14/08/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


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14/08/2017

Joanna Gosling looks at indefinite 'public protection' prison sentences.


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It's nine o'clock, I'm Joanna Gosling.

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Urgent action is needed to deal with thousands of prisoners

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still serving time on indeterminate sentences where they are still

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inside years after the jail term they were given.

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I don't like getting up in the morning, because I don't know what

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is going to happen. There might be a phone call. A phone call to say

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what? That he took his own life, I think that is what is going to

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happen if we can't get him out. We'll hear from the families

:00:45.:00:47.

of two men who have been in prison for years longer

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than their original sentence. Rallies and vigils in cities

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across America to condemn the violence and hatred seen

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in Charlottesville Virgina at the weekend when white

:00:56.:01:01.

supremicists and anti-fascists The American vice president

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Mike Pence has condemned far right protestors

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over the violence. We have no tolerance for hate

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and violence from white These dangerous fringe groups have

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no place in American public life and the American public debate

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and we condemn them And 70 years ago 200 years

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of British colonial rule in India came to an end when the country

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was partitioned into Pakistan and India -

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hundreds of thousands of people were killed as violence

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erupted on both sides. We will talk to two families

:01:42.:01:43.

about what it meant for them Welcome to the programme,

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we're live until 11 this morning. Do get in touch on all the stories

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we're talking about today - including the news of a big increase

:02:01.:02:03.

in the number of people being arrested for being drunk

:02:04.:02:06.

at airports or on flights. If you work in the travel industry

:02:07.:02:11.

and have experienced drunk passengers or if you're a traveller

:02:12.:02:17.

with views on whether licensing laws should be changed -

:02:18.:02:20.

do get in contact. Use the hashtag Victoria Live

:02:21.:02:22.

and if you text, you will be charged The US Vice President, Mike Pence,

:02:23.:02:25.

has responded to the weekend's deadly violence at a white

:02:26.:02:30.

supremacist rally in Virginia - by saying he condemns

:02:31.:02:33.

white supremacists "in A vigil was held in Charlottesville

:02:34.:02:34.

last night to remember Heather Heyer, who was killed

:02:35.:02:41.

during the protests. 19 others were injured when a car

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was driven into a crowd President Trump has been criticised

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for failing to speak out Our Washington Correspondent Laura

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Bicker has this report. The candles and songs

:02:52.:02:58.

are for Heather Heyer, who died standing up

:02:59.:03:04.

for what she believed in. After a weekend of deadly

:03:05.:03:09.

violence and anger on the streets, there is now

:03:10.:03:23.

a longing to come together Heather was one of the

:03:24.:03:25.

demonstrators trying to stop white supremacists marching

:03:26.:03:29.

through Charlottesville on Saturday. She was killed when

:03:30.:03:30.

this car ploughed Her close friend now

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appeals for unity. I want everybody to get together

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and unite and spread love and spread peace and spread happiness

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and don't let hate live. Don't just let someone

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walk away freely Tell them that that's not

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OK, that it's not OK. One of the organisers

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of the Unite The Right rally And as he left,

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he was forced to flee. Armed police had to

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escort him from the city. He's condemned the

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violence but says he I feel like my First Amendment

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rights and the rights of the people at my

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rally were violated. But there is no sympathy here for

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those who brought hate to the city. Laura Bicker, BBC News,

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Charlottesville. Rachel Schofield is in the BBC

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Newsroom with a summary The chairman of the Parole Board

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Nick Hardwick says ministers "must act now" to address the backlog

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of prisoners serving The sentence, known as Imprisonment

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for Public Protection, or IPP, was abolished in 2012 but more

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than 3000 people in England and Wales are still being held

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with no release date. The Ministry of Justice says it's

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working to process these cases And we'll have more on that

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story in a few minutes. Arrests of passengers suspected

:05:06.:05:12.

of being drunk at UK airports and on flights have risen

:05:13.:05:14.

by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation

:05:15.:05:17.

carried out by Panorama. Critics of the airline industry say

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a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working,

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and want the government A spokesman for the Home Office said

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they will respond in due course. A man has been charged

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with the murder of a grandfather who was attacked as he walked his

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dogs in Norfolk. The body of 83-year-old

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Peter Wrighton was found in woodland near the village

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of East Harling last Saturday. Police say he had been

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repeatedly stabbed. Alexander Palmer, who's 23,

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is due in court later today. Armed officers in the UK's biggest

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police force are to be issued They will be attached

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to the caps and protective helmets of members of

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the Metropolitan Police's Scotland Yard has yet to decide

:06:03.:06:04.

on how to use body-worn cameras Security forces in Burkina Faso have

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killed two suspected jihadist gunmen after a terrorist attack

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in the capital. The country's communications

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minister says a number of hostages were trapped inside a restaurant

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after gunmen opened At least 18 people are believed

:06:23.:06:24.

to have been killed in the attack South Korea's President has urged

:06:25.:06:32.

both the US and North Korea to act reasonably and peacefully

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in the current nuclear stand off. Moon Jae-in said, "There must be no

:06:43.:06:49.

more war on the Korean Peninsula". His comments come after a week of

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ratcheting up of tensions by the US He's due to meet America's most

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senior military officer later today. Up to 140,000 vulnerable children

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did not receive the help they needed last year

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because their situation was not judged to be serious enough,

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according to Action for Children. The charity has found thousands

:07:17.:07:19.

of young people referred to social services did not end up getting any

:07:20.:07:21.

support before their The government says its reforms

:07:22.:07:24.

will improve the situation. Debbie has been working

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in children's services for 16 years and helps families with anything

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from behavioural problems But she says it's become harder

