10/08/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


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10/08/2017

A look at children in Wales who go back to school in the holidays for free meals. And a family from Guam talk about being caught in a war of words between Trump and North Korea.


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Good morning. I'm Victoria Derbyshire. Welcome to the

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programme. "Only absolute force

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can work on him" - says North Korea as it accuses

:00:17.:00:18.

Donald Trump of being bereft of reason and claims it's making

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a plan to fire four rockets at the American territory

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of Guam within days. An attack or threat on Guam is an

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attack on the United States. They have said America will be defended.

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We are talking to a family from the pacific island of Guam,

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caught in the middle of this war of words - about how

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Very serious warnings this morning that homelessness could rise

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Right now around a quarter of a million people are caught

:00:46.:00:52.

in the homeless trap, rough sleeping, in hostels, cars,

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We look at the picture across the UK - and what can be done about it.

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Paula and Barry are with us this morning -

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both lost their jobs and ended up sleeping rough.

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They will be talking to us just after 9am.

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If the parents don't have enough money, they can put us into school,

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then we get to have food. Children in some of the most

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deprived parts of Wales are getting free meals during the summer

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holidays - but should more be done in other parts of the UK

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to tackle the growing Welcome to the programme,

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we're live until 11 this morning. We'll bring the latest news

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and sport and later we're This is the former editor of Vogue

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magazine Alexandra Shulman, she's posted this on Instagram -

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no filters no airbrushing, Some are saying it's

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refreshingly honest and normal, others that it is hypocrisy

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after years heading a magazine packed with impossibly

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thin, tanned bodies. As a woman, does an image

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like this, inspire you? Send me an email victoria@bbc.co.uk

:02:20.:02:27.

use the hashtag #Victorialive. If you text, you will be charged

:02:28.:02:29.

at the standard network rate. North Korea will reveal

:02:30.:02:32.

its plan for firing missiles at a US territory

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within the next few days - says Pyongyang - and if Kim Jon Un

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approves, four rockets could shoot over Japan towards the island

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of Guam with its US military bases. Our correspondent

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Yogita Limaye has more. North Korean state television showed

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a mass of people marching in support of the leadership in the country,

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even as the government These are details of its

:03:03.:03:06.

plan to attack Guam. Four rockets will fly over Japan

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and land in the Pacific Ocean It's drills by US bomber

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aircraft like these, which are stationed at Guam,

:03:14.:03:23.

that have angered Pyongyang. While a fierce reaction

:03:24.:03:29.

from North Korea is expected, this time it is matched

:03:30.:03:31.

by aggression from the US president. After saying Pyongyang would be

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met by fire and fury, Donald Trump boasted about America's

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nuclear arsenal, a message which will be perceived as another

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threat by North Korea. It's making people around the world

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nervous, and many countries Our strong wish is that

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the United States keeps calm and refrains from any moves that

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would provoke another party into actions that

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might be dangerous. The border is just about 50

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kilometres from here, but things on the streets

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are not tense. This country has dealt

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with threats from its neighbour for a long time now,

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and that's why perhaps now people here are unlikely to believe just

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yet that this war of words will turn Let's speak to our correspondent

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lies in see all in South Korea. Let's pick up on that point, the

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focus is on Guam but you are in a place that lives with this threat

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everyday -- live in Seoul. For decades the people of South Korea

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and Seoul have lived with the threat of a massive artillery on their

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border, and perhaps even the board tick-macro prospect of a nuclear

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strike. The focus is shifting to Guam, the obscure island stuck in

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the middle of the Pacific. What's interesting in Seoul is that these

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people who live every day with the prospect of a military confrontation

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and as was said in the report, they remained fairly calm. People are

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heading home here as it is 5pm in the evening. They are a good

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barometer of how serious the rhetoric is. We've heard from the

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defence chief of staff who say they are prepared for swift action and

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reminding everyone of the strong military relationship that South

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Korea has with the USA. I think if you couple that with stronger words

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from US Defence Secretary saying North Korea will be greatly

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overmatched, then the signal is warning Kim Jong-Un then, despite

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the rhetoric coming from both sides, that if a military confrontation was

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to come, then to repeat the words of Defence Secretary Mattis, it could

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be the end of the regime in Pyongyang.

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Let's bring you the rest of the morning's news.

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Matthew Price is in the BBC Newsroom with a summary

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Northumbria Police has defended paying ?10,000

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Officers did it to gather information in

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The force is standing by its actions after 17 - mostly Asian -

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men and one woman were convicted of grooming vulnerable

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Critics said it could have put victims at greater risk.

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The faces of just some of those who abused young women

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Vulnerable girls were given drinks and drugs and passed around for sex.

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The gang was caught in one of the biggest child abuse

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investigations the North of England has seen.

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But now there are questions, outrage even, over some

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Was it right to pay a convicted child rapist ?10,000

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We don't support the police in doing this.

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We think it was a misguided action, putting a person who had a track

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record of abusing girls into a situation with other

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vulnerable girls and perpetrators, and then paying them

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Northumbria Police has strongly defended the payment.

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It's surprising and disappointing for the NSPCC to adopt

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This is an ill-informed position they have taken.

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The fact is, we absolutely did not plant XY the informant in the midst

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of vulnerable girls, that did not happen.

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The force says this information to get convictions stopped

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Northumbria's Police Commissioner says she was uneasy about paying

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a rapist, but ultimately she's satisfied everything

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These are complex cases, and difficult judgments have to be made.

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Labour has accused the government top selling off valuable hospital

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assets to help plug a hole in NHS finances. The amount of health

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Service land in England that has been earmarked for sale has more

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than doubled in the past year. Analysis commissioned by Labour

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found 117 sites deemed surplus were still in medical or clinical use.

:08:42.:08:46.

Ministers said selling land would give vital funding for patient care

:08:47.:08:48.

and free up space for housing. Some prisoners should be able to use

:08:49.:08:55.

video calling technology to stay in touch with their families. It could

:08:56.:08:59.

cut reoffending rates, the government has been advised. A

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review by Lord Farmer suggests so-called virtual visit should be

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made available for inmates who cannot attend jail because of

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illness, distance or other factors. Research indicates a prisoner who

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receives visits from a visitor is 39% less likely to reoffend than an

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inmate who had such contact. And we'll have more on this

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after 10am when we'll be talking to former prisoners

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and their relatives, and a representative from a social

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justice charity which works A slowdown in the housing market

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is spreading from London to other parts of the South East

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of England, surveyors suggest. The Royal Institution

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of Chartered Surveyors said the balance of their UK members

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reporting price rises in July This is partly due to more

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surveyors in the South East reporting house price falls

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than the number reporting increases. However, other parts of the country

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are still on an upward trend. The driver of a double-decker bus

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has been taken to hospital after it crashed into a shop on a busy London

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High Street. Police were called early this morning to reports of a

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bus hitting a kitchen shop near Clapham Junction in south-west

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London. The 77 bus was involved. Paramedics treated six passengers at

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the scene. Two people are still trapped on the upper deck.

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Schoolchildren in some of the most deprived parts of Wales are getting

:10:27.:10:32.

free school meals during the summer holidays. They are paid for by the

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Welsh government. Half ?1 million of its education budget is going into

:10:38.:10:40.

these lunch clubs, they include all-day activities. Up to 3 million

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children across the UK risk going hungry in the holidays because poor

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families can't afford to pay for lunches that are normally provided

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by schools, according to a report by MPs brought out earlier this year.

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And we'll bring you an exclusive report on this later in this hour.

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Facebook has announced its launching a news service designed to compete

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with television and services like Netflix and Amazon. Users are soon

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going to see a new watch tap that's going to offer a range of shows,

:11:15.:11:19.

some of which have been funded by the social network. They will also

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see comments and connect with friends in dedicated groups.

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That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 9:30.

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Do get in touch with us throughout the morning -

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If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:11:34.:11:45.

For a man who told us yesterday he'd "lost everything",

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Isaac Makwala has the chance to be a famous world champion tonight.

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The Botswana sprinter had been banned from competing in London due

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to the norovirus outbreak, and missed the chance

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But after his quarantine period ended yesterday afternoon,

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he was given the chance to run a solo time trial in the 200 metres.

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He had to achieve the qualifying time.

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And, roared on by the crowd, he did - and took his place

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He celebrated with a view press ups to show how fit he was.

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So around three hours later he was back, and remarkably Makwala

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came second in his semi-final, qualifying for the final.

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Just behind him in third was Britain's Nathaneel Mitchell-Blake,

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The 400 metre champion Wayde Van Niekerk also secured a place.

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For Makwala though it was all about the chance to race again

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I wish to thank the IAAF for giving me another chance. The crowd is so

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amazing. I just want to thank this crowd, they are so amazing.

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Mo Farah says he feels a "little beaten up" after qualifying

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He hurt his knee and leg in winning the 10k on Friday night,

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but says he'll be fit for his last track race at a major competition.

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and admitted he didn't enjoy running in the rain.

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He'll also be joined by fellow Briton Andy Butchart

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after he qualified as a fastest loser from the second heat.

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Farah's track retirement is just around the corner and says he wants

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You can't dream of something unless you do something about it.

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I've been given a chance in life, and I work hard

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what I've achieved through hard work and keep grafting.

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To all the kids out there, youngsters, you can be like me,

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and we've got to start thinking about how we can get

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the next generation to leave a legacy behind.

:13:36.:13:49.

There was late drama in the women's 400 metres.

:13:50.:13:51.

Olympic champion Shaunae Miller Wee-Bo looked

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but went from first to fourth in about ten strides.

:13:53.:13:56.

The American Phyllis Francis won gold.

:13:57.:14:01.

England made an impressive start to their defence

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of the Women's Rugby World Cup, thrashing Spain 56-5 in Dublin.

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Wales lost to New Zealand, and the hosts Ireland won

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a nail-biting opener against Australia.

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They were leading by nine points after Sophie Spence's try,

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but the Australians fought back, and Ireland just clinched it, 19-17.

:14:16.:14:24.

And Rory McIlory says he has nothing to prove ahead of the US PGA

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Championship which starts this evening in North Carolina.

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He's among a top-class field, trying to stop the American Jordan Spieth

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becoming the youngest player to complete a career grand slam.

:14:33.:14:42.

The biggest challenge in winning will be the incredible talent out

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there this week. I really don't feel any expectations. This is a chance

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to complete the career grand slam. I'm here so I'm going to go ahead

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and try. But I believe I'm going to have plenty of chances and I'm young

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enough to believe in my abilities that it will happen at some point.

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Do I have to be the youngest? No, I don't feel that kind of pressure.

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The number of people who are sleeping rough

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is going to rise by three-quarters in the next ten years,

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Nearly 160,000 households, or just under a quarter

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of a million people, are experiencing the worst forms

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This includes rough sleeping and sofa surfing.

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But detailed economic analysis suggests if current housing policies

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don't change, the figures will keep on rising.

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It's been carried out by academics at Heriot-Watt University

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He's a chef who lost his home after becoming unemployed

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and slept rough for a year in parks and doorways in London.

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Paula Blennerhassett, a former care worker

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She spent several months sleeping in her car.

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Matt Downie is director of policy at the charity Crisis.

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Bob Blackman who is a Conservative MP for Harrow East and former

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member of the Communities and Local Government Committee.

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was given royal assent earlier this year.

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It puts a legal duty on councils to help people facing homelessness.

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And in our Oxford studio is Councillor Ed Turner.

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He's the Local Government Authority's housing spokesperson

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and deputy leader of Labour run Oxford City Council.

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Welcome, all of you, thank you very much for coming on the programme.

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Matt, how do you project future homelessness? Well, the best

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academics in the field about Heriot-Watt have looked into this,

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and they have looked at all available data sources for the

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different forms of homelessness, so rough sleeping, but also people in

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hostels. They predict the future by looking at the current levels of

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homelessness and how they are driven, so we know what causes

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homelessness, for example cuts in certain types of benefits lead to

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different forms of homelessness. Reduction in provisions for people

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leads to rub sleeping. So we can reliably predicted, and one of the

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messages is that we know what causes homelessness and we know what solves

:17:20.:17:22.

it, so this is about political decisions going forward. Did

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analysis take into account changes from the Homelessness Reduction Bill

:17:31.:17:34.

when it is enacted? We are really interested in how we get these

:17:35.:17:37.

numbers down, and the most rheumatic in terms of solutions can be found

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in terms of the Homelessness Reduction Act, that will require

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councils to deal with the problem early. In Wales, it has happened for

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a couple of years, and... So did the economic analysis take that into

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account? Yes. I just wanted to check that. Barry, hello to you, very nice

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to see you. You lost your home after losing your job and very quickly

:18:18.:18:20.

fell into homelessness, tell our audience about the places that you

:18:21.:18:27.

slept in that year. When I became homelessness, I sofa served for a

:18:28.:18:33.

while, then I was in hostels, and there were times when I was sleeping

:18:34.:18:37.

in doorways, times I was sleeping in blocks of flats, or in a Parkway.

:18:38.:18:43.

