11/08/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


11/08/2017

Joanna Gosling presents. The programme hears from a 12-year-old boy who lost all his possessions in the Grenfell Tower fire, plus a discussion on the egg contamination scare.


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Transcript


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Hello it's Friday 11th August, it's nine o'clock.

:00:09.:00:10.

I'm Joanna Gosling, welcome to the programme.

:00:11.:00:12.

War would be catastrophic - the words of American Defence

:00:13.:00:16.

Secretary James Mattis as he insists the US is trying to solve the North

:00:17.:00:21.

Korea crisis through diplomacy, but President Trump

:00:22.:00:22.

He does something in Guam, it will be an event the likes of which

:00:23.:00:38.

nobody 's seen before. The tragedy of war is well enough known, it does

:00:39.:00:42.

not need a number characterisation beyond the fact it would be

:00:43.:00:43.

catastrophic. We'll be live from Seoul

:00:44.:00:46.

with the latest. Also millions of pounds raised for

:00:47.:00:53.

the victims of the Grenfell Tower tragedy are not getting to people

:00:54.:01:01.

quick enough. People are still trying to rebuild their lives and we

:01:02.:01:04.

look at the effect on the children in particular caught up in the

:01:05.:01:08.

horror of what happened in June, one youngster told us he lost everything

:01:09.:01:09.

dear to him. My Wii Fit Plus, my Wii

:01:10.:01:11.

console, everything. What do you miss

:01:12.:01:13.

about your old home? You can hear from Tyshondrey

:01:14.:01:15.

and his grandmother just after 9am. And as four supermarkets continue to

:01:16.:01:31.

remove salads and some juice containing eggs the body which

:01:32.:01:35.

represents the British egg industry says there is anger that potentially

:01:36.:01:40.

contaminated eggs have been imported from Dutch farms. We will explain

:01:41.:01:44.

what the risk is and why this has happened.

:01:45.:01:50.

Welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning.

:01:51.:01:54.

This weekend sees the legend that is Usain Bolt take part

:01:55.:01:59.

in his final competitive race before retiring - he has inspired thousands

:02:00.:02:02.

of people and we are talking to one teenager who took up running

:02:03.:02:05.

It could be someone from sport or from something else entirely, let us

:02:06.:02:18.

know. Do get in touch on all the stories

:02:19.:02:20.

we're talking about this morning - Our top story today -

:02:21.:02:23.

US Defence Secretary James Mattis says war with North Korea would be

:02:24.:02:29.

catastrophic, despite increasingly heated words

:02:30.:02:31.

from President Donald Trump. Mr Trump warned that the North

:02:32.:02:33.

Korean regime should be "very, very nervous" if they acted

:02:34.:02:36.

against the US territory of Guam - but Mr Mattis said the US

:02:37.:02:39.

was still focussed on talking. The American effort

:02:40.:02:44.

is diplomatically lead, it has diplomatic traction,

:02:45.:02:47.

it is claiming diplomatic results. I want to stay right there,

:02:48.:02:57.

right now, the tragedy of war is well enough known,

:02:58.:03:00.

it doesn't need another characterisation beyond the fact

:03:01.:03:02.

that it would be catastrophic. He does something in Guam,

:03:03.:03:04.

it will be an event the likes of which nobody's seen before,

:03:05.:03:12.

what will happen in North Korea. Our correspondent Robin Brant

:03:13.:03:17.

is in Seoul in South Korea. What is this sense there of where

:03:18.:03:31.

this is going? Firstly, what a contrast in tone from those men. I

:03:32.:03:36.

think people here have lived with the prospect, the potential of the

:03:37.:03:40.

conflict with neighbours to the north, the border is 35 miles from

:03:41.:03:44.

where I am sitting, for decades. You hear this a lot but life does go on,

:03:45.:03:49.

there has been no change in status here. The language coming from

:03:50.:03:55.

Donald Trump, some thought he could not go any further than the fire and

:03:56.:04:00.

fury but he seemed to do that last night which is unsettling in

:04:01.:04:03.

particular for people living here so close to North Korea but I think

:04:04.:04:07.

they will be assured by other comments made by the President who

:04:08.:04:11.

said he did not think North Korea could go around threatening the

:04:12.:04:16.

United States and its allies Japan and South Korea, which reminds

:04:17.:04:20.

people of the close military alliance the United States has with

:04:21.:04:25.

South Korea, it is crucial for protecting and defending this

:04:26.:04:29.

country. If you listen to the words of James Mattis who talked about the

:04:30.:04:34.

diplomatic effort to try to de-escalates what's going on, this

:04:35.:04:38.

country elected a new president who is more consolatory in his tone and

:04:39.:04:42.

who envisages it some point trying to bring the North back around the

:04:43.:04:48.

negotiating table. There are some suggestions that perhaps it is time

:04:49.:04:53.

for South Korea to arm itself with its own nuclear weapons, is that

:04:54.:05:02.

being seriously with that? I think for now, in the immediate timescale,

:05:03.:05:07.

South Korea's security depends on its close alliance with the United

:05:08.:05:12.

States and the United States effort to maintain a regional alliance with

:05:13.:05:18.

Japan, another crucial member, Australia not director under threat,

:05:19.:05:22.

Malcolm Turnbull talking about Australia living up to its treaty

:05:23.:05:28.

commitments if the United States was attacked. That regional compact is

:05:29.:05:34.

crucial for South Korea. South Korea in the past has had the beginnings

:05:35.:05:41.

of a nuclear weapons programme, as has Japan, but pressure from the US

:05:42.:05:46.

saw those programmes go away. The new president envisages perhaps

:05:47.:05:52.

further down the road having negotiations once again with the

:05:53.:05:56.

North. That is where he wants to go. Thank you very much. Let's get the

:05:57.:06:00.

latest on the rest of today's news. The UK may continue to face

:06:01.:06:06.

the threat of Islamist terrorism That's the warning from the former

:06:07.:06:08.

head of MI5, Lord Evans. In an interview with the BBC's

:06:09.:06:16.

Today Programme, Lord Evans went onto to describe the issue

:06:17.:06:18.

as a generational problem and that the UK needed

:06:19.:06:21.

to persevere with efforts My guess is that we will still be

:06:22.:06:23.

dealing with the long tail I think this is genuinely

:06:24.:06:32.

a generational problem. I think that we are going to be

:06:33.:06:35.

facing 20 or 30 years of terrorist threats,

:06:36.:06:40.

and therefore we need absolutely Police investigating the European

:06:41.:06:42.

egg contamination scandal have arrested two company directors

:06:43.:06:49.

following raids in the Netherlands. Here the Food Standards Agency has

:06:50.:06:52.

revealed that 700,000 contaminated eggs have been imported

:06:53.:06:56.

from Dutch farms, but it insists it is highly unlikely they pose any

:06:57.:07:01.

risk to human health. Sandwiches and salads are among

:07:02.:07:04.

the foods that have now been removed from UK supermarket shelves,

:07:05.:07:08.

as Natasha Emerson reports. Millions of eggs destroyed,

:07:09.:07:13.

supermarkets scrambling Two men have been held by Dutch

:07:14.:07:17.

police over batches of poisonous Fipronil, a pesticide

:07:18.:07:25.

commonly used to kill lice and fleas on pets,

:07:26.:07:29.

has made its way Earlier this week,

:07:30.:07:31.

the Food Standards Agency said 21,000 contaminated eggs had been

:07:32.:07:35.

imported to the UK. Now, it thinks it could be

:07:36.:07:38.

as many as 700,000. But that's still only a fraction

:07:39.:07:42.

of the 34 million we eat each day. And the Agency said you would have

:07:43.:07:47.

to eat 10,000 contaminated Our assessment is that it is

:07:48.:08:01.

unlikely there is any public health risk but we think people deserve but

:08:02.:08:07.

Bury food they can trust. So far, some salads and sandwiches

:08:08.:08:11.

sold by these four supermarkets have been withdrawn from sale,

:08:12.:08:14.

but whole eggs are safe. Despite those reassurances,

:08:15.:08:16.

the scandal continues to spread through Europe,

:08:17.:08:18.

with 11 countries now Millions of eggs will be

:08:19.:08:20.

destroyed, as will hundreds Four years ago, horsemeat was found

:08:21.:08:23.

in burgers and ready-meals. Once again, questions

:08:24.:08:26.

are being raised about what goes into our processed foods

:08:27.:08:29.

and where it comes from. Officials hope the contaminated eggs

:08:30.:08:32.

will be out of the food chain soon, but the investigation into Europe's

:08:33.:08:35.

latest food scandal is likely One of the former aides

:08:36.:08:38.

to Brexit Secretary David Davis has said that leaving the EU will be

:08:39.:08:49.

a calamity for our country. Speaking to the Today Programme

:08:50.:08:52.

this morning, he said that the Conservatives had been

:08:53.:08:55.

badly damaged by the process - and that promises made to voters

:08:56.:08:59.

during the referendum were false. People have voted for Brexit and,

:09:00.:09:04.

yes, most people do now think, "Well, let's just get on with it,

:09:05.:09:07.

we've made the decision," but Where is the ?350 million a week

:09:08.:09:10.

for the health service? It's going to be a calamity

:09:11.:09:14.

for our country. Donations made to the victims

:09:15.:09:16.

of the Grenfell Tower fire are not reaching survivors quickly enough,

:09:17.:09:19.

according to campaigners Figures from the Charity Commission

:09:20.:09:21.

show that less than 15% of the ?18.9 million raised has

:09:22.:09:29.

been given to people affected almost two months

:09:30.:09:32.

after the tragedy - but it says that early difficulties

:09:33.:09:36.

in identifying and contacting those Passengers flying from Gatwick

:09:37.:09:38.

during the last two summers experienced the longest average

:09:39.:09:46.

delays, according to flight data Among the ten biggest airlines,

:09:47.:09:49.

easyJet travellers suffered the worst hold ups, with an average

:09:50.:09:56.

delay of 24 minutes. Both the airport and the airline say

:09:57.:09:59.

many of the problems CCTV cameras will be compulsory

:10:00.:10:02.

in all abattoirs in England, under new plans announced

:10:03.:10:07.

by the Environment Vets working for the Food Standards

:10:08.:10:09.

Agency will be given unrestricted access to footage

:10:10.:10:15.

from all areas containing livestock. Abattoirs with failing

:10:16.:10:18.

standards of care could face a criminal investigation

:10:19.:10:21.

or lose staff licences. We like to think that the food

:10:22.:10:23.

we eat is produced in Now Britain is on its way out

:10:24.:10:34.

of the European Union, the Government is reviewing

:10:35.:10:38.

standards. One idea, make it compulsory for

:10:39.:10:40.

abattoirs in England to have CCTV. I think this is a very important

:10:41.:10:45.

animal welfare measure, and I think it gives even greater

:10:46.:10:49.

confidence to the consumer both at home and abroad

:10:50.:10:51.

that British produce, British meat is achieved

:10:52.:10:53.

at the highest possible standards during their life and at the time

:10:54.:10:57.

of the animal's death. It's hoped cameras will reduce

:10:58.:11:01.

abuse suffered by animals This video was filmed in an abattoir

:11:02.:11:03.

as part of an investigation Much of the charity's of the footage

:11:04.:11:16.

is too graphic to show. It's a really vital tool for helping

:11:17.:11:20.

to stop the kind of appalling gratuitous violence and abuse

:11:21.:11:23.

that we filmed repeatedly in slaughterhouses during our

:11:24.:11:25.

undercover investigations. And it's not just the mandatory CCTV

:11:26.:11:30.

itself that's so important, but also the Independent monitoring

:11:31.:11:34.

of the footage. We're really urging the Government

:11:35.:11:38.

to introduce that in order to ensure that slaughterhouses

:11:39.:11:45.

are properly spot checked. The Government has faced questions

:11:46.:11:47.

over what future trade deals post By enforcing cameras

:11:48.:11:50.

in slaughterhouses, ministers hope to reassure us

:11:51.:11:54.

that they are committed to the highest standards

:11:55.:11:56.

and animal welfare. There has been a fall in the shares

:11:57.:12:19.

of the company which owned Snapchat. The number of users was lower than

:12:20.:12:23.

expected and market analysts say the company has been struggling with

:12:24.:12:27.

fierce competition from rivals such as Facebook's Instagram.

:12:28.:12:29.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 9:30am.

:12:30.:12:35.

We are just getting reports from London Fire Brigade today are

:12:36.:12:41.

investigating reports of a fire on a train at Oxford Circus underground,

:12:42.:12:47.

the Bakerloo line affected and the line is suspended we are hearing.

:12:48.:12:52.

Oxford Circus is closed due to a fire alert, smoke seen coming from a

:12:53.:12:58.

carriage. These are initial reports, no further detail on that at the

:12:59.:13:02.

moment but we will stay across those reports and keep you updated. Let us

:13:03.:13:07.

know what you think about the eggs scare, XP and withdrawn from most of

:13:08.:13:17.

the eggs we buy on the shelves are British Lion, British produced eggs.

:13:18.:13:23.

Jerome Taylor has said on Twitter that the crisis has been created by

:13:24.:13:28.

the media, there is no public health risk. And adulthood have to keep

:13:29.:13:32.

seven eggs in 24 hours to exceed the level of risk chemical presents to

:13:33.:13:41.

us so let us know what you think about that, how worried are you

:13:42.:13:50.

about that crisis? Let me see, the latest from London Fire Brigade on

:13:51.:13:53.

what is happening at Oxford Circus, they say crews have been called to

:13:54.:14:01.

Oxford Circus station to investigate reports of smoke, more information

:14:02.:14:04.

soon. We will keep you updated on that.

:14:05.:14:06.

The incredible story surrounding Isaac Makwala

:14:07.:14:09.

at the World Athletics Championships didn't have a fairytale

:14:10.:14:11.