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to provide the support they need. I've got, across the sites I run,

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I've got just under 2,500 under fives and three

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members of staff, so as much as we do,

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there's a lot that we can't possibly do because we can't be

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everywhere at once. We're already aware of families

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that we're not picking up in the same way and it's only

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going to get worse from that. A freedom of information request

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to local authorities found that last year, 184,500 children's needs

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assessments were closed because they fell short

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of the criteria for support. The charity Action For Children

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says only around one in four families received early help

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services such as children's centres We know from too many cases

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that if we're not able to help children early,

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that there are strong likelihoods For example, in serious

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case reviews, 70% of the time we know that there

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have been early warning signs But we also know that if we give

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children and families the tools to help themselves much earlier,

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then they're much more likely not to need help

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later on in any case. The local government association

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blames government cuts But the Department

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for Education says it's taking action to support vulnerable

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children by reforming social care services and better

:08:59.:09:00.

protecting victims It says councils spent almost

:09:01.:09:02.

?8 billion last year on children's social care,

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but it wants to help them do more. Pakistan is celebrating the 70th

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anniversary of its creation There were fireworks at midnight

:09:10.:09:15.

to mark the moment of partition from India at the end

:09:16.:09:22.

of British colonial rule. The partition of British India

:09:23.:09:27.

in 1947 was marked by the largest mass migration in history,

:09:28.:09:31.

with huge bloodshed on both sides. The American space agency's Cassini

:09:32.:09:36.

probe has begun the final phase The satellite has begun a series

:09:37.:09:39.

of "ultra-close" passes through Scientists are hoping it will reveal

:09:40.:09:44.

more about the chemical make-up and internal structure

:09:45.:09:50.

of the planet. It is either Billy one of the most

:09:51.:10:02.

distinctive sounds in the world -- it is arguably one of the most.

:10:03.:10:16.

However, next Monday at midday Big Ben will chime for the final

:10:17.:10:32.

time until 2021 to allow repair work to take place on the clock

:10:33.:10:35.

The bells will still ring out on Remembrance Sunday

:10:36.:10:38.

and at New Year but will otherwise fall silent for only

:10:39.:10:41.

Experts have suggested removing soot and repairing the bell in the clock

:10:42.:10:45.

could change the frequency of the soundwaves and even

:10:46.:10:47.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 930am.

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Let's get some sport with Hugh Ferris.

:10:52.:10:53.

Let's start with athletics and a string of medals over

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the weekend saw Great Britain reach their medal target.

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If you had asked me on Saturday morning I would have said not

:10:59.:11:03.

particularly brilliant, but now you are asking me on Monday night I

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would say quite impressive. The medal target was 5-8 and so they got

:11:07.:11:12.

six in the end, and four of those came over the weekend. Five in the

:11:13.:11:17.

last 48 hours if you include Mo Farah, but the women's four by 400

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metres have the won a medal in each of the last five championships. And

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then there was a bronze for the men's Quartet. Martyn Rooney on the

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last leg there. The relay medals papered over the cracks, some would

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say, after it was a disappointing championships and till then, but

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they have been very much investing time and money on the relay squad

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and it has paid dividends. It is a very young team, as well. You have

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to look at many fourth-place achievements by young athletes who

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will use this as a jumping off point for what will come in the next three

:12:08.:12:08.

years. How did Tom Bosworth get

:12:09.:12:11.

on in the 20 kilometre walk? Many people remember him from the

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Victoria Derbyshire programme when he came out as being gay, a very

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emotional time for him a couple of years ago, and it was very emotional

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for him yesterday, he was disqualified while leading in the 20

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kilometres walk. You basically get three red cards and then you are

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out, and there he is, he was devastated. He had to be

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disqualified from the race. He was very upset afterwards. This is just

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the beginning. These bad days happened but they make the good day

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's taste really good and the support I've had from everyone, I'm sorry...

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I've let them down and I can get a medal, but I know I can get a medal

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one-day. I won't be complacent, I've got to work hard and come out and

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show what Eichenried do. Such a shame, but he will go on to bigger

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and better things few -- show what I can really do.

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And Usain Bolt and MO Farah said their goodbyes yesterday?

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Usain Bolt was given a piece of the 2012 track, the Lane in which he won

:13:37.:13:44.

the 100 metres five years ago. He has said he will now spend time

:13:45.:13:51.

having some fun. Not like he hadn't had any for the last ten years for

:13:52.:13:57.

the Mo Farah departed with strong and angry words, saying part of the

:13:58.:14:02.

media had tried to destroy his legacy, concerning his relationship

:14:03.:14:07.

with his coach Alberto Salazar, who is being investigated by the US

:14:08.:14:12.

anti-doping agency. He has not been accused of anything wrong in terms

:14:13.:14:16.

of doping, but Mo Farah was not pleased that his legacy might be

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tarnished. I will still keep fighting and working hard and making

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my country proud, and I'm proud to be British and put my GB vest on and

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do it for my country. You can write what you like, but at the same time,

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I'm a clean athlete and as long as I sleep well at night and laughing my

:14:36.:14:43.

children, showing what's right, that is what counts -- loving. He is so

:14:44.:14:58.

going to be known as Mohammed Farah now.

:14:59.:15:00.

Away from the athletics, there was an unlikely winner

:15:01.:15:02.

