:29.:14:33.

And yesterday's World Athletics Championships news

:14:34.:14:35.

was dominated by a man who ultimately wasn't competing.

:14:36.:14:42.

Yes, Isaac Makwala. He wanted to run but it did not happen. He was turned

:14:43.:14:57.

away from the London stadium because of a suspected norovirus. The IAAF

:14:58.:15:13.

decided that they didn't want to risk affecting other athletes. Wayde

:15:14.:15:18.

van Niekerk took a gold medal comfortably in the end. Afterwards

:15:19.:15:22.

he told everyone that he was actually gutted not to take on his

:15:23.:15:25.

closest challenger. And there he is crossing the line.

:15:26.:15:27.

I would love him to have his fair opportunity.

:15:28.:15:32.

I believe he would have done very well this championships and,

:15:33.:15:39.

like I said earlier, I've got so much sympathy for him.

:15:40.:15:45.

I really wish I could even give him my medal.

:15:46.:15:48.

Meanwhile in the 800 metres a quick mention

:15:49.:15:50.

about Britan's Kyle Langford - he missed out on the podium

:15:51.:15:54.

finishing fourth, but he's not letting the disappointment get

:15:55.:15:57.

to him too much saying he's now focusing on the Tokyo

:15:58.:16:00.

So we're halfway through the tournament and that target

:16:01.:16:08.

of Great Britain getting between 6 to 8 medals isn't really looking

:16:09.:16:10.

England women start the defence of the rugby World Cup.

:16:11.:16:21.

Yes with England, Wales and Ireland all playing their first games later

:16:22.:16:24.

but as the action gets under way, there's a row over

:16:25.:16:31.

whether the England team are getting paid fairly,

:16:32.:16:33.

The Rugby Football Union are changing the way they pay

:16:34.:16:37.

So in the future, they'll only pay the women who play the version

:16:38.:16:42.

of the game with seven players, rather than the traditional,

:16:43.:16:44.

Joined now by former England rugby captain Sue Day.

:16:45.:16:50.

Thanks for joining us. It is a brilliant time for win in's sport.

:16:51.:16:58.

We have had World Cup cricket, football, and this tournament will

:16:59.:17:02.

be watched by people all over the world, which is exciting. Really

:17:03.:17:07.

exciting. We have seen coverage for winner's sport increased so much

:17:08.:17:14.

with over 100 million people watching the women's cricket World

:17:15.:17:18.

Cup and our team go to victory is so exciting to see how many people

:17:19.:17:23.

across the globe get the chance to watch this rugby World Cup. I want

:17:24.:17:28.

to take about the tasty line-up. England, defending champions, will

:17:29.:17:33.

mumble one, taking on Spain. We have Ireland versus Australia and Wales

:17:34.:17:37.

taking of New Zealand. Do you think England have it in them to defend

:17:38.:17:42.

the World Cup? Very much so. They just about going to this as

:17:43.:17:50.

favourites having beaten New Zealand in New Zealand in the summer, having

:17:51.:17:53.

lost to New Zealand before that, when they were over here. England go

:17:54.:17:56.

into it as favourites. They are not talking about defending the trophy

:17:57.:18:00.

but winning this tournament. A strong pack and they have a great

:18:01.:18:04.

chance. You talk about Wales playing New Zealand, that is a tough game

:18:05.:18:11.

first up in a World Cup. New Zealand have won the last four World Cups

:18:12.:18:16.

prior to the last one. The row I was talking about is after the

:18:17.:18:22.

tournament, the 15s will not exist and they will only pay the sevens

:18:23.:18:29.

side. How do you feel? The players always knew these were short-term

:18:30.:18:36.

15s contracts. The RFU have said loudly it is a temporary thing and

:18:37.:18:39.

they aren't looking at having full-time contracts for the players,

:18:40.:18:46.

the 15s included in the long-term. In the short-term they are focusing

:18:47.:18:50.

on investing a lot of money in a club game in England. The

:18:51.:18:53.

infrastructure would therefore be there in the future when players

:18:54.:18:58.

hopefully go professional long-term, they will be able to go back to

:18:59.:19:02.

clubs to play full-time and trained with the best coaches. Disappointing

:19:03.:19:07.

now there are not long-term full-time contracts but I'm hopeful

:19:08.:19:11.

it will happen soon. Thank you. That is all, we will be back at 9:30am.

:19:12.:19:15.

Next this morning, in an exclusive report a British Paralympian

:19:16.:19:18.

who was forced to wet herself on a train journey last year

:19:19.:19:21.

because the disabled loo was out of order tells us the lack

:19:22.:19:23.

of accessible toilets for disabled people is unacceptable.

:19:24.:19:29.

Anne Wafula-Strike says despite a government promise that it

:19:30.:19:32.

would never happen again, in a film for us, she's exposed

:19:33.:19:35.

examples of others who've found themselves with no other option,

:19:36.:19:39.

but to urinate on themselves on a train journey.

:19:40.:19:44.

In her investigation for this programme, the wheelchair racer

:19:45.:19:46.

speaks to people who've resorted to drastic measures including having

:19:47.:19:50.

surgery to stop them needing the loo when they're out.

:19:51.:19:52.

I have won medals in wheelchair racing, I have an MBE.

:19:53.:20:14.

But last year I was forced to wet myself on a train.

:20:15.:20:17.

I was on a cross-country route from the Midlands to Stansted.

:20:18.:20:23.

The accessible toilet was out of order.

:20:24.:20:27.

It was one of the most humiliating experiences of my life.

:20:28.:20:32.

At the time, the government's rail minister told me he was committed

:20:33.:20:37.

to ensuring no passenger would go through this again but eight

:20:38.:20:40.

months on, we can reveal it's still happening.

:20:41.:20:45.

I booked the journey to Birmingham six weeks in advance

:20:46.:20:48.

But I found the toilet was out of order when I got on the train.

:20:49.:20:53.

It seems a lack of accessible toilets is a problem everywhere.

:20:54.:21:02.

Many are out of order, not fit for purpose or just filthy.

:21:03.:21:10.

Parents are changing their children on floors covered in urine.

:21:11.:21:13.

There are people out there that are changing people

:21:14.:21:17.

on toilet floors all day, every day, in towns

:21:18.:21:19.

The issue is so extreme that some people are opting for unnecessary

:21:20.:21:24.

surgery because there are no toilets for them to use.

:21:25.:21:31.

I had a catheter fitted which means I don't have to get out of my chair

:21:32.:21:35.

I can go to the toilet wherever I want now.

:21:36.:21:38.

These are the realities faced by people living

:21:39.:21:40.

I've come along to my local athletics track in Harlow to chat

:21:41.:22:08.

to people about what they've come up against.

:22:09.:22:10.

You go out on a night out, bearing in mind half the clubs

:22:11.:22:16.

you kind of can't really get into because of the steps,

:22:17.:22:18.

and you find a club that you can get into...

:22:19.:22:21.

And then the toilet is used as storage.

:22:22.:22:23.

Because they've got storage in there.

:22:24.:22:30.

And then when you ask to go in there, they say, I'm sorry.

:22:31.:22:33.

What seems worse, they're not even maintained properly.

:22:34.:22:39.

I was camping a few years back, I phoned up and said,

:22:40.:22:42.

Got there, and I said, where is the disabled toilet?

:22:43.:22:47.

I just got off my chair, crawled along the floor, climbed up

:22:48.:22:53.

You literally got on the floor from your wheelchair

:22:54.:22:59.

And then you don't want to complain because you just feel like you're

:23:00.:23:06.

It's like, they don't really understand.

:23:07.:23:13.

The only able-bodied people who do understand are the parents,

:23:14.:23:17.

and people who have got friends or children with disabilities.

:23:18.:23:31.

Under the Equality Act, businesses have a legal duty to make

:23:32.:23:33.

reasonable adjustments so that their loos are accessible

:23:34.:23:35.

But recent research suggests as many as 40% of restaurants and a third

:23:36.:23:40.

of department stores still don't have appropriate toilets.

:23:41.:23:44.

Some people are taking the problem into their own hands.

:23:45.:23:49.

At 20, Manny decided to undergo surgery she had no need

:23:50.:23:51.

for because she couldn't find anywhere to go to

:23:52.:23:54.

Just down to my favourite cocktail bar.

:23:55.:24:05.

Oh, you're taking me to a cocktail bar, wow!

:24:06.:24:10.

She's used a power chair since he was three and needs a hoist

:24:11.:24:17.

Manny, you like going out with your friends,

:24:18.:24:22.

and I know when you're out you want to have a drink or you want

:24:23.:24:25.

How is that like? So, when I first went to university,

:24:26.:24:36.

I would avoid drinking as much as I could, because if I needed

:24:37.:24:41.

the toilet, I'd have to go home and leave the night out early,

:24:42.:24:44.

because I'd need a hoist and a plinth to be able

:24:45.:24:47.

Two years next month, I had a catheter fitted which means

:24:48.:24:59.

I don't have to get out of my chair to go to the toilet.

:25:00.:25:04.

So I can go to the toilet wherever I want now, so it's incredible.

:25:05.:25:08.

It's completely changed my life, I'm so much healthier because I can,

:25:09.:25:15.

not on nights out but in general day to day, I used to,

:25:16.:25:19.

at university I used to dehydrate myself,

:25:20.:25:20.

I wouldn't drink all day because I need the toilet.

:25:21.:25:23.

They create a hole just beneath your belly button to put

:25:24.:25:27.

And basically, it's like putting a needle in and a slightly bigger

:25:28.:25:37.

needle in and a slightly bigger needle until the hole is big enough

:25:38.:25:40.

I just can't believe that you actually opted

:25:41.:25:44.

to have an operation without any medical need.

:25:45.:25:48.

Yeah, no medical need, I wasn't incontinent.

:25:49.:25:53.

My urologist called it socially incontinent, where basically,

:25:54.:26:01.

it meant I was incontinent when I was out because I

:26:02.:26:03.

Because there wasn't the facilities there.

:26:04.:26:06.

And although it's incredible and it's life changing

:26:07.:26:08.

and I wouldn't change it for the world, I kind

:26:09.:26:13.

of wish I didn't have to in the first place.

:26:14.:26:17.

I was shocked to hear what lengths Manny was forced to go through.

:26:18.:26:25.

She maintains it was worth the risks.

:26:26.:26:29.

What has this operation meant for you?

:26:30.:26:33.

It's given me a lot more freedom, a lot more independence.

:26:34.:26:37.

I don't have to worry about having inaccessible toilets,

:26:38.:26:40.

I can just go out and have fun like anyone else.

:26:41.:26:43.

I've got so many friends that have had them done.

:26:44.:26:46.

It's quite ridiculous how many people have had to go through it

:26:47.:26:48.

just to be able to go to the toilet when they're out.

:26:49.:26:53.

Personally, I sort of feel like it's not fair that young people

:26:54.:26:56.

with certain disabilities are actually going to the length

:26:57.:27:03.

of having operations that they do not need.

:27:04.:27:06.

I mean, there's always things in life that you kind of can't do

:27:07.:27:12.

I mean, there's always things in life that you cand and can't do

:27:13.:27:16.

I mean, there's always things in life that you can and can't do

:27:17.:27:19.

but not being able to go to the toilet, purely

:27:20.:27:22.

because there's no facilities there, is just ridiculous.

:27:23.:27:24.

There are actually some public toilets in full with severe

:27:25.:27:26.

There are actually some public toilets people with severe

:27:27.:27:28.

They are called changing places toilets.