We have been talking about him a lot this week, he missed the 400 metre

:14:12.:14:22.

final after being banned from running and that was on medical

:14:23.:14:26.

grounds and he was not even allowed at one point into the London

:14:27.:14:31.

Stadium. He then had to run a solo time trial in the rain to qualify

:14:32.:14:36.

for the 200 metres on Wednesday and I guess it all looks to have taken

:14:37.:14:41.

its toll. He finished sixth in the end but it was of Turkey who won in

:14:42.:14:48.

the end ahead of Wayde van Niekerk, it was so close at the finish line,

:14:49.:14:57.

his first World Championship gold. Tell us about Dina Asher-Smith, she

:14:58.:15:02.

had a nasty injury but has made it through to the 200 metres final?

:15:03.:15:09.

Yes, she has had a really bad year with injury, an injury to her fruit

:15:10.:15:13.

but she has got a place in the women's two and metre final, running

:15:14.:15:18.

her second best of 22.73 to finish second and is among five British

:15:19.:15:23.

athletes who have a shot at medals, let's wasn't what she had to say. I

:15:24.:15:31.

completely broke my foot which is not great, they had to have surgery

:15:32.:15:36.

to put screws in, six weeks not doing anything, not putting any

:15:37.:15:39.

weight on it and then gradually putting weight on it, for three

:15:40.:15:44.

months I basically could not even what, but I learned how to walk

:15:45.:15:47.

again and here we are, it wasn't that bad! I am joking, I would not

:15:48.:15:50.

recommend it, it was not fun. It is great that she has come back

:15:51.:15:57.

so well. Laura Muir looked completely

:15:58.:16:01.

exhausted after her 5,000 metres Good girl she even collapsed to the

:16:02.:16:10.

ground, she has been quite busy during the championship, finishing

:16:11.:16:18.

fourth in the 1500 metres. She finished... Qualified as a fastest

:16:19.:16:22.

loser. She will run alongside Hamish McColgan, who ran her personal best

:16:23.:16:28.

of 15 minutes and 18 seconds. Katarina Johnson-Thompson organ

:16:29.:16:31.

like, the high jumpers, made the final. So something positive, a late

:16:32.:16:36.

surge from Great Britain and some more medals.

:16:37.:16:41.

the Premier League is back tonight - and Alan Shearer has been pretty

:16:42.:16:45.

outspoken about clubs not giving English youngsters a chance.

:16:46.:16:48.

It has come around quickly. We had the women's you rose, that kept our

:16:49.:16:56.

appetite going, Alan Shearer not holding back. He is essentially

:16:57.:17:02.

saying that more young players need to be given a chance at the top

:17:03.:17:07.

clubs. He does not believe that is happening at the moment and it will

:17:08.:17:11.

have a big impact on Premier League success in the future, including he

:17:12.:17:17.

says the success of the under 20s squad. That will not help him...

:17:18.:17:24.

That get top spots in big clubs, winning the World Cup. We will see

:17:25.:17:28.

Arsenal taking on Leicester in the opener, so lots to look forward to.

:17:29.:17:33.

That is all from me for now, I will have more at 9:30am. Thank you.

:17:34.:17:38.

We are staying across reports we are getting about a train appearing to

:17:39.:17:45.

be on fire at the Bakerloo line at Oxford Circus. We will keep you

:17:46.:17:47.

updated as soon as we get any more. Two months on since the Grenfell

:17:48.:17:49.

Tower fire in west London, campaigners have said donations

:17:50.:17:51.

are not reaching Charity Commission figures show that

:17:52.:17:53.

less than 15% of the ?18.9m raised has been given to people

:17:54.:17:57.

who lost their homes and loved ones, and it's not just those who have

:17:58.:18:00.

to provide for their families For most children it's

:18:01.:18:03.

now the holidays - meaning a time to rest,

:18:04.:18:09.

recuperate and have fun But for those children who escaped

:18:10.:18:11.

the Grenfell Tower fire - the summer has brought a stinging

:18:12.:18:16.

wave of trauma and shock. Around 600 people including 100

:18:17.:18:19.

children from the Grenfell Tower neighbourhood have been referred

:18:20.:18:22.

to mental health services in the aftermath of the fire,

:18:23.:18:24.

new figures show. Just how well are these

:18:25.:18:27.

children coping? Our reporter Ashley John-Baptiste

:18:28.:18:31.

has caught up with 12-year-old Grenfell survivor Tyrshondre,

:18:32.:18:36.

and his adoptive grandmother, Rumayatu Mamudu as they went

:18:37.:18:38.

swimming at the leisure centre close He lived on the first

:18:39.:18:41.

floor of Grenfell Tower with his adoptive grandmother,

:18:42.:19:00.

Rumayatu Mamudu. They escaped the tower

:19:01.:19:03.

during the night of the fire, and eight weeks on, Tyrshondre has

:19:04.:19:06.

broken up from school It's the summer holiday,

:19:07.:19:09.

how's it going? Does it at all feel different not

:19:10.:19:14.

being at the home you're used to? Can you tell me what toys

:19:15.:19:22.

you lost in the fire? My piano, my Wii Fit Plus,

:19:23.:19:27.

my Wii console, everything. What do you miss

:19:28.:19:31.

about your old home? It's been eight weeks

:19:32.:19:33.

since you lost your home. To tell you the truth,

:19:34.:19:52.

I think things are getting worse. If we had a little bit

:19:53.:19:58.

of attention as survivors, we would now be getting

:19:59.:20:02.

ready for closure. We have support from the society,

:20:03.:20:10.

from the charity organisation, If only the government would do

:20:11.:20:15.

their best to give us a roof. He wakes up in the night,

:20:16.:20:26.

he's afraid there might be a fire. So the fear is still in him,

:20:27.:20:30.

until we have a place Does it feel like the normal

:20:31.:20:37.

summer holiday for you? No, it can never feel

:20:38.:20:48.

like a normal summer holiday. I have been offered to go

:20:49.:20:51.

on holiday, but how could you go on holiday when you are not sure

:20:52.:20:55.

what you are coming back to? Have you got used to living

:20:56.:21:05.

in a hotel with your grandson? A hotel is supposed to be temporary

:21:06.:21:11.

accommodation for travellers. I was offered a place two weeks ago,

:21:12.:21:14.

outside my borough. I've spent 46 years of my

:21:15.:21:24.

life in this borough. My five children were born

:21:25.:21:26.

in this borough, they went So I don't see why I should be

:21:27.:21:29.

moved out of my borough. How are you making sure

:21:30.:21:39.

that your grandson's OK? Well, I tried to see some

:21:40.:21:54.

consultants, to talk to them, Is it getting tiring having

:21:55.:21:57.

these chats and feeling Everything done repeatedly

:21:58.:22:06.

without any result is boring. But to go back to that

:22:07.:22:13.

same hotel, I just feel sick going there every

:22:14.:22:16.

day, every day... Are you looking forward

:22:17.:22:20.

to going back to school? We are alive, which is most

:22:21.:22:33.

important, and we have We will try our best

:22:34.:22:47.

to look after one another. That has Tyrshondre and his

:22:48.:23:21.

grandmother talking about how they have been coping in the aftermath of

:23:22.:23:22.

the fire. So exactly what mental health

:23:23.:23:24.

and trauma support should children who survived

:23:25.:23:26.

the Grenfell fire receive? Here to give us some

:23:27.:23:28.

insight is Dr Gary Wannan - a consultant child and adolescent

:23:29.:23:31.

psychiatrist. Thanks very much for coming in. We

:23:32.:23:38.

were hearing that Tyrshondre keeps waking up in the night afraid of

:23:39.:23:42.

fire, is it always obvious if a child has suffered a trauma as a

:23:43.:23:48.

result of something they have been through? It is not always obvious,

:23:49.:23:54.

but hearing about Tyrshondre and about him waking in the night and

:23:55.:23:58.

being upset, we really need to help him. I am based in a clinic not far

:23:59.:24:04.

from where he lives and we would love to meet that family and any

:24:05.:24:08.

other family affected by the trauma of Grenfell. At this stage, we

:24:09.:24:12.

passed what we would call the watchful waiting periods for

:24:13.:24:16.

children experiencing symptoms like that who are distressed, it is

:24:17.:24:21.

really important that we help. What is the watchful waiting period? In

:24:22.:24:28.

the first four to six weeks we expect children, young people,

:24:29.:24:32.

adults to be quite understandably upset by what has happened. And

:24:33.:24:38.

during that time getting on with what parents would usually do to

:24:39.:24:43.

help children, provide comfort, do the normal things with them. We

:24:44.:24:47.

would usually expect to and symptoms with that to go down. But for a

:24:48.:24:56.

childlike Tyrshondre who at this stage is waking up at night quite

:24:57.:25:00.

upset, we would really want to meet that family and to work out the best

:25:01.:25:05.

way to help. Is it possible that some kids and adults will have gone

:25:06.:25:09.

through that without any lasting impact, or should everybody be

:25:10.:25:14.

getting mental health help at the moment? I think everybody is

:25:15.:25:17.

different. For some people they can go through a trauma, use the support

:25:18.:25:21.

they have around them and come through that without needing to get

:25:22.:25:25.

professional help. The last thing I would want to do is to say that

:25:26.:25:35.

everybody needs to meet a professional. Many people have good

:25:36.:25:37.

coping mechanisms and good support around them. What about the way it

:25:38.:25:41.

is being done. It is difficult for individuals to assess sometimes

:25:42.:25:43.

whether what their experience and requires professional help or

:25:44.:25:46.

whether they should just get through it. Are the services reaching out to

:25:47.:25:50.

these people in the way that they should just to make sure anybody in

:25:51.:25:54.

the situation where they really need help is actually getting at? With

:25:55.:25:59.

the first of those things, for people who are unsure, it is much

:26:00.:26:03.

better to be in touch and seek advice about whether to get

:26:04.:26:16.

treatment or not. In terms of being out there, as well as having a

:26:17.:26:18.

dedicated phone line and meeting young people and families in the

:26:19.:26:21.

clinic I work in, we have gone out and visited people at home, there

:26:22.:26:23.

have been public clinics and activities where people have been

:26:24.:26:26.

able to join in and meet children and young people that way, we have

:26:27.:26:29.

been in schools, in the emergency centres, we have wanted to get in

:26:30.:26:31.

the community where people are to make sure the help they can get.

:26:32.:26:38.

Your team has helped around 100 kids, what issues have been coming

:26:39.:26:43.

up? There has been quite a variety. For some people it has been

:26:44.:26:49.

reassuring parents and carers that they are doing a good job. At the

:26:50.:26:55.

other end we have seen some severely affected children and young people

:26:56.:26:59.

who have needed to begin quite specific treatments for the trauma

:27:00.:27:03.

experienced. What would be an indication where somebody is

:27:04.:27:06.

severely affected, is that the type of thing we are hearing about from

:27:07.:27:11.

Tyrshondre, waking up in a night afraid of fire? Adult fears that

:27:12.:27:15.

will Maher go, nightmares, flashbacks, not been able to pay

:27:16.:27:22.

attention, not being able to do what you usually do, that would make me

:27:23.:27:28.

more concerned about a child. How do you help somebody experiencing that?

:27:29.:27:32.

I think every child is different but for the most severely affected we

:27:33.:27:38.

would use CBT, cognitive behavioural therapy, where children are

:27:39.:27:40.

encouraged to go back and think about the upsetting memories but

:27:41.:27:44.

instead of being associated with fear and distress, a therapist is

:27:45.:27:51.

able to work with the child and help them find ways to bring calm to that

:27:52.:27:55.

situation. It is a treatment that works really well and I have seen

:27:56.:28:00.

many children and young people helped with that. It will not be a

:28:01.:28:07.

quick treatment? No, it can be quite hard work but it can make a big

:28:08.:28:12.

difference. Just behind you we are seeing the picture of the building,

:28:13.:28:17.

the charred building. It will be covered, I think later this month.

:28:18.:28:21.

How much does having to see that on a daily basis impact on those

:28:22.:28:27.

affected by this? I think it can add to the distress. With what I have

:28:28.:28:31.

been saying about treatment as well and getting on with life and finding

:28:32.:28:37.

ways to find can rather than distress thinking about what has

:28:38.:28:42.

happened, this is a way of also beginning to come to terms with what

:28:43.:28:46.

has happened. Thank you very much, Dr Gary Wannon.

:28:47.:28:48.

Hundreds of people are going to be moved out of their high rise flats

:28:49.:28:51.

in South East London - after an investigation has

:28:52.:28:53.

Dan Johnson is there with the latest.

:28:54.:28:58.

What is the situation? This is the Ledbury estate in Southwark, south

:28:59.:29:09.

London. There are four tower blocks, 242 flats. Residents have had

:29:10.:29:12.

letters from the council telling them that urgent work is needed and

:29:13.:29:17.

but for the meantime the flats are not safe unless the gases cut-off.

:29:18.:29:22.

To understand this we need to go back nearly 50 years to a tower

:29:23.:29:27.

block collapse in London called Ronan point, which was prompted by a

:29:28.:29:33.

gas explosion which blew out a wall in a flat, which prompted a collapse

:29:34.:29:37.

on one side of the building. It killed four people back in 1968. As

:29:38.:29:43.

a result of that dust -- disaster new building regulations were

:29:44.:29:46.

stipulated which meant blocks like those constructed in the same way

:29:47.:29:50.

had to be strengthened to withstand a similar gas explosion. In the last

:29:51.:29:53.

few weeks the council has been conducting inspections in the wake

:29:54.:29:59.

of the Grenfell Tower disaster and as as well as looking at the

:30:00.:30:02.

external fabrication of the building they have been looking at the

:30:03.:30:06.

structure inside. This is not about the cladding on the outside or even

:30:07.:30:11.

the fireproofing inside, it is about whether the concrete structure could

:30:12.:30:15.

withstand a gas explosion. The conclusion of the engineers

:30:16.:30:19.

yesterday is that the structural improvement work that should have

:30:20.:30:22.

been done almost 50 years ago has not been done, therefore those tower

:30:23.:30:26.

blocks are not safe, that is why the gas has been cut off as we speak and

:30:27.:30:31.

residents are told they will have to provide their own hot water with

:30:32.:30:35.

electric heaters and in the very near future residents will have to

:30:36.:30:39.

move out so improvement work can take place. Let's talk to one of the

:30:40.:30:43.

people who lives here, she joins us with her two sons. How do you feel?