You mean in the stairwell? Yes, a little bit warmer and a little bit

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more safe than being on the street. I had never experienced this before,

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it is the first time I experienced it, and it was a new experience for

:18:54.:18:59.

me. I'm very glad I overcame it. I think it is disgraceful that anybody

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has to live like that, I am not just talking about me - anybody. What is

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it like? What words would you use to describe it? I think it is shameful,

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yeah, that we have to put ourselves in a position where we can evict

:19:15.:19:17.

people and expect them to sleep on the pavement, and it makes you feel

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like you are isolated, you feel rejected by society. You immediately

:19:29.:19:32.

come under that label where people make stereotypical remarks about

:19:33.:19:38.

you. You encounter more aggression by members of society. And I think

:19:39.:19:47.

it's very difficult to do it day in and day out because you are

:19:48.:19:51.

constantly exhausted, you never have an opportunity to have a decent

:19:52.:19:56.

night's sleep. Let me bring in Paula, Barry has described it, you

:19:57.:20:03.

know, in incredibly sad and articulates terms, and you

:20:04.:20:07.

experienced similar. You were a care worker until you hurt your back, you

:20:08.:20:11.

lost your job, your mobile home, and a new-found yourself living in your

:20:12.:20:15.

car for several months - tell our audience what that is life. It is

:20:16.:20:26.

absolutely terrifying, day by day you are finding something to do, and

:20:27.:20:32.

then at night it is like not knowing who is outside, because to just get

:20:33.:20:41.

some privacy, you put towels up at the windows, just to get that tiny

:20:42.:20:45.

bit of privacy that otherwise you wouldn't get. Eventually, you got

:20:46.:20:50.

into a homeless hostel, so you had a roof over your head, but it still

:20:51.:20:56.

wasn't great, was it? Not at all. I was surrounded 24/7 by alcoholics

:20:57.:21:03.

and track addicts. Some people with mental disabilities. -- drug

:21:04.:21:06.

addicts. Which I could help, because my training in my work helped me

:21:07.:21:15.

deal with that. But it was getting harder to not be drawn into, like,

:21:16.:21:21.

the alcohol stage of it. I had to stay sober 24/7, I couldn't go out,

:21:22.:21:26.

because I was scared I would get pulled into it. So I chose to stay

:21:27.:21:31.

completely sober through that time so that I wouldn't get pulled into

:21:32.:21:37.

the alcohol side of it. Sure. Let me bring in Conservative MP Bob

:21:38.:21:42.

Blackman, the estimates from Crisis are alarming - if things carry on as

:21:43.:21:46.

they are, you have heard they take into account the Bill that God Royal

:21:47.:21:51.

assent earlier this year, as a party that has been in government for many

:21:52.:21:56.

years, do you accept some responsibility? All governments have

:21:57.:22:02.

to accept responsibility for people sleeping rough. Including the

:22:03.:22:07.

Conservative government that has been in power for seven years. The

:22:08.:22:10.

reality is that the reasons for people becoming homelessness are

:22:11.:22:16.

very different... Including cuts to benefits. For the last 30 years,

:22:17.:22:19.

governments of all persuasions have failed to build and of housing in

:22:20.:22:23.

this country to meet demand. We can all agree on that. The good news is

:22:24.:22:31.

that is increasing. I put it to you, including the welfare cuts, the

:22:32.:22:35.

likes that? One of the things that a solution to this... Of course we're

:22:36.:22:40.

just go to talk about solutions, but do you accept that cuts to welfare

:22:41.:22:48.

benefits have contributed partly to homelessness? The important thing is

:22:49.:22:52.

that we build more homes. You are ignoring my question. The reason why

:22:53.:22:58.

benefit cuts have come in is because of the spiralling cost of friends,

:22:59.:23:01.

because of the shortage of supply in the first place. So what we have to

:23:02.:23:06.

do is provide more low-cost housing which councils can then charge

:23:07.:23:10.

rents... The reason you brought in benefit cuts was to reduce the

:23:11.:23:15.

deficit. Indeed, and the housing benefit bill has spiralled out of

:23:16.:23:21.

control over the last ten years. I will try again - do you accept that

:23:22.:23:25.

cuts to welfare benefits have in part contributed to the homelessness

:23:26.:23:31.

problem in Britain? No, because as the housing benefit bill increased,

:23:32.:23:35.

so rents increased, so the reality was that money was being thrown at

:23:36.:23:39.

the problem, rather than dealing with the problem, which is the

:23:40.:23:42.

provision of more housing at an affordable level that people can pay

:23:43.:23:47.

a reasonable rent. What do you say to that? We are going to disagree on

:23:48.:23:56.

welfare, the leading cause of homelessness is the loss of a

:23:57.:24:01.

private tenancy, and that is about the affordability gap. In London and

:24:02.:24:04.

the south-east in particular. I would say that this is not just

:24:05.:24:09.

about welfare, it is about other things too, and if you go back to

:24:10.:24:16.

the early 2000s, both the Major government and the Blair government,

:24:17.:24:19.

there were extraordinary things happening in this country where

:24:20.:24:23.

people from abroad were looking at us, we were tackling homelessness

:24:24.:24:26.

really successfully - so we know what works, we prevent homelessness,

:24:27.:24:30.

that is why the Bill is so important, but when it does happen,

:24:31.:24:35.

you act quickly, get people do permanent accommodation as soon as

:24:36.:24:37.

possible, and don't allow people to sort of get stuck in the

:24:38.:24:43.

homelessness system, people stuck in hostels and night shelters and

:24:44.:24:47.

refuges for far too long. As Paula suggested, there is quite a lot of

:24:48.:24:50.

support needs in the system that can prevent people from moving on. Ed

:24:51.:24:58.

Turner is the leader of Oxford City Council, Labour run, how do you

:24:59.:25:02.

think the Homelessness Reduction Act is going to impact in your area?

:25:03.:25:07.

Will it help people? Will it cause you to stop people becoming

:25:08.:25:12.

homelessness? A lot of councils are doing exactly what the act is asking

:25:13.:25:17.

us to do, and council workers on the front line see the horrible

:25:18.:25:20.

consequences that we have heard about every day and wants to help.

:25:21.:25:24.

Sorry to interrupt, of course they want to help, but we know, because

:25:25.:25:29.

we have covered it many times, that the priorities are the most

:25:30.:25:33.

vulnerable - single women with children, young people et cetera. So

:25:34.:25:39.

people like Paula Barry would not be considered a priority, and this act

:25:40.:25:42.

will make you consider them priority too. A lot of councils have already

:25:43.:25:49.

tried to help. The key thing is how we are able to help, and that is why

:25:50.:25:53.

it is important to return to the point is we have picked up on,

:25:54.:25:57.

making sure there is genuinely affordable accommodation for people

:25:58.:26:01.

to go to. I looked on the internet how many affordable properties there

:26:02.:26:06.

are in Oxford advertised on right move, not one. So build some more

:26:07.:26:11.

houses, then. That is what we are trying to do. But we're not allowed

:26:12.:26:15.

to borrow to build council housing above a certain level. What would be

:26:16.:26:19.

really good is if we can form a delegation to ministers and say

:26:20.:26:22.

let's stop the red tape that is stopping councils building housing,

:26:23.:26:26.

that councils borrowed to build, it makes sense for our communities and

:26:27.:26:31.

will help prevent homelessness. So you are not allowed to borrow to

:26:32.:26:36.

build social housing. There is a cap on borrowing for building housing.

:26:37.:26:40.

There is no cap on councils borrowing for other purposes, only

:26:41.:26:45.

to build housing, it is crazy. What is your limit? It is set in each

:26:46.:26:52.

individual local authority. In my authority, we have got a small

:26:53.:26:56.

amount of headroom left, borrowing headroom, and we are not allowed to

:26:57.:26:59.

borrow beyond that. Every council is in that position, you are not

:27:00.:27:04.

allowed to - it just doesn't make sense. How much are you allowed to

:27:05.:27:09.

borrow? In Oxford, the figure is about 250 million, but we had to

:27:10.:27:14.

borrow 220 million anyway to make a payment to the Government, so we

:27:15.:27:18.

have a small amount of money to play with, and in some cases councils are

:27:19.:27:25.

borrowing up to the limit. Why is a lot of money, you could build

:27:26.:27:32.

thousands of social homes. 220 million has already been paid to

:27:33.:27:35.

the Government because we were required to do that. Councils say,

:27:36.:27:43.

let us borrow to build again. At the same time, let's link housing

:27:44.:27:46.

benefit to real rents in the market. Bob Blackman, your Government is

:27:47.:27:53.

doing this, what do you say to Ed? We have to have more low-cost

:27:54.:27:57.

housing, units that can be provided for as little as ?20,000 per unit,

:27:58.:28:03.

and then allow local authorities to charge the rent on those properties

:28:04.:28:07.

that is commensurate with the cost of providing them, rather than

:28:08.:28:12.

market rents, which of course very difficult to afford, and for people

:28:13.:28:15.

who are unemployed, depending on benefits, it reduces the benefit

:28:16.:28:20.

bill, allows local authorities to develop housing quickly and more

:28:21.:28:24.

cheaply, and it is a solution to the problem of the fact that we are not

:28:25.:28:28.

building and of homes. Right. So with that going to happen, then? It

:28:29.:28:33.

is not a government policy yet, but I am pushing the Government to look

:28:34.:28:37.

at it as one of the solutions. The other solutions, by the way, is

:28:38.:28:41.

housing associations are sitting with large amounts of money in their

:28:42.:28:47.

reserves that could be used to build more social housing. There are also

:28:48.:28:55.

councils sitting with large reserves. What have you got in

:28:56.:29:01.

Oxford? We have got a balance of ?3.5 million over our four year

:29:02.:29:04.

plan, the minimum we are allowed to go down too. Are not as much as

:29:05.:29:08.

some. People are not sitting on a war chest, we just want to build

:29:09.:29:13.

council houses. Some councils are, thank you very much. Paul says there

:29:14.:29:21.

is little chance of solving the homelessness problem when rough

:29:22.:29:23.

sleepers are treated as criminals. Very disturbing to see the projected

:29:24.:29:27.

figures, I live in Runcorn, I have seen the first cases of homeless

:29:28.:29:32.

people sleeping rough. It is even worse in Liverpool. The bedroom tax

:29:33.:29:35.

and universal credit have been a big factor in people losing their

:29:36.:29:42.

houses, amongst other things. And pizzas, I was homeless for two

:29:43.:29:48.

years, and councils do not care one bit, and only a homelessness charity

:29:49.:29:51.

helped me, I am now a share. Thanks very much for coming on the

:29:52.:29:53.

programme. Still to come, North Korea

:29:54.:29:54.

accuses Donald Trump It talks about plans for sending

:29:55.:30:06.

four rockets into the sea around the island of Guam. We'll be speaking to

:30:07.:30:10.

a teacher on the Pacific island which has suddenly found itself at

:30:11.:30:18.

the centre of a crisis. With some schools in Wales offering free meals

:30:19.:30:22.

during the holidays, should more be done to tackle holiday hunger in

:30:23.:30:23.

other parts of the country? Here's Matthew in the BBC Newsroom

:30:24.:30:26.

with a summary of today's news. North Korea says its plan to fire

:30:27.:30:29.

four missiles near the US territory of Guam will soon be ready,

:30:30.:30:33.

as a war of words with State media said rockets would pass

:30:34.:30:36.

over Japan and land in the sea about 17 miles from Guam,

:30:37.:30:41.

if the plan was approved It denounced Donald Trump's warnings

:30:42.:30:43.

of "fire and fury" and said the US A police chief has said paying

:30:44.:30:50.

a child rapist ?10,000 as part of an investigation into a grooming

:30:51.:30:57.

gang was the "right thing". Northumbria Police's Steve Ashman

:30:58.:31:02.

said the information provided by the man led to the conviction

:31:03.:31:05.

of 17 men and a woman Charities have criticised the force

:31:06.:31:08.

for paying the criminal. Labour has accused the government

:31:09.:31:14.

of selling off valuable hospital assets to help plug a hole

:31:15.:31:17.

in NHS finances. The amount of Health Service land

:31:18.:31:21.

in England that has been earmarked for sale has more than doubled

:31:22.:31:24.

in the past year. Analysis commissioned by Labour

:31:25.:31:26.

found 117 sites deemed surplus were still in medical

:31:27.:31:30.

or clinical use. Ministers said selling

:31:31.:31:34.

land would give vital funding for patient care, and free

:31:35.:31:36.

up space for much-needed housing. Some prisoners should be able to use

:31:37.:31:43.

video calling technology to stay It could cut reoffending rates,

:31:44.:31:47.

the government has been advised. A review by Lord Farmer suggests

:31:48.:31:53.

so-called virtual visits should be made available for inmates whose

:31:54.:31:56.

family members who cannot attend jail because of illness,

:31:57.:31:58.

distance or other factors. Research indicates a prisoner

:31:59.:32:03.

who receives visits from a visitor is 39% less likely to reoffend

:32:04.:32:06.

than an inmate who had The driver of a double-decker bus

:32:07.:32:08.

has been taken to hospital after it crashed into a shop on a busy

:32:09.:32:18.