:27:29.:27:30.

They have more spaces and specialist equipment but there are only around

:27:31.:27:35.

a thousand across the UK, and it's estimated a quarter of

:27:36.:27:38.

There aren't any in some parts of the country.

:27:39.:27:44.

It's been really good, we've got nine changing places

:27:45.:27:46.

Lorna needs one for her daughter Emily Mae, who has

:27:47.:27:50.

Lorna, tell me, how does a changing places toilet look like,

:27:51.:27:58.

how does it work, and why is it important?

:27:59.:28:01.

Well, this is an adult changing bench and it actually

:28:02.:28:04.

And that means that you can lay somebody on there to have their

:28:05.:28:13.

I've been changing my daughter on a baby change facility

:28:14.:28:21.

for a long, long time, but she's obviously

:28:22.:28:23.

And we need adult changing places toilets like these.

:28:24.:28:27.

Because without these, I'd either have to change her on the toilet

:28:28.:28:30.

floor or find somewhere else to change her.

:28:31.:28:34.

But the other important bit of kit is that you've got this hoist.

:28:35.:28:37.

So you can hoist somebody out of their wheelchair onto the adult

:28:38.:28:40.

changing bench or you can hoist a person onto the toilet.

:28:41.:28:43.

So are you telling me that without certain facilities,

:28:44.:28:51.

So are you telling me that without such facilities,

:28:52.:28:53.

you actually have to change your daughter on this floor?

:28:54.:28:55.

There are people out there that are changing people on toilet floors

:28:56.:28:58.

all day every day in towns and cities across the UK.

:28:59.:29:01.

There's people with very low immunities who are at risk

:29:02.:29:03.

of catching infections from toilet floors.

:29:04.:29:07.

There are people with feeding tubes, tracheostomies, all sorts of things

:29:08.:29:10.

that you do not want to get dirty, and which could actually kill

:29:11.:29:13.

somebody if they got an infection into it.

:29:14.:29:15.

I want these in all large public buildings, and I'm not

:29:16.:29:19.

talking little teashops, I'm talking cinemas, theatres,

:29:20.:29:23.

hospitals, town halls and in larger public buildings.

:29:24.:29:26.

Particularly when they're being built brand-new.

:29:27.:29:30.

And also equipment like this, to have a facility like this,

:29:31.:29:33.

You see why some businesses would say why it's expensive to afford.

:29:34.:29:43.

I can understand small businesses, but we're talking about a lot

:29:44.:29:46.

There's a shopping centre near us that's just spent ?180,000

:29:47.:29:50.

They have not included a changing places toilet facility.

:29:51.:29:57.

There are people who cannot go out just because of a simple toilet,

:29:58.:30:00.

A recent government committee recommended this toilet should be

:30:01.:30:10.

made compulsory in large buildings that serve the public,

:30:11.:30:13.

but no legislation has been put in place to make that happen.

:30:14.:30:20.

But will it happen went access to standard disabled

:30:21.:30:23.

Despite promises that no one else would have to suffer

:30:24.:30:32.

the humiliation I went through, in May, Virgin Trains had

:30:33.:30:34.

He was forced to wet himself because the accessible toilet on one

:30:35.:30:43.

I booked a journey to Birmingham six weeks in advance,

:30:44.:30:51.

But I found the toilet was out of order when I got on the train.

:30:52.:30:57.

When I arrived to check in at the station, someone

:30:58.:31:03.

somewhere knew that that's when it was out of order.

:31:04.:31:11.

And someone should have given me the choice to either take the risk,

:31:12.:31:14.

maybe travel anyway, or get a later train.

:31:15.:31:16.

But nobody told me the toilet was out of order and nobody gave me

:31:17.:31:20.

those choices and they didn't communicate with me at all,

:31:21.:31:22.

I was disgusted by the attitude of the train company that

:31:23.:31:26.

I was angry about the train company's negligence,

:31:27.:31:30.

knowing that there was a passenger, a wheelchair user, needing that

:31:31.:31:33.

They should have got the toilet ready and had it in working order.

:31:34.:31:39.

You know, after I had my accident on the train, when I wet

:31:40.:31:42.

myself on the train, I had a meeting with

:31:43.:31:44.

And he assured me that no such incident would be

:31:45.:31:49.

I think that assurance is completely worthless,

:31:50.:31:55.

The Minister hasn't managed to fulfil that promise.

:31:56.:32:04.

Do you think many people, wheelchair users will continue

:32:05.:32:06.

to wet themselves on the trains because the toilets

:32:07.:32:08.

Yes, I've spoken to many wheelchair users and it's

:32:09.:32:15.

And I'm sure it's going to happen many times again.

:32:16.:32:23.

I've never had a problem on the line we are travelling on at the moment,

:32:24.:32:26.

but there is clearly still an issue across the UK.

:32:27.:32:31.

So I've decided it's time to go back to the rail minister

:32:32.:32:36.

He tells me they are working on an action plan to

:32:37.:32:40.

improve access ability across-the-board in transport.

:32:41.:32:44.

Paul, you know, when I had my terrible incident on the train,

:32:45.:32:47.

you promised that no other passenger would have to suffer

:32:48.:32:50.

So, what guarantee can you give us that there's

:32:51.:32:58.

I'm hoping that when people see the accessibility action plan,

:32:59.:33:05.

they will see in it a range of ideas that will not just make sure

:33:06.:33:09.

passengers get a better service on the day, but that we can work

:33:10.:33:12.

more tactically and more strategically to make sure that more

:33:13.:33:15.

toilets are in service on trains in the first place.

:33:16.:33:23.

What are you going to do to make sure that the train companies

:33:24.:33:26.

actually serve the disabled traveller?

:33:27.:33:28.

There is strict legal rules in place as to what threshold of achievement

:33:29.:33:34.

The office for road and rail enforces that and I've been

:33:35.:33:43.

very clearly to them, I want them to take it

:33:44.:33:45.

Talking to the minister, this action plan could be a step

:33:46.:33:49.

in the right direction, but we don't know the details

:33:50.:33:52.

There's around seven million working age people

:33:53.:33:59.

People may not understand why such a fuss is being made about toilets.

:34:00.:34:09.

But when you have a disability, knowing you're not defined

:34:10.:34:11.

So, this is not just an issue about access to toilets.

:34:12.:34:16.

It's about access to all areas of life.

:34:17.:34:35.

It has happened quite a few of you. Mum on a mission said, "This

:34:36.:34:42.

happened to me and my son this week at a big supermarket. Disabled

:34:43.:34:47.

toilets are not fit for purpose. It was embarrassing for me, but

:34:48.:34:52.

degrading and uncomfortable for my son."

:34:53.:34:53.

If this has happened to you, then let me know because we'd

:34:54.:34:56.

like to talk to you via Facetime or Skype on the programme today.

:34:57.:34:59.

Put your number on your message and we'll call you back.

:35:00.:35:02.

More on this to come through the programme this morning.

:35:03.:35:04.

Let's return to the breaking news this morning.

:35:05.:35:06.

Police in Paris say a group of French soldiers on patrol

:35:07.:35:09.

in a western suburb have been hit by a car.

:35:10.:35:11.

Dymond Is in the French capital and gave us this update.

:35:12.:35:16.

Well, this is as a result of an attack that took place just under an

:35:17.:35:21.

hour ago, maybe an hour now. A man or woman, we don't know, a driver,

:35:22.:35:27.

drove into a group of soldiers in the north western suburb of

:35:28.:35:31.

Levallois-Perre. It's about 15 minutes drive from the BBC bureau in

:35:32.:35:36.

the centre of Paris. The car injured six of the soldiers, two of them

:35:37.:35:40.

seriously. Those soldiers were part of what is called Operation

:35:41.:35:45.

Sentinell a heightened state of counter terror alert that's been in

:35:46.:35:48.

place now since 2012, since the attacks on the offices of the

:35:49.:35:55.

satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. The mayor of the neighbourhood,

:35:56.:35:58.

Levallois-Perre said this is an intentional attack. As I say, two

:35:59.:36:03.

soldiers seriously injured and four lightly injured and perhaps of

:36:04.:36:06.

greatest concern after those injuries is the fact that the driver

:36:07.:36:11.

and the vehicle are still at large. There is a large and very serious

:36:12.:36:16.

police operation going on throughout Paris to try and track down the

:36:17.:36:18.

driver. We will keep you up-to-date

:36:19.:36:21.

throughout the morning. Tensions between the US

:36:22.:36:24.

and North Korea have Pyongyang says it's

:36:25.:36:29.

considering launching a ballistic missile strike close to the US

:36:30.:36:32.

military base on Guam President Trump has declared

:36:33.:36:34.

that any further threats from the North Koreans will be met

:36:35.:36:37.

with a devastating response. This programme has learned

:36:38.:36:47.

that the Fire Service has drafted in 60 counsellors to help treat

:36:48.:36:50.

traumatised firefighters The figure is more than 10 times

:36:51.:36:52.

the number who normally We'll be hearing from

:36:53.:36:56.

the London Fire Authority 500 new doctors will be recruited.

:36:57.:37:18.

It is to help ease staffing pressures. The British Medical

:37:19.:37:21.

Association says it won't address the shortage of medics.

:37:22.:37:25.

Kenya's incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta has taken a strong lead

:37:26.:37:28.

as votes are counted after Tuesday's election.

:37:29.:37:30.

With more than three-quarters of results in,

:37:31.:37:31.

Mr Kenyatta has a lead of close to 10% over his rival.

:37:32.:37:34.

However, the opposition coalition has rejected the figures,

:37:35.:37:36.

and has accused officials of publishing fake results.

:37:37.:37:47.

We will keep you up-to-date throughout the morning with the news

:37:48.:37:55.

from morning. Paris throughout the morning.

:37:56.:38:01.

Four former footballers - all survivors of childhood

:38:02.:38:03.

sexual abuse - are calling on the Government to introduce

:38:04.:38:06.

new laws to protect children from the kind

:38:07.:38:07.

David White, Derek Bell, Ian Ackley and Paul Stewart,

:38:08.:38:12.

three of whom are here in the studio with us today, set-up

:38:13.:38:15.

Save to improve safeguarding in football and to help other

:38:16.:38:18.

with former footballers who were

:38:19.:38:29.

abused during their childhood - many on this programme -

:38:30.:38:31.

hundreds of people came forward to report abuse to the police.

:38:32.:38:34.

Let's talk now with three of the four former professional

:38:35.:38:36.

Former Man City and England player David White, former Newcastle player

:38:37.:38:40.

Derek Bell and Ian Ackley, who way back in the 1990s spoke up

:38:41.:38:43.

Welcome all of you. David tell us more about Save and how you came to

:38:44.:38:52.

set it up? We didn't intend to set it up. That's the most important

:38:53.:38:56.

thing. On the back of last November we were invited individually to the

:38:57.:39:02.

FA. From day one we found them very, very receptive. We found them very

:39:03.:39:07.

professional. The safeguarding policies very thorough and they let

:39:08.:39:10.

us in and we have been working with them on a fairly regular basis since

:39:11.:39:14.

then and it just developed. It just seemed to become the right thing for

:39:15.:39:19.

us to do, for us to, I suppose, we have been working quietly in the

:39:20.:39:22.

back ground for us to say this is what we have been doing. This is

:39:23.:39:25.

what we're going to be doing in the future. So Save safeguarding the

:39:26.:39:31.

victim and victim engagement and we want to actually sort of celebrate

:39:32.:39:35.

the thoroughness of we believe safeguarding that is in football and

:39:36.:39:40.

probably in other sports for the FA to share those practises, but we've

:39:41.:39:45.

discovered in many ways that legislation is a barrier to that.