:30:44.:30:51.

We are worried, we are angry it's got to this point. We have been

:30:52.:30:59.

advised to use local leisure centre is to take the children and

:31:00.:31:03.

ourselves to shower. We are not going to run any hot water in the

:31:04.:31:09.

flat. I'm lucky I have got an electric cooker but I have been told

:31:10.:31:13.

to heat water on the electric cooker to Bath the baby, we are well past

:31:14.:31:20.

that stage, 1946 my mum was born and that is how they Bath babies back

:31:21.:31:26.

then and we should not have to do it now. It's not just now, if there was

:31:27.:31:31.

a fire it would spread straight through. There have been cracks in

:31:32.:31:35.

the building that residents have been highlighting for years? For

:31:36.:31:40.

over 20 years, I have been here seven years and have alerted the

:31:41.:31:45.

council to them more than once. We have seen some pictures from inside

:31:46.:31:50.

your flat. I had people out to fix them but they are back under worse

:31:51.:31:55.

than ever. They are not just a structural problem they might be a

:31:56.:31:59.

fire risk as well. We can only stay here because we have fire wardens,

:32:00.:32:04.

this is what we were told and this has been going on since the 29th of

:32:05.:32:10.

June. We went out, came back in and there was a security system and fire

:32:11.:32:17.

wardens sat on every floor. They are here 24/7, does it make you feel

:32:18.:32:22.

safe? Not really, because have of them do not speak English. They

:32:23.:32:26.

cannot understand when somebody does smell smoke, she ran down from the

:32:27.:32:30.

tenth floor to the fourth floor before she could find somebody who

:32:31.:32:33.

could understand, other than that she was being told no English,

:32:34.:32:38.

that's not helpful. The council said they will re-home you will be make

:32:39.:32:43.

things safer, are you happy with that? No, once I move out I need to

:32:44.:32:48.

be gone permanently, we cannot move backward and forward, it is not

:32:49.:32:54.

fair. You want a new home and a new start? I don't want to leave the

:32:55.:32:57.

community we have got here because it is an amazing community, the

:32:58.:33:02.

tenants Association, the chair has worked hard to give us the community

:33:03.:33:12.

we have got, we are going to leave a lot behind but when you look at it

:33:13.:33:16.

from a safety aspect I have to put the children first. Of course, thank

:33:17.:33:21.

you, appreciate your time. Another reason for people in tower blocks to

:33:22.:33:24.

be an easy, it looks like another developing scandal, building

:33:25.:33:29.

regulations, measures which should have been enacted almost 50 years

:33:30.:33:33.

ago still not adhered to and it's possible these are not the only

:33:34.:33:38.

blocks affected. Thank you. Let's get you the latest on Oxford Circus

:33:39.:33:43.

station after being evacuated after smoke was seen coming from inside

:33:44.:33:48.

the Bakerloo line carriage, that's one of the pictures on social media,

:33:49.:33:54.

it looks pretty dramatic, British Transport Police saying the cause of

:33:55.:33:58.

the fire is not being treated as suspicious. We will bring you the

:33:59.:34:06.

very latest shortly. Expecting to speak to an eyewitness. Also coming

:34:07.:34:09.

up: A warning Britain could face

:34:10.:34:12.

30 years of terror. The former head of MI5, Lord Evans,

:34:13.:34:14.

says the Islamist terror Have you been stuck waiting

:34:15.:34:17.

for hours at an airport this summer? Found out what the worst airport

:34:18.:34:23.

for delays is in Britain, and the airline that's adding

:34:24.:34:26.

to the queues. Here's Ben in the BBC Newsroom

:34:27.:34:29.

with a summary of todays news. US Defence Secretary James Mattis

:34:30.:34:34.

has said America still hopes to solve the North Korea

:34:35.:34:37.

crisis using diplomacy. After days of fiery rhetoric

:34:38.:34:41.

from both the US and North Korea, Mr Mattis said war would be

:34:42.:34:45.

"catastrophic" and that diplomacy On Thursday, the North Korean regime

:34:46.:34:48.

announced it was finalising a plan to fire four missiles near the US

:34:49.:34:55.

territory of Guam. Donations made to the victims

:34:56.:35:02.

of the Grenfell Tower fire are not reaching survivors quickly enough,

:35:03.:35:04.

according to campaigners Figures from the Charity Commission

:35:05.:35:06.

show that less than 15% of the ?18.9 million raised has

:35:07.:35:11.

been given to people affected, almost two

:35:12.:35:14.

months after the tragedy - but it says that early difficulties

:35:15.:35:16.

in identifying and contacting those easyJet Travelers suffered the worst

:35:17.:35:43.

hold-ups with an average delay of 24 minutes. Both the airport and

:35:44.:35:47.

airline say many of the problems were beyond their control.

:35:48.:35:49.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10:00am.

:35:50.:35:53.

Let's get the sport again. Last night the big event was the

:35:54.:36:03.

men's 200 metre final and the winner from Turkey beat 400 metre champion

:36:04.:36:08.

and favourite Wayde van Niekerk with Isaac Makwala back in sixth. After

:36:09.:36:15.

breaking her food just six months ago better news for Dina Asher-Smith

:36:16.:36:19.

as she qualified for the 200 metres final running her season 's best of

:36:20.:36:26.

22.73 to finish second. And Britain only has one medal so far from a

:36:27.:36:30.

target of 6-8 but there could be a podium finish tonight in the long

:36:31.:36:38.

jump final. And Rory McIlroy said the course played tricky after his

:36:39.:36:43.

opening round at the USPGA championship in North Carolina, he

:36:44.:36:50.

three shots and finished five behind the leaders. More later.

:36:51.:36:56.

The former head of MI5, Lord Evans, has warned

:36:57.:36:58.

that the Islamist terror threat facing Britain could continue

:36:59.:37:00.

In an interview with the BBC, he also said Russia was likely

:37:01.:37:05.

to be trying to interfere in the UK's democracy.

:37:06.:37:10.

Our security correspondent Frank Gardner has been speaking

:37:11.:37:12.

Tell us more about what he said about the terror threat. This was a

:37:13.:37:24.

unique opportunity because he's never done a full interview, when he

:37:25.:37:31.

was in MI5 or since he retired four years ago, he has been right at the

:37:32.:37:35.

top of it for six years, there were a lot of things to ask and I started

:37:36.:37:40.

by asking him in his 32 years how has it changed and evolved? There

:37:41.:37:47.

was terrorism in the 1970s with the IRA and there was the espionage

:37:48.:37:50.

threat from the cold War, from Russia even back then. He started by

:37:51.:37:56.

talking about the generational aspect of the terror threat. We are

:37:57.:38:03.

at least 20 years into this. My guess is we will still be dealing

:38:04.:38:08.

with the long tail and another 20 years' time. I think this is

:38:09.:38:12.

genuinely a generational problem. I think we are going to be facing

:38:13.:38:17.

20-30 years of terrorist threats and therefore we need absolutely

:38:18.:38:23.

critically to persevere. One of the really interesting things was I

:38:24.:38:28.

asked him what's it like as an intelligence officer to send out an

:38:29.:38:33.

agent, an informant basically? They do not really do this buying

:38:34.:38:37.

themselves, they do surveillance and intercepts but the people at the

:38:38.:38:44.

sharp end of risk-taking, people who they tried to insert inside

:38:45.:38:53.

terrorism plotters, trying to penetrate foreign organisations,

:38:54.:38:56.

what is it like to send some beer like that out knowing if they are

:38:57.:39:00.

discovered terrible things will happen to them and he was really

:39:01.:39:05.

interesting, he said often it's sleepless nights, it is nail-biting

:39:06.:39:09.

if you are running an operation. They take whatever measures they can

:39:10.:39:14.

to protect them. He was quite alarming I think about some of the

:39:15.:39:19.

threats coming down the line, I asked what the unconventional

:39:20.:39:21.

threats where and he talked about the threat to the Internet of

:39:22.:39:26.

things. This is enabling more of our gadgets including car is to be

:39:27.:39:30.

linked to the Internet which brings new vulnerabilities to hackers,

:39:31.:39:37.

people holding you to ransom, your car or kettle not working unless you

:39:38.:39:43.

pay a fine. He also spoke about what Russia might be doing to meddle with

:39:44.:39:49.

British democracy? Yeah, he spent some time in counter espionage

:39:50.:39:55.

himself which is a branch of MI5's work, he said it would be impossible

:39:56.:40:02.

to imagine the kind of interference as he put it that Russia has

:40:03.:40:09.

allegedly carried out in the United States and other Western countries

:40:10.:40:13.

particularly with elections, that Britain would not also be vulnerable

:40:14.:40:17.

to that. He did not want to go into more detail but said it is a threat.

:40:18.:40:23.

What is being done to protect us from that threat, what is likely to

:40:24.:40:30.

be done? They have the national cyber Security Centre which they

:40:31.:40:34.

launched sometime ago, it was slightly farcical I must say because

:40:35.:40:38.

they were talking about the defence of properties and I said is there

:40:39.:40:43.

any kind of offensive capability Britain has and the person giving

:40:44.:40:47.

the speech said I don't think we can talk about that, then I heard him

:40:48.:40:53.

say, do we actually have one? They do now but I don't think they did

:40:54.:40:57.

when they launched it. They are investing billions of pounds in

:40:58.:41:02.

trying to shore up Britain to make it as hard a target as possible and

:41:03.:41:07.

yet these digital hacks and vulnerabilities persist. We are

:41:08.:41:10.

still on the of the iceberg when it comes to the digital threats to the

:41:11.:41:14.

UK and other countries. Thank you Frank.

:41:15.:41:17.

Why were contaminated eggs imported from the Netherlands?

:41:18.:41:21.

It seems an adult would have to eat seven eggs over 24 hours to be at

:41:22.:41:34.

risk from any contaminated eggs. Oxford Circus tube station has been

:41:35.:41:38.

closed and the Bakerloo line suspended between elephant and

:41:39.:41:41.

Castle and Piccadilly Circus because of a fire alert. Pictures on social

:41:42.:41:47.

media show smoke coming from a train. The British Transport Police

:41:48.:41:52.

say the fire is not being treated as suspicious. We can speak to a man

:41:53.:41:56.

who was in the station at the time, I think we have some of your

:41:57.:42:03.

pictures as well, well, Tom, tell us what happens? I was going from

:42:04.:42:11.

Brixton to moral born so I normally change at Oxford Circus, I got off

:42:12.:42:15.

my train, as we were waiting on the platform you could smell something

:42:16.:42:19.

as the train was coming in and as it got closer and the smell got

:42:20.:42:23.

stronger and stronger and when the train pulled then you could see one

:42:24.:42:31.

carriage with smoke inside it. Then a lot more smoke started coming out,

:42:32.:42:38.

everybody was standing around and they started evacuating the station

:42:39.:42:41.

but a lot of people with hands or mouths and coughing. Did the smoke

:42:42.:42:46.

seem to be contained to one carriage? It looked like it was,

:42:47.:42:52.

just one carriage that had a problem. Coogee see any indication

:42:53.:42:59.

of where the smoke might have been coming from, what might have caused

:43:00.:43:06.

it? I suspect may the mortars or something like that underneath the

:43:07.:43:11.

carriage, I don't know much about trains to be honest. Whether any

:43:12.:43:16.

people on the carriage as it pulled in? I think there were a few, it's

:43:17.:43:20.

quite difficult to get between carriages. Thanks very much for

:43:21.:43:28.

telling us your experiences and giving us your pictures, thank you.

:43:29.:43:30.

No problem, by? Police investigating the European

:43:31.:43:36.

egg contamination scandal have arrested two company directors

:43:37.:43:38.

following raids in the Netherlands. Here the Food Standards Agency has

:43:39.:43:40.

revealed that 700,000 contaminated eggs have been imported

:43:41.:43:42.

from Dutch farms, up from their original

:43:43.:43:44.

estimate of 21,000 but experts insists it is "highly

:43:45.:43:46.

unlikely" they pose any Sandwiches and salads are among

:43:47.:43:48.

the foods that have now been removed And should we be worried

:43:49.:43:55.

about the eggs currently Mark Williams from the British Egg

:43:56.:44:05.

Industry Council joins us Thank you for joining us, can you

:44:06.:44:18.

understand how the number of affected eggs shot up to 700,000 in

:44:19.:44:26.

a matter of days? This is what the Food Standards Agency have notified

:44:27.:44:31.

as part of their investigations, the key point is I believe the food

:44:32.:44:35.

products which have been withdrawn from sale of all been made with

:44:36.:44:41.

these potentially affected imported eggs. Another key point is that

:44:42.:44:49.

British eggs are safe. The safest in the world. The assurance consumers

:44:50.:44:52.

in this country can have is that if they look for the lion on the egg

:44:53.:44:56.

shell and the box they are getting the safest eggs in the world. Are

:44:57.:45:04.

most of the eggs we buy in our supermarkets British produced? How

:45:05.:45:08.

many actual eggs we buy, forget eggs in other products are imported?

:45:09.:45:15.