Yes, his name is Justin Thomas. He was known for his sartorial

:15:03.:15:13.

elegance, but he is an American. And this is one of his six birdies on

:15:14.:15:18.

his final-round 68. Trust me, that was one of his six birdies. He walks

:15:19.:15:28.

away, and then he finds that a gust of wind is on his side and in it

:15:29.:15:35.

goes. It was very dramatic, at 1.5 players shared the lead. -- at one

:15:36.:15:44.

point five players. He is one of a new group of Americans, along with

:15:45.:15:47.

the likes of Jordan Spieth, who failed to become the youngest ever

:15:48.:15:53.

player to win a golfing grand slam. They are good friends and they will

:15:54.:15:57.

be a real challenge to the likes of Rory McIlroy in the years to come,

:15:58.:16:00.

but once again a new winner of a major tournament. Watch out for

:16:01.:16:09.

Justin Thomas and his 14 seconds putt. Thanks for joining us.

:16:10.:16:14.

One person has written to us to say, why don't they close the bars at

:16:15.:16:22.

airports, it is just profits that keep them going. Each traveller

:16:23.:16:27.

could buy in airports but not be allowed to have it until they land

:16:28.:16:31.

at their destination and it would be much easier to ban it altogether,

:16:32.:16:38.

they say. Let us know what you think about thinking on planes. --

:16:39.:16:40.

drinking. 11 years ago today James Ward

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was given a 10 month He is still inside and still

:16:47.:16:48.

has no release date. He is serving what's

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known as an indeterminate sentence called an IPP -

:16:53.:16:53.

Imprisonment for Public Protection. Labour introduced them in 2003

:16:54.:16:56.

and thought they would apply to a few hundred serious violent

:16:57.:16:58.

and sexual offenders. Ken Clarke - when he was

:16:59.:17:00.

the Justice Secretary - called them a "stain"

:17:01.:17:05.

on the criminal justice Let's talk to Zoe Conway who's been

:17:06.:17:07.

investigating this for us. We will be discussing self harm

:17:08.:17:22.

within this section of the programme, so you may find that

:17:23.:17:28.

upsetting and distressing. Imprisonment for Public Protection

:17:29.:17:32.

was brought in by Labour in 2005 but abolished in 2012. It wasn't

:17:33.:17:40.

retroactive which means there are still thousands of people in prison

:17:41.:17:44.

on the sentence. At its peak there were 6000 IPP prisoners. Now there

:17:45.:17:58.

are 3300. 85% of them have already served the minimum sentence or

:17:59.:18:01.

tariff. This is what is called the punishment bit of the sentence.

:18:02.:18:06.

They've already done that bit of the sentence and yet they are still in

:18:07.:18:09.

prison. In terms of how over the tariff they are, we are looking at

:18:10.:18:16.

465 prisoners who were given two years or less, who are now serving

:18:17.:18:24.

many more years than that. 465 had served at least five years on top of

:18:25.:18:30.

that tariff. We are talking about some people who have served an

:18:31.:18:34.

extraordinary length of time. 48 prisoners have in fact served more

:18:35.:18:41.

than ten years over their minimum. They might have got in the case of

:18:42.:18:46.

James Ward, ten months. And yet 11 years later, he is still in prison.

:18:47.:18:51.

This is what is causing such concern amongst prison campaigners. This

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morning we heard from Nick Hardwick the chairman of the parole board and

:18:57.:19:00.

he is urging the government to act. He's been calling on them for the

:19:01.:19:05.

last year to get a grip on this. He wants to put the burden of proof on

:19:06.:19:10.

the state, on the present system, to prove that these prisoners still

:19:11.:19:17.

pose a serious risk. At the moment you get towards the end of your

:19:18.:19:21.

tariff, you have to show a parole board you are no longer a risk. Many

:19:22.:19:26.

people including Ken Clarke and Nick Hardwick, also including Michael

:19:27.:19:30.

Gove, are saying how can a prison prove they are no longer a risk? It

:19:31.:19:35.

has to be up to the state to decide that. Nick Hardwick feels the parole

:19:36.:19:40.

board has made some progress, 900 people have been released in the

:19:41.:19:46.

last year but now it's up to the government to move things along. Why

:19:47.:19:50.

is it taking so long? There are many reasons but part of the problem is

:19:51.:19:54.

because there are so many more people in prison than was ever in

:19:55.:19:58.

visit, the system can't cope. They are supposed to be able to access

:19:59.:20:03.

courses to reduce their risk, there are huge waiting lists for these

:20:04.:20:08.

courses. Then they have a parole board hearing, they have to do

:20:09.:20:13.

another course and they get stuck. Last week, I spent time with the

:20:14.:20:20.

family of James Ward who went to visit him in prison. I spent the day

:20:21.:20:25.

with them and we filmed with them. It was rather distressing because

:20:26.:20:29.

James has been self harming. This film contains some quite distressing

:20:30.:20:30.

scenes. It's been a while since

:20:31.:20:35.

we have seen him last. I don't think we have

:20:36.:20:38.

seen him this year. Bill and Christine

:20:39.:20:41.

Ward are preparing themselves to visit

:20:42.:20:43.

their son in prison. He has been locked up

:20:44.:20:45.

for the last 11 years. They don't know what to

:20:46.:20:47.

expect when they see him. I think this is the worst

:20:48.:20:51.

year I have ever done with James, because it is touch

:20:52.:20:58.

and go, kind of thing. One minute he's up,

:20:59.:21:03.

the next minute he is down. He is like us, he doesn't

:21:04.:21:07.

know where he is. When James was 17, he went to prison

:21:08.:21:17.

for a year for assault. Near the end of his

:21:18.:21:20.

sentence, he set fire For doing this, a judge

:21:21.:21:22.

gave him an IPP, or imprisonment for

:21:23.:21:26.

public protection, and said he should serve

:21:27.:21:27.

a minimum of ten months. It really does get to you,

:21:28.:21:32.

you can't sleep at night. You get up, have a cup

:21:33.:21:41.