:39:46.:39:52.

Let me bring in Ian. Where do you believe the legislation is allowing

:39:53.:39:55.

children potentially to slip through the net to fall through the net? I

:39:56.:40:01.

think that the DBS system that we've got in this country in my opinion

:40:02.:40:05.

isn't fit for purpose. That's the old criminal records check? Yes,

:40:06.:40:13.

absolutely, yeah. We've got a situation whereby a person can have

:40:14.:40:17.

a criminal record check and they are working or volunteering at an

:40:18.:40:21.

organisation, they can be barred from working with children or young

:40:22.:40:25.

adults because they are deemed to be a risk and the DBS system isn't

:40:26.:40:29.

allowed to tell the organisation that the person has been barred from

:40:30.:40:35.

working with them. And that's on the basis that it breaks data protection

:40:36.:40:39.

so it breaks their Human Rights. It is ill logical, what is the point of

:40:40.:40:43.

the system if it doesn't trigger information to the people hiring the

:40:44.:40:47.

individual? Absolutely. We talk about breaking people's Human

:40:48.:40:51.

Rights, then actually we do that on a daily basis when we incarcerate

:40:52.:40:54.

people and put them in prison because they are a risk to society.

:40:55.:40:58.

We say it's OK to take away their liberty and their freedom, their

:40:59.:41:01.

right to a private and family life because they need to be incarcerated

:41:02.:41:06.

to keep society safe. On one hand the Government is saying, well, it's

:41:07.:41:09.

OK to disregard the Human Rights Act in order to protect society, but on

:41:10.:41:13.

the other hand, to protect children and vulnerable adults, it's not OK.

:41:14.:41:18.

OK. So that's one area where you can see loopholes could be tightened up.

:41:19.:41:24.

Yes? In terms of legislation. Derek, what about mandatory reporting We

:41:25.:41:31.

formed a group as I say and there is 11 charters on that. One of them

:41:32.:41:35.

which is mandatory reporting which we feel very strongly about. That

:41:36.:41:40.

means professionals, volunteers, anybody in football, halving a legal

:41:41.:41:45.

duty to report either abuse or suspected abuse to the authorities?

:41:46.:41:50.

Correct. There is the system in Scotland that is in place, but not

:41:51.:41:54.

in England. Which I think it is an educational point of view. People

:41:55.:41:58.

think that, you know, there should be mandatory reporting. Parents, you

:41:59.:42:03.

know, can, you know, report mandatory reporting, but it's not

:42:04.:42:05.

legislation as yet and that's something that we have been

:42:06.:42:10.

campaigning to Government and campaigning with Government to try

:42:11.:42:13.

and change the law where it is up to a parent, if they see something

:42:14.:42:17.

wrong on a football pitch or in any sport, they have got an obligation

:42:18.:42:23.

and a duty of care to report that incident and we're fighting

:42:24.:42:26.

hopefully to, you know, get mandatory reporting in place. A lot

:42:27.:42:29.

of people think it is in place at the minute, but it isn't actually

:42:30.:42:31.

legislation. OK. Ian, in the past, and when you

:42:32.:42:37.

first spoke to us back in November, you criticised the Football

:42:38.:42:42.

Association in England. You said it had reacted dismissively to worries

:42:43.:42:46.

about sexual abuse in the game when they emerged in the 1990s, your

:42:47.:42:50.

dad's call for better protection fell on deaf ears. Have you changed

:42:51.:42:54.

your mind about the FA? I have to since they have invited us to speak

:42:55.:42:58.

with them, my opinion has definitely changed. What my experience of the

:42:59.:43:03.

safeguarding team at the FA and the work we've done so far has changed

:43:04.:43:08.

my prospective. I really do believe that the FA are working very, very

:43:09.:43:13.

hard in order to make football as robust and as safe as possibly can

:43:14.:43:17.

do. They will be the first to admit there are always changes that can be

:43:18.:43:21.

made and improvements will always be ongoing, the landscape changes and

:43:22.:43:24.

we need to keep up with the times, but actually, they're doing a

:43:25.:43:27.

tremendous amount of work to make sure that they do make football an

:43:28.:43:32.

incredibly safe and is an incredibly safe sport for our children. Do you

:43:33.:43:37.

have faith in the FA's internal inquiry into historical sexual abuse

:43:38.:43:41.

in the game? Absolutely. With all three of us and Paul have been down,

:43:42.:43:46.

we've taken part and just speaking with the guys down there, they are

:43:47.:43:49.

taking it very, very seriously and it's going to be about obviously

:43:50.:43:53.

what's happened in the past and recommendations moving forward and

:43:54.:43:55.

we hope to be auble to contribute to that. Obviously we would always

:43:56.:44:00.

reserve jult until those inquiries come out, but without a doubt, there

:44:01.:44:03.

is nothing we have seen within the FA that would cast any doubt about

:44:04.:44:08.

the thoroughness, the integrity, both in terms of the inquiry and of

:44:09.:44:12.

safeguarding moving forward and support for survivors as well. Let

:44:13.:44:17.

me ask all of you, since, I mean, Ian, as I said, you spoke out in the

:44:18.:44:22.

90s and torve's disgrace, it really wasn't taken anywhere. No. You spoke

:44:23.:44:27.

out again. You all did last year. What has been the impact for you?

:44:28.:44:31.

What effect has that had on each of you individually, Derek, let me

:44:32.:44:36.

start with you, since you spoke out? When I first come out, you know, I

:44:37.:44:42.

wasn't aware of how the much of an impact it would make. Something like

:44:43.:44:51.

700 live cases, but you know there was - I didn't know David. I didn't

:44:52.:44:58.

know Ian. We got together and we had a lot of synergy together. We used

:44:59.:45:02.

our experiences and it is all different parts of process to form

:45:03.:45:07.

Save and hopefully to make some changes that are really meaningful

:45:08.:45:12.

changes and in fact if we as a group can do that, then it will be

:45:13.:45:14.

fantastic. What about you, David? What about

:45:15.:45:19.

the effect on you? I would agree with Derek. The four of us getting

:45:20.:45:25.

together and being part of the process has been fantastic. The

:45:26.:45:28.

support from the FA has been incredible. We've got an

:45:29.:45:34.

unbelievable union in the PFA, the support from day one from Gordon

:45:35.:45:43.

Taylor and from Darren Wilson, who I think has been the first point of

:45:44.:45:47.

contact has been exemplary. Everything comes up after many, many

:45:48.:45:50.

years, but we have been able to support each other in that process

:45:51.:45:55.

and that's what we want to do with Save is to help make everybody else

:45:56.:46:00.

part of a process in terms of improving the safeguarding landscape

:46:01.:46:06.

and making sure that the survivors liaison and Victim Support is where

:46:07.:46:10.

it needs to be. So, it is great comfort and we've enjoyed this work.

:46:11.:46:13.

That's the most important thing and that's why we intend to carry it on.

:46:14.:46:15.

And yourself, Ian? The impact has been profound. The

:46:16.:46:25.

impact this time around was greater than it was 20 years ago. I am no

:46:26.:46:30.

longer working where I was working. I walked away from that line of

:46:31.:46:35.

work. The impact of my partner, children has been huge. I would be

:46:36.:46:40.

lying if I said it was not. What has come out of it, it is something very

:46:41.:46:46.

positive. I am a great believer you can take something that has a

:46:47.:46:50.

negative impact and turn it around into something positive and grow

:46:51.:46:54.

from that and learn from that and leading in a positive direction,

:46:55.:46:59.

that is a good thing. The relationship we have formed the work

:47:00.:47:02.

we are doing and we have done quietly behind the scenes has been

:47:03.:47:06.

totally worthwhile. Ultimately, I the impact it has had on me

:47:07.:47:12.

personally is that it is worthwhile in the long run in that what will

:47:13.:47:17.

come out is something positive, not for was, but children and vulnerable

:47:18.:47:23.

adults in the future. -- not for us. If we can leave that as a legacy it

:47:24.:47:30.

is a job well done. I have not asked about unaffiliated clubs, small

:47:31.:47:35.

drops, not affiliated to the FA, so don't have to follow the

:47:36.:47:37.

safeguarding rules you have said are good from the FA point of view. They

:47:38.:47:47.

are a great concern. We have a voluntary system. Unaffiliated

:47:48.:47:52.

clubs, there is nothing to say they have to register with anybody. It

:47:53.:47:57.

could be a guide, lady who has a bag of balls, some cones, in the park,

:47:58.:48:03.

starting up. Soccer schools, short-term camps effectively there

:48:04.:48:07.

to make money. Not there are essentially for the welfare of the

:48:08.:48:11.

children and many soccer schools in the summer are not affiliated to the

:48:12.:48:17.

FA. They do not half to answer questions about regulations,

:48:18.:48:21.

standards. If they want to, they not bother taking out checks because it

:48:22.:48:27.

is voluntary and Bacon said they chose not to. And if it were

:48:28.:48:32.

latterly found out they were, they can say I did not know that. It is

:48:33.:48:37.

not a compulsory scheme. It is an area with a lot of concern. The FA

:48:38.:48:44.

hands are tied in that respect. A lot of work needs to be done in that

:48:45.:48:48.

area to make it secure. Thank you very much. More on the breaking news

:48:49.:48:59.

from Paris with six French soldiers injured after being hit by a car in

:49:00.:49:05.

a western suburb of Paris. They want patrol in a suburb called

:49:06.:49:09.

Levallois-Perret. Apparently the vehicle was a BMW. We can speak to a

:49:10.:49:15.

journalist in Paris he was at the scene. Hello, I can say that I saw

:49:16.:49:21.

the streets blocked by police because maybe a terror attacked

:49:22.:49:27.

happened early this morning. We do not have a lot of information. I can

:49:28.:49:35.

say that, a man tried to rush into the military. Six people were

:49:36.:49:47.

injured. The minister is coming but we cannot see anything now because

:49:48.:49:51.

the streets are blocked by the police. OK, thank you very much. We

:49:52.:50:00.

will keep you updated on that story through the morning. It is eight

:50:01.:50:10.

weeks Instagram 45. The Fire Brigade's rescue operation, to get

:50:11.:50:15.

hundreds of people out, was unprecedented. Having to make life

:50:16.:50:18.

or death decisions about who to leave and who to say. It will take a

:50:19.:50:26.

long time to heal the mental scars. Jesus Christ, baked.

:50:27.:50:31.

We could see this was a bad word immediately. The sky was glowing.

:50:32.:52:38.

We sat looking at the building we had come out of. It is worse now,

:52:39.:52:44.

the fire is everywhere and it is fierce. It is hard to comprehend we

:52:45.:52:50.

were just in there. At no stage did they waver. They were going in time

:52:51.:52:55.

and again, battling through intense heat to get to the floors to find

:52:56.:52:59.

people missing, even though they knew their lives could potentially

:53:00.:53:03.

be in danger and for that I am truly grateful and the people who attended

:53:04.:53:09.

the fire, who took 999 calls, they are heroes in my eyes and they made

:53:10.:53:12.

me proud to be the London Fire Commissioner.

:53:13.:53:40.

Heroes. I mean, they are heroes. They went in to try to save people,

:53:41.:53:46.

in that. I just... They are heroes. Now this programme has learned the

:53:47.:54:03.