London High Street. Police were called early this

:32:19.:32:20.

morning to reports of a bus hitting a kitchen shop near Clapham Junction

:32:21.:32:23.

in south-west London. Paramedics treated six

:32:24.:32:28.

passengers at the scene. Two people are still

:32:29.:32:34.

trapped on the upper deck. Schoolchildren in some of the most

:32:35.:32:40.

deprived parts of Wales are getting free school meals

:32:41.:32:42.

during the summer holidays. They are paid for by

:32:43.:32:45.

the Welsh government. ?0.5 million of its education budget

:32:46.:32:47.

is going into these lunch clubs, Up to 3 million children

:32:48.:32:51.

across the UK risk going hungry in the holidays because poor

:32:52.:32:57.

families can't afford to pay for lunches that are normally

:32:58.:32:59.

provided by schools, according to a report by MPs brought

:33:00.:33:01.

out earlier this year. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:33:02.:33:10.

News - more at 10:00am. Isaac Makwala could become one of

:33:11.:33:25.

the strangers but most celebrated world champions later after being

:33:26.:33:28.

banned from competing in London because of a Norah virus outbreak.

:33:29.:33:33.

The Botswana sprinter was given a reprieve via this time trial which

:33:34.:33:37.

he used to get through to the semifinals. Later on he made the

:33:38.:33:42.

final, which is tonight. He was particularly happy and full of beans

:33:43.:33:47.

as well. Mo Farah's progress to the 5000 metres final was secured. He

:33:48.:33:52.

hurt his knee and a leg in winning the 10,000 metres the other day but

:33:53.:33:58.

insisted he would be OK for his race on Saturday. Ireland held on to win

:33:59.:34:02.

their opening match in the women's rugby World Cup beating Australia

:34:03.:34:07.

19-17 in Dublin thanks in part to that late try. England won

:34:08.:34:12.

comfortably but Wales lost to New Zealand. Rory McIlroy said he has

:34:13.:34:16.

nothing to prove ahead of the US PGA championship which starts later

:34:17.:34:20.

today in North Carolina. He is among a top-class field, trying to stop

:34:21.:34:24.

Jordan Spieth becoming the youngest player to complete a career grand

:34:25.:34:29.

slam, he's just 24. Will be live at the London Stadium looking at what's

:34:30.:34:34.

to come ahead in the world athletics Championships at 10am.

:34:35.:34:37.

North Korea says its plan for a missile strike on the US

:34:38.:34:40.

territory of Guam will be ready by mid August.

:34:41.:34:45.

State media says that if Kim Jong-un approves,

:34:46.:34:47.

rockets will shoot over Japan and land in the sea about 17 miles

:34:48.:34:51.

from the island's military bases, just hours after Donald Trump

:34:52.:34:57.

promised to meet any threat to the United States

:34:58.:34:59.

He tweeted another statement saying, "My first order as President

:35:00.:35:04.

was to renovate and modernize our nuclear arsenal."

:35:05.:35:11.

"It is now far stronger and more powerful than ever before."

:35:12.:35:14.

He also adds, "Hopefully we will never have to use this power,

:35:15.:35:17.

but there will never be a time that we are not the most powerful

:35:18.:35:20.

Well it's already 10th August, so how worried should the world be?

:35:21.:35:32.

Let's go live to Guam and talk to Nelia Grace Mercado

:35:33.:35:34.

Neila is a teacher on the island and works for the US

:35:35.:35:41.

Department of Defence at one of their military bases.

:35:42.:35:44.

Victoria Guerrero is also from Guam and says she is "terrified"

:35:45.:35:47.

Karin von Hippel from the defense think-tank Rusi,

:35:48.:35:55.

as well as Dr James Hoare, who used to be Britain's most senior

:35:56.:35:58.

Nelia, tell me how you and your relatives and children are feeling

:35:59.:36:18.

on the island right now? What I'm sensing from a friends on social

:36:19.:36:21.

media and the friends I see everyday, although we are getting as

:36:22.:36:26.

year and says from a government that we are prepared to protect ourselves

:36:27.:36:30.

should North Korea send a missile hour wait, we are carrying anxiety

:36:31.:36:37.

under our hearts in our day-to-day lives. Our governor has asked us to

:36:38.:36:42.

stay calm and proceed with our lives, but it's quite difficult to

:36:43.:36:51.

do so. This is the first time that we've heard any formal threat from

:36:52.:36:58.

North Korea. We are anxious about what's to come, particularly the

:36:59.:37:05.

latest news that they are going to or are threatening to approve the

:37:06.:37:11.

release of those missiles, miles away from Guam. We are very

:37:12.:37:16.

concerned despite assurances from our local government leaders. You

:37:17.:37:21.

tweeted the president Donald Trump. We can have a look at that now. You

:37:22.:37:27.

showed a picture of yourself and your children. Why did you do that?

:37:28.:37:32.

I thought it was important for the president to see the faces of Guam.

:37:33.:37:39.

Guam isn't some abstract point on the map with an American flag on it.

:37:40.:37:49.

It's a dimensional community. We have a history and a culture, we

:37:50.:37:56.

have life that people are fighting to keep, survive and thrive with.

:37:57.:38:02.

Much like that of any other community in the United States. I

:38:03.:38:07.

wanted him to understand that their faces. Also, to release the lack of

:38:08.:38:13.

understanding that much of our nation might have, if not enough

:38:14.:38:22.

misunderstanding, of what Guam is. I stated to your producer that even

:38:23.:38:25.

Fox News didn't get their facts right about Guam. For the sake of my

:38:26.:38:31.

island, I wanted the president to see that there are valuable lives

:38:32.:38:41.

here, much like his and any of the people in the USA. We are as complex

:38:42.:38:49.

and as alive as any of the states, and I wanted him to be aware of the

:38:50.:38:55.

faces for which he is responsible. Are you sending him that photo of

:38:56.:38:59.

your family because you want to protect you, or are you sending it

:39:00.:39:02.

to say please tone down your language? I'm sending it that photo

:39:03.:39:10.

for him to be aware. OK. Let me bring in Victoria. What is your view

:39:11.:39:22.

of what is going on right now? Do you really think North Korea could

:39:23.:39:26.

potentially send four rockets into the sea around Guam in the next

:39:27.:39:30.

week? I think they have the capability, yes. She was right that

:39:31.:39:35.

this is the first time we are hearing such a direct threat in

:39:36.:39:39.

terms of here is the time we are going to attack, this is the kind of

:39:40.:39:43.

attack we are going to do. Guam is readily caught in the middle of

:39:44.:39:48.

other countries conflicts. We have been told in the past that we would

:39:49.:39:53.

be attacked by North Korea or China. I believe China has missiles called

:39:54.:40:03.

the Guam killers. As a mother, this causes a lot of anxiety. Largely

:40:04.:40:08.

because it is important to understand Guam's history and that

:40:09.:40:13.

we are a unique people in the world. The indigenous people of our island

:40:14.:40:19.

have been here for 4000 years. We have been colonised for centuries

:40:20.:40:23.

and our relationship to America is that of a UN recognised colony.

:40:24.:40:29.

These conflicts are happening without anything to do with us. The

:40:30.:40:34.

military presence here has been without our consent. You used to be

:40:35.:40:41.

written's most senior diplomat in North Korea, if North Korea fires

:40:42.:40:46.

rockets into the sea around Guam, is that an act of war? Probably not. I

:40:47.:40:54.

think we are jumping rather ahead. They've talked about making a plan,

:40:55.:40:57.

then that plan has to be approved. What I think they are doing is

:40:58.:41:02.

saying we could do this. They are hoping there will be some response

:41:03.:41:06.

so they can draw back. I don't think the North Koreans are actually

:41:07.:41:10.

suicidal, and I think that they are concerned that Mr Trump makes these

:41:11.:41:19.

sorts of throwaway remarks, and that they need to do something to say

:41:20.:41:23.

that you can't do this without a possible consequence. I don't think

:41:24.:41:30.

they will necessarily fire their rockets at Guam. If they do, I don't

:41:31.:41:35.

think those rockets are likely to be terribly successful. One of the

:41:36.:41:38.

things I think the North Koreans still cannot guarantee is the

:41:39.:41:43.

accuracy of their weaponry of that type. If they do, what would you

:41:44.:41:51.

expect Donald Trump to do? I have no idea in the world. What would you

:41:52.:41:56.

say? It's hard to say. What you are seeing is a US president that has an

:41:57.:42:01.

ad hoc foreign policy. He doesn't have a team that comes together and

:42:02.:42:04.

agrees on a strategy and then they all follow it. Secretary of State

:42:05.:42:09.

Rex Tillerson says one thing, Trump says another thing and Mike Pence

:42:10.:42:14.

says another thing. It's a really uncomfortable situation. They are

:42:15.:42:17.

like this on all foreign policy issues but this is potentially the

:42:18.:42:23.

most dangerous. Although they may not agree on a formal policy, it

:42:24.:42:30.

seems clear to me Donald Trump is saying if you do anything you will

:42:31.:42:38.

regret it. But a US president should not be threatening to potentially

:42:39.:42:41.

use of nuclear force. The president should be trying to calm the world

:42:42.:42:49.

down. He's talked about firing... He has ratcheted it up instead of

:42:50.:42:53.

calming down. Dr Hoare, you don't think this is going to be a nuclear

:42:54.:42:58.

war? I don't know, but there have been equally apparently dangerous

:42:59.:43:06.

crises in the past. It's not so long since the North Koreans showed the

:43:07.:43:10.

leader on television with a map on the wall showing the cities of the

:43:11.:43:15.

United States they could attack. The cities, not some intermediate place

:43:16.:43:19.

but actually attacking the USA. Of course, they backed away. They

:43:20.:43:23.

didn't have the capability. They may still not have the capability. I

:43:24.:43:29.

think that, depending on how Washington react, you have signs

:43:30.:43:35.

that the North Koreans would quite like to get out of this tense

:43:36.:43:40.

relationship that has worked up over the last two months. Let's go back

:43:41.:43:48.

to Guam because we can hear from Nelia's son. Hello. How are you?

:43:49.:43:57.

Good. You're talking to Great Britain, welcome and thank you.

:43:58.:44:02.

You're welcome. How are you feeling right now? A bit shy. Don't be,

:44:03.:44:08.

please! What has your man said to you about what's going on in the

:44:09.:44:13.

world with North Korea and other world leaders -- mum? That they are

:44:14.:44:24.

going to launch a missile at Guam, and that's all she has told me. What

:44:25.:44:30.

about the missiles that protect Guam? There's a missile that

:44:31.:44:36.

protects Guam, it it's called the antiballistic missile defence

:44:37.:44:46.

system. Does that make you feel safer? Yes. What about the defences

:44:47.:44:59.

of Guam? There is a system in place for the region, there are US troops

:45:00.:45:04.

throughout the region, US troops in Japan and South Korea, almost 60,000

:45:05.:45:08.

US troops as well as US civilians throughout the region. There are

:45:09.:45:14.

defences everywhere, but this could easily spiral out of control if both

:45:15.:45:18.

leaders are not careful to ratchet it back.

:45:19.:45:23.

Jeshua, finally, what would you say to the leader of North Korea? I

:45:24.:45:30.

would say, please stop, there are families that live here on Guam. My

:45:31.:45:43.

grandma just had knee surgery, she is in the hospital, please stop.

:45:44.:45:48.

Thank you to Jeshua and his mother, and Victoria Guerrero, and Dr James

:45:49.:46:00.

Hoare and Karin von Hippel from Rusi. Let me read this message,

:46:01.:46:04.

Michael said that North Korea consistently threatens the safety of

:46:05.:46:08.

US citizens and Rock write the response, and somehow he is painted

:46:09.:46:14.

as the bad guy and all of this. -- and Trump rightly response.

:46:15.:46:22.