We are about 85% self-sufficient and have to import about 15% of our

:45:16.:45:24.

needs, unfortunately. All the major supermarkets, the discount

:45:25.:45:27.

supermarkets, they all stop British Lion egg so consumers do not have to

:45:28.:45:32.

be worried at all, British eggs are safe. What do you think about the

:45:33.:45:38.

time taken for this to be picked up in the way it has been? I mentioned

:45:39.:45:42.

that in a matter of days the number of eggs being looked at in this

:45:43.:45:47.

country, the estimate has gone from 21,000 to 700,000. The problem was

:45:48.:45:51.

first picked up last November but it was only last week that a

:45:52.:45:56.

Europe-wide safety alert was issued. Of statements are being made coming

:45:57.:46:01.

out of the continent but the key point is that this contamination is

:46:02.:46:06.

a result of criminal activity. Somebody has put this insecticide

:46:07.:46:10.

Fipronil into a normal product which is used to treat red mites, which

:46:11.:46:16.

can potentially have bird welfare issues unless their numbers are kept

:46:17.:46:22.

down. Somebody has adulterated this normal product in Holland and that

:46:23.:46:26.

has led to this particular crisis in Holland. It is totally wrong, it

:46:27.:46:31.

does not help trust in food at all but I think from a British point of

:46:32.:46:36.

view our consumers can be totally assured that British eggs are safe.

:46:37.:46:41.

The problem we have is when it comes to food products made with processed

:46:42.:46:46.

egg, how does a consumer tell they are British? We know that there are

:46:47.:46:51.

quite a few food products made with imported eggs at the moment, we have

:46:52.:46:57.

been calling on food manufacturers and retailers to actually use

:46:58.:47:00.

British Lion egg products in these food products. We also like to see

:47:01.:47:06.

country of origin labelling on egg products. So if any imports come in

:47:07.:47:10.

in the future they will be clearly labelled with the country of origin.

:47:11.:47:14.

At the beginning you said there was about a 15% shortfall in the number

:47:15.:47:18.

of British eggs being produced versus eggs on the shelves, is the

:47:19.:47:25.

shortfall because Moore can't be produced effectively? How much

:47:26.:47:28.

capacity is there in the market when you say you want British eggs used

:47:29.:47:33.

for everything in the supermarkets, including products made from eggs?

:47:34.:47:37.

We would dearly like to supply all the eggs and egg products to our

:47:38.:47:41.

customers, but what we need is clear market signals from them that will

:47:42.:47:46.

lead to our egg producers, who do a fantastic job in this country,

:47:47.:47:52.

basically being able to produce more eggs for consumers. Thank you very

:47:53.:47:54.

much for joining us. A pleasure. This weekend the world's

:47:55.:47:57.

fastest man - Usain Bolt - will take part in his final

:47:58.:47:59.

competitive race before retiring. During his career, the sprinter has

:48:00.:48:02.

won eight Olympic gold medals and holds the 100 and 200

:48:03.:48:04.

metre world records. He's also one of the world's most

:48:05.:48:09.

popular athletes - with fans won over by his talent,

:48:10.:48:12.

playful nature and trademark pose. Usain Bolt's final race

:48:13.:48:18.

will be the 4x100m relay at the World Athletics Championships

:48:19.:48:20.

in London tomorrow. It's not sure if he will take part

:48:21.:48:22.

in the heats in the morning, but he's expected to compete

:48:23.:48:26.

in the final in the evening. Joining us now to talk about Bolt's

:48:27.:48:30.

career are two of the four men who made up Great Britain's 4x400m

:48:31.:48:33.

relay team and so memorably stormed to victory,

:48:34.:48:36.

winning gold in the event at the World Championships in 1991 -

:48:37.:48:38.

Kriss Akabusi and Roger Black. Actually, one of the men joins us,

:48:39.:48:52.

Kriss Akabusi. Hello, how are you? About great, we are looking for to

:48:53.:48:56.

speaking to you. Also joining a $:/STARTFEED.

:48:57.:48:57.

13-year-old Vera, who is a fan of Usain Bolt,

:48:58.:48:59.

And we're also joined by the Telegraph's

:49:00.:49:02.

Welcome to you all. Kriss, tell us how he ranks among the all-time

:49:03.:49:13.

greats in athletics? Clearly he is an icon of the sport. He is ranked

:49:14.:49:20.

along with guys like Edwin Moses, Lord Coe, Daley Thompson, Michael

:49:21.:49:26.

Johnson, these guys are icons of the sport. You sane is the icon of his

:49:27.:49:35.

day. -- Usain is the icon of his day. He has won three Olympic golds,

:49:36.:49:41.

which is phenomenal. Vera, you have been inspired by Usain Bolt? When

:49:42.:49:46.

did that happen? When I first saw him is when he beat the 2008 world

:49:47.:49:52.

record, I could see it was really hard work and determination he put

:49:53.:49:57.

in to be the fastest man. What impact has it had on you? It has

:49:58.:50:02.

taught me to work harder, even if I did not win this

:50:03.:50:14.

race I could come back stronger if I work harder for the next race. What

:50:15.:50:19.

are you doing in athletics and how are you getting on? About 200

:50:20.:50:21.

metres, it is going well so far. Ifeanyi, it is always nice when a

:50:22.:50:24.

child has a role model who can help to propel them forward? Of course.

:50:25.:50:27.

My family have a lot of interest in sports, and as her dad it is always

:50:28.:50:34.

my duty and obligation to support them in any form. Taking them from

:50:35.:50:42.

one place to another, financially and otherwise. Ben, he is an athlete

:50:43.:50:47.

who does not seem to have put a foot wrong. He has performed amazingly? I

:50:48.:50:54.

think I would take it a step forward than what Kriss said, Kriss named

:50:55.:50:59.

some of the greats of athletics over the years. They are big within the

:51:00.:51:03.

sport and somewhat transcend the sport, but athletics has never had

:51:04.:51:07.

anyone like Usain Bolt before who is bigger than the sport, you can say

:51:08.:51:12.

the name Bolt anywhere in the world and they will know who this man is,

:51:13.:51:17.

he is enormous. What is it about him? If you don't follow athletics,

:51:18.:51:22.

you know who he is and his trademark pose. It has really caught on. The

:51:23.:51:28.

pose is a big thing. Obviously he has done amazing things on the

:51:29.:51:33.

track. You listed the titles he has won and the gold medals, that is one

:51:34.:51:38.

thing, the other is his superstar aura that he carries with him, the

:51:39.:51:44.

phone he has on the start line, the dancing, playing with his hair and

:51:45.:51:47.

all that stuff. That has really resonated with the wider world. That

:51:48.:51:53.

is what takes it beyond a sporting achievement into the wider public

:51:54.:51:59.

realm. Kriss, when you watch it you get the sense, it has been said so

:52:00.:52:03.

many times, gosh, if he really tried, how much faster could he go?

:52:04.:52:09.

He makes it look so easy? I think that is going to be one of the

:52:10.:52:12.

things that will come back to haunt him one day. He seemed like he was

:52:13.:52:21.

jogging in 2009. I think one day he will see somebody run 9.49 and know

:52:22.:52:25.

deep down inside that he could have smashed that. But you can only

:52:26.:52:31.

compete in your time, he has been phenomenal, he is a legend. The

:52:32.:52:35.

sport will miss him, he has big shoes to fill. But he is here, we

:52:36.:52:40.

had to enjoy him this weekend. You are seeing poetry in motion, a

:52:41.:52:46.

legend in his lifetime, enjoy it. When you say he might look back and

:52:47.:52:49.

think he could have smashed it, do you think he has not done as well as

:52:50.:52:55.

he potentially could have? He was a young man, when he ran 9.58 it was

:52:56.:53:02.

2009, he was young. He had all of his life ahead of him. As an athlete

:53:03.:53:06.

you can always say you can do a little bit better, he was banging

:53:07.:53:09.

his chest, not kidding around. But coming to the twilight of your

:53:10.:53:12.

career you realise you never get that chance again. It is a real

:53:13.:53:18.

death in his life, he has to moved from a field that he knew so well

:53:19.:53:23.

and graced so beautifully into his next phase. He has lots of lovely

:53:24.:53:26.

things ahead of him but he will never be in the shape to run 9.49

:53:27.:53:31.

and he will know deep down he could have done that. Roger Black joins

:53:32.:53:37.

us. How do you think Usain Bolt ranks among the all-time greats?

:53:38.:53:42.

Here is the greatest athlete of all time. I don't think many people

:53:43.:53:47.

would argue against that. Nine Olympic gold medals, multiple world

:53:48.:53:51.

records and the sustainability over such a long period. More

:53:52.:53:54.

importantly, he has transcended athletics. He is a global superstar.

:53:55.:54:03.

Many great athletes have not been like Usain has been. How hard is it

:54:04.:54:09.

when you are bowing out? He has had an amazing career and it seems like

:54:10.:54:15.

universal adoration? It is pretty sad, it is hard. The athlete

:54:16.:54:18.

struggles in retirement because you will never be as good as what you

:54:19.:54:22.

have just done, you have the rest of your life that if you want it will

:54:23.:54:25.

never be as clear. In athletics every year there is a Championships

:54:26.:54:30.

and your whole world leads to that. Kriss and I have moved on, it has

:54:31.:54:36.

been OK. Some people struggle, some do better. Usain Bolt will have so

:54:37.:54:40.

many options and opportunities, the world is at his hands, whatever he

:54:41.:54:44.

wants to do, but he will miss it, Kriss is right, the clarity is of

:54:45.:54:50.

purpose, but I think he will be all right. What do you think he will do?

:54:51.:54:57.

There have been jokes he will sign for Manchester United? He will go to

:54:58.:55:04.

Hollywood! Do you reckon, Kriss? Do some films, bust a fewer records,

:55:05.:55:09.

travel the world. He is worth 45 million quid, there is a lot you can

:55:10.:55:13.

do when you are worth that. He does not need the money. What do you

:55:14.:55:20.

reckon, Roger? I think he will be some sort of global ambassador. He

:55:21.:55:25.

likes his football. In retirement you see the opportunity to do will

:55:26.:55:28.

be things you could not do as an athlete. He will play loads of

:55:29.:55:32.

football, get involved in the things he could not do and then at some

:55:33.:55:35.

point he will decide what he wants to be, but I think he will have a

:55:36.:55:40.

few years of having a lot more fun, he has had enough phone in the last

:55:41.:55:50.

ten! At some point he will decide. Have you both met him? Not

:55:51.:55:52.

personally. I have seen him like everybody else but not met him. I

:55:53.:55:56.

met him when he was very young, he is one of these athletes who was

:55:57.:56:00.

breaking records that are very early age, so I met him when he was 15,

:56:01.:56:06.

16, 17. I have not meant him properly in the past few years.

:56:07.:56:11.

Dawes had not met him properly. We can't see you but we can hear you.

:56:12.:56:17.

What was he like at that age? Just another athlete, really. He was a

:56:18.:56:22.

great talent, he showed a lot of promise but to become what he

:56:23.:56:29.

became, the fact that he did it is the mark of the man. There is lots

:56:30.:56:34.

of talent out there who never fulfil their potential. Behind all the

:56:35.:56:40.

laughing and joking and the moves and all that, there is a very... I

:56:41.:56:45.

would not say serious athlete but he knows who he is and how to prepare

:56:46.:56:49.

and get it right, he deserves enormous respect for that. He is a

:56:50.:56:54.

serious athlete. He hits his numbers. 20 in the winter, 20 in the

:56:55.:57:03.

spring, 20 in the summer, speed endurance, strength, conditioning.

:57:04.:57:08.

He does his numbers. He does his weights, he actually gets himself

:57:09.:57:19.

ready. Forget all that joking stuff, he must be focused because you can't

:57:20.:57:24.

deliver, no matter how talented. I see many, many talented failures.

:57:25.:57:29.

Sorry to interrupt you, Kriss, but that is what you said, Vera, about

:57:30.:57:34.

why he is a role model, you know the hard work he puts in? Yes. Even

:57:35.:57:39.

recently when he didn't win his race he showed good sportsmanship and

:57:40.:57:46.

clapped to the audience, appreciated them and stuff. Ben, have you met or

:57:47.:57:52.

interviewed him? A few times in group situations. What was he like?

:57:53.:57:57.

A group he does not much enjoy the whole media focus. He likes playing

:57:58.:58:03.

the showman to the crowd. I think he has got to the stage now where he

:58:04.:58:08.

wants a bit of normality in his life, he does not necessarily what

:58:09.:58:11.

the attention the whole time. When he is on the stage she will have the

:58:12.:58:15.

attention, away from the stage he quite likes just being normal. I was

:58:16.:58:19.

in Kingston in Jamaica for his last run in Jamaica couple of months ago,

:58:20.:58:23.

speaking to people who know him quite well. They got across the

:58:24.:58:29.

sense of normality. He goes to the local gym, takes part in spin

:58:30.:58:33.

classes with me is due and whoever turns up for a spin class.

:58:34.:58:41.

Those classes must be popular! I thought it was amazing, turning to

:58:42.:58:44.

your left and single bull's fastest man on the bike. And he is six foot

:58:45.:58:50.

five, hard to miss him. What do you think he will do? After he retires?

:58:51.:58:56.

He has mentioned the football thing. Is that a complete joke or is it

:58:57.:59:01.

possible? I think at one stage he would like to have thought he could

:59:02.:59:05.

maybe do something but he has sort of accepted that will not happen.

:59:06.:59:10.

Like Kriss and Rogers said I think he will travel the world, take on

:59:11.:59:15.

some ambassadorial projects, do charity work. He says his heart is

:59:16.:59:21.

in athletics so he will promote the sport, he is an amazing figurehead

:59:22.:59:24.

so the sport does not want to lose him, they want to get everything

:59:25.:59:28.

they can out of him and he will continue to help the sport grow.