Fire Service has drafted in 60 counsellors to help to treat

:54:04.:54:08.

traumatised firefighters. More than ten times the number who normally

:54:09.:54:13.

works of the brigade, after cutbacks that have seen this service almost

:54:14.:54:18.

halved. We can speak to a member of the London fire authority that has

:54:19.:54:24.

approved funding for those counsellor. And a former counsellor

:54:25.:54:30.

with the London Fire Brigade. Tell us about the decision to bring in 60

:54:31.:54:37.

counsellors and why it is needed. We felt the fantastic response, not

:54:38.:54:41.

from just the firefighters who went into the building, but the people

:54:42.:54:44.

who had to take lengthy phone calls that came through to the 999

:54:45.:54:49.

operators and a decision was taken at the beginning to bring in

:54:50.:54:54.

counsellors, so nobody left the site that evening without having spoken

:54:55.:54:58.

to someone and they have had access to a 20 47 helpline. There has been

:54:59.:55:11.

an opportunity for counselling but that was augmented because it was

:55:12.:55:15.

such a horrible thing that happened at Grenfell and they were so brave.

:55:16.:55:21.

We need to ensure... Years past we have ignored mental health needs as

:55:22.:55:25.

a result of terrible traumas they have gone through. This number of 60

:55:26.:55:30.

is a lot of counsellors, and administration of how much need

:55:31.:55:34.

there is from firefighters. Absolutely. We felt it important to

:55:35.:55:40.

ensure firefighters who went into the building and also people who

:55:41.:55:43.

took the lengthy phone calls have the opportunity to have counselling

:55:44.:55:48.

and to make sure they did not have lasting trauma from the events at

:55:49.:55:53.

Grenfell. Siobhan McGee, what do you say to people who say that is a

:55:54.:55:59.

firefighter's job after all, smack firefighters are resilient people.

:56:00.:56:07.

They are well trained. In the main they are resilient. But if you are

:56:08.:56:13.

exposed to lots of traumatic incidents, it may take a toll and it

:56:14.:56:20.

is important to support. You used to work for the counselling service.

:56:21.:56:23.

What kinds of things will the firefighters be going through? A lot

:56:24.:56:32.

of the symptoms of trauma, traumatic stress, are quite normal to

:56:33.:56:35.

experience following a traumatic incident. They may be experiencing

:56:36.:56:44.

physically shaking in their body, elevated heart rate, they might have

:56:45.:56:49.

disturbed sleep, they might have nightmares, intrusive images and

:56:50.:56:54.

flashbacks. All of that is quite natural. It is the body trying to

:56:55.:56:59.

process the trauma and it is quite normal to have that anything up to a

:57:00.:57:03.

month following the critical incident. One firefighter speaking

:57:04.:57:07.

after Grenfell said, it will say with me all my life. We were offered

:57:08.:57:12.

a session with a counsellor which I took up and it did help but nothing

:57:13.:57:16.

will get those images out of my mind. How do you help somebody like

:57:17.:57:27.

that? Clearly, it was such a tragedy and traumatic incident for anybody

:57:28.:57:31.

involved for the families who lost their loved ones and people who lost

:57:32.:57:36.

their homes and also for first responders. What happens in trauma

:57:37.:57:42.

is that memories initially are in the short-term memory. The brain is

:57:43.:57:47.

like a big filing cabinet. With trauma, it is like files have been

:57:48.:57:53.

taken out of the filing cabinet and thrown all over the room. Fragments

:57:54.:58:00.

of memory often come back, but, over time, what happens is once trauma

:58:01.:58:05.

memory gets processed, it goes into the long-term memory and then the

:58:06.:58:11.

images become... They do not have such a distressing impact. They

:58:12.:58:15.

become less distressing. OK, thank you very much. We will bring you the

:58:16.:58:25.

latest news and sport in a moment. Before that, the weather and Carol.

:58:26.:58:31.

Good morning, we have seen an array of whether this morning. I will show

:58:32.:58:39.

you some of it using weather watchers' pictures. As we come

:58:40.:58:42.

further north, lovely blue skies. Rey Lee-Lo a variety. And this one

:58:43.:58:52.

also in Scotland, lovely blue skies. High-pressure showing its influence

:58:53.:58:56.

across much of the UK but equally we have a weather front sinking south,

:58:57.:58:59.

bringing rain and as temperatures rise ahead of it, showers will

:59:00.:59:12.

develop. As we move north, it brightens up across northern

:59:13.:59:16.

England, Wales, the North Midlands and eventually the south-west.

:59:17.:59:19.

Northern Ireland and Scotland hang on to the lion's share of the

:59:20.:59:26.

sunshine. Currently, areas of cloud but they will break away and we will

:59:27.:59:31.

see more sunshine. Highs up to 21, feeling quite pleasant. This is the

:59:32.:59:36.

sun coming out across northern England. You can see where we have

:59:37.:59:40.

the cloud. A pleasant afternoon in the north and west of Wales, but in

:59:41.:59:45.

the south-west of England he will brighten up later in the day, and

:59:46.:59:51.

then we headed to rain in Hampshire, Isle of Wight, and Kent. If you are

:59:52.:59:58.

travelling today, especially in East Anglia and south-east England, there

:59:59.:00:02.

is a risk of travel disruption due to the amount of rainfall. We may

:00:03.:00:08.

have issues with surface water flooding, for examples. Overnight

:00:09.:00:13.

the rain edges down, and where we have laid rain, patchy mist and fog

:00:14.:00:19.

will be forming. A lot of dry weather around. Temperatures

:00:20.:00:22.

indicating what you can expect in towns and cities. In rural areas it

:00:23.:00:28.

could get down to four Celsius. Tomorrow, we lose the front from the

:00:29.:00:33.

south-east but we have another area of low pressure. Tomorrow a

:00:34.:00:37.

different day across northern and western parts of Scotland with more

:00:38.:00:42.

cloud and lower temperatures and rain on the islands. We lose the

:00:43.:00:46.

rain in the south-east. Between, a lot of dry weather with a fair bit

:00:47.:00:52.

of sunshine. Much drier across England and Wales compared to what

:00:53.:00:56.

we have had of late. Friday, the front coming in across the

:00:57.:01:01.

north-west on Thursday sinks southwards taking rain with it. A

:01:02.:01:05.

weakening feature as it gets to the south-east. Saturday and Sunday,

:01:06.:01:07.

drier weather with sunshine. Hello, it's Wednesday, it's 10am,

:01:08.:01:11.

I'm Victoria Derbyshire. A car hit have group of soldiers in

:01:12.:01:23.

Paris injuring six, two seriously. We'll keep you up-to-date with that

:01:24.:01:27.

story through the morning. President Trump promises

:01:28.:01:29.

"fire and fury" if there are any more threats

:01:30.:01:30.

to attack the United States. North Korea responds

:01:31.:01:33.

by threatening just that - singling out a US military base

:01:34.:01:35.

2000 miles away. North Korea best not

:01:36.:01:38.

make any more threats They will be met with fire and fury

:01:39.:01:42.

like the world has never seen. People are having surgery to stop

:01:43.:02:16.

themselves needing the loo when out because of the lack of accessible

:02:17.:02:18.

disabled toilets. Ridiculous what people have to go

:02:19.:02:30.

through to go to the toilet when they are out.

:02:31.:02:46.

We'll be speaking to paralympian Anne Wafula Strike to find out more.

:02:47.:02:49.

And it's now ten years since the financial crisis began.

:02:50.:02:51.

We'll speak to a group of people whose lives were affected about how

:02:52.:02:54.

Police in Paris say a group of soldiers have been hit by a car. A

:02:55.:03:06.

search Sunday way for the vehicle and the driver. The low canical

:03:07.:03:10.

mayor said he had no doubt it was a deliberate act.

:03:11.:03:27.

Well, this is as a result of an attack that took place

:03:28.:03:30.

just under an hour ago, maybe an hour now.

:03:31.:03:32.

A man or woman, we don't know, a driver, drove into a group

:03:33.:03:35.

of soldiers in the north western suburb of Levallois-Perre.

:03:36.:03:37.

It's about 15 minutes drive from the BBC bureau

:03:38.:03:39.

The car injured six of the soldiers, two of them seriously.

:03:40.:03:43.

Those soldiers were part of what is called Operation Sentinell

:03:44.:03:46.

a heightened state of counter terror alert that's been in place now

:03:47.:03:48.

since 2012, since the attacks on the offices of the satirical

:03:49.:03:51.

was an intentional attack. Levallois-Perre, has said this

:03:52.:03:57.

As I say, two soldiers seriously injured and four lightly injured

:03:58.:04:00.

and perhaps of greatest concern after those injuries

:04:01.:04:02.

is the fact that the driver and the vehicle are still at large.

:04:03.:04:05.

There is a large and very serious police operation going on throughout

:04:06.:04:08.

Paris to try and track down the driver.

:04:09.:04:13.

North Korea says it is considering launching a bass saoul strike in the

:04:14.:04:20.

western Pacific. The threat comes after reports that Pyongyang has

:04:21.:04:27.

produced a nuclear warhead to fit on its ballistic missiles.

:04:28.:04:32.

This programme has learned that the Fire Service has drafted

:04:33.:04:34.

in 60 counsellors to help treat traumatised firefighters

:04:35.:04:36.

The figure is more than ten times the number who normally

:04:37.:04:43.

We felt that the fantastic response, not just from the firefighters who

:04:44.:04:51.

went into the building, but also from the people who had to take some

:04:52.:04:55.

of those lengthy phone calls, that had come through to the 999

:04:56.:04:58.

operators and the decision was taken right at the beginning to bring in

:04:59.:05:03.

counsellors so that nobody actually left the site that evening without

:05:04.:05:05.

having spoken to someone. 500 new medical school places

:05:06.:05:08.

will be made available in England next year,

:05:09.:05:11.

as the government attempts to boost the number of home-grown

:05:12.:05:13.

doctors in the NHS. The target is to increase the total

:05:14.:05:15.

number of training places by a quarter by 2020,

:05:16.:05:18.

to help ease staffing pressures. The British Medical Association

:05:19.:05:20.

says it won't address Those who commit cruelty

:05:21.:05:22.

against animals "are getting away with it" due to the "leniency" of UK

:05:23.:05:33.

courts, according to a report. Of the nearly 14,000 people found

:05:34.:05:36.

guilty of animal cruelty in England and Wales from 2005 to 2015,

:05:37.:05:39.

more than 92% avoided prison, the Centre for

:05:40.:05:41.

Crime Prevention says. It has called for the maximum

:05:42.:05:43.

sentence for offenders to be increased from six months

:05:44.:05:46.

to five years. The Government says

:05:47.:05:51.

it is reviewing the matter. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:05:52.:05:55.

News - more at 10.30am. Lorna says regarding Ann's film on

:05:56.:06:05.

the shocking lack of provision of disabled toilets. Lorna says there

:06:06.:06:08.

is a big problem with people not being able to go to the loo on their

:06:09.:06:12.

own. Doors don't open enough to get a wheelchair in. That's the first

:06:13.:06:16.

thing and then no rails to allow the person to transfer from wheelchair

:06:17.:06:20.

to the toilet seat is another thing. We will talk more about that in the

:06:21.:06:27.

next half an hour. If you are getting in touch with us,

:06:28.:06:31.

you're welcome. We'd like to hear from you. Perhaps you were forced,

:06:32.:06:36.

like some people, to wet yourself effectively because you just

:06:37.:06:40.

couldn't get to the disabled loo for whatever reason.

:06:41.:06:50.

Use the hashtag Victoria LIVE and If you text, you will be charged

:06:51.:06:53.