of tea, it still I can't remember when I proper

:21:42.:21:45.

laughed, the last time I laughed. I don't know what it is

:21:46.:21:57.

like to have a good time James wanted to write to us

:21:58.:22:06.

but he is not allowed pens I was rushed to

:22:07.:22:16.

hospital last week as I feel ill treated and I'm still not

:22:17.:22:21.

getting anywhere after all these I have spoken to my sister recently

:22:22.:22:28.

and she was in tears I am trying so hard to stay

:22:29.:22:32.

as strong as possible but I couldn't promise her that I wouldn't

:22:33.:22:41.

do something stupid. He shoved a pen in his arm

:22:42.:22:51.

so he went to hospital for that, Basically James is saying that

:22:52.:22:54.

when he is crying out for help, he is not getting any

:22:55.:22:58.

and that is why we are so dedicated, you know, to getting him home

:22:59.:23:01.

because we have got 100% dedication. James is just a number to them,

:23:02.:23:04.

you know, he is family member, he is my brother, we can look

:23:05.:23:07.

after him, we can get him the right help, you know,

:23:08.:23:10.

and every day we could be with him and step-by-step

:23:11.:23:14.

we can get him there. In order to be released,

:23:15.:23:15.

IPP prisoners must prove to a parole board that they are no longer

:23:16.:23:18.

a risk to society. That might sound straightforward

:23:19.:23:20.

but many have struggled to access the programmes designed

:23:21.:23:23.

to reduce that risk. Some people watching this will say,

:23:24.:23:25.

he must have done things in prison to deserve him being kept there this

:23:26.:23:31.

long, that this 11 years has to be for reason,

:23:32.:23:34.

it has to be his fault. I can't stress enough

:23:35.:23:40.

how untrue that is. A mattress fire, you know, a piece

:23:41.:23:43.

of paper has been set on fire, James has chucked his bed

:23:44.:23:46.

about around his cell a little bit. This does not, I can't stress

:23:47.:23:49.

enough, he's not dangerous, he has never been violent in the 11

:23:50.:23:52.

years in prison. The officers said that they never

:23:53.:23:54.

feel unsafe around James. James' parole hearings have

:23:55.:24:00.

been delayed repeatedly because the prison service has

:24:01.:24:03.

failed to carry out vital His upcoming hearing in September

:24:04.:24:05.

is more than a year behind schedule. I dread getting up in the morning

:24:06.:24:13.

because I don't know what is going to be coming

:24:14.:24:16.

that they, what is going to happen. Is there going to be

:24:17.:24:19.

a knock on the door, is there going to be a phone

:24:20.:24:21.

call or whatever? Took his own life and that is

:24:22.:24:24.

what I believe he will do. If we can't get him out, I think

:24:25.:24:30.

that's what it's going to be. This is the first visit

:24:31.:24:33.

by James' family since James feels so unsafe on the main

:24:34.:24:53.

wing here at Garth Prison that he deliberately behaves badly

:24:54.:25:00.

to get himself to put The Chief Inspector of Prisons

:25:01.:25:02.

wrote a damning report It was called very unsafe

:25:03.:25:08.

and the segregation unit was said to be fellow

:25:09.:25:15.

prisoners seeking sanctuary. The living conditions were very poor

:25:16.:25:17.

and the staff overwhelmed. He is not sleeping,

:25:18.:25:25.

he has lost weight... Pippa Carruthers has

:25:26.:25:34.

been representing James She says key paperwork

:25:35.:25:35.

is still missing. So the parole board is meant to meet

:25:36.:25:41.

on the 6th of September, how optimistic are you that the board

:25:42.:25:44.

is actually going to be able to make a decision

:25:45.:25:46.

about what to do with James? We are now less than a month away

:25:47.:25:51.

from the hearing where potentially the parole board will still not

:25:52.:25:55.

have the information it needs in order to make

:25:56.:25:58.

a thorough realistic decision about whether James can be

:25:59.:26:00.

managed in the community. A further knock back,

:26:01.:26:06.

particularly in circumstances where I will have to explain to him

:26:07.:26:09.

that some of the reasons are because of things that haven't

:26:10.:26:12.

been available or done thoroughly enough or made available

:26:13.:26:14.

to the parole board will be extremely difficult for him

:26:15.:26:17.

to understand and to take. James' family may have got used

:26:18.:26:26.

to hearing about his self harming, but they are unprepared for just how

:26:27.:26:28.

ill he looked on the visit. We've got in there, James looked

:26:29.:26:40.

absolutely terrible. His skin's yellow, he has

:26:41.:26:41.

lost so much weight. And they are just

:26:42.:26:44.

leaving him there to rot. This is not just about mental

:26:45.:26:49.

illness, he cannot cope in there. He was on a wing, he thought

:26:50.:26:55.

he was doing OK, they found out he was a IPP prisoner and that makes

:26:56.:26:58.

them vulnerable and then they want him to do silly things

:26:59.:27:02.

and if he doesn't cooperate So he's had separate himself

:27:03.:27:05.

against which means causing problems, causing trouble

:27:06.:27:09.

so obviously that looks bad for the fact that he has

:27:10.:27:12.

to misbehaves to get himself in the block, to protect himself,

:27:13.:27:15.

and then because he is on constant watch because of the self harm,

:27:16.:27:18.

he's literally sat behind a cage like an animal where they walk past

:27:19.:27:21.

and point and laugh at him. Let's talk now to James

:27:22.:27:30.

Ward's sister April - Lisa Ullah, who's brother -

:27:31.:27:43.

also called James is on an IPP. He was given a 4 year

:27:44.:27:47.

sentence for robbery, Mark Day is from the

:27:48.:27:49.