:59:29.:59:32.

Vera and Ifeanyi, what would you like to see him do? I accept what

:59:33.:59:39.

was said by one of the guys over there that he would like to do more

:59:40.:59:46.

of travel around. Sometimes be with family or something like that. He

:59:47.:59:52.

deserves a break. He deserves a break. The family, if possible.

:59:53.:00:01.

That's what I think. He has to relax a little bit. Vera, have you met

:00:02.:00:08.

him? No. Hopefully you might at some stage. Let's see what he does, he

:00:09.:00:12.

might carry on in a mentoring role. Thank you all very much. We would

:00:13.:00:17.

love to know who has inspired you in sport or any other field.

:00:18.:00:25.

The weather are not very inspiring across Northern and Western parts of

:00:26.:00:33.

the UK, lots of cloud and outbreaks of rain, the rain will be quite

:00:34.:00:38.

heavy at times gradually moving further east but I think for East

:00:39.:00:41.

Anglia and the south-east of England you will get away with a dry day

:00:42.:00:46.

without sunshine, temperatures getting up to 22 or 23 degrees but

:00:47.:00:51.

elsewhere a lot of cloud, outbreaks of rain and particularly in Northern

:00:52.:00:58.

Western parts are bit of drizzle. Through this evening that rain will

:00:59.:01:02.

spread its way to the far east, cloudy for many of us into Saturday

:01:03.:01:06.

morning but during Saturday many of us will see the clouds breaking up

:01:07.:01:10.

to give a sunny spells, pleasant during the afternoon, one or two

:01:11.:01:15.

showers dotted around but I think for most of us the emphasis should

:01:16.:01:20.

be on a dry day but on Sunday and other dry day for many of us, role

:01:21.:01:24.

play a better day in terms of the sunshine.

:01:25.:01:33.

Hello it's Friday 11th August, it's ten o'clock.

:01:34.:01:35.

I'm Joanna Gosling in for Victoria Derbyshire.

:01:36.:01:37.

Donald Trump's heated words over North Korea -

:01:38.:01:39.

but his Defence Secretary James Mattis insists

:01:40.:01:40.

is well enough known. it would be an event the likes

:01:41.:01:53.

It doesn't need another characterisation beyond the fact

:01:54.:01:55.

CCTV will soon be mandatory in slaughterhouses with vets

:01:56.:02:03.

watching the footage - the Environment Secretary Michael

:02:04.:02:05.

Gove says it'll make the UK a world leader in animal welfare.

:02:06.:02:08.

We speak to three very different voices to ask if it'll help.

:02:09.:02:13.

There's protests against tourists in Spain.

:02:14.:02:16.

Anarchist groups there say mass tourism is destroying places

:02:17.:02:19.

# When I'm finished # They won't even know your name #

:02:20.:02:33.

Kesha's back with a new album after a five year hiatus,

:02:34.:02:35.

after a long legal battle with her former producer Dr Luke.

:02:36.:02:43.

Here's Ben in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of todays news.

:02:44.:02:55.

US Defence Secretary James Mattis says war against North Korea would

:02:56.:03:02.

be catastrophic. That despite increased rhetoric from Donald

:03:03.:03:07.

Trump. James Mattis says the US is still focused on talking. The

:03:08.:03:14.

American effort is diplomatically lead, it has diplomatic traction and

:03:15.:03:20.

is gaining diplomatic results and I want to stay right there right now.

:03:21.:03:25.

The tragedy of war is well enough known, I does not need another

:03:26.:03:29.

characterisation beyond the fact it would be catastrophic. Lets see what

:03:30.:03:35.

he does with Guam. He does something in Glam it will be an event the

:03:36.:03:41.

likes of which no one has ever seen before, what will happen in North

:03:42.:03:42.

Korea. The UK may continue to face

:03:43.:03:45.

the threat of Islamist terrorism for another "20 to 30 years" ,

:03:46.:03:48.

that's the warning from the former In an interview with the BBC's Today

:03:49.:03:51.

programme, Lord Evans went onto to describe the issue

:03:52.:03:55.

as a "generational problem" and that the UK needed

:03:56.:03:57.

to "persevere" with efforts My guess is that we will still be

:03:58.:03:59.

dealing with the long tail I think this is genuinely

:04:00.:04:08.

a generational problem. I think that we are going to be

:04:09.:04:12.

facing 20 or 30 years of terrorist threats,

:04:13.:04:17.

and therefore we need absolutely One of the former aides

:04:18.:04:19.

to Brexit Secretary David Davis has said that leaving the EU will be

:04:20.:04:29.

a calamity for our country. Speaking to the Today Programme

:04:30.:04:32.

this morning, he said that the Conservatives had been

:04:33.:04:35.

badly damaged by the process - and that promises made to voters

:04:36.:04:38.

during the referendum were false. People have voted for Brexit and,

:04:39.:04:42.

yes, most people do now think, "Well, let's just get on with it,

:04:43.:04:45.

we've made the decision," but Where is the ?350 million a week

:04:46.:04:48.

for the health service? It's going to be a calamity

:04:49.:04:52.

for our country. Firefighters have closed

:04:53.:04:58.

Oxford Circus Underground station in central London following reports

:04:59.:05:00.

of smoke on a train. London Fire Brigade confirmed

:05:01.:05:02.

that they were at the station and investigating smoke

:05:03.:05:05.

on a Bakerloo line train. Witnesses report the smell

:05:06.:05:08.

of burning plastic as they were But the fire is not being

:05:09.:05:11.

treated as suspicious. Donations made to the victims

:05:12.:05:19.

of the Grenfell Tower fire are not reaching survivors quickly enough,

:05:20.:05:22.

according to campaigners Figures from the Charity Commission

:05:23.:05:24.

show that less than 15% of the ?18.9 million raised has

:05:25.:05:28.

been given to people affected, almost two

:05:29.:05:33.

months after the tragedy - but it says that early difficulties

:05:34.:05:35.

in identifying and contacting those Passengers flying from Gatwick

:05:36.:05:53.

during the last two Summers experienced the longest average

:05:54.:05:55.

delays according to data analysed by the BBC. EasyJet Travelers suffered

:05:56.:06:01.

the worst hold-ups with an average delay of 24 minutes. The airport and

:06:02.:06:07.

airline say many of the problems are beyond their control.

:06:08.:06:10.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10:30pm.

:06:11.:06:17.

Let us know who has inspired you in any field, we are talking in

:06:18.:06:25.

particular about Usain Bolt as he retires from athletics tomorrow and

:06:26.:06:29.

we were talking to a girl inspired by Usain Bolt to go into athletics

:06:30.:06:34.

and work hard because she said she could see his worth -- work ethic.

:06:35.:06:43.

We also want to hear from you on this team did eggs story, one person

:06:44.:06:48.

getting in touch seeing the EU nations should stop trying to cover

:06:49.:06:57.

this up, thank goodness for Brexit. Some people waiting for me to drop

:06:58.:07:06.

the pun eggspert. I will not be doing that. It seems you will have

:07:07.:07:17.

to eat seven eggs in 24 hours to have any problems and in terms of

:07:18.:07:22.

how long it took to unfold the issue was first spotted in November but it

:07:23.:07:27.

was last week at Europe-wide alert was put out. Let's catch up with the

:07:28.:07:35.

sport at the London Stadium. Good morning, busy morning session

:07:36.:07:39.

already in action here we have got the men's decathlon and the 100

:07:40.:07:45.

metres heats under way, one person who has been catching the eye here

:07:46.:07:50.

is Dina Asher-Smith of Great Britain, just five years ago she was

:07:51.:07:56.

at this London Stadium for the London 2012 Olympics but was not

:07:57.:08:01.

competing, she was carrying equipment and here she is now racing

:08:02.:08:07.

against the best athletes on the globe. She has really impressed

:08:08.:08:11.

during these championships in the 200 metres and earlier I spoke to

:08:12.:08:16.

her about how tough season has been. I completely broke my foot, I had to

:08:17.:08:23.

have surgery and is then I had to spend six weeks not doing anything,

:08:24.:08:26.

not putting weight on it then gradually putting weight on it,

:08:27.:08:31.

three months I was completely out of pretty much walking then I learnt

:08:32.:08:34.

how to walk and here we are. It wasn't that bad, I am joking, I

:08:35.:08:38.

would not recommend it, it was no fun! There has been lots of talk

:08:39.:08:47.

about the British medal tally, they were given an ambitious target in

:08:48.:08:52.

the run-up, 6-8 medals but there have been a lot of fourth-place

:08:53.:08:57.

finishes, Callum Hawkins in the marathon, Laura Muir in the 1500

:08:58.:09:01.

metres and recently Kyle Langford in the 800 metres. Such fine margins in

:09:02.:09:14.

elite sport. Earlier I spoke to Colin Jackson and he said sometimes

:09:15.:09:18.

results are out of the athletes control. Sometimes you need a bit of

:09:19.:09:26.

luck, we have had four fourth places which could have been bronze medals

:09:27.:09:29.

which would be a different feel for us all. At the beginning of the

:09:30.:09:34.

championships I said we will have many fourth and fifth places that we

:09:35.:09:37.

should celebrate because the team is still developing and with that in

:09:38.:09:41.

mind it is a developing and hungry team, do not give up on them yet.

:09:42.:09:48.

The morning session already underway here, British bands will have a lot

:09:49.:09:52.

to cheer about, Robbie Grabaz scores in the high jump qualifying, he got

:09:53.:09:58.

a medal in Rio last year so will want to put in a good showing and

:09:59.:10:02.

later tonight the final of the women's long jump with the British

:10:03.:10:08.

indoor record-holder who is looking good for possibly a podium place. On

:10:09.:10:15.

the track Lynsey Sharp one of three British women in the semifinals of

:10:16.:10:19.

the 800 metres, the sun is out and there will be lots for fans to cheer

:10:20.:10:21.

about. Thanks. CCTV will be mandatory

:10:22.:10:26.

in all slaughterhouses in England under new plans announced

:10:27.:10:28.

by Environment Cameras will have to be in all areas

:10:29.:10:29.

where live animals are present, with unrestricted access to footage

:10:30.:10:33.

for Official Vets The aim is to reassure consumers

:10:34.:10:35.

that high welfare standards According to a study

:10:36.:10:43.

at Sheffield Hallam University, while some of England's 260

:10:44.:10:46.

slaughterhouses chose to install CCTV, 'the cameras were by-and-large

:10:47.:10:49.

used to prevent meat theft rather than to protect animals,

:10:50.:10:52.

and the footage was Let's talk now to Kate Fowler,

:10:53.:10:54.

who led an undercover camera investigation into slaughterhouses

:10:55.:11:00.

for Animal Aid. Craig Kirby is from the Association

:11:01.:11:06.

of Independent Meat Suppliers, that represents slaughterhouses

:11:07.:11:08.

and has also worked as a vet in slaughterhouses

:11:09.:11:10.

for 20 years in the past. Thank you both for joining us, tell

:11:11.:11:22.

us first of all about your investigations thank you, it started

:11:23.:11:27.

in 2009 when we put our first fly in the wall camera inside a UK

:11:28.:11:31.

slaughterhouse and we did not have any expectations, it was just out of

:11:32.:11:36.

interest. What we found was very worrying, we did not expect to find

:11:37.:11:40.

lawbreaking but we found it. We did not want to go public... What did

:11:41.:11:49.

you find? There was rough handling, questions over stunning, it was not

:11:50.:11:54.

the worst but we had enough concerns we wanted to continue so we placed

:11:55.:11:59.

two more cameras, the next slaughterhouse was better and the

:12:00.:12:02.

one after that significantly worse so we had a whole range of

:12:03.:12:07.

situations. That is when we went public initially. Since 2009 we have

:12:08.:12:11.

placed cameras in a lot more slaughter houses, 14 in total and we

:12:12.:12:17.

believe all but one were breaking animal welfare laws. How widespread

:12:18.:12:22.

the think issues have been? Almost all of them were breaking laws on

:12:23.:12:25.

the day we had the cameras they are, these were not things you could

:12:26.:12:31.

miss, these work punching pigs in the head, using a shackle hooked in

:12:32.:12:34.

the face of an animal, kicking them in the belly, problems with layout

:12:35.:12:42.

and the handling of animals, it is widespread and serious. Craig is

:12:43.:12:48.

that the picture you recognise? I do not think it is a representative

:12:49.:12:52.

example of the food industry in the UK generally, there is another

:12:53.:12:59.

charity that has done a similar activity inside two or three

:13:00.:13:03.

slaughter houses, there are about 260 in the country and everyone of

:13:04.:13:09.

them has a full-time vet. Why would it be the case these things have

:13:10.:13:13.

been happening in the 14, most of the 14 may have looked that? Most of

:13:14.:13:19.

the footage I saw when I was working for the Food Standards Agency with

:13:20.:13:23.

different skills problem, some were technical breaches which were not

:13:24.:13:26.

causing suffering to the animals, some were things which just did not

:13:27.:13:32.

work, to the uneducated eye the process difficult to digestive

:13:33.:13:36.

think, some of the things were very bad and some people have been

:13:37.:13:41.

brought to task. At the slaughter houses you put cameras in, they had

:13:42.:13:47.

vets so how could this be happening? That's a good question, vets work

:13:48.:13:54.

throughout the slaughterhouse, a lot of them do not appear to be at what

:13:55.:13:58.

we call the business end of events. In all of our footage and I

:13:59.:14:02.

personally have watched maybe 300 hours of footage and we have not

:14:03.:14:05.

seen vets coming into the stunning or slaughter areas all that much. So

:14:06.:14:12.

what would you say to that Craig, you have been a vet in a

:14:13.:14:16.

slaughterhouse, have you sometimes not been near being able to see it?

:14:17.:14:21.