Still to come, Facebook's revamped video service, will it be a

:46:23.:46:26.

competitor to Netflix and Amazon? Schoolchildren in some of the most

:46:27.:46:29.

deprived parts of Wales are getting free school meals

:46:30.:46:31.

these summer holidays ?500,000 has been allocated,

:46:32.:46:33.

which still means only a small number

:46:34.:46:39.

of schools are covered. A report earlier this year said

:46:40.:46:40.

that up to three million children across the UK risked going

:46:41.:46:43.

hungry in the holidays. Catrin Nye has been meeting

:46:44.:46:46.

children in Cardiff. Can you tell me what your

:46:47.:46:52.

favourite foods are? It's one of 39 schools in the most

:46:53.:46:59.

deprived parts of Wales providing breakfast and lunch

:47:00.:47:51.

in the school holidays, just like they

:47:52.:47:54.

normally do in term time. For the first time this year,

:47:55.:47:59.

the Welsh Government's funding lunch clubs,

:48:00.:48:01.

which also involve You guys have to go

:48:02.:48:03.

to school all year round. My mum think it's good

:48:04.:48:10.

because she works, and normally I sit home

:48:11.:48:26.

with my nan, but because I'm in here,

:48:27.:48:31.

it makes a big difference. If the parents don't have

:48:32.:48:38.

enough money, they can put us into school

:48:39.:48:40.

and then we get to have food. They don't agree on whether school

:48:41.:48:47.

is better with or without lessons. In summer school we don't have to do

:48:48.:48:54.

as much work as normal school. Summer school is better

:48:55.:49:00.

than normal school? Normal school is better,

:49:01.:49:02.

because you get to learn Can you tell when pupils

:49:03.:49:15.

in your class haven't eaten, If they're not prepared

:49:16.:49:28.

for their day, already off on the wrong foot,

:49:29.:49:34.

it affects mood, Without the fundamentals in place,

:49:35.:49:37.

children can't learn. This project is all about providing

:49:38.:49:46.

the meals that you always get I think every parent that brings

:49:47.:49:50.

a child in here is grateful for it. Lots of different reasons -

:49:51.:49:58.

childcare, food, entertainment. They're going to be stuck

:49:59.:50:02.

in the house anyway, aren't they? If the weather is bad,

:50:03.:50:06.

you can't take them anywhere. At this time, so many people

:50:07.:50:11.

are struggling, like me. Having to make sure your kids get

:50:12.:50:13.

fed, not just feeding them with anything but giving them

:50:14.:50:18.

the right food. We're constantly restocking

:50:19.:50:20.

the cupboards, constantly doing shopping, sometimes you go

:50:21.:50:24.

to the shop and at the checkout you go through your receipt to see

:50:25.:50:29.

if the assistant made a mistake. My daughter is seven,

:50:30.:50:35.

so bringing her in here They're interacting

:50:36.:50:37.

with other children, playing, They don't look at it

:50:38.:50:47.

as they're in school, There are people on free school

:50:48.:50:51.

meals - suddenly, that is taken away and the family budget has to stretch

:50:52.:51:09.

that bit further. Do you see children going

:51:10.:51:15.

without in the summer? In Swansea recently they actually

:51:16.:51:18.

ran out of food in the food bank. If you think that it's been decided

:51:19.:51:25.

that children need free school meals because of the amount of income

:51:26.:51:28.

the family has got, it's not surprising during the long summer

:51:29.:51:32.

holidays, when suddenly those things are not there,

:51:33.:51:34.

families are struggling. The summer lunch club costs

:51:35.:51:39.

about ?30 a day per child. A third of the children who go

:51:40.:51:42.

to this school have free school meals, but you don't need to be

:51:43.:51:45.

eligible to get the free We don't qualify, unfortunately,

:51:46.:51:48.

because my husband receives working tax credits -

:51:49.:51:56.

not a great amount a week, but because he receives

:51:57.:51:58.

that, they don't qualify They have sandwiches when they come

:51:59.:52:00.

to school in term time, this is an added bonus,

:52:01.:52:10.

because they get a school meal. My favourite food is

:52:11.:52:17.

chocolate spread sandwiches! Because it has a really good taste,

:52:18.:52:38.

and it isn't that healthy, but sometimes you can make

:52:39.:52:57.

yourself free like a bird. You guys have eaten more

:52:58.:53:04.

of your vegetables than me. A report by a cross-party group

:53:05.:53:09.

of MPs warned that three million children across the UK risk

:53:10.:53:18.

going hungry in school holidays. The Welsh Goverment has put ?500,000

:53:19.:53:23.

of its education budget, controlled in Cardiff

:53:24.:53:26.

rather than Westminster, Money is very tight,

:53:27.:53:28.

and at the moment It may not be feasable to run it

:53:29.:53:40.

in every school, I accept that, but actually in schools

:53:41.:53:47.

which need it, I think the cost

:53:48.:53:49.

has got to be worth it. It's part of closing the education

:53:50.:53:55.

gap, making sure children get food I can't think of anything more

:53:56.:53:58.

tragic than being able to predict at the beginning of a child's life

:53:59.:54:05.

what their GCSE results will be. At the moment, the education

:54:06.:54:12.

departments in England and Scotland are not allocating specific funding

:54:13.:54:14.

to lunch clubs. Charities and local authorities

:54:15.:54:18.

are able to set them up, but there are calls for more

:54:19.:54:20.

central government money. Katrin Nye reporting, more on this

:54:21.:54:33.

in the next hour of the programme, asking whether this should be rolled

:54:34.:54:36.

out across the rest of the UK, let me know your views.

:54:37.:54:38.

Facebook is spreading out into the TV market,

:54:39.:54:40.

taking on the like of Netflix and Amazon.

:54:41.:54:45.

Rory Cellan-Jones is here, what are they launching? They are launching a

:54:46.:54:54.

new tab on Facebook called Watch, where you will be able to watch

:54:55.:54:57.

original video content. There is already a lot of video on Facebook,

:54:58.:55:01.

including from this show, and this is just starting in America, you

:55:02.:55:06.

won't see it in the UK for a while, but a real mark of how competitive

:55:07.:55:10.

this world is. They are doing some deals, they will get original

:55:11.:55:14.

content from the likes of BuzzFeed, some American sports franchises,

:55:15.:55:20.

basketball and so on, and they are offering you the chance to watch TV

:55:21.:55:25.

through Facebook. Mark Zuckerberg has a slightly cheesy quote,

:55:26.:55:29.

watching a show doesn't have to be passive, it can be a chance to share

:55:30.:55:33.

an experience and bring people together who care about the same

:55:34.:55:37.

things, so what about caring and sharing, but really they are about

:55:38.:55:42.

advertising revenue. They are already hugely dominant. I think

:55:43.:55:45.

they are looking at Netflix and Amazon, but also looking at YouTube,

:55:46.:55:49.

which is owned by Google, the other big powerhouse of the internet in

:55:50.:55:53.

terms of advertising. They are looking at how much money YouTube is

:55:54.:55:57.

now churning out for Google, and they are thinking, we would like

:55:58.:56:01.

some of that. I think it is going to be pitch to the kind of people who

:56:02.:56:07.

make you know, that whole class of people who make money from

:56:08.:56:12.

advertising on YouTube - what were amateurs have become professionals.

:56:13.:56:15.

I think they would like to see some of those people pitching up on

:56:16.:56:18.

Facebook. But YouTubers got a big start. Yeah... So we will get it in

:56:19.:56:25.

this country eventually, will we? The option to watch on Facebook if

:56:26.:56:30.

we want to? Yeah, and I'm sure they will try to do deals with global

:56:31.:56:35.

content providers... Including the BBC? Who knows?! Of course, we

:56:36.:56:42.

wouldn't get the advertising money from it. But we would be paid for

:56:43.:56:48.

our content. If we provide original drama or whatever. Yeah, a question

:56:49.:56:54.

of where you want your content to end up, Facebook, I mean, there are

:56:55.:57:00.

concerns about the sheer power of these giant American companies.

:57:01.:57:05.

Facebook, Google, Apple, Amazon and so on, they dominate our world, and

:57:06.:57:09.

there is a big battle between them to be the top dog in the online

:57:10.:57:14.

advertising world. Thank you very much, Rory. Let me bring you some

:57:15.:57:19.

news about NHS waiting times, it is from our health editor, Hugh Pym.

:57:20.:57:24.

The number of people waiting for Dean surgery in England in June was

:57:25.:57:29.

the highest since December 2007. -- for routine surgery. 3.8 million

:57:30.:57:38.

patients were on waiting lists, 19% were waiting for longer than the

:57:39.:57:43.

target of 80 weeks. The number of people on waiting lists in June was

:57:44.:57:47.

the highest since December 2007, the highest for ten years. More on that

:57:48.:57:52.

later. Still to come, family relationships are key to stopping

:57:53.:57:55.

prisoners reoffending. A government review is recommending that inmates

:57:56.:58:02.

should be able to talk to relatives on Skype to get in touch with them.

:58:03.:58:07.

We will talk to former inmates and their relatives. News and sport and

:58:08.:58:09.

ten, but first the weather. A lovely start across much of the

:58:10.:58:20.

UK, some showers around, rain across northern parts of the country, but

:58:21.:58:25.

look at these lovely pictures, this one from East Yorkshire, blue skies,

:58:26.:58:29.

and as we drift into Derbyshire, again blue skies, fair weather

:58:30.:58:32.

cloud, not much more than that. Through the course of the day, for

:58:33.:58:37.

most of us, with high pressure in charge, staying settled, but this

:58:38.:58:40.

weather front is still producing some showers, patchy rain across

:58:41.:58:44.

Kent, and we have got another one across the far north of Scotland,

:58:45.:58:48.

introducing more cloud, and also some rain, mainly across the

:58:49.:58:52.

Northern Isles. So a lot of dry weather, fair weather cloud bubbling

:58:53.:58:56.

up through the day, gentle breezes, in the sunshine, it will feel quite

:58:57.:59:00.

pleasant. Temperatures roughly where they should be in August, perhaps a

:59:01.:59:04.

smidgen below. From the Midlands down towards the Isle of Wight,

:59:05.:59:09.

heading towards the Isles of Scilly, all points in between, we are

:59:10.:59:13.

looking at a dry afternoon with some sunshine. Sunshine across Wales,

:59:14.:59:17.

Cardiff up to 20 Celsius, sunny spells for more than island, a

:59:18.:59:24.

little bit more in the way of cloud. -- sunny spells for Northern

:59:25.:59:29.

Ireland. Moving across the bulk of Scotland, dry and sunny. Across

:59:30.:59:32.

northern England, a similar story, dry and sunny. The Midlands seem the

:59:33.:59:37.

same with justice hang back of cloud, the balance of yesterday's

:59:38.:59:40.

rain, the remnants of a weather front which could produce a shower.

:59:41.:59:44.

Not expecting showers in London this afternoon, but a fair bit of

:59:45.:59:49.

sunshine, temperatures up to 20 or even a 21. Through the evening and

:59:50.:59:53.

overnight, early evening sunshine, then clear skies developing, but at

:59:54.:59:56.

the same time a weather front coming in across West of Scotland, Northern

:59:57.:00:00.

Ireland, that will introduce rain, accompanied by strengthening winds

:00:01.:00:05.

as it sinks southwards through the course of the overnight period. You

:00:06.:00:10.

can see why, we have got a cold front that is bringing rain, and

:00:11.:00:12.

other occlusion culling in right behind it, a weaker affair, but it

:00:13.:00:18.

does mean, for many parts of England and Wales, we will start on a sunny

:00:19.:00:22.

note, but as the weather fronts push southwards, with windy conditions,

:00:23.:00:25.

you will find cloud will continue to build. The far south-east of England

:00:26.:00:30.

will hang onto the sunshine probably until evening time. But it all goes

:00:31.:00:33.

through June the course of Friday night, so by Saturday we start on a

:00:34.:00:38.

chilly note, but a further sunshine around, one or two showers dotted

:00:39.:00:42.

here or there across the Highlands, highs up to 22, Sunday is also

:00:43.:00:45.

looking like being mostly dry. Hello it's Thursday, it's ten

:00:46.:00:57.

o'clock, I'm Victoria Derbyshire. North Korea says it plans to fire

:00:58.:01:08.

missiles at Guam will soon be ready. The US warns the North Koreans their

:01:09.:01:11.

actions could mean the end of the regime.

:01:12.:01:15.

Although we are getting as you answers from a government that we

:01:16.:01:21.

are prepared to protect ourselves should North Korea send a missile

:01:22.:01:26.

our way, we are carrying anxiety and our hearts in our day-to-day lives.

:01:27.:01:34.

Prisoners relationships with their family are key to stopping them

:01:35.:01:39.

reoffending and vital to reforming a troubled prison service. We'll be

:01:40.:01:43.

asking a man who's been in jail three times what impact the support

:01:44.:01:44.

of his family had on him. A report by MPs said that up

:01:45.:01:47.

to three million children across the UK risked going hungry

:01:48.:01:49.

in the holidays. Should more be done

:01:50.:01:51.

to tackle the growing Here's Matthew in the BBC Newsroom

:01:52.:01:53.

with a summary of todays news. North Korea will reveal its plan

:01:54.:02:04.

for firing missiles at a US territory within the next few days -

:02:05.:02:11.

says Pyongyang - and if Kim Jong-Un approves, four rockets could shoot

:02:12.:02:14.

over Japan towards the South Pacific island of Guam with

:02:15.:02:17.

its US military bases. Our correspondent Robin Brant

:02:18.:02:21.

is in Seoul in South Korea - where the mood, despite mounting

:02:22.:02:23.

tensions, remains calm. For decades, the people of South

:02:24.:02:39.

Korea and Seoul have lived with the threat of a massive artillery on

:02:40.:02:43.

their border, and perhaps even the prospect of a nuclear strike. The

:02:44.:02:48.

focus is shifting to Guam, the obscure island stuck in the middle

:02:49.:02:51.

of the Pacific. What's interesting here in Seoul, is those people who

:02:52.:02:56.

live every day with the prospect of military confrontation, and they

:02:57.:03:03.

remain fairly calm. It's a normal Wednesday, people are heading home

:03:04.:03:08.

because it's just gone past 5pm. They are a good barometer of how

:03:09.:03:12.

serious the rhetoric is. We've heard from the chief of the defence staff

:03:13.:03:18.

saying they are prepared for swift action as usual and reminding

:03:19.:03:22.

everyone, particularly the North Korean 's, of the close relationship

:03:23.:03:27.

South Korea has with the United States. If you couple that with

:03:28.:03:32.

stronger words from the US Defence Secretary Mattis, saying North Korea

:03:33.:03:37.

would be grossly overmatched, then the signal is very much warning Kim

:03:38.:03:41.