Prison Reform Trust and John Podmore's

:27:50.:27:53.

a former prison governor As we saw in the film there,

:27:54.:27:59.

James is in a really bad place You feel he is in a vicious cycle.

:28:00.:28:16.

Definitely. He's lost all hope. He's got nothing left. He's drained, he

:28:17.:28:21.

can't take any more. The hardest thing to accept is that James is

:28:22.:28:25.

doing nothing wrong. He's not got a mental illness to put him in

:28:26.:28:29.

hospital, but he's self harming and they say he's got a personality

:28:30.:28:34.

disorder. Nobody seems to want to help James reform and get better. Is

:28:35.:28:40.

he getting any treatment? No. He guessed tablets for ADHD but apart

:28:41.:28:44.

from that he gets no help. He's in segregation because he says he

:28:45.:28:47.

doesn't feel safe on the wing. He gets bullied. The prisoners don't

:28:48.:28:53.

lift you up, they target the fact you are suffering and that is very

:28:54.:28:56.

disturbing. Has he had a formal assessment of his mental state? No,

:28:57.:29:00.

we are still waiting for the assessment. That is why parole has

:29:01.:29:06.

been put back. Not only do psychiatric assessment, the

:29:07.:29:09.

probation officer hasn't done any reports or care plans. They've known

:29:10.:29:13.

for nearly three years that his parole was coming up, it's a year

:29:14.:29:17.

over tariff so he should have had the parole a year ago. It's been

:29:18.:29:22.

knocked back after knock-back, there's only so many times you can

:29:23.:29:26.

play with a man's freedom. He can't cope there. Because he's not fully

:29:27.:29:32.

mentally unwell he can't be hospitalised but he's at the point

:29:33.:29:35.

where he can't cope with prison life and he's self harming because of

:29:36.:29:40.

having no hope. He's fallen through the net and how should that be

:29:41.:29:44.

allowed, that James is left to rot in prison because he doesn't fit a

:29:45.:29:49.

category? This is a man's lies, they should be doing something for him.

:29:50.:29:53.

And if they don't want to, give him back to his family and let us deal

:29:54.:29:59.

with James and his problems. I'm no specialist but surely the fact that

:30:00.:30:03.

James is getting these anxieties and problems because of prison life. I

:30:04.:30:08.

hear what you are saying about the fact he wants to be out of the, he

:30:09.:30:14.

wants to be put into isolation to get out of where he is so he behaves

:30:15.:30:18.

in a way that gets him put in there. From the perspective of the prison

:30:19.:30:22.

authorities, if he is behaving like that and he's on one of these orders

:30:23.:30:26.

that is about public protection... They are minimal crimes. James is

:30:27.:30:31.

getting three years for doing minimal crime spot parole officers

:30:32.:30:33.

need to understand the environment he's living in. He's never been

:30:34.:30:37.

violent, the prison officers have never felt unsafe around him. He's

:30:38.:30:40.

not a risk to the public. What does he do to get sent there?

:30:41.:30:51.

He basically throws things around his cell and that is against the

:30:52.:30:55.

rules and he is put in segregation, and he remains there even when he is

:30:56.:30:59.

allowed to be out, he keeps himself down there because he can't cope in

:31:00.:31:05.

the hostile environment that it is in prison. Your brother James is

:31:06.:31:16.

also in on an indeterminate term. He was sentenced to a four-year IPP in

:31:17.:31:27.

2006 and he still remains now. 12 years in April, he was alongside

:31:28.:31:33.

other co-defendants and one of those got four years and did two years and

:31:34.:31:39.

one of them got five years and did two and a half years and another one

:31:40.:31:44.

got out early release ten months down the line and the last one got a

:31:45.:31:50.

12 month supervision. Why did he get the sentence he got? He is not an

:31:51.:31:57.

angel, he had a troubled upbringing, and I'm not saying what he did was

:31:58.:32:01.

right, he should be punished but the crime should reflect the punishment.

:32:02.:32:09.

He's not a murderer or a rapist or a paedophile, he has not done anything

:32:10.:32:14.

severe to be in this position. But these people are being released

:32:15.:32:20.

before an IPP prisoner. He is not a dog. He is a family member, my

:32:21.:32:28.

brother, someone cares about him. He is not just there to be forgotten

:32:29.:32:32.

about. They are pushed further and further in the system and they are

:32:33.:32:37.

left to rot. And that is where the mental health issues become a

:32:38.:32:44.

problem. Neither of you say that they should not have been punished.

:32:45.:32:51.

James Coppinger IPP for ten months for setting fire to a mattress and

:32:52.:33:00.

that happens daily in prison stash James got an Heather Heyer.

:33:01.:33:06.

They need support, they are not animals. The same with his parole,

:33:07.:33:13.

it is not his behaviour holding him back, but the authority don't have

:33:14.:33:16.

the care plans in place for him to be released, he needs the care plans

:33:17.:33:22.

and the psychiatric report in place for him to be released. These were

:33:23.:33:28.

introduced because of public protection and he did plead guilty

:33:29.:33:38.

to a crime of STUDIO: Involving knives? -- a crime involving knives?

:33:39.:33:47.