It's about having the right skill and knowledge to understand animals

:14:22.:14:24.

and the slaughtering process and being in the right place at the

:14:25.:14:30.

right time. This is why we support mandatory CCTV as a supportive

:14:31.:14:33.

measure because Bates should be there and abattoir owners have got

:14:34.:14:39.

responsibilities to make sure the animals are handled and killed what

:14:40.:14:43.

you mean way possible. If the system was working this would not be

:14:44.:14:49.

happening. CCTV is not the silver bullet to the problem, you have to

:14:50.:14:52.

have people watching it to need to be properly skilled. I think

:14:53.:14:59.

personally the best thing CCTV ads is a training means for abattoir

:15:00.:15:06.

owners to help pick up problems with Staffs bogey staff. It seems unfair

:15:07.:15:10.

we are targeting slaughterhouse staff with government monitored CCTV

:15:11.:15:14.

all the time and no other profession gets this, care home workers are not

:15:15.:15:21.

monitored by CCTV, why are we targeting slaughterhouse workers? Do

:15:22.:15:25.

you think it will make a difference? As Craig is saying it will require a

:15:26.:15:29.

lot of people involved to be across what is coming in.

:15:30.:15:34.

The devil will be in the detail. We are not targeting slaughterhouse

:15:35.:15:41.

workers for no reason, we do not want cameras everywhere but of all

:15:42.:15:44.

the investigations we have found they are not able to comply with the

:15:45.:15:47.

law when they think they are not being watched, so we need better

:15:48.:15:51.

regulation, the current system is clearly not working. We need the

:15:52.:15:55.

cameras monitored independently by somebody with welfare is their

:15:56.:15:59.

priority. We see Association of Independent Meat Suppliers's cameras

:16:00.:16:02.

is a version of independently monitored CCTV. The cameras were

:16:03.:16:24.

placed in the right place, switched on, I and my colleagues watched the

:16:25.:16:28.

footage and reported incidents. That is why so many workers have had

:16:29.:16:30.

licenses removed, why we have had prosecutions and there are more to

:16:31.:16:33.

come and why people have been sent to jail, because the CCTV works, and

:16:34.:16:35.

we hope independently monitored CCTV will do the same thing.

:16:36.:16:38.

Thank you both let me bring you an update on the fire on the Bakerloo

:16:39.:16:40.

line train at Oxford Circus tube station, the Fire Service says it is

:16:41.:16:43.

not being treated as suspicious. Hearing a London Ambulance Service

:16:44.:16:45.

spokesperson saying we were called at 8:53am to reports of an incident

:16:46.:16:48.

on board a Bakerloo line train at Oxford Circus tube, we sent an

:16:49.:16:51.

ambulance crew, the hazardous area response team and an incident

:16:52.:16:55.

response officer to the scene, with the first of the medics arriving in

:16:56.:17:01.

less than five minutes. We four patients at the scene for smoke

:17:02.:17:04.

inhalation and have taken two to hospital as a precaution. There is

:17:05.:17:10.

no information yet as to what caused the smoke.

:17:11.:17:13.

What is the worst airline for flight delays? With the summer getaway

:17:14.:17:17.

getting into the full swing, BBC analysis shows where you will find

:17:18.:17:22.

the longest queues. If you have been now you will probably know! Get in

:17:23.:17:25.

touch if you want to tell us what you have experienced this summer.

:17:26.:17:29.

It's a country which attracts almost 18 million people every year.

:17:30.:17:31.

But now a group protesting against mass tourism in Spain has

:17:32.:17:34.

threatened further attacks after targeting British

:17:35.:17:36.

holiday-makers in Barcelona and Mallorca.

:17:37.:17:37.

A sightseeing bus carrying tourists in the Catalan capital was recently

:17:38.:17:39.

attacked by angry demonstrators who slashed its tyres.

:17:40.:17:42.

They say tourism expels people from their neighbourhoods

:17:43.:17:44.

The group behind the protests, Arran - which has been described

:17:45.:17:52.

by the Spanish Prime Minister as extremists - have said

:17:53.:17:55.

they will be carrying out further action over the summer.

:17:56.:17:57.

So with protests now spreading to other countries like Venice

:17:58.:18:00.

and Dubrovnik in Croatia, how much of an impact will this

:18:01.:18:02.

Let's speak now to Duncan McCann, a researcher at the New Economics

:18:03.:18:09.

And from Madrid Taleb Rifai, who has been the Secretary General

:18:10.:18:13.

of the World Tourism Organization since 2010.

:18:14.:18:21.

Thank you both for joining us. Duncan, first of all, tell us why

:18:22.:18:30.

there is this backlash in some areas, some cities, when obviously

:18:31.:18:34.

tourism has always been a vital part of some local economies? I think it

:18:35.:18:38.

is a variety of reasons for the build-up and why it is reaching its

:18:39.:18:42.

crescendo. I think there has been a long term feeling that economies are

:18:43.:18:47.

not working for people. I think in some of these places which also face

:18:48.:18:51.

pressures of mass tourism, the likes of Airbnb allowing tourists to

:18:52.:18:58.

spread out further and deeper into cities, a change nature of tourism

:18:59.:19:02.

focusing more on city breaks rather than longer holidays and in some of

:19:03.:19:06.

these cities, Venice the best example, the rise of these cruise

:19:07.:19:10.

ships and the impact on these small, old towns. And the concerns around

:19:11.:19:16.

those changes are things like Airbnb, people letting up their

:19:17.:19:20.

places on Airbnb, for instance, putting up rents in cities beyond

:19:21.:19:24.

the affordability of residence. I am trying to understand the impact that

:19:25.:19:32.

Airbnb Empoli can have, especially in places with limited accommodation

:19:33.:19:35.

and regulated rental markets. Barcelona, Berlin, San Francisco are

:19:36.:19:40.

some of the highlights in terms of impact but it definitely spreads of

:19:41.:19:45.

a wider area. Taleb Rifai, what is your reaction to these protests?

:19:46.:19:51.

It's very sad to see that happening, simply because while I agree very

:19:52.:19:57.

much with the professor, we are now because of our inability to manage

:19:58.:20:02.

the situation and make tourism growth a sustainable one, we are

:20:03.:20:05.

sacrificing all the good things that can happen and come out of tourism,

:20:06.:20:10.

the jobs, the benefits, in return for mismanagement. I am fully

:20:11.:20:16.

convinced it is an issue of management and it could be sold. I

:20:17.:20:20.

completely agree with the professor that the cruisers are aggravating

:20:21.:20:26.

the situation in a very great man, but it is not tourism to be blamed.

:20:27.:20:31.

Growth is not the enemy, people are not the enemy, numbers are not the

:20:32.:20:35.

enemy. It is how we manage growth that matters. Or you sympathise with

:20:36.:20:40.

the protesters? Absolutely, absolutely. But I would not be so

:20:41.:20:46.

enthusiastic about it. The same people that are now crying no

:20:47.:20:49.

tourists would be the same ones that will save where are the tourists

:20:50.:20:53.

when they disappear. The benefits that are coming are being ignored

:20:54.:20:57.

and overlooked. The city administrations are the first people

:20:58.:21:02.

to be responsible for that. There are remedies and recipes that we

:21:03.:21:06.

could use to be able to deal with the situation, but instead of doing

:21:07.:21:10.

that some of these city administrators are trying to appease

:21:11.:21:18.

the crowds instead of trying to deal with the problem. The easiest way is

:21:19.:21:21.

to say stop and activity. That is not the way to do it. What remedies

:21:22.:21:26.

would you suggest? For example cruisers would have to be better

:21:27.:21:31.

regulated and stay longer. They stay for a very short period, crowding

:21:32.:21:34.

and consuming the place without giving much benefit to people living

:21:35.:21:39.

there. Cruisers can give coupons to visit people Donegall Place as far

:21:40.:21:43.

away from the centre of the city, they can stop benefiting restaurants

:21:44.:21:46.

and cafes in the city instead of having everybody coming back to the

:21:47.:21:51.

ship. -- they can start benefiting. In a city like Barcelona, if you go

:21:52.:21:57.

just half a kilometre from the city centre, the residents are saying

:21:58.:22:00.

where are the tourists? In fairness if you go one or two kilometres, the

:22:01.:22:06.

beautiful countryside, Hills and chapels -- in Venice if you go one

:22:07.:22:11.

or two kilometres. We should have more investment in surrounding areas

:22:12.:22:15.

to defuse the crowds. There are techniques that are very well proven

:22:16.:22:20.

to be working in crowd management, we are not using this. How much

:22:21.:22:26.

other issue has the opening up of people's homes to tourists been? It

:22:27.:22:32.

can undercut hotels, it means the city breaks have become much

:22:33.:22:36.

cheaper, cheap flights means a greater influx of people into cities

:22:37.:22:43.

in greater numbers, I suppose? Of course it is an issue, but it is

:22:44.:22:49.

remedies. Airbnb is also having its benefits as well. It is bringing

:22:50.:22:56.

direct interests and benefits to communities and families directly.

:22:57.:22:59.

When you have a building completely occupied by them with a minority of

:23:00.:23:04.

the regional residents, of course you will have a reaction. We have

:23:05.:23:08.

tried to say no more than 20% of any building should be rented out, there

:23:09.:23:13.

are issues that can be done, regulations that can be imposed and

:23:14.:23:17.

improved. But we will not stop Airbnb, we will not be able to. We

:23:18.:23:22.

will not be able to stop. We had to deal with it, manage it better and

:23:23.:23:28.

approach it more intelligently. Duncan, Taleb outlined some of the

:23:29.:23:32.

things he thinks will make a difference, are there moves to

:23:33.:23:36.

introduce measures like that? For instance, maybe with regard to

:23:37.:23:41.

Airbnb, Barcelona and Berlin have taken a much more robust attitude to

:23:42.:23:46.

Airbnb, reinforcing the regulations forcing them to compete with the

:23:47.:23:50.

hotel industry on an equal basis. I think you are seeing the start of

:23:51.:23:57.

some authority being reimposed in the system, but Taleb is absolutely

:23:58.:24:01.

right that we need to refocus the benefits of tourism to the local

:24:02.:24:06.

communities rather than having them extracted through these large

:24:07.:24:09.

multinationals that engage in large tours but don't really give back to

:24:10.:24:13.

the local community. That is how we will really move forward. Taleb, are

:24:14.:24:20.

you worried the anger could turn into violence against tourists? It

:24:21.:24:26.

is protests and tyres being slashed at the moment, might it escalate? Of

:24:27.:24:32.

course I am worried. My call is to city administrators, instead of

:24:33.:24:35.

aggravating the situation we can work together. Duncan is correct,

:24:36.:24:43.

Airbnb and the like are ready to cooperate. We should not overlook...

:24:44.:24:49.

One out of every ten jobs in the world as travel and tourism. People

:24:50.:24:58.

that are crying now will be the first to cry at the city mayors and

:24:59.:25:01.

administration when there are motorists, they will say white do we

:25:02.:25:09.

lose that benefit. We should not sacrifice the benefits of a good

:25:10.:25:13.

human activity like travel for the sake of our inability to manage the

:25:14.:25:18.

situation in a proper way. It is a failure of management. Duncan, you

:25:19.:25:26.

can go one a city break very quickly, state in an Airbnb samara

:25:27.:25:30.

is much more quickly when hotels effectively had total control and

:25:31.:25:34.

therefore also controlled numbers. Can this genie be put back on the

:25:35.:25:40.

bottle? I think it will be very challenging, numbers have increased

:25:41.:25:43.

steadily for a very long time, the Chinese market is opening up with a

:25:44.:25:49.

real quantity of tourists wanting to visit Europe and elsewhere, I think

:25:50.:25:53.

you will be very challenging but I think cities need to take back

:25:54.:25:56.

control and places like Bataan actively limit tourist numbers

:25:57.:26:04.

because they really value the local culture, places are trying things.

:26:05.:26:10.

Thailand recently banned some restricted tourists from some

:26:11.:26:13.

specific islands. You are seeing this regaining of control but it

:26:14.:26:17.

will not happen overnight and I think it will be challenging to look

:26:18.:26:21.

at stemming those numbers, but it is not about changing the quality but

:26:22.:26:25.

changing the spread, encouraging people out of the tight city

:26:26.:26:30.

centres, regulating cruisers so you have less mass arrivals who go

:26:31.:26:35.

around very quickly in the city. It is about changing the numbers

:26:36.:26:38.

overall, changing the spread, where they go, how they move within the

:26:39.:26:42.

city, and solutions are out there for these things. Duncan McCann and

:26:43.:26:48.

Taleb Rifai, thank you. And we are staying with travel.

:26:49.:26:49.

We all know that the summer getaway can be a nightmare.

:26:50.:26:51.

Figures from the Civil Aviation Authority analysed by the BBC show

:26:52.:26:54.

that passengers leaving Gatwick have faced the longest average delays

:26:55.:26:57.

When it came to airlines, Easyjet travellers suffered

:26:58.:27:00.

the worst delays among the ten biggest airlines -

:27:01.:27:03.

So what can we expect and what can we do about it?

:27:04.:27:10.

Frank Barrett is the travel editor for the Mail on Sunday.

:27:11.:27:17.

Hi, thank you for joining us. Tell us more about the worst performers.

:27:18.:27:26.

EasyJet seemed to come out as the worst, but as they say in their

:27:27.:27:31.

defence, that is a function of them operating from Gatwick Airport,

:27:32.:27:36.

which is the place you are most likely to suffer delays. It is a bit

:27:37.:27:40.

tough on easyJet, I can say in their defence I have flown with them a few

:27:41.:27:45.

times from Bristol recently and we have been early. If you are delayed

:27:46.:27:52.

it seems like the worst thing on earth, but I would guess the overall

:27:53.:28:01.

picture come out of Gatwick, at least, business has been streamlined

:28:02.:28:06.

to such an extreme that they get to the destination airport and have a

:28:07.:28:09.