The focus is on the person who couldn't take part? Wayde van

:06:54.:07:11.

Niekerk won the gold, but many will be wondering what might have been.

:07:12.:07:15.

Makwala has been at the heart of this story since he pulled out of

:07:16.:07:19.

the 200 meter heat and then last night, probably meant to be one of

:07:20.:07:22.

the biggest moments of his career as he was about to race in the final we

:07:23.:07:27.

found that he wasn't allowed to race because he had been affected by this

:07:28.:07:33.

superbug that's been going around at this World Athletic Championships.

:07:34.:07:39.

He said he was OK to race. The IAAF said they wouldn't authorise it,

:07:40.:07:43.

despite him coming to the stadium last night and trying to get in. He

:07:44.:07:49.

was refused entry. The 400 meter final was supposed to be one of the

:07:50.:07:51.

highlights of this championships here at the world athletics

:07:52.:07:56.

competition. As you will see, Wayde van Niekerk did win the race. He

:07:57.:08:00.

crossed the line in first place, but very muted celebrations for him and

:08:01.:08:05.

after the race, he said afterwards that he had sympathy for Makwala. It

:08:06.:08:11.

is quite disappointing. I would love him to have his fair opportunity. He

:08:12.:08:16.

was in great, great form. I believe that he would have done very, very

:08:17.:08:20.

well at this championships and like I said earlier, I have got so much

:08:21.:08:29.

sympathy for him. Does the IAAF have questions to

:08:30.:08:37.

answer then? Well, certainly, many are asking, they weren't clear why

:08:38.:08:40.

they weren't clear with their information. Why they weren't

:08:41.:08:46.

forthright with their information. Much of the information coming out

:08:47.:08:54.

in the build up came from Public Health England and the tower Hotel.

:08:55.:08:58.

This led to a lot of confusion and I spoke to the athletics commentator

:08:59.:09:02.

and she says the IAAF are bound by their rules. When he presented

:09:03.:09:11.

himself, of course, the IAAF medical team had to go their protocol where

:09:12.:09:16.

he was showing symptoms of the Norovirus and to the suggestion of

:09:17.:09:20.

Public Health England because it had been an issue as of Sunday. 30

:09:21.:09:25.

athletes have been quarantined so they were on edge clearly and they

:09:26.:09:31.

didn't want this to spread. Well, the race has been and gone, but you

:09:32.:09:34.

have to wonder, I don't think we've heard the last of this. The medal

:09:35.:09:38.

ceremony for Wayde van Niekerk is tonight. He will be on top of the

:09:39.:09:43.

podium u but you wonder if Isaac Makwala had been allowed to race

:09:44.:09:48.

whether he too would have been on the podium, Victoria. Thank you very

:09:49.:09:53.

much, Jess. This news just in. A 15-year-old boy has been stabbed to

:09:54.:09:57.

death near Croydon in South London. It is the second fatal stabbing of a

:09:58.:10:03.

teenager in London in 24 hours and the 13th this year.

:10:04.:10:08.

A 15-year-old boy, stabbed to death, near Croydon in South London.

:10:09.:10:16.

US President Donald Trump has threatened North Korea with "fire

:10:17.:10:19.

and fury like the world has never seen".

:10:20.:10:22.

North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States.

:10:23.:10:29.

US President Donald Trump has threatened North Korea with "fire

:10:30.:10:34.

They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.

:10:35.:10:39.

He has been very threatening, beyond the normal state, and,

:10:40.:10:43.

as I said, they will be met with fire, fury and frankly power

:10:44.:10:47.

the likes of which this world has never seen before.

:10:48.:10:55.

His threat follows the latest intelligence reports which suggest

:10:56.:10:57.

they've produced a nuclear warhead small enough to fit

:10:58.:11:00.

North Korea is now threatening to launch a missile strike close

:11:01.:11:06.

to America's military base on the South Pacific

:11:07.:11:08.

The island is home to 160,000 people and a significant US military base.

:11:09.:11:15.

Here's what locals woke up to in this morning's news report.

:11:16.:11:35.

The developing story today involving the US and North Korea. Guam at the

:11:36.:11:47.

centre of it today. That information confirmed on record by Homeland

:11:48.:11:50.

Security advisor, knowing that homeland officials say that the

:11:51.:11:54.

short time frame the most important thing for the community would be to

:11:55.:11:58.

find concrete structures to shelter in place. We want you to know at

:11:59.:12:04.

this time the threat level on Guam has not changed. Officials saying

:12:05.:12:08.

they don't want to alarm the public at this tile. Local and military

:12:09.:12:14.

officials are said to be monitoring the situation after North Korea

:12:15.:12:19.

threatened a pre-emptive strike. That follows words from Donald Trump

:12:20.:12:24.

saying any threat to the US would be met with fire and fury. Our

:12:25.:12:30.

Government does have a management plan in place to deal with all

:12:31.:12:36.

hazard type situations. Once we have more information, we'll pass it

:12:37.:12:37.

along. This is how North Korean State TV

:12:38.:12:49.

responded. TRANSLATION: The strategic force is

:12:50.:12:58.

carefully examining the operational plan, with medium lalistic rocket in

:12:59.:13:02.

order to contain the US military bases on Guam including the Anderson

:13:03.:13:10.

Air Force Base. Any plans to execute the preventative war devised by the

:13:11.:13:15.

US would be met with an all-out war, wiping out all the strongholds of

:13:16.:13:17.

enemies including the US mainland. But why does North Korea

:13:18.:13:21.

want nuclear weapons? The US and the Soviets

:13:22.:13:24.

divided Korea into two Reunification talks failed

:13:25.:13:26.

and by 1948 there were two The 1950 to 1953 Korean War

:13:27.:13:31.

entrenched the split. The communist North developed

:13:32.:13:39.

into a dictatorship. Almost entirely isolated

:13:40.:13:41.

on the global stage, its leaders say nuclear capabilities

:13:42.:13:44.

are its only deterrent against an outside world

:13:45.:13:47.

seeking to destroy it. It's understood they have

:13:48.:13:52.

an intercontinental ballistic missile or ICBM capable

:13:53.:14:01.

of reaching the US. They've tested nuclear

:14:02.:14:04.

devices five times. Intelligence reports warn

:14:05.:14:11.

the country is also close to or has already achieved,

:14:12.:14:15.

"miniaturisation", that's developing a nuclear warhead

:14:16.:14:20.

small enough to fit on a rocket. So how likely is it that the threats

:14:21.:14:31.

will lead to a further escalation of violence.

:14:32.:14:37.

We can speak now to Charlie Wolf - he's a Republican commentator

:14:38.:14:40.

And in Guam is Senator Michael San Nicolas -

:14:41.:14:43.

he's the Democratic chairman of Guam's Legislature

:14:44.:14:45.

How do you respond to what Donald Trump is said and how North Korea

:14:46.:14:53.

reacted? Glow-worm will not get in of the countries and we will make

:14:54.:15:02.

sure we are prepared for whatever comes our way -- Guam. Are you

:15:03.:15:11.

alarmed? Not particularly. We are as ready as we were yesterday and will

:15:12.:15:16.

be tomorrow. You are prepared if North Korea launch a missile at you?

:15:17.:15:24.

Very much so. We have numerous defence assets between here and

:15:25.:15:27.

there and I am comfortable regardless what it is the North

:15:28.:15:31.

Koreans tried to put towards the territory, we will be able to

:15:32.:15:35.

respond. You expecting them to fire a missile? I do not think it would

:15:36.:15:41.

be the wisest use of assets to fire at the smallest target farthest away

:15:42.:15:46.

from the concerns surrounding them. So you are, that the situation? Very

:15:47.:15:51.

much so. What difference does it make when Donald Trump uses language

:15:52.:15:59.

like fire and fury and power? That is related to the North Koreans. I

:16:00.:16:04.

imagine they would be concerned when the president of the most powerful

:16:05.:16:08.

country in the free world uses that language. How do you react to the

:16:09.:16:12.

language Donald Trump has used and the reaction? We are talking about

:16:13.:16:18.

Donald Trump and his language and seem to forget it has been Kim

:16:19.:16:23.

Jong-un who has made crazy threat since he was elected. President

:16:24.:16:28.

heroin was elected in January and he is responding rightly so. --

:16:29.:16:36.

President Trump was elected in January. Whether it is Guam, the

:16:37.:16:43.

United States, it is a precedent we do not want to see. He has put it

:16:44.:16:52.

into terms hopefully Kim Jong-un will understand by saying there are

:16:53.:16:59.

consequences for actions. Hopefully he will be smart and not take any

:17:00.:17:04.

further action with his nuclear programme. Do you think the North

:17:05.:17:09.

Koreans keep calling America's bluff. They keep doing it, but one

:17:10.:17:17.

day they may be surprise. Saddam Hussein thought the Americans would

:17:18.:17:21.

never respond. They thought George Bush would not respond and he

:17:22.:17:27.

responded. Donald Trump seems like a chap who responds and if I were in

:17:28.:17:31.

Kim Jong-un's shoes I would be smart to listen to what the president

:17:32.:17:35.

says. And stop trying to develop nuclear capability? I would stop. If

:17:36.:17:42.

you listen to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. His language is more

:17:43.:17:46.

diplomatic. Even though we would like to bring them into the

:17:47.:17:51.

community of nations. Tell them economically. Generally in the past

:17:52.:17:55.

that is what the nuclear programme has been used for. They would

:17:56.:17:59.

threaten and get more wheat and close down the programme and bring

:18:00.:18:03.

it up several years later. Nobody wants to see the country suffering.

:18:04.:18:08.

If you do a programme like this, you will face consequences. Hopefully

:18:09.:18:16.

China will have seen this audio and know there is some serious stuff

:18:17.:18:21.

going on. Thank you very much. Earlier this year Paralympian

:18:22.:18:27.

athlete Anne Wafula-Strike came on this programme to talk

:18:28.:18:29.

about the moment she was "was She had been forced to urinate

:18:30.:18:31.

on herself on a train after no accessible toilet was provided

:18:32.:18:38.

on her journey. At the time the wheelchair racer

:18:39.:18:43.

decided to go public to raise awareness of the kind of obstacles

:18:44.:18:46.

people with disabilities have She was given promises that it

:18:47.:18:48.

wouldn't happen again but eight months on this programme has learned

:18:49.:18:55.

that it's still happening - and she is still hearing stories

:18:56.:18:58.

from people facing similar problems. We asked her to make a special

:18:59.:19:02.

report for us on the issue. We played you her full film earlier

:19:03.:19:05.

- here's a short extract. But last year I was forced

:19:06.:19:10.

to wet myself on a train. Because the accessible

:19:11.:19:21.

toilet was out of order. It was one of the most humiliating

:19:22.:19:23.

experiences of my life. And it turns out this is not

:19:24.:19:29.

just an issue on trains. People with disabilities

:19:30.:19:32.

are having problems accessing And some are being forced

:19:33.:19:34.

to take extreme action. Two years ago, she chose

:19:35.:19:38.

to have a permanent catheter fitted because there was nowhere

:19:39.:19:44.

for her to go to They create a hole just

:19:45.:19:46.

beneath your belly button to put I just can't believe

:19:47.:19:52.

that you actually opted to have an operation

:19:53.:19:56.

without any medical need. Yeah, no medical need,

:19:57.:20:01.

I wasn't incontinent. My urologist called it socially

:20:02.:20:04.

incontinent, where basically, it meant I was incontinent

:20:05.:20:11.

when I was out because I Because there wasn't

:20:12.:20:13.

the facilities there. Before the operation,

:20:14.:20:16.