Jong-Un then, despite the rhetoric coming from both sides, that is a

:03:42.:03:46.

military confrontation came, then to repeat the words of Defence

:03:47.:03:49.

Secretary Mattis it could be the end of the regime in Pyongyang.

:03:50.:03:57.

The number of people waiting for routine surgery in June was the

:03:58.:04:04.

highest since December 2000 and seven. The figures tell us that 3.83

:04:05.:04:09.

million patients were on lists for operations. 90.3% were seen within

:04:10.:04:15.

18 weeks, that is below the target of 92%. There was an increase in the

:04:16.:04:20.

year-on-year of more than 21% in the numbers of people waiting longer

:04:21.:04:26.

than 18 weeks. That went up to 373,000. A police chief has said

:04:27.:04:35.

paying a child rapist ?10,000 is part of an investigation into a

:04:36.:04:41.

grooming gang was the right thing. Steve Ashman said the information

:04:42.:04:44.

provided by the man led to the conviction of 17 men and a woman for

:04:45.:04:49.

abusing girls in Newcastle. Charities have criticised the force

:04:50.:04:50.

for paying the criminal. Some prisoners should be able to use

:04:51.:04:54.

video calling technology such as Skype to stay in touch

:04:55.:04:57.

with their families and cut reoffending rates,

:04:58.:04:59.

the government has been advised. The review, by Lord Farmer,

:05:00.:05:01.

suggests so-called "virtual visits" should be made available for inmates

:05:02.:05:03.

whose relatives cannot attend jail because of illness,

:05:04.:05:06.

distance or other factors. Research indicates a prisoner

:05:07.:05:08.

who receives visits from a relative, is 39% less likely to re-offend

:05:09.:05:11.

than an inmate who had School children in some of the most

:05:12.:05:14.

deprived parts of Wales are getting free school meals during the summer

:05:15.:05:24.

holidays, paid for by Half a million pounds

:05:25.:05:26.

of its education budget Up to three million children

:05:27.:05:29.

across the UK risk going hungry in the holidays because poor

:05:30.:05:35.

families can't afford to pay The driver of a double-decker bus

:05:36.:05:39.

has been taken to hospital after it crashed into a shop on a busy

:05:40.:05:42.

London high street. Police were called early this

:05:43.:05:45.

morning to reports of a bus hitting a kitchen shop near Clapham Junction

:05:46.:05:47.

train station in south-west London. A route 77 double-decker bus

:05:48.:05:50.

was involved in the incident. Paramedics treated six

:05:51.:05:52.

passengers at the scene. Two people are still

:05:53.:05:54.

trapped on the upper deck. The Fire Brigade have now freed

:05:55.:06:04.

those two people. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:06:05.:06:08.

News - more at 10:30am. This photograph of the ex-editor of

:06:09.:06:23.

Vogue. She edited Vogue for 25 years and put this photograph on her

:06:24.:06:30.

Instagram page on holiday. I was asking if a picture of a normal

:06:31.:06:35.

woman like that, someone in her position, does it inspire youth? A

:06:36.:06:40.

number of people have said what a refreshingly honest picture. Others

:06:41.:06:43.

have said total hypocrisy because she was the head of a fashion bible

:06:44.:06:48.

that would never dream of putting a woman that was slightly wobbly on

:06:49.:06:52.

their front cover. Another view says, good on you, I really want to

:06:53.:06:56.

see my share of positive imagery that I can relate to. I want to see

:06:57.:07:01.

positive, fat and older female and male images. It's sad that Vogue and

:07:02.:07:07.

their like don't lead the way. I realised many years ago we don't

:07:08.:07:11.

have much in common so I don't buy their product! Thank you.

:07:12.:07:14.

Do get in touch with us throughout the morning -

:07:15.:07:17.

If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:07:18.:07:21.

Let's get the latest from the World Athletics Championships -

:07:22.:07:23.

it's day seven, and Jessica is at the London Stadium for us.

:07:24.:07:26.

Jessica will there be a fairytale ending for

:07:27.:07:28.

It's been one of the major talking points at the world athletics

:07:29.:07:39.

Championships. This time yesterday Isaac Makwala was in quarantine

:07:40.:07:43.

thinking his World Championships were over. Tonight, he'll be

:07:44.:07:47.

competing for a gold medal in the 200 metres. It was on this very

:07:48.:07:54.

track when Makwala lined up on the 200 metre line for this remarkable

:07:55.:07:58.

solo time trial that the IAAF granted him. It was just him against

:07:59.:08:03.

the clock. None of his rivals around him to spare him on, just him, the

:08:04.:08:09.

clock and the crowd. It was remarkable, the something you rarely

:08:10.:08:13.

see in world athletics Championships. Makwala was one of a

:08:14.:08:18.

group of athletes affected by the stomach bug going around at these

:08:19.:08:21.

championships. He was prevented from competing. He was refused to race on

:08:22.:08:31.

medical grounds. He went through the solo time trial, required a certain

:08:32.:08:37.

qualifying time. He got the qualifying time which meant he went

:08:38.:08:43.

into the semifinals. He finished that semifinal in second place which

:08:44.:08:47.

means tonight he will race for gold in front of all the fans who have

:08:48.:08:51.

really warmed to him in the past few days.

:08:52.:08:54.

I wish to thank the IAAF for giving me another chance

:08:55.:08:56.

They didn't need to believe, the crowd being British,

:08:57.:09:01.

I just want to thank this crowd, so amazing!

:09:02.:09:09.

I loved the press ups at the end! Just in case we hadn't noticed from

:09:10.:09:17.

the way he ran that, that message that I'm fine, I do not have

:09:18.:09:25.

norovirus, and the crowd were fantastic!

:09:26.:09:26.

We saw Mo Farah back on the track last night and in impressive form.

:09:27.:09:30.

What is there to look forward to today for British fans?

:09:31.:09:33.

We weren't sure about Mo Farah and how much that 10,000 had taken out

:09:34.:09:41.

of him. He seemed to do OK, he was relatively comfortable in the 5000.

:09:42.:09:45.

He did enough to get through but also to look forward to for the

:09:46.:09:49.

British fans will be Katarina Johnson-Thompson in the high jump.

:09:50.:09:53.

It's one of her strongest events. She didn't do as well as you might

:09:54.:09:57.

have done in the heptathlon in that event. I spoke to Denise Lewis

:09:58.:10:01.

earlier, the Olympic heptathlon champion from Sydney 2000. She said

:10:02.:10:08.

Johnson Thompson should fare better despite her disappointment in the

:10:09.:10:14.

heptathlon. She's a really good high jumper, she holds the British

:10:15.:10:18.

record. I think she had a blip. Maybe she overbought it in the

:10:19.:10:22.

heptathlon. She has been adjusting her runway. I think she will be fine

:10:23.:10:33.

tonight. There is a good chance they might both qualify, fingers crossed.

:10:34.:10:39.

She went be the only Brit in action, we've got Eilidh Doyle in the final

:10:40.:10:48.

of the 400 meter hurdles and Nathaniel Mitchell Blake. Hopefully

:10:49.:10:51.

we might have a few medals to cheer about tonight?

:10:52.:10:54.

Family relationships are key to stopping prisoners reoffending

:10:55.:10:56.

and vital to reforming a prison system which, as we have

:10:57.:10:58.

reported on this programme, has seen a surge in levels

:10:59.:11:01.

According to a Government review out today, research has shown prisoners

:11:02.:11:06.

who receive visits from a family member are 39% less

:11:07.:11:08.

The team behind the research took in over 1,000 submissions from men

:11:09.:11:14.

in prison, their families, voluntary organisations,

:11:15.:11:16.

academics and members of staff in the sector,

:11:17.:11:19.

and recommendations include inmates being able to use Skype

:11:20.:11:21.

or Facetime on iPads to talk to their relatives at home.

:11:22.:11:29.

Let's talk now to Cody Lachey, who was released from

:11:30.:11:31.

He has been in prison three times in the last three years.

:11:32.:11:38.

Josette Baldacchino, who regularly visited her ex-partner in prison

:11:39.:11:41.

She now volunteers for Partner of Prisoners and speaks

:11:42.:11:46.

to other prison families on the organisation's helpline.

:11:47.:11:50.

Jacob Tas, chief executive of Nacro, a social justice charity which works

:11:51.:11:54.

They help them to settle back into society and rebuild

:11:55.:12:00.

relationships, or maintain them, and have submitted

:12:01.:12:02.

Welcome. Cody, you are released in February, you've been inside three

:12:03.:12:16.

times in the last three years for witness intimidation and assault on

:12:17.:12:19.

a police officer, then for an assault on someone else. Your man

:12:20.:12:24.

came to visit you. You had that contact, you saw the effect on her

:12:25.:12:28.

and you still reoffended, tell us why. To be honest, my criminality

:12:29.:12:34.

was embedded within me. I made very bad decisions going forward. It was

:12:35.:12:38.

only on my third and final stretch where I saw the effect it was having

:12:39.:12:43.

on my mum psychologically and emotionally, not to mention

:12:44.:12:47.

financially. That stopped my criminality. I am reformed now and I

:12:48.:12:52.

campaign for prison reform across the board. Her continuing visits in

:12:53.:12:57.

those three occasions when you were inside, in the end, they have helped

:12:58.:13:02.

you make a decision that you aren't going to reoffend again. Yes, I did

:13:03.:13:06.

think it was down to the visits, I think it was down to the effect it

:13:07.:13:12.

was having on my mum and I grew a conscience overnight. I came out of

:13:13.:13:16.

prison and that was it. It's definitely different this time?

:13:17.:13:20.

Absolutely. I'm staying away from crime, I've got a new circle of

:13:21.:13:25.

friends, I'm a changed person. Mike rhinestone define the other person

:13:26.:13:29.

and I've used my experiences to campaign for prison reform

:13:30.:13:36.

across-the-board -- my crime doesn't define me as a person. Why was it

:13:37.:13:40.

important to keep close contact with your partner when he was in prison?

:13:41.:13:45.

I found it was important to keep contact because it gave him

:13:46.:13:48.

something to look forward to. It gave him something to look forward

:13:49.:13:56.

to to coming home and it made an impact on our family. I think when

:13:57.:13:59.

he saw that he understood what he did was wrong. I do agree with the

:14:00.:14:04.

fact that they should have some kind of video to be able to speak to

:14:05.:14:14.

them. Often people get sent to a jail that is hundreds of miles from

:14:15.:14:18.

home. The idea you could go and visit regularly is a nonstarter.

:14:19.:14:24.

It's really hard for families as they go far. Sometimes even if they

:14:25.:14:28.

are nearby, it's hard to go on visits. Or if they've got elderly

:14:29.:14:40.

parents. It was hard, really hard. What's it like going to visit

:14:41.:14:43.

someone you love in prison and taking your daughter and grandchild

:14:44.:14:48.

with you? It's not the best experience. Not when you're going to

:14:49.:14:51.

be searched or when you're going to be treated along the same lines as

:14:52.:14:59.

the offender. What do you mean? You feel as though you're being treated

:15:00.:15:03.

as though you what the criminal. Which is extremely hard and not

:15:04.:15:08.

something you should be put through. That's where the support comes in

:15:09.:15:14.

from organisations like Partners of Prisoners.

:15:15.:15:19.

What do you think about these figures that somebody would be 39%

:15:20.:15:25.

less likely to offend if contact is maintained? You just pulled a face,

:15:26.:15:34.

Josette! Well, personally, I would have said 50%. The contact with

:15:35.:15:43.

families, it is very important, and I am not saying that family support

:15:44.:15:48.

is going to stop all offenders reoffending, because it doesn't. You

:15:49.:15:52.

are going to get half that are going to look at the family support and

:15:53.:15:55.

they are going to stop, and another half will just continue to do it,

:15:56.:16:02.

and it's not what you are a way of life for them. Led me bring in

:16:03.:16:15.

Nacro, the social justice charity. What about this recommendation that

:16:16.:16:18.

inmates should be able to talk to inmates on Skype on an iPad, for

:16:19.:16:24.

example, so relatives can call into prison to talk to their loved ones?

:16:25.:16:28.

I think it is a very positive development. The whole report, we

:16:29.:16:36.

strongly support the report from Lord Farmer, and one of the

:16:37.:16:40.

recommendations is that the preferred is physical meeting,

:16:41.:16:44.

face-to-face, and having that relationship continue on that basis.

:16:45.:16:50.

But as we already know, lots of prisoners are far away, quite

:16:51.:16:54.

difficult to access, and exactly what we heard before, the treatment

:16:55.:16:57.

of children and family members is usually similar to the end being

:16:58.:17:01.

treated in prison, which is, of course, not right at all. That could

:17:02.:17:07.

change tomorrow, couldn't it? It should, and that is another

:17:08.:17:12.

recommendation, but back to the FaceTime, Skype, regular contact,

:17:13.:17:16.

how was your day at school for a child, you know, obviously the day

:17:17.:17:18.

in prison is not so interesting to talk about most likely, but the

:17:19.:17:23.

relationship with the family members, all with parents or

:17:24.:17:27.

anybody, to know what is going on, that there is a life outside of

:17:28.:17:32.

prison, and the stronger the relationship is, the more ties they

:17:33.:17:36.

have that are worth continuing, the more likely that it is that they

:17:37.:17:39.

don't want to go back to prison. What do you say to people watching

:17:40.:17:44.

who will say, well, I don't have an iPad, why should an inmate? This is

:17:45.:17:50.

not about issuing iPad is as a toy, it will be purely as an instrument

:17:51.:17:57.

to be able to communicate with, so like a phone. Today you can call,

:17:58.:18:03.

for example, it is very different as you can see in the report, different

:18:04.:18:06.

experiences, it is why hard to make phone calls, they are costly for

:18:07.:18:10.

offenders, it is hard for them to enough money to make phone calls.