20 minute turnaround, there is not much slack. If something is going on

:28:10.:28:14.

it can accumulate throughout the day, but overall I think they do an

:28:15.:28:18.

amazing job. Looking back to where we have come from, it is 40 years

:28:19.:28:22.

ago next month that the sky train started in New York, which ushered

:28:23.:28:26.

in the modern era of cheap air travel. People queued for hours and

:28:27.:28:30.

days to get a cheap tickets, now you can pick them from your mobile phone

:28:31.:28:35.

in a few seconds. We might be getting blase and overexcited that

:28:36.:28:39.

we had to wait ten or 15 minutes to get on a plane or whatever. It might

:28:40.:28:46.

feel churlish to complain when we have such cheap flights, but it can

:28:47.:28:51.

be a huge inconvenience if you are travelling and relying on getting to

:28:52.:28:55.

somewhere at a certain time. Who is to blame. You are talking about the

:28:56.:29:01.

tight turnaround and budget airlines, is that the main culprit?

:29:02.:29:06.

The problem is there are so many things potentially that can delay

:29:07.:29:11.

you, how many times have you waited City people stuck in the bar Origi

:29:12.:29:19.

to free shop and then everybody is tearing their hair out. Lots of

:29:20.:29:23.

things can happen in the procedure of flying, but it looks like it is

:29:24.:29:29.

the outline, but it is a whole number of factors. I am always

:29:30.:29:34.

amazed whenever I fly that the plane takes off and you arrive on time,

:29:35.:29:38.

given what could possibly go wrong. In their favour they are doing a

:29:39.:29:44.

pretty good job. It is tough on the budget airlines, you are being

:29:45.:29:49.

saddled with these quite severe costs after paying compensation. I

:29:50.:29:53.

am all in favour of getting compensation, but if it threatens

:29:54.:29:56.

the business model of the budget airline, I think that is quite

:29:57.:30:00.

worrying as well. A lot of things are into the mix, Brexit is another

:30:01.:30:07.

thing, how will that affect airlines, Britain's relationship

:30:08.:30:10.

with the ATC and everything else that goes on through Europe? Thank

:30:11.:30:13.

you for joining us, Frank Barrett. And you can see how long your summer

:30:14.:30:16.

holiday flight could be delayed by. Just go to our website

:30:17.:30:20.

bbc.co.uk/news, enter the airport you're flight

:30:21.:30:22.

from and your destination, and our online calculator will show

:30:23.:30:24.

you individual airlines' average delays at both airports

:30:25.:30:26.

in the last two years. Still to come, the new Premier

:30:27.:30:41.

League season kicks off tonight, Arsenal take on Leicester City after

:30:42.:30:46.

a summer of big spending. And is back with the new album after a long

:30:47.:30:51.

legal battle with her former producer.

:30:52.:31:16.

James Mattis says the US is still focused on talking. The American

:31:17.:31:26.

effort is diplomatically lead, it has diplomatic traction, it is

:31:27.:31:29.

gaining diplomatic results and I want to stay right there right now,

:31:30.:31:34.

the tragedy of war is well enough known, it does not need another

:31:35.:31:40.

characterisation beyond the fact it would be catastrophic. Lets see what

:31:41.:31:44.

he does with Glam. He does something in

:31:45.:32:03.

The UK may continue to face the threat of Islamist terrorism

:32:04.:32:06.

for another "20 to 30 years" , that's the warning from the former

:32:07.:32:09.

In an interview with the BBC's Today programme, Lord Evans went

:32:10.:32:13.

onto to describe the issue as a "generational problem"

:32:14.:32:15.

and that the UK needed to "persevere" with efforts

:32:16.:32:17.

My guess is that we will still be dealing with the long tail

:32:18.:32:26.

I think this is genuinely a generational problem.

:32:27.:32:29.

I think that we are going to be facing 20 or 30 years

:32:30.:32:32.

of terrorist threats, and therefore we need absolutely

:32:33.:32:34.

Firefighters have closed Oxford Circus Underground station

:32:35.:32:37.

in central London following reports of smoke on a train.

:32:38.:32:40.

London Fire Brigade confirmed that they were at the station

:32:41.:32:46.

the London Ambulance Service is safe four people were treated at the

:32:47.:32:54.

scene for smoke inhalation. The fire is not currently being treated by

:32:55.:32:55.

police as suspicious. Donations made to the victims

:32:56.:32:58.

of the Grenfell Tower fire are not reaching survivors quickly enough,

:32:59.:33:01.

according to campaigners Figures from the Charity Commission

:33:02.:33:03.

show that less than 15% of the ?18.9 million raised has

:33:04.:33:06.

been given to people affected, almost two

:33:07.:33:09.

months after the tragedy - but it says that early difficulties

:33:10.:33:12.

in identifying and contacting those Passengers flying from Gatwick

:33:13.:33:27.

during the last two Summers experienced the longest average

:33:28.:33:29.

delays according to flight data analysed by the BBC. Among the ten

:33:30.:33:36.

biggest airlines EasyJet Travelers suffered the worst hold-ups with an

:33:37.:33:40.

average delay of 24 minutes, both the airport and the airline say many

:33:41.:33:43.

of the problems were beyond their control. That is a summary of the

:33:44.:33:50.

latest BBC News, join me at 11 o'clock for BBC newsroom life.

:33:51.:33:55.

Sports. Busy morning session under way, we

:33:56.:34:06.

have just had the 100 metres heats of the men's decathlon, it was not

:34:07.:34:12.

to be a fairy tale ending for Isaac Makwala in the 200 metre final last

:34:13.:34:16.

night after an incredible few days he could only finish sixth. It was

:34:17.:34:23.

Ramil Guliyev taking gold ahead of the champion at 400 metres and the

:34:24.:34:29.

favourite, Wayde van Niekerk. What a year it has been for Dina

:34:30.:34:34.

Asher-Smith, after breaking her food just six months ago she ran a season

:34:35.:34:38.

's best to make the final of the women's 200 metres. Britain only has

:34:39.:34:43.

one medal so far from a target of 6-8 but there could be a podium

:34:44.:34:50.

finish in the long jump final. And away from the athletics Rory McIlroy

:34:51.:34:53.

said the course played tricky after his opening round at the USPGA

:34:54.:34:58.

championship in North he dropped three shots to finish the day five

:34:59.:35:04.

shots behind the leaders Thorbjorn Olesen and Kevin Kisner.

:35:05.:35:10.

The new Premier League season gets under way tonight,

:35:11.:35:12.

with Arsenal taking on Leicester at the Emirates Stadium

:35:13.:35:14.

It's been another summer of huge spending in the transfer market.

:35:15.:35:19.

Let's take you through a few of the big money buys

:35:20.:35:22.

Manchester United signed the striker Romelu Lukaku

:35:23.:35:25.

Alvaro Morata went from Real Madrid to Chelsea for ?60 million.

:35:26.:35:34.

And Alexandre Lacazette arrived at Arsenal for ?52 million from Lyon.

:35:35.:35:39.

That doesn't even take into account the top spending club -

:35:40.:35:43.

Manchester City - who've dished out a whopping ?212 million pounds

:35:44.:35:46.

on players, and the transfer window hasn't even closed yet!

:35:47.:35:48.

So will the money make any difference to the

:35:49.:35:51.

And away from the biggest spenders there are two clubs who've never

:35:52.:35:55.

Brighton and Huddersfield Town are the newcomers to the league,

:35:56.:36:00.

To discuss all of this and more Pat Nevin, the former

:36:01.:36:07.

Chelsea player and pundit, Rory Smith, who writes

:36:08.:36:09.

for the New York Times, Akhil Vyas from the Arsenal Supporters Trust

:36:10.:36:13.

and Paul Hollas, a Huddersfield Town fan who's got tickets to the game

:36:14.:36:16.

Thank you all very much for joining asked, Paul we will start with you

:36:17.:36:29.

because it is a big deal. Echoes, the biggest season for the club in

:36:30.:36:36.

probably 40 years, 50 years. We have done, we have got no expectations, a

:36:37.:36:42.

lot of pundits have us as relegation fodder and that puts no pressure on

:36:43.:36:46.

us, we have got no limits, we will go and have a go. A comfortable

:36:47.:36:53.

position to be in but you must be thinking, Leicester City? We had the

:36:54.:36:57.

same thing last year, we were tipped to be relegated, we had one of the

:36:58.:37:01.

smallest budgets in the championship but still got promoted. We will do

:37:02.:37:05.

what we can, we are not there to make up the numbers. Who ever anyone

:37:06.:37:11.

supports we love it when the underdog does well so we wish you

:37:12.:37:16.

the best. Pat Nevin, huge amount of money spent on transverse, has it

:37:17.:37:21.

got out of hand? We have been saying this for 20 years maybe more. The

:37:22.:37:28.

money does look a bit stupid, there is no moral argument and I would not

:37:29.:37:32.

make one but it is a market and at the moment the market seems oddly

:37:33.:37:35.

enough to be working because so much money is coming in from the

:37:36.:37:39.

broadcast rights and advertising, coming to the door as well but that

:37:40.:37:46.

appears to be much less of a part of it. I cannot see any obvious

:37:47.:37:50.

stalling of the money, it might do one day but they are a big sums of

:37:51.:37:56.

money, some of the headlines I don't agree with necessarily. Huge sums

:37:57.:38:02.

spent by one club, look at the net spending, they are getting money in

:38:03.:38:08.

from sales, well over ?1 billion spent by Premier League clubs but

:38:09.:38:12.

when you look at the net figure it is less than half of that. Having

:38:13.:38:19.

said that it is still a lot. Is the quality of football getting better?

:38:20.:38:23.

Not necessarily. I think it will be a bit better this season because the

:38:24.:38:28.

top teams were in transition last season, Manchester City, and even

:38:29.:38:34.

though Chelsea won the league they did not have Champions League to put

:38:35.:38:38.

them off, teams like Manchester United are much closer to the place

:38:39.:38:43.

they want to be. Does not seem stylish to say at the moment but I

:38:44.:38:48.

am looking forward to it and it will be exciting. Rory what do you think

:38:49.:38:54.

as we head into the new season? I tend to agree with Pat at the moment

:38:55.:38:59.

you have the top six who will be slightly better on the broad look

:39:00.:39:05.

because of the players they have signs and then you have the

:39:06.:39:08.

remaining, Everton in a league of their own and then the remaining 13

:39:09.:39:12.

clubs who are trying to survive relegation, Huddersfield, I don't

:39:13.:39:18.

think they should look at it with any great trepidation because there

:39:19.:39:20.

are a lot of teams in the Premier League who are not exactly world

:39:21.:39:24.

beaters. What we have seen this summer is they are paying huge sums

:39:25.:39:28.

of money, inflated sums of money for the same players they would have

:39:29.:39:32.

signed two years ago, three years ago, the quality is is less but I

:39:33.:39:38.

think it'll be more exciting the last two or three. What have

:39:39.:39:45.

Huddersfield spent on players? I think about 40 million so far. And

:39:46.:39:50.

some might become more valuable during the course of the season?

:39:51.:39:56.

Absolutely, put it in context, last season our biggest outlay was 1.8

:39:57.:40:00.

million so we broke our transfer record four times in the summer

:40:01.:40:05.

window which is good. You are an Arsenal fan so you are used to these

:40:06.:40:13.

big figures. More than Huddersfield Broadway, yeah. How are you feeling

:40:14.:40:20.

going into the season? Interesting, we started well, signing a left back

:40:21.:40:23.

and a centre forward, we have kept our best players at the moment,

:40:24.:40:29.

Alexis Sanchez and Mesut Ozil. If we can start well we have got three

:40:30.:40:33.

tough games, the window closes and our best players are still here then

:40:34.:40:37.

we can be optimistic. When you go into a new season you have to be

:40:38.:40:43.

optimistic. A lot happened at Arsenal last season, I think it is

:40:44.:40:49.

time for fans to get behind the team and keeping our best players is the

:40:50.:40:54.

key for me. What do you think about the huge sums of money being spent

:40:55.:40:59.

on football and players Pat there never seems to be a backlash? There

:41:00.:41:07.

are some, there will be a moral backlash in certain places. It

:41:08.:41:10.

depends what hat I am wearing when I am having the discussion, as former

:41:11.:41:16.

chairman of the PFA if there is huge money, that is the workers doing the

:41:17.:41:23.

work, but I don't think there is a great moral justification to say

:41:24.:41:26.

someone should be paid these horrendous sums of money. However it

:41:27.:41:30.

is a market and if you are willing to live in a market, my background

:41:31.:41:34.

is economic same way so I would say that. But what it's bringing into

:41:35.:41:40.

the country, what it is selling, how this league sells around the world,

:41:41.:41:44.

I sound as if I am a promoter for the Premier League when I am not for

:41:45.:41:49.

a lot of the time because there are weaknesses but looking at the model

:41:50.:41:53.