Manny needed a hoist There are some toilets

:20:17.:20:18.

that people with severe But campaigners say there

:20:19.:20:26.

aren't enough of them. They are called

:20:27.:20:31.

Changing Places toilets. There are only around

:20:32.:20:33.

a thousand across the UK, and it's estimated quarter

:20:34.:20:36.

of a million people Meanwhile, the state

:20:37.:20:37.

of standard disabled toilets Recent research suggests that

:20:38.:20:47.

as many as 40% of restaurants and 30% of shopping centres don't

:20:48.:20:53.

have disabled loos. The Equality Act states that

:20:54.:21:03.

businesses have that legal duty to make reasonable adjustments

:21:04.:21:05.

to accommodate them. Despite promises from the Rail

:21:06.:21:08.

Minister that no one would go through what I went through,

:21:09.:21:16.

it is still happening. Virgin Trains has

:21:17.:21:18.

since had to apologise I booked a journey to Birmingham

:21:19.:21:19.

six weeks in advance, But I found the toilet was out

:21:20.:21:23.

of order when I got on the train. So I've decided to go

:21:24.:21:29.

to the Rail Minister He tells me they are working

:21:30.:21:37.

on an action plan to I'm hoping that when people see

:21:38.:21:41.

the accessibility action plan, they will see in it a range of ideas

:21:42.:21:46.

that will not just make sure passengers get a better service

:21:47.:21:50.

on the day, but that we can work more tactically and more

:21:51.:21:54.

strategically to make sure that more toilets are in service on trains

:21:55.:21:59.

in the first place. The action plan is due to be rolled

:22:00.:22:01.

out later this summer but it's not clear yet exactly

:22:02.:22:04.

what it will contain. Earlier this year, a government

:22:05.:22:08.

committee recommended changing places toilets should be made

:22:09.:22:12.

compulsory in all large buildings So far, no legislation has been put

:22:13.:22:16.

in place to make that happen. So it seems for the time being,

:22:17.:22:24.

some disabled people Anne Wafula-Strike

:22:25.:22:26.

is with us in studio. Also with us Georgia Moat -

:22:27.:22:35.

who actually had surgery to have a catheter fitted

:22:36.:22:37.

because of a lack Neil Williams, who is with us

:22:38.:22:47.

from the British Beer And Jonathan Fogerty,

:22:48.:22:51.

who is a disability rights lawyer. What angers you most about what you

:22:52.:23:00.

have discovered? Making this film made me realise that there is a big

:23:01.:23:07.

group of people with disabilities that has been neglected. In this day

:23:08.:23:12.

and age and century, to know that young people will actually go to the

:23:13.:23:15.

lengths of having surgery, just because they lack toilets, it should

:23:16.:23:24.

not be happening. It is shocking. It is terrible. You had this particular

:23:25.:23:30.

surgery. It seems an extreme measure. Tell our audience why you

:23:31.:23:35.

did it. I had mine fitted because other than when I was at home, there

:23:36.:23:42.

are limited places I can use the bathroom, because of the amount of

:23:43.:23:46.

equipment required for me to be able to use the toilet. Before you have

:23:47.:23:51.

the operation, how often would you be able to find a bar, pub, where

:23:52.:23:55.

you could use the toilet? There were no bars or pubs I could use it. It

:23:56.:24:08.

was shopping centres, mostly. Niall Williams, how do you plead? There is

:24:09.:24:12.

no doubt there is a lot more we can and should be doing. Why are you not

:24:13.:24:20.

doing it? There is a great increase in the population and we will have

:24:21.:24:26.

more people would access needs. A lot of pubs are installing disabled

:24:27.:24:32.

toilets, but it is not always easy to do that. Some premises, there are

:24:33.:24:36.

issues with planning permission, there are sometimes the oldest

:24:37.:24:41.

buildings in the high street so making modifications is not

:24:42.:24:46.

straightforward. The kind of bars you were going to, old buildings,

:24:47.:24:50.

difficult to get planning permission? It depends where I go,

:24:51.:24:56.

but there are some places that have been newer built and they still have

:24:57.:25:01.

what they say is a disabled toilet, but it is no good for what I

:25:02.:25:09.

require. I think people have been talking a lot, a lot of talk and no

:25:10.:25:16.

action. I think you can do more than what you are doing at the moment. It

:25:17.:25:22.

is not fair that the disabled group is left out. I did not think it is

:25:23.:25:27.

just about planning permission, I think it is just about putting

:25:28.:25:31.

disability on the agenda. It needs to be a priority. I think it is

:25:32.:25:35.

really important because some of the issues in the film is about as good

:25:36.:25:42.

management and training. We saw the terrible example of the man on the

:25:43.:25:47.

train. We want all pubs and we have urged them to do it through guidance

:25:48.:25:51.

to have a disability Champion who thinks through issues on every

:25:52.:25:58.

premises. How many members? We represent 20,000 pubs. We urge

:25:59.:26:03.

members through our own channels and through to their pubs to do as much

:26:04.:26:08.

as they can. How many members have disability champions? We do not know

:26:09.:26:13.

the statistics. We need to gather data. You do not know if there are

:26:14.:26:19.

two, or 10,000? We don't know the figures. That is illustrative of how

:26:20.:26:24.

little you care. I think we do care and that is why we have produced

:26:25.:26:29.

guidance. We are on the second edition of this guide and we urge

:26:30.:26:37.

people to think through the issues and make sure there is proper

:26:38.:26:41.

information available. And access statement is really important. Visit

:26:42.:26:48.

England, Visit Scotland have done work and you can fill it in online

:26:49.:26:52.

so people can see what is available in the pub before they visit because

:26:53.:26:56.

part of the issue is making sure there is enough information before

:26:57.:27:02.

they go. I have heard this so many times. We need is now strong

:27:03.:27:07.

measures to be put in place. People who do not far -- do not follow the

:27:08.:27:15.

legislation should have action taken against them. The government needs

:27:16.:27:23.

to crack down on this. It is all right saying that there will be

:27:24.:27:27.

information available to see what is available before you go, but not a

:27:28.:27:32.

lot of people have two plan their journeys as hard as we do for a

:27:33.:27:37.

simple things like being able to go to the bathroom. Fair point. It is.

:27:38.:27:42.

Everything helps and we should do as much as we can to keep things

:27:43.:27:46.

improving. I think we have made progress but there is no doubt there

:27:47.:27:53.

is more we can do. Are you ashamed about that? We are making progress

:27:54.:27:56.

and should continue to do that. When things go wrong it is terrible and

:27:57.:28:03.

we saw that in the film but through voluntary action and education,

:28:04.:28:06.

awareness, training, good management, we can make

:28:07.:28:09.

improvements, as well as investment. Maybe the fact it is voluntary is

:28:10.:28:18.

the problem. It is not voluntary under the equality act, premises

:28:19.:28:22.

have to do as much as they can without unreasonable costs, that is

:28:23.:28:26.

how the legislation is framed, and we need to make sure we do as much

:28:27.:28:30.

as we can. Jonathan you have listened to what has been said on

:28:31.:28:35.

behalf of the British beer and Pub association. Be clear for the

:28:36.:28:40.

audience, what is illegal when it comes to the equality act? Good

:28:41.:28:48.

morning. Very interesting and some very interesting exchanges of views

:28:49.:28:53.

and comments. Can I take a slight step back and reflect on perhaps

:28:54.:28:59.

where we have come? There have been comments made about progress made.

:29:00.:29:04.

If I look back over the time I have been a wheelchair user, over 30

:29:05.:29:08.

years, the first time I tried to travel from Manchester to London on

:29:09.:29:15.

the train, going from Piccadilly to Euston, I could not access the

:29:16.:29:20.

carriage, I had to sit with post bags in the guard's van, so in terms

:29:21.:29:27.

of casting disability as a right, we have made progress over the past 30

:29:28.:29:32.

years. The disability discrimination act and equality act have helped.

:29:33.:29:38.

Are we at a point where everything is satisfactory? We are certainly

:29:39.:29:40.

not and we have a long way to go and Anne's experience shows we

:29:41.:29:55.

have a long way to go. One thing that has come up this morning, this

:29:56.:30:01.

is about the enforceability, enforcement organisation and

:30:02.:30:07.

measures in place to back-up the legislation and that is the equality

:30:08.:30:12.

act. If we look at what the equality act says, at no point in the

:30:13.:30:18.

equality act does it explicitly said that service providers have to

:30:19.:30:26.

provide a wheelchair access a ball toilet. It says in their service

:30:27.:30:33.

providers have to make reasonable adjustment where a feature places a

:30:34.:30:39.

disabled person at a disadvantage all weather service provider is

:30:40.:30:43.

providing a facility to members of the public that reasonable

:30:44.:30:46.

adjustment should be made so that is made available to somebody with an

:30:47.:30:50.

impairment. What you think of the wording? One of the weaknesses of

:30:51.:30:57.

the legislation is its interpretation, that it is left to

:30:58.:31:01.

the courts to determine and there are a number of factors that will be

:31:02.:31:05.

taken into account when considering whether or not a service provider

:31:06.:31:11.

has made a reasonable adjustment. One might be the financial cost of

:31:12.:31:15.

that reasonable adjustment, was it reasonably practical to make it?

:31:16.:31:21.

Inevitably, you tend to find the largest service providers, high

:31:22.:31:27.

street shops, for example, are able to make those reasonable adjustments

:31:28.:31:31.

and people expect them, so in this case providing a wheelchair

:31:32.:31:35.

accessible toilet facility, but the smaller shops are unable to do so,

:31:36.:31:40.

all would claim they are unable, because of financial restraints.

:31:41.:31:45.

It's very difficult to say without people taking cases themselves,

:31:46.:31:53.

where they deem they have been discriminated against on the grounds

:31:54.:31:58.

of their disability because the enforcement measures I'm afraid are

:31:59.:32:02.

still with that individual, discrimination happens to that

:32:03.:32:05.

individual. Very interesting. Let me read you these messages from people

:32:06.:32:09.

watching. Yvonne says, "I am so pleased this subject is being

:32:10.:32:13.

highlighted. This is a problem for people with crones. It is so

:32:14.:32:18.

important and yet receives very little publicity." Jane says, "Our

:32:19.:32:24.

son is 16. He is severely disabled and we have changed him hundreds of

:32:25.:32:29.

times on toilet floors, holding him on baby changers and using the back

:32:30.:32:33.

of his van in the car park. Now he is an adult and he's on adult

:32:34.:32:37.

floors. Baby changers are not an option for him anymore. We try to

:32:38.:32:42.

time our journey so he does not need changing while we are out. Fully

:32:43.:32:51.

inclusive disabled toilets are more rather than a useful MP." Thank you

:32:52.:32:56.

for your time and your expertise. We really appreciate it. Thank you.

:32:57.:33:02.

A number of soldiers have been hit by a car, a vehicle in the suburb of

:33:03.:33:11.

Paris. Jonny Dymond Is at the scene. What else can you tell us? Around

:33:12.:33:15.

two-and-a-half, three hours, a vehicle went into a group of

:33:16.:33:20.

soldiers, they were part of Operation Sentinell a counter terror

:33:21.:33:23.

operation that's been in place for a couple of years. At least two

:33:24.:33:26.

soldiers have been seriously injured. I'm in the neighbourhood.

:33:27.:33:33.