I don't think where knives has come from, I don't know anything about

:33:48.:33:53.

that. The way you get put down the block, setting fire to the

:33:54.:33:55.

mattresses and pieces of paper, James did that, he was then released

:33:56.:34:04.

from the ABH and was given the IPP for the mattress fire, and the only

:34:05.:34:08.

thing that has occurred is for him being bullied, he can't cope and he

:34:09.:34:12.

sets fire to pieces of paper and he messes up the cell Annie refuses to

:34:13.:34:17.

come out of the cell. -- and he refuses. There are many people in

:34:18.:34:23.

prison on these. They were meant to affect a small number of people but

:34:24.:34:27.

have gone on to affect thousands of people. How come they have been used

:34:28.:34:33.

so widely? When they were introduced in 2005 there was no proper planning

:34:34.:34:39.

to resource the sentence and predict how many people would end up coming

:34:40.:34:46.

under it. What was planned for about 900 people, turned into several

:34:47.:34:52.

thousand inmates and what this meant was that there wasn't the offending

:34:53.:34:55.

behaviour programmes available in prisons. And also the parole board

:34:56.:35:01.

wasn't equipped to deal with this number of indeterminate sentences.

:35:02.:35:09.

How can you tell if someone is a threat to the public, in terms of

:35:10.:35:13.

sentencing? This is part of the problem, when the sentence was

:35:14.:35:15.

created it could be imposed on a very long list of offences either

:35:16.:35:23.

violent or sexual offences. What about this one here? James set fire

:35:24.:35:30.

to a mattress in a prison cell. Arson is one of these offences which

:35:31.:35:39.

can come under the remit of the IPP. There was a large range of offences

:35:40.:35:42.

which it could cover and also there was a mandatory element where the

:35:43.:35:46.

judge had to impose it if it had been a second offence which had been

:35:47.:35:52.

committed. All these elements came together to mean that a large number

:35:53.:35:56.

of people received the IPP far greater than had been predicted and

:35:57.:36:01.

the parole board faced rate difficulties trying to resource this

:36:02.:36:08.

-- great difficulties. A number of changes to legal judgments which

:36:09.:36:12.

further placed pressure on the caseload and it meant we had longer

:36:13.:36:16.

parole board delays and it results in the situation we have today where

:36:17.:36:21.

despite the sentence being abolished in 2012, we still have over 3000

:36:22.:36:28.

people in prison serving the IPP. John, you are a former prison

:36:29.:36:35.

governor, what of these IPPs? They are a disgrace, Ken Clarke said they

:36:36.:36:38.

are a stain on the criminal justice system and they remain so. Important

:36:39.:36:43.

point, this is the only sentence of its kind that is sentencing people

:36:44.:36:47.

to incarceration is not for what they have done, but for what they

:36:48.:36:54.

might do. The onus has been put on someone to prove they are innocent

:36:55.:36:58.

and that is wholly inappropriate. How do you prove when you are locked

:36:59.:37:04.

up 23 hours a day and in some cases in segregation, how do you prove

:37:05.:37:08.

that you are safe. The prison system should not be doing harm and with

:37:09.:37:13.

this sentence it clearly is, from the examples you are showing. Is it

:37:14.:37:18.

justified that anyone who is still in prison on one of these, bearing

:37:19.:37:23.

in mind they were scrapped from any future prisoners? They have been

:37:24.:37:29.

abolished and Nick Hardwick has given sensible proposals on how

:37:30.:37:33.

these people might be released. Certainly reversing the test whereby

:37:34.:37:41.

the prisoner proving that he or she is safe to be released, the onus

:37:42.:37:45.

should be on the state and that should be on the prison service.

:37:46.:37:52.

When David Blunkett brought these sentences in, he was relying on

:37:53.:37:59.

amongst many things offending behaviour courses and they are still

:38:00.:38:05.

around as being the universal panacea. You have spoken about the

:38:06.:38:11.

litmus test in terms of whether people are safe to be released, but

:38:12.:38:15.

as we have seen with sex offender courses, it can be unproven and it

:38:16.:38:20.

can make things worse and many of them are not suitable for many

:38:21.:38:23.

people, especially those who have got learning difficulties and mental

:38:24.:38:29.

health problems. Given that the sentence has been abolished, Ken

:38:30.:38:32.

Clarke said it is a stain on the criminal justice system, it is down

:38:33.:38:37.

to the Secretary of State for Justice to show political courage

:38:38.:38:41.

and do something about this. It is within his gift. Reference has been

:38:42.:38:48.

made to Michael Gove, he was in the process of making some of these

:38:49.:38:51.

political decisions but then he was sacked. We have had one minister

:38:52.:38:59.

after another. And we hear nothing at the moment, and it is about time

:39:00.:39:03.

that we did. Thank you all very much. We asked the Justice Secretary

:39:04.:39:09.

and the Parliamentary Undersecretary for prisons and probation to come on

:39:10.:39:15.

the programme. They said in a statement they are determined to

:39:16.:39:17.

address the challenge. Here's Rachel in the BBC Newsroom

:39:18.:39:38.

with a summary of today's news. The US Vice President, Mike Pence,

:39:39.:40:11.

has condemned far-right groups in response to the violence over

:40:12.:40:14.

the weekend in Virginia. A woman was killed and 19

:40:15.:40:18.

people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd

:40:19.:40:20.

protesting against a far-right rally Demonstrations and vigils

:40:21.:40:23.

have been held in cities The chairman of the Parole Board,

:40:24.:40:26.

Nick Hardwick says ministers "must act now" to address the backlog

:40:27.:40:30.

of prisoners serving The sentence - known as Imprisonment

:40:31.:40:32.

for Public Protection - was abolished in 2012 but more

:40:33.:40:36.

than 3,000 people in England and Wales are still being held

:40:37.:40:38.

with no release date. The Ministry of Justice says it's

:40:39.:40:41.

working to process these cases Arrests of passengers suspected

:40:42.:40:43.

of being drunk at UK airports and on flights have risen by 50%

:40:44.:40:47.

in the past year, according to an investigation

:40:48.:40:50.

carried out by Panorama. Critics of the airline industry say

:40:51.:40:51.

a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working,

:40:52.:40:54.

and want the government A spokesman for the Home Office said

:40:55.:40:56.

they will respond in due course. A man has been charged

:40:57.:41:00.

with the murder of a grandfather who was attacked as he walked his

:41:01.:41:02.

dogs in Norfolk. The body of 83-year-old

:41:03.:41:05.