I have to say 15 years ago I would be telling you everything has ups

:41:54.:41:58.

and downs. Yet the property market or the economy, football must have

:41:59.:42:02.

that as well. When you look at the players and the amount of money some

:42:03.:42:07.

of them get, even graduate, do you think they are worth it, do you

:42:08.:42:11.

think, what do you think it does to players on the pitch? I'm not sure

:42:12.:42:17.

what it does to them on the pitch but do we begrudge it? For example

:42:18.:42:22.

at Arsenal, media reports telling us Alexis Sanchez once double his

:42:23.:42:28.

wages, the moral side you would think is anybody worth that but at

:42:29.:42:30.

the same time Arsenal need Alexis Sanchez to play for the club. We

:42:31.:42:36.

accept that as fans, if it's the money he wants its the money we will

:42:37.:42:41.

have to pay him. We are in a bit of a situation where we cannot have

:42:42.:42:46.

morals because we want our clubs to win. What do you think Paul? It is a

:42:47.:42:52.

lot of money, I am from up north and there is not a lot of money up north

:42:53.:42:55.

in a lot of areas but at the same token they are top of their

:42:56.:42:59.

profession and lots of other professions earn top money. People

:43:00.:43:01.

pay what they are worth but the pressure is on them to perform. And

:43:02.:43:08.

they do not always and when they do not people say particularly in the

:43:09.:43:13.

national context questions asked if they are hungry enough. I think

:43:14.:43:17.

that's a great question and it's one of the difficulties you have with

:43:18.:43:20.

younger players coming through, if you are making them comfortable for

:43:21.:43:25.

life when they are 90 years of age, you say stay hungry but that easy,

:43:26.:43:29.

when you have everything you want, the car and the life you want, and

:43:30.:43:33.

everyone is telling you you are the best in the world, you are the bee's

:43:34.:43:40.

knees, you take that into your head and it's hard to take yourself back

:43:41.:43:44.

out to normality. When I was playing the game I saw it myself but the

:43:45.:43:49.

good ones have the talent and the right psychology, they keep moving

:43:50.:43:55.

on, and end up being the best because if you iron ?150,000 a week

:43:56.:44:00.

you have probably had to be hungry to get there. Great to talk to you

:44:01.:44:06.

all, thank you. Get in touch with your thoughts in the usual ways.

:44:07.:44:08.

It's just over a month since six-year-old Bradley Lowery

:44:09.:44:11.

died after battling a rare form of cancer.

:44:12.:44:13.

The Sunderland fan won a legion of supporters across the country,

:44:14.:44:16.

Now, in his first interview since Bradley's death,

:44:17.:44:19.

Jermain told the BBC how he's been inspired by his "best mate".

:44:20.:44:27.

They were best friends and it was a friendship

:44:28.:44:29.

which captured the hearts of everyone.

:44:30.:44:30.

I have a nice picture in the house of me and Bradley

:44:31.:44:33.

He loved me, I loved him and after seeing his eyes,

:44:34.:44:56.

it was genuine because he was a child.

:44:57.:44:58.

There was nothing I could give him apart from just being a friend.

:44:59.:45:06.

Even towards the end, when he was really struggling

:45:07.:45:11.

and he couldn't really move, I would walk into the room

:45:12.:45:16.

and he would just jump up and his mum said,

:45:17.:45:19.

"He hasn't moved all day," so yeah, it was a special feeling.

:45:20.:45:24.

The emotion is still raw but the impact the little boy has

:45:25.:45:27.

The Bournemouth striker says it is a gift and he will

:45:28.:45:32.

I always wake up thinking, you know, if you don't feel well,

:45:33.:45:41.

Because I can see little kids suffer like that and still fight,

:45:42.:45:46.

to me, there is no bigger motivation.

:45:47.:45:50.

If he could go through that and fight.

:45:51.:45:58.

You walked out with him so many times.

:45:59.:46:02.

But was that England moment the best?

:46:03.:46:05.

I came down the tunnel, gave him a cuddle.

:46:06.:46:12.

Joe Hart said to me, you walk the team out.

:46:13.:46:16.

For him to do that, that was special.

:46:17.:46:18.

And we walked out, standing there, singing the national anthem.

:46:19.:46:24.

Being involved in the squad and actually playing, and scoring...

:46:25.:46:31.

For me, it's one of the best moments of my career.

:46:32.:46:37.

You can see the whole of Juliette Ferrington's

:46:38.:46:39.

interview with Jermain Defoe on Football Focus

:46:40.:46:41.

We are in the middle of the school holidays, which means a chance to

:46:42.:46:53.

rest, recuperate and have fun with friends and family for many. But for

:46:54.:46:59.

the children who escaped the Grenfell tower fire, summer has

:47:00.:47:04.

brought shock. Around 600 children from the Grenfell Tower

:47:05.:47:06.

neighbourhood have been referred to mental health services in the

:47:07.:47:10.

aftermath of the fire. Just how well are these children coping? Ashley

:47:11.:47:16.

Jean-Baptiste Dubie with 112-year-old survivor, and his

:47:17.:47:21.

adoptive grandmother. They went swimming at the leisure centre close

:47:22.:47:22.

to their former home. He lived on the first

:47:23.:47:32.

floor of Grenfell Tower with his adoptive grandmother,

:47:33.:47:37.

Rumayatu Mamudu. They escaped the tower

:47:38.:47:45.

during the night of the fire, and eight weeks on, Tyrshondre has

:47:46.:47:48.

broken up from school It's the summer holiday,

:47:49.:47:50.

how's it going? Does it at all feel different not

:47:51.:47:53.

being at the home you're used to? Can you tell me what toys

:47:54.:47:59.

you lost in the fire? My piano, my Wii Fit Plus,

:48:00.:48:03.

my Wii console, everything. What do you miss

:48:04.:48:07.

about your old home? It's been eight weeks

:48:08.:48:10.

since you lost your home. To tell you the truth,

:48:11.:48:28.

I think things are getting worse. If we had a little bit

:48:29.:48:34.

of attention as survivors, we would now be getting

:48:35.:48:37.

ready for closure. We have support from the society,

:48:38.:48:47.

from the charity organisation, If only the government would do

:48:48.:48:53.

their best to give us a roof. He wakes up in the night,

:48:54.:48:58.

he's afraid there might be a fire. So the fear is still in him,

:48:59.:49:07.

until we have a place Does it feel like the normal

:49:08.:49:17.

summer holiday for you? No, it can never feel

:49:18.:49:22.

like a normal summer holiday. I have been offered to go

:49:23.:49:28.

on holiday, but how could you go on holiday when you are not sure

:49:29.:49:32.

what you are coming back to? Have you got used to living

:49:33.:49:42.

in a hotel with your grandson? A hotel is supposed to be temporary

:49:43.:49:47.

accommodation for travellers. I was offered a place two weeks ago,

:49:48.:49:50.

outside my borough. I've spent 46 years of my

:49:51.:49:58.

life in this borough. My five children were born

:49:59.:50:03.

in this borough, they went So I don't see why I should be

:50:04.:50:06.

moved out of my borough. How are you making sure

:50:07.:50:14.

that your grandson's OK? Well, I tried to see some

:50:15.:50:33.

consultants, to talk to them, Is it getting tiring having

:50:34.:50:35.

these chats and feeling Everything done repeatedly

:50:36.:50:42.

without any result is boring. But to go back to that

:50:43.:50:49.

same hotel, I just feel sick going there every

:50:50.:50:51.

day, every day... Are you looking forward

:50:52.:50:54.

to going back to school? We are alive, which is most

:50:55.:51:10.

important, and we have We will try our best

:51:11.:51:23.

to look after one another. Tyrshondre and his grandmother

:51:24.:51:57.

talking to Ashley. This week and will's fastest man Usain Bolt takes

:51:58.:52:00.

part in his final competitive race at the world athletics Championships

:52:01.:52:05.

in London before retiring. During his career the sprinter has won

:52:06.:52:08.

eight Olympic gold medal 's and holds a 100 and 200 metre world

:52:09.:52:13.

records. Earlier I spoke to Ben Bloom of the Telegraph, 13-year-old

:52:14.:52:17.

via red, a Usain Bolt van, along with her father, and the three-time

:52:18.:52:22.

Olympic medallist sprinter Kriss Akabusi, who explained what kind of

:52:23.:52:28.

legacy Bolt will be. He is an icon of the sport, ranked alongside

:52:29.:52:34.

Moses, Lord Coe, Daley Thompson, Michael Johnson, Bubka. These guys

:52:35.:52:43.

are icons of the sport. Usain is the icon of his day and has surpassed

:52:44.:52:47.

some of those guys, inasmuch as he has won three Olympic golds in track

:52:48.:52:53.

and field events, phenomenal. Vera, you have been inspired by Usain

:52:54.:52:59.

Bolt. What was it and when did it happen? I first saw him when he beat

:53:00.:53:03.

the world record in 2008, I could see it was through hard work and

:53:04.:53:07.

determination that he put in to get where he is today, to be the fastest

:53:08.:53:10.

man. What impact has it had on you? It has

:53:11.:53:24.

taught me to work harder, I could always come back stronger if I

:53:25.:53:27.

worked harder for the next race. What are you doing in athletics? 200

:53:28.:53:30.

metres, it is going well so far. It is always nice when a child has a

:53:31.:53:33.

role model to look up to that can help to propel them forward? Of

:53:34.:53:40.

course. My family have a lot of interest in sports, and is glad that

:53:41.:53:44.

it is always their duty and obligation to support them in any

:53:45.:53:51.

form -- always my duty and obligation. Taking them from one

:53:52.:53:55.

place to another, financially and otherwise. Ben, he is an athlete who

:53:56.:54:00.

does not seem to have put a foot wrong, people love him and he has

:54:01.:54:06.

performed amazingly? People do, I would take it a step forward than

:54:07.:54:10.

what Chris said, he named some of the greats that athletics has had

:54:11.:54:15.

over the years, they are big within the sport and somewhat transcend the

:54:16.:54:18.

sport, athletics has never had anyone like Usain Bolt before he was

:54:19.:54:23.

bigger than the sport. You can say the name Bolt anywhere in the world

:54:24.:54:28.

and they will know who this man is. Jason has said inspiring is a term

:54:29.:54:33.

used lightly, Usain Bolt has set the world alight and inspired millions,

:54:34.:54:38.

myself included. Steve said my family is by me, I

:54:39.:54:43.

don't need sporting people for inspiration, the UK make too much of

:54:44.:54:48.

a deal about sportspeople. Taylor Swift appeared in court

:54:49.:54:51.

yesterday to testify against a DJ she said put his hand up her skirt

:54:52.:54:55.

and grabbed her backside. She has asked for a symbolic $1 in damages,

:54:56.:55:00.

our entertainment reporter Chi Chi Izundu is here with more. What is

:55:01.:55:05.

she claiming? This is quite complicated, initially this happened

:55:06.:55:11.

back in 2013 and the DJ actually sued Taylor Swift because of the

:55:12.:55:15.

allegation. She has since countersued him. She claims that

:55:16.:55:21.

they were taking a picture backstage at one of her concerts and he put

:55:22.:55:26.

his hand behind her skirt and grabbed her backside. In court she

:55:27.:55:30.

basically said it was a definite grabber, a very long grab, it was

:55:31.:55:35.

intentional, he latched onto her backside. David Mueller, the DJ

:55:36.:55:41.

being accused of doing this, told the court that he may have made an

:55:42.:55:48.

innocent physical contact like brushing her arm or torso but he has

:55:49.:55:55.

denied any inappropriate behaviour. Taylor said security had seen him

:55:56.:56:01.

actually grab her backside and lift my skirt but only a person on the

:56:02.:56:05.

floor looking up my skirt would have seen the fallout, and of course we

:56:06.:56:09.

did not have someone in that position. Her testimony was very

:56:10.:56:15.

direct. Is there any evidence to back up? This whole court case hangs

:56:16.:56:19.

on a picture, and the picture is what is being used as Taylor Swift's

:56:20.:56:24.

evidence. Her mum gave testimony, her mum as part of her management

:56:25.:56:28.

team, she said because it happened and what they call a meeting greed,

:56:29.:56:33.

where artists meet and greet fans after a concert, she said they have

:56:34.:56:38.

made that much smaller, they have added metal detectors, note the use

:56:39.:56:41.

metal wants to one's people when they come in and they do background

:56:42.:56:51.

checks on people before Taylor meets any fans, she said it totally

:56:52.:56:53.

absolutely shattered their trust. Mueller's lawyer told Taylor Swift

:56:54.:56:59.

at one point why could she not reported when it happened? Taylor

:57:00.:57:03.

Swift said your clients could have taken a normal picture with me

:57:04.:57:06.

instead of her having to reported. She said she did not at the time

:57:07.:57:10.

because she had other fans to meet and did not want to disappoint them,

:57:11.:57:15.

but two days later Mueller was fired from his $150,000 a year job after

:57:16.:57:27.

she reported it, that is when she took the counteraction. She wants to

:57:28.:57:31.

highlight it is not OK. During her testimony yesterday she said to his

:57:32.:57:35.

lawyer I will not allow you or your client to make me feel in any way

:57:36.:57:40.

that it is my fault. She wants to highlight it is an issue that

:57:41.:57:43.

happens to women all around the world and it is not OK. She is

:57:44.:57:50.

asking for just a dollar. Thank you for dating is. Oxford Circus tube

:57:51.:57:56.

station has reopened, it was temporarily closed earlier after

:57:57.:57:59.

there was smoke on a bacon blue line train at Oxford Circus. We have had

:58:00.:58:04.

pictures coming through social media and we spoke to one of the

:58:05.:58:08.

passengers who saw the smoke in the carriage. It is not clear what

:58:09.:58:12.

caused the smoke to be there but four people were treated for smoke

:58:13.:58:18.

inhalation and it has not been treated as suspicious. Thank you for

:58:19.:58:22.

your company today, I will be here every day next week, in the meantime

:58:23.:58:26.

have a lovely afternoon and a good weekend. Goodbye.

:58:27.:58:42.

Good morning. Looking pretty nice at the moment across the south-east of

:58:43.:58:46.

England, but for

:58:47.:58:48.

Joanna Gosling presents. A 12-year-old boy who lost all his possessions in the Grenfell Tower fire discusses his experiences and there is a look at eggs in the UK following the recent contamination scare.

As CCTV is to become compulsory in all abattoirs in England, the programme hears from Animal Aid, which since 2009 has secretly filmed inside 13 British slaughterhouses.