:18:11.:18:15.

For those determined to keep relationships going, we're not

:18:16.:18:19.

making it easy to do so. So this type of technology will make it

:18:20.:18:23.

easy, as it is accessible to many of us, through smartphones or... Cody,

:18:24.:18:27.

you have been inside three times, you know what it is like to lose

:18:28.:18:31.

your liberty, you think this idea of video calls might lead critics to

:18:32.:18:38.

say this is softening the prison regime and it is meant to be a place

:18:39.:18:43.

of punishment? The simple fact is, Victoria, we have seen in the last

:18:44.:18:46.

week that assault on prisons are at a record high, up 20% on last year.

:18:47.:18:55.

Self harm, 40,414 incidents in the last 12 months and stuff. The prison

:18:56.:18:59.

system as a powder keg right now. I cannot stress enough how important

:19:00.:19:04.

family ties are. Children not seeing their dads because financial

:19:05.:19:07.

restraints are in place, people having to travel hundreds of miles

:19:08.:19:11.

to visit, the cost of train fares, the price of food on the visits,

:19:12.:19:15.

accommodation, things like that, it all plays a part. So it is pivotal.

:19:16.:19:22.

If you put this in system, this Skype, I believe it will reduce

:19:23.:19:26.

violent incidents in one way or another, and self harm, which can

:19:27.:19:29.

only be a good thing, and it will reduce incidents which will reflect

:19:30.:19:34.

well on the Ministry of Justice. And if reoffending is reduced as a

:19:35.:19:38.

result of introducing Skype or whatever, then that will save a lot

:19:39.:19:43.

more money to taxpayers who might be criticising the up the idea of an

:19:44.:19:49.

iPad in a jail. Very much so, and it will help people not commit further

:19:50.:19:53.

crime, thereby generating further victims, but it is important,

:19:54.:19:56.

because we have major issues in our prison system at the moment - we

:19:57.:20:00.

need to stop writing reports and start taking action to improve the

:20:01.:20:04.

circumstances, and therefore, when we have these people captured in our

:20:05.:20:10.

prison, have a relentless focus on rehabilitation, which means giving

:20:11.:20:13.

them a roof to sleep under, making sure that they have a job somehow,

:20:14.:20:18.

and these family ties are critically important, to make our society

:20:19.:20:22.

safer, to reduce the number of people in prison, and therefore have

:20:23.:20:25.

more money available to make that all happen, that is very strongly

:20:26.:20:33.

our view at Nacro. That big here, reoffending gusts ?15 billion a

:20:34.:20:37.

year, that is what reoffending gusts. The Justice Minister, David

:20:38.:20:43.

Lidington says we are committed to reforming prisons in places of

:20:44.:20:49.

safety and reform, and families can play a signature control in

:20:50.:20:51.

supporting an offender. Obviously, they would point out they are

:20:52.:20:57.

spending money on an extra 2500 prison officers. We will see what

:20:58.:21:00.

the Government do with this report, they set it up, that doesn't mean

:21:01.:21:03.

there will follow the recommendations. We hope so. Thank

:21:04.:21:09.

you very much, all of you. Thank you very much for coming on the

:21:10.:21:17.

programme, Cody, Josette. Still to come, with some schools in Wales

:21:18.:21:20.

offering free meals during the summer holidays, should more be done

:21:21.:21:24.

in other parts of the UK to tackle the growing problem of holiday

:21:25.:21:25.

hunger? The story of a 20-year-old model

:21:26.:21:29.

being abducted whilst out on a job in Milan this week

:21:30.:21:31.

has made global news. and told she would be sold

:21:32.:21:34.

as a sex slave. who specialises in

:21:35.:21:41.

the modelling industry and says the problem

:21:42.:21:49.

of sex trafficking isn't just in the glamour

:21:50.:21:51.

modelling world - "it's rife" within

:21:52.:21:54.

the fashion industry. Good morning. What is your evidence

:21:55.:22:03.

for saying that? Well, there is no... It is with the these sort of

:22:04.:22:16.

thing you see when you work in the industry. And I have known lots of

:22:17.:22:20.

models, my wife was a former fashion model. When you say sex

:22:21.:22:30.

trafficking... That is quite a wide ambit in terms... But what I have

:22:31.:22:40.

seen is a rather relaxed attitude by some agencies. To what? To girls who

:22:41.:22:51.

come from abroad, from all over the world, mostly Russia, most of the

:22:52.:22:59.

fashion models come from Russia. They come very young, sometimes as

:23:00.:23:06.

young as 14, sometimes older, 17, 16, but still 16, 17 is not that

:23:07.:23:16.

old. And whilst they don't actually get introduced to promoters, club

:23:17.:23:21.

promoters, the agencies will have parties at nightclubs, where there

:23:22.:23:26.

will be alcohol, the girls obviously won't be old enough to drink, and

:23:27.:23:32.

that environment creates opportunities for predators. I can

:23:33.:23:40.

see that, but are you saying that young teenagers, teenagers and young

:23:41.:23:44.

adults, beautiful women from all over the world, are being carpeted

:23:45.:23:52.

in this country. No. Right. I'm not saying that. But what I'm saying

:23:53.:23:56.

is... Well, they are, obviously, because there is evidence for that

:23:57.:24:01.

with police reports and, you know, what have you. But specific to the

:24:02.:24:06.

fashion industry. Specific to the fashion industry, there is, you

:24:07.:24:09.

know, what I'm saying is the environment is created where there

:24:10.:24:15.

is more possibility of that happening, and more could be done by

:24:16.:24:19.

the agencies to keep these girls safer. And of course anyone can set

:24:20.:24:26.

up as an agent, anyone can set up as if the dog about. YouGov yeah. --

:24:27.:24:37.

can set up as a photographer. Yeah. Would more regulation help? There is

:24:38.:24:40.

regulation at the moment, there is a code of employment agencies, and the

:24:41.:24:48.

employment business regulation is 2003, and what that seeks to do is

:24:49.:24:58.

it seeks to put some kind of duty on agencies, that is to save modelling

:24:59.:25:05.

agencies, to protect models. So for example they have got to check you

:25:06.:25:13.

ever the hirers are, that they do not have an immoral reputation or

:25:14.:25:18.

something else, insolvent, but still relevant in another respect. Is that

:25:19.:25:24.

code working? Obviously, not really, because the agencies themselves are

:25:25.:25:29.

rather like that in a way they treat models. I'm sure you heard about the

:25:30.:25:34.

incident in Paris last Fashion Week, where a number of models were locked

:25:35.:25:40.

in a room for hours whilst everybody went for lunch. So there could be a

:25:41.:25:47.

lot more done to protect these girls, to give them more confidence.

:25:48.:25:53.

You know, I have heard of situations where girls have gone to foreign

:25:54.:25:58.

countries and they have lost their money, you know, lost their wallets,

:25:59.:26:06.

and the agencies won't help them out, or they find it very, very

:26:07.:26:11.

difficult to do so. And some of the ways these agreements are framed,

:26:12.:26:14.

the way in practice the girls are more or less trapped, because they

:26:15.:26:21.

have got no money of their own, they are 15, in a foreign country, a lot

:26:22.:26:27.

of them come from rural areas, this is all new to them, because usually

:26:28.:26:32.

modelling takes place in very big cities, you know, well-known, like

:26:33.:26:37.

Paris, London, New York, and they, you know, they are given pocket

:26:38.:26:44.

money, which they deduct from whatever they earn. So these girls,

:26:45.:26:53.

they say that they are work seekers who can come in and out of the

:26:54.:26:57.

contract as they like, but in practice they are sort of trapped

:26:58.:27:02.

there, so in a way the agencies, they can do, they do whatever the

:27:03.:27:07.

agencies tell and to do. If they say, go to this nightclub, there is

:27:08.:27:12.

a party, they go there. If someone says, I know you're agencies or

:27:13.:27:16.

whatever, the next thing you know, I am not saying this happens all the

:27:17.:27:20.

time, but the next thing you know, a promoter who knows some very rich

:27:21.:27:27.

men, the girls become prostitutes. Thank you very much, thank you,

:27:28.:27:28.

Peter. Amazon saw a 50% drop

:27:29.:27:32.

in the amount of UK corporation tax it paid last year -

:27:33.:27:34.

despite a 54% increase in turnover. Amazon UK Services received a bill

:27:35.:27:37.

of ?7.4 million in 2016, compared to almost ?16 million

:27:38.:27:42.

the previous year. The firm says it meets

:27:43.:27:44.

its tax obligations. Let's talk to our business editor,

:27:45.:28:00.

Simon Jack, hello, hello, hello. Corporation tax is what you pay on

:28:01.:28:05.

profits, which may be the keys here. That is exactly right, there are a

:28:06.:28:08.

lot of raised eyebrows because their turn-up went up 50%, the global

:28:09.:28:14.

company made billions and billions, but talking about Amazon UK

:28:15.:28:20.

Services, the bit of the company where people process your orders and

:28:21.:28:23.

send them to your house, picking stuff out, putting it in boxes.

:28:24.:28:28.

Their turnover went up 50%, but the tax bill came down to 7 million. You

:28:29.:28:34.

are quite right that although their turnover went up, their profits went

:28:35.:28:38.

down, partly because of the way they pay their staff. They have 24,000

:28:39.:28:44.

staff in the UK, about 60,000 working in the centres. When you

:28:45.:28:47.

arrive as a permanent staff member, you get ?1000 worth of shares, there

:28:48.:28:52.

you go. Over time, if the share price goes up, the value of those

:28:53.:28:57.

shares goes up as well. You can't catch them in on day one, but when

:28:58.:29:01.

you do, if they have gone up a lot in value, the company as to account

:29:02.:29:05.

and say, this is the value of the stuff we gave to our staff members.

:29:06.:29:10.

For the last couple of years, the Amazon share price has rocketed, so

:29:11.:29:13.

some of those awards are worth much more, so when the company does its

:29:14.:29:18.

accounts, it paid this, which is now with that, so the expenses have gone

:29:19.:29:24.

up, so their profits go down. So good for Amazon, it doesn't cost

:29:25.:29:28.

them any cash, good for the employees, because they get a

:29:29.:29:31.

windfall, which they mostly do not have to pay tax on, because while

:29:32.:29:37.

allowed to receive ?3600 per year from your employer without paying

:29:38.:29:41.

tax, so good for the employee, good for the company, bad for HMRC,

:29:42.:29:44.

because they do not see any of this money. So the profits of Amazon UK

:29:45.:29:51.

Services were about 24 million, they paid just over 7 million in tax, and

:29:52.:29:59.

that is legit? And if the Government have a problem, they need to put up

:30:00.:30:04.

rates? Exactly right, and the more the share price goes up, the less

:30:05.:30:09.

tax HMRC gets, and it is an unusual way for a company, for jobs like

:30:10.:30:13.

this, for people to be paid. Very common in Silicon Valley, and it is

:30:14.:30:18.

an approach that has this unusual effect.

:30:19.:30:21.

It emerged that during the court process that led to 18 convictions

:30:22.:30:25.

of child abuse in Newcastle, police paid a convicted child rapist

:30:26.:30:28.

The former editor of Vogue magazine Alexandra Shulman posted this selfie

:30:29.:30:50.

on her Instagram page. Some say it is refreshingly honest and normal

:30:51.:30:54.

because that's what we look like in our bikinis, let's be honest. Others

:30:55.:30:58.

say it's hypocrisy because after years of heading that magazine

:30:59.:31:02.

packed with thin, tanned women, should never put an image like that

:31:03.:31:06.

on the cover of Vogue. As a woman, does that image inspire you?

:31:07.:31:09.

With the news, here's Matthew in the BBC Newsroom.

:31:10.:31:12.

North Korea says its plan to fire four missiles near the US territory

:31:13.:31:15.

of Guam will soon be ready, as a war of words with

:31:16.:31:18.

State media said rockets would pass over Japan and land in the sea

:31:19.:31:25.

about 17 miles from Guam, if the plan is approved

:31:26.:31:27.

It denounced Donald Trump's warnings of "fire and fury" and said the US

:31:28.:31:34.

Earlier, a little boy who lives on Guam begged for calm.

:31:35.:31:47.

Please stop, there are families that live here on Guam. My grandma just

:31:48.:31:55.

had knee surgery and she's in the hospital. Please stop.

:31:56.:31:59.

The number of people waiting for routine surgery in England

:32:00.:32:01.

in June was the highest in almost ten years.

:32:02.:32:04.

3.83 million patients were on lists for operations.

:32:05.:32:06.

Other key NHS targets were also missed -

:32:07.:32:08.

including urgent referrals for cancer care.

:32:09.:32:17.