It is a quiet and prosperous neighbourhood. The Paris prosecutors

:33:34.:33:40.

office have opened a counter terror probe into what happened here. It

:33:41.:33:45.

has been sealed off. A large media presence and a fair number of

:33:46.:33:50.

residents standing around wondering what has happened here. The vehicle

:33:51.:33:54.

and the perpetrator, the driver of the vehicle, are being searched for

:33:55.:34:00.

pretty vigorously in what is a large police operation, but at the moment,

:34:01.:34:05.

it's unclear as to what the motive was and clit whether or not this was

:34:06.:34:10.

part of any larger operation. The suburb itself is to the north-west

:34:11.:34:16.

of the centre of Paris, 15 minutes drive from the arc detry oomph and

:34:17.:34:20.

it is an investigation into what happened and also a manhunt into

:34:21.:34:24.

finding the person who carried it out. Thank you. Jonny Dymond in that

:34:25.:34:37.

west Paris suburb where the attack place.

:34:38.:34:39.

With the news, here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom.

:34:40.:34:44.

North Korea says it is considering launching a ballistic missile strike

:34:45.:34:47.

close to the American military base of Guam in the western Pacific.

:34:48.:34:49.

The threat comes after reports that Pyongyang has produced a nuclear

:34:50.:34:52.

warhead small enough to fit on to its ballistic missiles.

:34:53.:34:54.

President Trump has said that further threats

:34:55.:34:56.

from the North Koreans will be met with fire, fury and power.

:34:57.:34:59.

This programme has learned that the Fire Service has drafted

:35:00.:35:03.

in 60 counsellors to help treat traumatised firefighters

:35:04.:35:05.

The figure is more than ten times the number who formally

:35:06.:35:09.

500 new medical school places will be made available in England

:35:10.:35:13.

next year as the Government attempts to boost the number of home-grown

:35:14.:35:15.

The target is to increase the total number of training places

:35:16.:35:22.

by a quarter by 2020 to help ease the staffing pressures.

:35:23.:35:25.

The British Medical Association says it won't address

:35:26.:35:27.

That's a summary of the news. Join me for newsroom live from 11am.

:35:28.:35:47.

Wayde van Niekerk took gold in the 400m at the World Athletics

:35:48.:35:53.

The South African's win was overshadowed by the IAAF's

:35:54.:35:56.

decision to not let Botswana's Isaac Makwala run,

:35:57.:35:58.

One man who definitely made his presence felt at these

:35:59.:36:01.

He came oh so close to adding to Britain's medal tally

:36:02.:36:08.

but just like Laura Muir the evening before

:36:09.:36:13.

he just missed out on the medals, finishing an agonising

:36:14.:36:17.

And can he do the double double yet again?

:36:18.:36:20.

Following his breathtaking 10,000 metres win, Britain's only medal

:36:21.:36:25.

winner of the games so far, Mo Farah, is back on the track.

:36:26.:36:28.

He beins his campaign for the 5,000 metres at just after 8

:36:29.:36:31.

And the women's rugby World Cup gets under way this afternoon,

:36:32.:36:35.

with England looking to defend the title they won back in 2014.

:36:36.:36:38.

All the competing teams are in action on day one

:36:39.:36:40.

of the tournament in Dublin, with England taking on Spain,

:36:41.:36:42.

Wales in action against New Zealand, and Ireland taking on Australia.

:36:43.:36:46.

Those are your headlines for now. I will see you soon, Victoria.

:36:47.:36:51.

Representatives of a British model allegedly kidnapped in Milan have

:36:52.:36:55.

dismissed as "evil" doubts and conspiracy theories

:36:56.:37:05.

about the ordeal, saying it was real and it was terrifying.

:37:06.:37:07.

Italian police said Chloe Ayling was snatched last month by a group

:37:08.:37:10.

She's believed to have been drugged and transported in a bag

:37:11.:37:14.

to an isolated village near Turin, where she was held for six days

:37:15.:37:17.

as her captors tried to auction her online.

:37:18.:37:19.

But as more details emerged, including that she went shopping

:37:20.:37:22.

for shoes and groceries with her captor, had

:37:23.:37:25.

breakfast with him before he handed her in to the Italian

:37:26.:37:32.

consulate, questions have begun to be asked about the story.

:37:33.:37:36.

Earlier I spoke to two models from the same

:37:37.:37:38.

Sophia Blake worked with her before and says that after what's

:37:39.:37:42.

happened she won't work with the agency again.

:37:43.:37:44.

Holly Gibbons says she's been working for a decade but says she's

:37:45.:37:47.

now questioning whether to leave the industry.

:37:48.:37:49.

Holly, you have spent a decade in this industry. In what ways has it

:37:50.:37:58.

changed would you say? I think when I first started, everything was all

:37:59.:38:05.

magazines. Everything was, we didn't have social media either. So, I

:38:06.:38:12.

think we weren't, we had a more professional relationship with

:38:13.:38:16.

photographers, with companies that we were working with and now people

:38:17.:38:22.

can get into contact with us through our social media and they can see

:38:23.:38:28.

more about us which isn't always a good thing. So it has changed a lot

:38:29.:38:34.

and everything is very much online. Websites and jobs like that rather

:38:35.:38:40.

than a magazine or, you know, bigger jobs as well. We have less people on

:38:41.:38:47.

a job. Do you think it has become less safe as a result of those

:38:48.:38:54.

changes? It's hard to say. I think that maybe the younger girls are a

:38:55.:39:08.

little less, I think they're more naive because they perhaps are

:39:09.:39:13.

trusting more people. When they first hear from somebody they may

:39:14.:39:18.

not do the checks that they need to, where I think, as you get older,

:39:19.:39:23.

they don't get in touch with you as much. Maybe because you have more

:39:24.:39:25.

experience in the industry. They think that you're not going to fall

:39:26.:39:31.

for it as or fall for, you know, things that maybe we shouldn't do.

:39:32.:39:36.

Which would be what? What would be something that you would say we

:39:37.:39:41.

shouldn't do in our industry? When I was younger I maybe was so excited

:39:42.:39:46.

by it all, that I said yes to everything and I may not have put

:39:47.:39:51.

into process check-ups on who I was working with so much. So I would

:39:52.:39:56.

just say yes and I would go along to jobs and perhaps they were

:39:57.:40:00.

unprofessional or they would push me to do levels beyond what I should

:40:01.:40:06.

have done. But now, I think only people that I've worked with, I look

:40:07.:40:13.

for references, I ask other models how was the job? What to expect from

:40:14.:40:22.

the job. So, it's age changes and how the industry has changed as

:40:23.:40:27.

well. Sure. Maybe those sort of people who haven't got the good

:40:28.:40:31.

intentions get in touch with younger girls.

:40:32.:40:35.

Sophia, has this ever happened to you, you are slightly younger? You

:40:36.:40:40.

have had less time in the glakor modelling industry. Have you ever

:40:41.:40:43.

felt in a position where you felt vulnerable? I think there is a lot

:40:44.:40:50.

of like because I am younger, they do seem to like prey on you, but I'm

:40:51.:40:55.

quite aware of it so I just kind of like as soon as alarm bells ring I

:40:56.:41:01.

just like say no to the job or if it's on a shoot,le' just leave. Have

:41:02.:41:06.

you done that? You've left a shoot because you felt uncomfortable?

:41:07.:41:10.

Once, but to be honest, most of the time I don't really feel that way.

:41:11.:41:17.

Right. Yeah. How, I mean, it's clearly very competitive. Do you

:41:18.:41:22.

think that there are some girls who take risks or potentially take risks

:41:23.:41:28.

because they want to get on so much? I think there probably are girls

:41:29.:41:33.

like that out there. I think in the freelance industry we are all quite

:41:34.:41:37.

like connected and we speak to each other a lot and if someone has a

:41:38.:41:40.

problem generally you can talk to another model about it. And you've

:41:41.:41:43.

worked with Chloe Ayling in the past. What was she like to work

:41:44.:41:48.

with? She was, yeah, she was fine. She was just like a normal person.

:41:49.:41:54.

She just, she was quite qi the and quite reserved. Yeah. You say you're

:41:55.:42:00.

freelance. When you are signed to an agency, how are they supposed to

:42:01.:42:05.

look after you? Well, you'd think that you would be safer going with

:42:06.:42:09.

an agency because like they're obviously taking their cut and

:42:10.:42:14.

that's for the safety like, you'd expect them to have done the checks

:42:15.:42:19.

before giving you the job and stuff. And does that always happen in your

:42:20.:42:25.

experience? I've never had a bad experience, but obviously the Chloe

:42:26.:42:29.

things makes it seem like maybe the right checks aren't being done.

:42:30.:42:34.

And what's your view on that Holly, when it comes to agencies, what sort

:42:35.:42:38.

of checks should they be making on behalf of their clients, people like

:42:39.:42:42.

yourselves? So, I would rely on, I am signed with an agency and I would

:42:43.:42:50.

rely on them to do website checks, background checks, get references

:42:51.:42:53.

from other girls who have worked with them. And also exactly what

:42:54.:43:00.

they're expecting us to do in the job when we arrive, what times,

:43:01.:43:07.

everything. However, I still want, even more information. So I'll still

:43:08.:43:12.

do my own checks, get in touch with the girls and say, "Have you done

:43:13.:43:16.

this job before? What do I expect from it?" So you can't put

:43:17.:43:20.

everything on your agent. You need to do your own checks as well. But,

:43:21.:43:25.

if I get a job through the agent then I would hope, and I would

:43:26.:43:32.

expect it to be, safe and the measurements in place before I go to

:43:33.:43:37.

the job. Sure. And finally what percentage commission would an agent

:43:38.:43:44.

take from your work? They take 20%. Sophia, what's your view about the

:43:45.:43:50.

kind of discussion regarding this story of Chloe Ayling and what's

:43:51.:43:55.

alleged to have happened to her? Some people say it doesn't add up

:43:56.:43:59.

somehow? Yeah. I think, a lot of people have been quite like,

:44:00.:44:03.

everyone thinks the story is a bit fishy and there's something weird

:44:04.:44:07.

going on. I think, I understand why they say that because it is such an

:44:08.:44:12.

elaborate story, but I don't know. What about you, Holly? I think the

:44:13.:44:20.

problem is that she has done interviews and she is dressed this a

:44:21.:44:24.

certain way that people are very, very jmental. She has a smile on her

:44:25.:44:29.

face. And that's hard to believe that somebody has been through

:44:30.:44:33.

something very, very traumatic and than looks a certain way, maybe

:44:34.:44:39.

happy and maybe not sad or traumatised so people are finding it

:44:40.:44:44.

very difficult to believe and then the media has gone through,

:44:45.:44:48.

unfortunately her Instagram or whatever social media and picked out

:44:49.:44:54.

images of her doing modelling jobs, doing glamour which people aren't

:44:55.:45:00.

very sympathetic towards, but that is our job and it doesn't

:45:01.:45:05.

necessarily mean that she's lying or that it's a made up story or

:45:06.:45:08.

elaborated. Thank you both. Thank you very much, both of you. Thank

:45:09.:45:12.

you for coming on the programme. Thank you.

:45:13.:45:14.

It's ten years to the day since the credit crunch hit the UK

:45:15.:45:17.

leading to the global financial crisis that many of us

:45:18.:45:19.

The credit crunch was caused by banks being too nervous to lend

:45:20.:45:35.

money to us or each other. The date when this started, 9th of August,

:45:36.:45:42.