Peter Wrighton was found in woodland near the village

:41:06.:41:07.

of East Harling last Saturday. Police say he had been

:41:08.:41:09.

repeatedly stabbed. Alexander Palmer, who's 23,

:41:10.:41:11.

is due in court later today. South Korea's President has urged

:41:12.:41:21.

both the US and North Korea to act reasonably and peacefully

:41:22.:41:24.

in the current nuclear stand off. Moon Jae-in said, "There

:41:25.:41:26.

must be no more war His comments come after a week of

:41:27.:41:29.

ratcheting up of tensions by the US His comments come as China tightened

:41:30.:41:33.

sanctions on North Korea - banning several key industrial

:41:34.:41:37.

imports from the country. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:41:38.:41:45.

News - more at 10am. The Charity Commission has

:41:46.:41:48.

issued its first-ever "official warning" to a charity over the way

:41:49.:41:50.

it spends its money. The National Hereditary Breast

:41:51.:41:56.

Cancer Helpline has been spending as little as 3%

:41:57.:42:00.

of the money you give it on raising awareness

:42:01.:42:03.

and the helpline that it runs. The rest goes on things

:42:04.:42:05.

like management costs and overheads. The trustee who set up the charity

:42:06.:42:07.

has also paid herself ?31,000, The Charity Commission

:42:08.:42:10.

is a government body which registers There are more than 167,000

:42:11.:42:14.

individual charities in England and Wales,

:42:15.:42:21.

raising around ?73 billion a year. Let's speak to the BBC Radio

:42:22.:42:27.

Manchester's Kate West, who first Kate, tell us about this

:42:28.:42:30.

breast cancer helpline. The helpline was set up in the 90s

:42:31.:42:39.

by a campaign called Wendy Watson, the first woman in the UK to have a

:42:40.:42:41.

the first woman in the UK to have a pre-emptive double must -- Max

:42:42.:42:55.

She started a helpline after becoming the first woman

:42:56.:42:57.

in the UK to have a pre-emptive double mastectomy, like the one

:42:58.:43:00.

The surgery reduces your chances of getting breast cancer.

:43:01.:43:03.

The phone line is aimed at men and women who have a faulty gene

:43:04.:43:06.

that makes them more likely to develop breast cancer.

:43:07.:43:09.

In 2012 she started a charity to raise money for her helpline

:43:10.:43:11.

and was later awarded an MBE for her work.

:43:12.:43:14.

So why has this charity been given this official warning?

:43:15.:43:17.

The Charity Commission got involved after noticing

:43:18.:43:18.

that the charity behind the helpline was in financial difficulty.

:43:19.:43:27.

When you go through their accounts, like I've done, the amounts spent

:43:28.:43:34.

year on year are as little as 6%, 3.4% and just 2.8% of its donations

:43:35.:43:37.

The average charity spends 83%, so in comparison,

:43:38.:43:40.

When the charity commission first investigated the helpline

:43:41.:43:45.

they found they were poorly managing their finances

:43:46.:43:51.

and discovered that Watson had been paying herself from the charity

:43:52.:43:56.

And then when the commission went back a few months later,

:43:57.:44:04.

the finances were still out of control and even though Wendy had

:44:05.:44:07.

resigned as a trustee, she was still being paid.

:44:08.:44:09.

So that's why this charity has become the first to ever get

:44:10.:44:12.

What has the charity said about the investigation? We asked them for a

:44:13.:44:21.

statement and we have received a statement from the lawyers

:44:22.:44:23.

representing Wendy Watson and the charity. They said the payments made

:44:24.:44:30.

to her were in error and it said she also worked full-time for the

:44:31.:44:34.

charity as a volunteer since 2012 and they did not realise the

:44:35.:44:39.

payments were inappropriate, but when they realised, she resigned.

:44:40.:44:44.

They also said although she was played for three months at the end

:44:45.:44:48.

of last year, she has otherwise work full-time on a voluntary basis.

:44:49.:44:50.

Thanks for joining us. Let's talk now to Michelle Russell

:44:51.:44:54.

from the Charity Commission It's not unusual that charities get

:44:55.:45:09.

into financial distress. That's why we took the action that we did. We

:45:10.:45:13.

had a look at the accounts and saw the warning signs. That's why we

:45:14.:45:17.

tried to help early on by going to visit the charity and setting them

:45:18.:45:21.

an action plan. What did the charity do wrong, in your eyes? There are a

:45:22.:45:26.

number of things that went wrong, and it's not unusual for charities

:45:27.:45:30.

to make mistakes. I run by volunteers doing their best for the

:45:31.:45:37.

benefit of others. But actually there are a number of issues that we

:45:38.:45:40.

saw. Their business plan didn't work, they weren't making any money

:45:41.:45:42.

from their charity shops, they had got into a model with their

:45:43.:45:47.

finances, the loans from trustees were there, and they were paying

:45:48.:45:51.

money effectively to themselves, signing off their own expenditure.

:45:52.:45:56.