A police chief has said paying a child rapist ?10,000 as part of an

:32:18.:32:23.

investigation into a grooming gang was the right thing. Northumbria

:32:24.:32:29.

Police's Steve Ashman said the information he provided led to the

:32:30.:32:33.

conviction of 17 men and a woman for abusing girls in Newcastle.

:32:34.:32:36.

Charities criticised the force for paying the criminal.

:32:37.:32:40.

Some prisoners should be able to use video calling technology such

:32:41.:32:43.

as Skype to stay in touch with their families -

:32:44.:32:45.

to help cut reoffending, the government's been told.

:32:46.:32:47.

A review suggests so-called "virtual visits" should be made available

:32:48.:32:50.

for inmates whose relatives cannot attend jail.

:32:51.:32:51.

A prisoner who receives visits from a relative, is around 40 % less

:32:52.:32:55.

The driver of a double-decker bus has been taken to hospital after it

:32:56.:33:06.

crashed into a shop on a busy London High Street. Police were called this

:33:07.:33:11.

morning after a bus hit a shop near Clapham Junction in south-west

:33:12.:33:15.

London. It was a Route 77 double-decker bus. Paramedics

:33:16.:33:20.

treated six passengers at the scene, the Fire Brigade freed two people

:33:21.:33:24.

trapped on the upper deck. Looks pretty nasty.

:33:25.:33:27.

That's a summary of the latest news, join me for BBC

:33:28.:33:30.

Here's some sport now with Hugh Ferris.

:33:31.:33:36.

Jess is that the London Stadium again. Good morning.

:33:37.:33:41.

Isaac Makwala could complete one of the more extraordinary stories

:33:42.:33:44.

at the World Athletics Championships with a medal later.

:33:45.:33:46.

After being banned from competing in London because of

:33:47.:33:48.

The Botswana sprinter was then given a reprieve via this time trial

:33:49.:33:52.

which he used to get through to the semis of the 200

:33:53.:33:55.

metres, and then later on he made the final,

:33:56.:33:57.

Mo Farah's progress to the 5000 metres final was secured,

:33:58.:34:03.

despite him feeling "a little beaten up".

:34:04.:34:06.

He hurt his knee and leg in winning 10k gold but insists he'll be ok

:34:07.:34:10.

for his last major track race on Saturday.

:34:11.:34:16.

Later Katarina Johnson-Thompson will attempt to qualify

:34:17.:34:17.

She'll have to improve on her efforts in the heptathlon

:34:18.:34:21.

Rory McIlory says he has nothing to prove ahead of the US PGA

:34:22.:34:28.

Championship which starts this evening in North Carolina.

:34:29.:34:31.

He's among a top-class field, trying to stop the American Jordan Spieth

:34:32.:34:35.

becoming the youngest player to complete a career grand slam.

:34:36.:34:47.

Newcastle was yesterday added to the list of towns and cities

:34:48.:34:49.

where girls have suffered from the predations

:34:50.:34:52.

17 men of Asian heritage and one white woman were convicted yesterday

:34:53.:34:57.

for their part in a "cynical organisation" which groomed

:34:58.:35:00.

vulnerable young girls and women into sex.

:35:01.:35:03.

That list of towns now includes Rochdale, Derby,

:35:04.:35:06.

Liverpool, Peterborough, all have seen multiple convictions

:35:07.:35:10.

of predominantly Pakistani men for child sexual exploitation.

:35:11.:35:15.

So do we need to be looking further into the reasons

:35:16.:35:18.

Sarah Champion, the Shadow Secretary for Women and Equalities,

:35:19.:35:22.

is calling for research into this issue.

:35:23.:35:26.

She joins us now from Sheffield to explain.

:35:27.:35:33.

What is it that we need to understand more? I just can't

:35:34.:35:39.

believe that we are here doing the same story in a different town. This

:35:40.:35:44.

is going to keep going on and on and on until we grasp the nettle. What

:35:45.:35:50.

we need to look at is why this specific crime is a caring. This

:35:51.:35:55.

specific crime is organised gangs of dominantly Pakistani British men

:35:56.:36:00.

going out and looking for vulnerable children, predominantly girls,

:36:01.:36:03.

grooming, exploiting, trafficking, abusing them across the country.

:36:04.:36:07.

What frustrates me is that we are not going to the root of the

:36:08.:36:12.

problem. We aren't protecting our children properly so they understand

:36:13.:36:17.

about this crime. We also now have probably hundreds of these

:36:18.:36:20.

perpetrators in jail, so let's start doing some research. The government

:36:21.:36:24.

needs to paid to do research and see what are the commonalities. It's not

:36:25.:36:30.

rocket science. This is a specific group of men doing this crime so

:36:31.:36:34.

let's understand why. What are the drivers? What can we do to prevent

:36:35.:36:38.

it in the future? I don't want to be sitting here in another six months

:36:39.:36:42.

with another town. It's getting too much, Victoria. I hear your words

:36:43.:36:47.

for money to be put into research but what do you believe could be at

:36:48.:36:51.

the root of the problem? Obviously it is a complex issue but what kind

:36:52.:36:55.

of things are you thinking could be at the root? This is me guessing

:36:56.:37:01.

because I don't know, I'm obviously not Pakistani but I know

:37:02.:37:05.

particularly the Pakistani women I talked to. There does seem to be

:37:06.:37:11.

that women and girls are not as respected as much as boys are

:37:12.:37:16.

respected. There seems to be, I don't know if there is a manual on

:37:17.:37:19.

the inter-net but there seems to be a tight pattern of how the grooming

:37:20.:37:24.

process happens. This is obviously being shared amongst members within

:37:25.:37:31.

the Pakistani community. The girls that I've worked with, not only in

:37:32.:37:36.

Rob but other towns are being trafficked to the different towns

:37:37.:37:42.

where we are seeing this pattern happening. There have -- we have to

:37:43.:37:49.

get to the root of it and address it. I'm sorry it's quite unpalatable

:37:50.:37:54.

for some people. The reason I'm a bit fragile is I was up all night

:37:55.:37:58.

worrying. I know that Islamophobia is getting more and more in this

:37:59.:38:02.

country. I know there will be a backlash against the Pakistani

:38:03.:38:05.

community with me saying this. I also know that we have to do

:38:06.:38:10.

something, because this is a minority of people. Unless we stop

:38:11.:38:15.

them and deal with them as abusers, deal with them as paedophiles, the

:38:16.:38:20.

whole community is getting smeared by this. We have to be grown up and

:38:21.:38:27.

deal with it. You say it may be unpalatable to some but unpalatable

:38:28.:38:32.

to everybody, surely we can agree on that, is young girls being targeted,

:38:33.:38:40.

groomed and raped aged 12, for goodness' sake. You would think so,

:38:41.:38:43.

but unfortunately when you look at the two enquiries into the failings

:38:44.:38:48.

in the city of Robbie Renwick, what we see is not the front line staff

:38:49.:38:52.

but middle management staff saying to front-line workers take out the

:38:53.:38:57.

word Asian when identifying people -- the city of Rotherham. Front line

:38:58.:39:03.

staff have been told they are racist for saying this. They aren't being

:39:04.:39:08.

racist. This is an identifiable characteristics. They all belonged

:39:09.:39:12.

to one motorbike gang we would be dealing with that accordingly. We

:39:13.:39:20.

have to deal with this. Thank you. Sarah Champion, shadows is a gradual

:39:21.:39:23.

state for women and equality is. Coming up. Alexandra Shulman has

:39:24.:39:30.

been praised for that selfie, is she an inspiration or a hypocrite?

:39:31.:39:35.

Should never put that on the front of her former magazine, would she?

:39:36.:39:41.

-- she would never put that on the front of her former magazine.

:39:42.:39:45.

School children in some of the most deprived parts of Wales are getting

:39:46.:39:48.

free school meals these summer holidays paid for by

:39:49.:39:50.

?500,000 has been allocated which still means only a small

:39:51.:39:53.

A report earlier this year said that up to three million children

:39:54.:39:57.

across the UK risked going hungry in the holidays.

:39:58.:39:59.

We played you Catrin Nye's full report earlier -

:40:00.:40:02.

here's a short extract before we have conversation about this.

:40:03.:40:04.

Can you tell me what your favourite foods are?

:40:05.:40:06.

What did you have for lunch yesterday?

:40:07.:40:17.

And how many bowls did you have? Three bowls?!

:40:18.:40:23.

It's one of 39 schools in the most deprived parts of Wales

:40:24.:40:36.

providing breakfast, lunch and activities

:40:37.:40:38.

It's funded by the Welsh Government's education department,

:40:39.:40:40.

a budget controlled in Cardiff rather than Westminster.

:40:41.:40:42.

Do you guys have to go to school all year round?

:40:43.:40:45.

My mum think it's good, because she works, has a full-time

:40:46.:40:53.

job, and normally I sit home with my nan, but because I'm

:40:54.:40:55.

If the parents don't have enough money, they can put us into school

:40:56.:41:09.

I think every parent that brings a child in here is grateful for it.

:41:10.:41:18.

Lots of different reasons - childcare, food, entertainment.

:41:19.:41:24.

At this time so many people are struggling, like me.

:41:25.:41:26.

Having to make sure your kids get fed, not just feeding them

:41:27.:41:31.

with anything but giving them the right food.

:41:32.:41:34.

They're interacting with other children, playing,

:41:35.:41:36.

They don't look at it as they're in school,

:41:37.:41:44.

You guys have eaten more of your vegetables than me.

:41:45.:41:49.

A report by a cross-party group of MPs warned that three million

:41:50.:41:54.

children across the UK risk going hungry in school holidays.

:41:55.:42:00.

A third of the children who go to this school have free school

:42:01.:42:03.

meals, but you don't need to be eligible to get the free

:42:04.:42:06.

If you think that it's been decided that children need free school meals

:42:07.:42:10.

because of the amount of income the family has got, it's not

:42:11.:42:15.

surprising during the long summer holidays, when suddenly those things

:42:16.:42:21.

are not there, families are struggling.

:42:22.:42:24.

This is still only in a tiny proportion of the schools in Wales

:42:25.:42:27.

and at the moment the education departments in England and Scotland

:42:28.:42:29.

are not allocating specific funding to lunch clubs.

:42:30.:42:33.

Charities and local authorities are able to set them up,

:42:34.:42:36.

but there are calls for more central government money.

:42:37.:42:43.

Let's talk now to Daphine Aikens, she holds breakfast and lunch clubs

:42:44.:42:46.

Lindsay Graham is talking to us from Cardiff, where she's visiting

:42:47.:42:53.

schools there and comparing how free school meals are being effective.

:42:54.:43:05.

And Ruth Smeeth, on the Parliamentary committee on hunger.

:43:06.:43:13.

Welcome. How much of a demand I use seeing in London? We see a big

:43:14.:43:20.

increase every year in the summer holidays, and the Christmas

:43:21.:43:23.

holidays. We see many more children in the food bank and attending our

:43:24.:43:29.

holiday clubs. It's a club which provides loads of activities and a

:43:30.:43:33.

meal at lunchtime. Yes. Yesterday we had about 40 children in our W 12

:43:34.:43:42.

branch and another 30 in our full branch. About 70 people a day.

:43:43.:43:50.

That's going up? The amount of people needing food holiday clubs is

:43:51.:43:55.

increasing. What is your expertise in this area? I've done a Winston

:43:56.:44:05.

Churchill Fellowship in America to look at their policy on summer

:44:06.:44:08.

meals. I've been looking at Best practice and innovation in holiday

:44:09.:44:14.

provision in this country. I wrote a report about the days of the year

:44:15.:44:18.

where children don't access free school meals. It's not just the free

:44:19.:44:22.

school meals, it's all the other services that children need to

:44:23.:44:27.

access as well through education, health and social services. How is

:44:28.:44:32.

it working in parts of Wales? I think this is gold standard stuff.

:44:33.:44:37.

I'm going to see one of the schools and see it working. The schools are

:44:38.:44:41.

public venues and they are closed for 13 weeks of the year. They are a

:44:42.:44:47.

good place to do a good service like this and all credit to the Welsh

:44:48.:44:50.

government for what they've done here. Ruth Smeeth, thank you for

:44:51.:44:55.

talking to us. Some people are watching you who will be thinking

:44:56.:45:00.

there is no way in 2017 that parents cannot afford to feed their kids, if

:45:01.:45:05.

potentially they budget properly. What do you say to that? I think

:45:06.:45:11.

we've got to be really aware of what we are talking about. If your child

:45:12.:45:16.

qualifies for free school meals during the summer holidays you have

:45:17.:45:20.

to pay for a minimum of five extra meals per day but probably more

:45:21.:45:25.

likely ten if they qualify for free breakfast as well. That's ten extra

:45:26.:45:29.

meals per child per week. When you add onto that the fact all research

:45:30.:45:33.

is saying one third of parents are going without food at some point

:45:34.:45:36.

during the school holidays in order to feed their children, this isn't

:45:37.:45:40.

just a matter of budgeting, this is about how we feed our children. We

:45:41.:45:44.

are one of the richest countries in the world what's happening in the

:45:45.:45:45.

country is heartbreaking. What kernel stories do you hear from

:45:46.:45:53.

parents when they dropped their children off in the summer holidays?