2007, that is when a major French bank told investors they would not

:45:43.:45:46.

be able to withdraw money from two of its funds. This triggered a sharp

:45:47.:45:52.

rise in the cost of credit, causing a credit crunch. The problem started

:45:53.:45:59.

before 2007, in the USA. Back then, interest rates were low and cheap

:46:00.:46:04.

loans available. The banks lend money and took on debt with no

:46:05.:46:08.

worries, which meant they lend to just about everyone, including

:46:09.:46:12.

people with weak credit ratings, known as the sub-prime market, that

:46:13.:46:21.

is people with poor credit history or levelling come. They did not

:46:22.:46:31.

worry about repayments because the right to collect those debts were

:46:32.:46:36.

sold on again and again. Analysts saw these as low risk. Then came a

:46:37.:46:41.

big increase in the cost of mortgage payments and people started to

:46:42.:46:47.

default. It came as a shock to financial institutions. The result

:46:48.:46:51.

was billions in losses written off. It is why banks like Northern Rock

:46:52.:46:55.

and Newman brothers in America disappeared and others like Royal

:46:56.:46:59.

Bank of Scotland hack to be taken over by the government to stay

:47:00.:47:03.

afloat. Other banks got nervous about lending to anyone and

:47:04.:47:14.

everyone. They were not be repaid and St Lomans became more expensive

:47:15.:47:16.

and they demanded greater deposits. It caused the global financial

:47:17.:47:21.

system to come to a standstill and stock markets, investment value and

:47:22.:47:25.

confidence plummeted and the effects are still felt today. And so how

:47:26.:47:33.

have people who were affected recovered?

:47:34.:47:39.

She lost her family home and her holiday home

:47:40.:47:43.

when the credit crunch hit, her marriage collapsed soon after.

:47:44.:47:45.

Michael Foote was working on the trading floor

:47:46.:47:47.

for a stockbrokers in the city - but was fired when the crunch hit.

:47:48.:47:50.

And in Maidstone is Paul, who built up debt of around

:47:51.:47:53.

?60,000 on credit cards - at one point he had 20

:47:54.:47:56.

He's asked us to only use his first name.

:47:57.:47:59.

Welcome. Dude, you were doing well, you and your husband a holiday home

:48:00.:48:05.

in Florida. What happened? It because America went down before we

:48:06.:48:14.

did. Looking back, we had bought at the wrong time. Their economy went

:48:15.:48:19.

and it plummeted. We thought we would rented out to Americans to

:48:20.:48:24.

cover the money and on our jobs cover what we have to pay here and

:48:25.:48:29.

ride it out but unfortunately the American family we rented to stop

:48:30.:48:34.

paying rent after being given that a month or two and so we had to get

:48:35.:48:38.

them evicted and that took several months. Then the house over there

:48:39.:48:42.

was foreclosed and it was a knock-on effect here because of what was

:48:43.:48:46.

happening and the cost of living going up. We were not earning quite

:48:47.:48:54.

as much. The balance tipped and we lost our home over here because we

:48:55.:48:57.

had credit cards we used to furnish the home over there to get it going.

:48:58.:49:03.

You had used the house here to buy the place in Florida? We got an

:49:04.:49:08.

extra secured loan on it so we looked at trying to sell it to clear

:49:09.:49:14.

debt but because of house prices and what happened to the market here,

:49:15.:49:19.

there was not enough in it to cover what we owed. Goodness. Michael, you

:49:20.:49:26.

had just started this new job and you were called in and you thought

:49:27.:49:31.

you were going to get a pay rise. Such a shocking moment because I was

:49:32.:49:35.

walking up the stairs, thinking I have done my first trade, earned

:49:36.:49:40.

money for the company. Walked upstairs and they said, we are

:49:41.:49:44.

sorry, we will have to let you go, pack your stuff and leave. We had

:49:45.:49:50.

just signed a new rental contract in the house and three in the house and

:49:51.:49:54.

two lost their jobs that we can be packed up everything out of the

:49:55.:49:59.

house and moved home to the parents. That is the reason you were fired,

:50:00.:50:04.

because he were last in. Was it that policy? That is how I feel. Rather

:50:05.:50:09.

than taking it more personally? Fair enough. Paul, I spoke to you on

:50:10.:50:17.

radio 59 years ago when the recession started to bite and you

:50:18.:50:22.

were surviving on credit. Tell how you manage to do that, juggling

:50:23.:50:28.

cards. You think it would be difficult but it was not. I started

:50:29.:50:34.

on the credit cards a long time ago and always thought there could be a

:50:35.:50:40.

crash. I was talking of a property crash, but never saw the big crash

:50:41.:50:45.

coming. By the time it came I amassed quite a few credit cards

:50:46.:50:50.

because during the boom years everybody was throwing credit cards

:50:51.:50:54.

at me and offers and I kept them ticking over by doing balance

:50:55.:50:58.

transfers and occasionally spending on the cards. When the crash came I

:50:59.:51:03.

had a significant amount on the cards but... I have some here.

:51:04.:51:08.

During the crash a lot of companies withdrew cards and cut credit

:51:09.:51:14.

limits. I have a fair amount. That is a lot of credit cards. About 25.

:51:15.:51:22.

I think one is a debit card. There is about 120,000 of credit on there.

:51:23.:51:34.

That roughly gives me 50,000 and ?60,000 worth of balance transfers.

:51:35.:51:40.

When the crash came and I had the money amassed, I started

:51:41.:51:44.

transferring money, being creative, and when the credit cards ran out I

:51:45.:51:49.

turned to my mum and says, why don't you open a credit card and I

:51:50.:51:53.

transferred the money to her cards and transferred them back and it

:51:54.:51:57.

kept going and going until the crash sorted disappeared. Things picked up

:51:58.:52:05.

slightly. Have you paid off the debt? I have not paid it off. I

:52:06.:52:11.

transferred it into the mortgage. One of those flexible mortgages

:52:12.:52:15.

where you can pay as much as you like into the mortgage and now I am

:52:16.:52:20.

knuckling down and paying it off. It is going quite well. Your marriage

:52:21.:52:27.

ended as a direct result presumably of the stresses you went through?

:52:28.:52:33.

There were other things in a relationship but it was a big

:52:34.:52:40.

contributor, the stress. The ripple effect on some families were

:52:41.:52:45.

massive. Do you feel you are still paying the price? Do you think you

:52:46.:52:49.

have recovered and it seems a lifetime ago? I would say I have

:52:50.:52:54.

recovered. I have launched a new business and would not have done

:52:55.:52:57.

that without the financial crisis. It was hard in the short-term after

:52:58.:53:05.

it, sort of I had plans of being in the City for years and suddenly you

:53:06.:53:10.

have to rethink everything. Critics ask why no senior banker was

:53:11.:53:14.

prosecuted. Do you wonder about that? I don't, personally. What

:53:15.:53:22.

about you? No, it is just decisions. We all make decisions in life. I am

:53:23.:53:27.

in a better place now. I have just finished my final draft of a book

:53:28.:53:33.

that is out in November on a different story. Paul, what about

:53:34.:53:40.

you? People ask why gnome one was prosecuted for the decisions made in

:53:41.:53:43.

the financial institutions across the world. Do you think they are

:53:44.:53:50.

responsible? I think the whole system is responsible and

:53:51.:53:54.

politicians are responsible for the relaxed way they let people get away

:53:55.:53:58.

with this, bankers, especially Gordon Brown. But there are so many

:53:59.:54:03.

people involved. It is like when the government makes the wrong decision,

:54:04.:54:06.

who do you shoot? The Prime Minister or those who made the decision is

:54:07.:54:13.

beneath them. It is institutional. It is not maybe an individual

:54:14.:54:18.

responsible. It is everybody jumping on the bandwagon doing the same

:54:19.:54:22.

thing. Thank you for coming on. All the best.

:54:23.:54:24.

The World Athletics Championships have seen stories of hope, despair,

:54:25.:54:26.

rivalry and triumph - and in some cases

:54:27.:54:28.

David Omoregie is a 110 metre hurdler who made his senior debut

:54:29.:54:36.

six years after the deaths of his father and sister.

:54:37.:54:41.

The 21-year-old is one of Great Britain's brightest young

:54:42.:54:43.

Hello. It is nice to see you. Thank you for having the arm. Make

:54:44.:54:56.

yourself at home. It was your goal to take part in the championships.

:54:57.:55:01.

What was it like in the stadium? Amazing. I have competed at the

:55:02.:55:06.

Olympic Stadium in the annual Diamond League event and it has been

:55:07.:55:10.

a great experience. This is the worlds. The World Championships,

:55:11.:55:16.

being a home championships, I wanted to make the team and I was excited

:55:17.:55:19.

to get out there and had the crowd screaming for you on the line was

:55:20.:55:23.

amazing and a enjoyed the experience. You did not make the

:55:24.:55:27.

semifinals. How do you assess your performance? I am still young, I am

:55:28.:55:35.

always learning. It is my first senior championships, but it was

:55:36.:55:39.

disappointing. Hurdles is unpredictable. If you hit one

:55:40.:55:44.

hurdle, it can jeopardise your race and unfortunately that happened to

:55:45.:55:51.

me, I hit too many and fell back. I definitely learned a lot from this

:55:52.:55:56.

experience and I hope in two years, next time, I will not make the same

:55:57.:56:00.

mistakes and hopefully challenge to make the final and maybe challenge

:56:01.:56:04.

for medals. You learn from mistakes, you keep going. You studied for your

:56:05.:56:13.

GCSEs when your sister was killed by a drunk driver in Kent and a month

:56:14.:56:16.

later your father died, he had cancer. What impact does it have on

:56:17.:56:27.

a young man and your outlook? Of course, for anyone going through

:56:28.:56:31.

that adversity it is difficult, but in my situation it was a very

:56:32.:56:38.

difficult period. My dad, he was terminally ill with cancer. We were

:56:39.:56:44.

preparing for that and then a month later, a month before that, to find

:56:45.:56:48.

out my sister died in a car crash was out of the blue and that sent my

:56:49.:56:54.

dad in a bit of the spiral and he passed away after that. It is

:56:55.:57:01.

difficult. At the same time, for me, it has given me a lot of dry. My dad

:57:02.:57:08.

and sister were both hard-working, both doctors, both very intelligent

:57:09.:57:13.

people. From my family, we have always got this mentality that

:57:14.:57:17.

whatever you do you work hard and try to achieve what you can do and

:57:18.:57:22.

that is what I carried on. At the time, I was not doing well in

:57:23.:57:30.

academics and my athletics but it gave me drive to keep on working for

:57:31.:57:37.

them. Slowly, over time, things began to click in athletics and my

:57:38.:57:45.

academics. And here I am. Your dad passed on those values of that work

:57:46.:57:52.

ethic? Definitely. I think my dad worked incredibly hard for all of

:57:53.:57:57.

us. We are a big family of seven in total. My dad worked to put us into

:57:58.:58:08.

good schools and Justin we do, the achieving the very best. That is my

:58:09.:58:17.

core value now in what I do. Whatever it is in my athletics, no

:58:18.:58:23.

matter what will set me back, I know I can work hard and get to where I

:58:24.:58:27.

want. Briefly, finally, your ultimate goal? I am 21 so hopefully

:58:28.:58:36.

I want to be a medal contender in the 2020 Olympics. Just to be

:58:37.:58:41.

competitive and we have a long way to go.

:58:42.:58:42.

Victoria hears from people having surgery to stop themselves needing the loo when out because of a lack of accessible disabled toilets.

A firefighter's account of one of the worst disasters they've ever faced.

The programme is live in Guam as North Korea threatens to attack the US military base.