:45:54.:45:58.

A lot of stories about people on low incomes, so families where parents

:45:59.:46:02.

are working, but when it comes to the school holidays, they are not

:46:03.:46:07.

getting free school meals, whether breakfast and lunch or just to

:46:08.:46:10.

lunch, and it is a huge increase on family budgets. I had a lovely mum

:46:11.:46:16.

withered two little boys, and she is a victim of domestic violence who

:46:17.:46:19.

had to leave home in the middle of the night, arrived at a hostel in

:46:20.:46:25.

London, she doesn't have any... She can't work, she has just arrived,

:46:26.:46:28.

trying to get the kids settled into new accommodation, she doesn't have

:46:29.:46:34.

any benefits. And the holiday club is a godsend for her. But you are

:46:35.:46:41.

saying there are children there with parents, two parents who both work,

:46:42.:46:45.

and they still need free school meals during the holidays.

:46:46.:46:49.

Absolutely, it is a chronic issue, because they are not earning enough,

:46:50.:46:54.

and in the holidays, the extra cost of that food can be ?30 per week per

:46:55.:46:59.

child according to the all-party report on anger. And that is a lot

:47:00.:47:03.

of money for anybody, let alone somebody on a low income. So who

:47:04.:47:09.

pays for the meals when they come to your club? We appeal for funding, so

:47:10.:47:17.

the Innocent Project Ara funded some Trussell Trust foodbanks, and we

:47:18.:47:27.

have also had donations. Lindsey, what you see in Wales, which you

:47:28.:47:33.

have described as the gold standard, you think it should be funded by

:47:34.:47:39.

British taxpayers? I think from the report, there were six specific

:47:40.:47:44.

recommendations, and I was just sitting writing the number of

:47:45.:47:47.

programmes, big scale programmes that I have seen across the UK, and

:47:48.:47:53.

there are about 14. But there are hundreds of these projects across

:47:54.:47:56.

the country, and there is a mixture of funding, and this report

:47:57.:48:02.

suggested that it isn't the Government's duty alone. The

:48:03.:48:05.

commercial world and the third sector and the statutory sector are

:48:06.:48:10.

picking it up. In Wales here, it is joint funding through the Welsh

:48:11.:48:14.

Government. We all have a duty to ensure that our children are well

:48:15.:48:19.

cared for, we can't ask them to be the global citizens, politicians,

:48:20.:48:22.

doctors and nurses of the future unless we start looking after them.

:48:23.:48:26.

It is a child poverty issue as well. We have got families who are

:48:27.:48:30.

homeless, zero-hours contracts, upstream measures are needed to

:48:31.:48:34.

tackle child poverty, as well as the downstream measures. We cannot have

:48:35.:48:38.

hungry children in this country, it is a national disgrace. A couple of

:48:39.:48:43.

messages from Sue, whilst I have sympathy for anyone who struggles to

:48:44.:48:47.

be their children, 30 years ago we had no help from government. Lara

:48:48.:48:52.

says, it is a great idea, but surely it should not need to be done in one

:48:53.:48:55.

of the richest countries in the world in 2017. I agree that it

:48:56.:49:00.

definitely shouldn't need to be done, and what I am really asking

:49:01.:49:05.

for from government is support for those community groups, which does

:49:06.:49:08.

include funding, who are providing this. In my own constituency this

:49:09.:49:12.

summer, we have had a series of pilots happening, demand has

:49:13.:49:16.

exceeded expectations. We have had one of the play centres, we were

:49:17.:49:22.

expecting 25 kids a day, we are averaging 90. We have got other

:49:23.:49:26.

opportunities happening across my constituency, where dozens of

:49:27.:49:29.

children, and this is the first year we have been able to put together an

:49:30.:49:34.

initiative to fund it, it is being funded locally, as well as through

:49:35.:49:38.

the national lottery and others. I want national funding plus a level

:49:39.:49:42.

of safeguards so that people can do it properly, there is support for

:49:43.:49:45.

community groups trying to do this. But I couldn't agree more, it is a

:49:46.:49:49.

disgrace and simply shouldn't be happening in the 21st century. Act

:49:50.:49:58.

for coming on the programme. -- thanks. The number of people waiting

:49:59.:50:02.

for routine NHS surgery in England in June was the highest in ten

:50:03.:50:07.

years, just over 90% of patients on waiting lists were seen within 18

:50:08.:50:13.

weeks, below the target of 92%. Our health editor, Hugh Pym, is here.

:50:14.:50:19.

The highest for quite a long time, why? Well, Victoria, part of this is

:50:20.:50:24.

because the NHS is doing more operations every year, so if it is

:50:25.:50:27.

doing more procedures, you will get more people waiting. But that is not

:50:28.:50:32.

the whole explanation. Many doctors, surgeons and others are saying it

:50:33.:50:36.

reflects the mounting pressure on the NHS, more people having to wait

:50:37.:50:41.

for routine surgery, and that figure of 3.83 million people waiting in

:50:42.:50:45.

England was the highest since December 2000 and seven. Within

:50:46.:50:50.

that, the total waiting more than 18 weeks... Which is supposed to be the

:50:51.:50:56.

target. It should be 92% who start their treatment within 18 weeks. But

:50:57.:51:02.

373,000 were waiting longer than that, up 21% year-on-year from that

:51:03.:51:11.

target which was missed. People are saying something has to give, and

:51:12.:51:14.

this is what is giving, the NHS is under pressure on all sides, it is

:51:15.:51:19.

having to put more money into A, and it has missed that target again,

:51:20.:51:24.

it is and pressure to spend in all areas, and a Simon Stevens, the head

:51:25.:51:28.

of NHS England, gave the nod to hospitals back in March - if

:51:29.:51:32.

something has to give, it probably has to be waiting lists. That might

:51:33.:51:36.

sound fine in theory, if you have to deal with mil urgent cases, but

:51:37.:51:40.

people waiting a long time for hip and knee surgery, they will be very

:51:41.:51:45.

frustrated. So is that what routine surgeries, hip and knee is, what

:51:46.:51:51.

kind of stuff are we talking about? If you are waiting for a new hip, it

:51:52.:51:57.

must be blooming painful. Exactly, it could even be routine surgery of

:51:58.:52:02.

any description that is not urgent, or a procedure. It is not an

:52:03.:52:07.

emergency. So you have to wait, and you could be in a lot of pain, and

:52:08.:52:12.

for hip and knee surgery, there are parts of the NHS which are

:52:13.:52:16.

restricting the criteria, so you have to be in more pain before you

:52:17.:52:20.

qualify for it, and then if you aren't third, you have to wait more

:52:21.:52:24.

than 18 weeks in some cases. -- and then if you are referred. NHS

:52:25.:52:30.

England chiefs would say, we have been told by the Government that it

:52:31.:52:35.

is A which is very important, because people are waiting more than

:52:36.:52:38.

four hours, and that something has to, if you like, take up the slack.

:52:39.:52:44.

But NHS England say they want to get back on target. Waiting lists was a

:52:45.:52:49.

huge issue back in the late 1980s when New Labour came in, they

:52:50.:52:53.

pledged to bring down waiting times, and it is becoming an issue again.

:52:54.:52:58.

And where are we with money going into the NHS in England and Wales?

:52:59.:53:04.

Some will say, if you put more money in, it will help with bringing

:53:05.:53:09.

waiting times down again. Well, the money in England is going up a lot

:53:10.:53:13.

less rapidly than it did last year, and for next year as well. So still

:53:14.:53:18.

getting more? And not keeping up with demand. If it carries on rising

:53:19.:53:23.

at 4% per year, more patients needing more treatments for

:53:24.:53:25.

understandable reasons, but the budgets are going up at only about

:53:26.:53:31.

1%. Scotland and Ireland have devolved, they're spending has not

:53:32.:53:34.

gone up as rapidly as in England, so they are facing the same problems

:53:35.:53:38.

with waiting list as well. Their waiting lists are getting longer, so

:53:39.:53:43.

it is a problem throughout the NHS in the UK, this is just the latest

:53:44.:53:45.

illustration of it. Thank you, Hugh. Not the bikini shot you'd expect

:53:46.:53:51.

from a woman who's spent decades overseeing the promotion of perfect,

:53:52.:53:54.

often airbrushed, This is Alexandra Shulman,

:53:55.:53:56.

recently retired editor of Vogue, a woman of a certain age -

:53:57.:54:02.

that's 59 - and now a selfie taker gone viral, mosquito bites

:54:03.:54:08.

and wobbly bits and all. A lot of women replying to her feet

:54:09.:54:21.

have said it is refreshing you have posted this picture, a few women

:54:22.:54:25.

have said this is hypocritical, because you oversaw a fashion bible

:54:26.:54:29.

where you have a picture like that on that front.

:54:30.:54:32.

Let's speak now to the stylist and image consultant Ceril Campbell.

:54:33.:54:36.

She's styled many celebrities including the likes

:54:37.:54:39.

of Zara Phillips, Darcey Bussell and Serena Williams.

:54:40.:54:44.

Good morning. What do you think of the selfie from Alexandra Shulman?

:54:45.:54:52.

Well, funnelling of, I posted one of myself paddle boarding on Instagram,

:54:53.:54:57.

because I am older than Alex. -- funnily enough. I think we can all

:54:58.:55:01.

do what we want to do, we shouldn't have to airbrush, we should be

:55:02.:55:05.

confident in our bodies, and my clients, not celebrities, but real

:55:06.:55:09.

women, everything I do is to help women look in the mirror and

:55:10.:55:13.

appreciate all their good bits and look at the whole of themselves, not

:55:14.:55:18.

just focus on the bad bits. Because we all have something that is really

:55:19.:55:21.

good about ourselves, and real bodies, we are not on Love Island,

:55:22.:55:28.

we are not perfect, we don't need to be airbrushed, and I also go into

:55:29.:55:32.

schools and teach teenagers Annie Power of social media and how it

:55:33.:55:39.

affects negative body images. -- about the power of social media.

:55:40.:55:45.

No-one I have ever dressed is perfect, however famous they are. So

:55:46.:55:51.

refreshing that Alexandra Shulman has done this, but what about the

:55:52.:55:54.

charge of hypocrisy? She has written about the pressure on women, she has

:55:55.:55:58.

acknowledged it, but yet she has presided over Vogue for 25 years,

:55:59.:56:04.

where already beautiful and thin women are airbrushed to within an

:56:05.:56:08.

inch of their life in order to appear on the cover. This is true,

:56:09.:56:14.

but I suppose that anyone in a high-profile position, you have to

:56:15.:56:16.

be careful what you put out on social media, because everything on

:56:17.:56:21.

social media is at there, is at there, it is difficult to get rid

:56:22.:56:29.

of. If you are the head of Vogue, you wouldn't post a bikini picture

:56:30.:56:33.

of yourself because it is not pertinent, it doesn't make you look

:56:34.:56:35.

authoritative anymore, does it, really? And to be honest, I think

:56:36.:56:43.

you have to... If you're going to tell other people what to do,

:56:44.:56:47.

especially if you are in a position as Vogue, you have to give yourself

:56:48.:56:54.

some sort of... It is the equivalent of not... You need to dress for the

:56:55.:56:59.

job, you are the face of the brand, so putting yourself up in a bikini

:57:00.:57:02.

is not the face of the brand. I and not suggesting it would have been

:57:03.:57:07.

wise for her to do that when she was the editor, but such a position of

:57:08.:57:11.

influence, she could have banned airbrushing in her own magazine if

:57:12.:57:16.

she had wanted to. She was never the skinny editor, out of all the

:57:17.:57:19.

editors and people sitting on the front row... I know, but she was the

:57:20.:57:24.

editor of the magazine, she could have done what you wanted, but

:57:25.:57:29.

whatever she wanted on the cover, but a size 16 woman on the cover of

:57:30.:57:34.

British Vogue, what a statement that would have made! It would have, but

:57:35.:57:39.

you are very beholden... When you are in the magazine world, which I

:57:40.:57:42.

am not, you are very beholden to your advertisers, which is very sad,

:57:43.:57:46.

because they keep the magazine alive, and obviously with some money

:57:47.:57:50.

to be able to publish it. So often you can only do what the advertisers

:57:51.:57:55.

allow you to do. I remember years ago I used to be involved in a

:57:56.:58:02.

magazine which was for older women, and none of the advertisers would

:58:03.:58:05.

advertise in it because they felt nobody over the age of 35 was going

:58:06.:58:10.

to be wanting to buy that magazine or buy a magazine. Which is really

:58:11.:58:18.

sad. Thank you, Ceril Campbell. I do apologise for pronouncing your name

:58:19.:58:23.

that way! I appreciate your time. And thanks for your time today, BBC

:58:24.:58:27.

Newsroom Live is coming up next, have a good day.

:58:28.:58:33.

..this season, the whole game in full

:58:34.:58:34.

It's been a knockout day in the Premier League.

:58:35.:58:38.

The second half, Jermaine, very much...

:58:39.:58:44.

A look at children in the most deprived parts of Wales who go back to school in the holidays for free meals.

Victoria talks to a family from Guam about being caught in a war of words between President Trump and North Korea.

A former Vogue editor is being praised on social media for posting a bikini selfie without airbrushing or filters.