There were a number of issues where they got into a bit of a mess and

:45:57.:46:01.

needed help. Why can't you be paid as a trustee? If you think about

:46:02.:46:08.

charity and why we trust the public trust charities, it is based on the

:46:09.:46:13.

premise of volunteering and helping others. Also, in the role of a

:46:14.:46:17.

trustee, whose job it is to scrutinise what's going on by the

:46:18.:46:21.

employees, if you are paid as an employee that makes your job very

:46:22.:46:25.

difficult. That's why there are rules in place that say you

:46:26.:46:29.

shouldn't get paid as a trustee or be a paid employee and a trustee,

:46:30.:46:34.

without special permission. This charity didn't do it, and after we

:46:35.:46:39.

warned them that they needed to sort it out, they still didn't take the

:46:40.:46:43.

steps they needed to. That's why we took the action of giving them an

:46:44.:46:46.

official warning. What legal powers do you have, if you feel charities

:46:47.:46:51.

aren't carrying out their work in the way they should be? We've got a

:46:52.:46:56.

range of powers. Our role is to support charities by guidance and

:46:57.:47:01.

advice at one end. At the other end of things, we can launch an

:47:02.:47:06.

investigation and take quite serious powers. What we are talking about in

:47:07.:47:11.

this case is firm but fair action in the middle of that. So we aren't up

:47:12.:47:19.

at that quite invasive and web we passed giving guidance and advice.

:47:20.:47:23.

This is a warning that you need to sort out your house. And it's the

:47:24.:47:27.

first time you've ever given an official warning, tell us more about

:47:28.:47:32.

what that does mean. This is a new power that we went to Parliament to

:47:33.:47:37.

and asked for. We could see the gap between the lower end of support and

:47:38.:47:42.

the upper end of intervention. It is a power where we can warn the

:47:43.:47:47.

charity and the trustees that there has been some breaches and they need

:47:48.:47:51.

to act to take action to stop it going forward. It's for a limited

:47:52.:47:56.

period of time, and our support is still there for them while they've

:47:57.:48:01.

got this warning. It should be reassurance to the public that the

:48:02.:48:04.

regulator is there, watching what's going on, and it won't walk away.

:48:05.:48:08.

Said the charity is still running itself, what's time frame forward?

:48:09.:48:15.

We set its deadlines for us going back to make sure those things were

:48:16.:48:20.

wrong or they've made mistakes on were sorted out. We're really

:48:21.:48:23.

pleased some new trustees stepped forward and taking up the mantle, to

:48:24.:48:29.

use their heads to scrutinise what's going on. We don't want to lose the

:48:30.:48:34.

passion and enthusiasm that people have in volunteering for charities,

:48:35.:48:38.

particularly because sometimes it's for a cause close to their heart. We

:48:39.:48:42.

don't want to lose that, but we definitely need trustees who carry

:48:43.:48:46.

out a rewarding but responsible job. Thank you.

:48:47.:48:52.

Just to re-iterate what The National Hereditary Breast

:48:53.:48:54.

Cancer Helpline told us - they say Wendy Watson paying

:48:55.:48:57.

Her solicitors told the BBC she worked full time for the charity

:48:58.:49:01.

from August 2012 until now and that she was paid

:49:02.:49:03.

for her work for one year while she was also a trustee.

:49:04.:49:06.

They say neither Ms Watson or the charity were aware that this

:49:07.:49:09.

was inappropriate and Ms Watson immediately resigned as a trustee.

:49:10.:49:11.

And they say it's a well-used helpline.

:49:12.:49:18.

Next this morning - protests and vigils in support

:49:19.:49:20.

of Charlottesville have been held in many US cities.

:49:21.:49:32.

In Seattle on Sunday, police made arrests,

:49:33.:49:35.

deployed pepper spray and confiscated weapons

:49:36.:49:37.

as anti-fascist protesters approached a pro-Trump rally.

:49:38.:49:38.

Meanwhile President Trump has been facing criticism from both

:49:39.:49:41.

Republicans and Democrats for his response to the violence

:49:42.:49:43.

in Charlottesville which saw a woman killed and 19 others injured.

:49:44.:49:45.

The White House has said that the President did condemn

:49:46.:49:48.

violence by right-wing groups, when he criticised everyone involved

:49:49.:49:50.

Here's a look back at how events unfolded in Charlottesville

:49:51.:49:57.

which led to clashes resulting in three deaths.

:49:58.:50:13.

Go home. You are not wanted in this great Commonwealth. Shame on you.

:50:14.:52:13.

Overnight, the US Vice President Mike Pence has condemned

:52:14.:52:15.

what he describes as white supremacists "in the

:52:16.:52:17.

We have no tolerance for hate and violence

:52:18.:52:20.

from white supremacists, neo-Nazis and the KKK.

:52:21.:52:27.

These dangerous fringe groups have no place in American public life

:52:28.:52:32.

and the American public debate and we condemn them

:52:33.:52:34.

Marissa Blair, a friend of heather hair who was killed when a car was

:52:35.:52:47.

driven into a crowd has been speaking to our correspondent. She

:52:48.:52:53.

understood as a white woman the privilege that she may have had and

:52:54.:52:58.

she felt sorry for it. She was sorry that we had to go, minorities have

:52:59.:53:05.

to go through what they go through, and that's why she was out here. I

:53:06.:53:12.

was with her. We came with her, me and my fiance and another friend, we

:53:13.:53:17.

met at a parking barrage and we parked our cars. We were together

:53:18.:53:22.

all day long. When it happened, Heather was standing right in front

:53:23.:53:29.

of me. What did you see? We were marching and... There was a

:53:30.:53:33.

commotion at the front of the crowd. We thought, there was a commotion

:53:34.:53:39.

and someone was scuffling. You look up and use the bodies flying. It's a

:53:40.:53:44.

split-second decision and all you can think is to move, but it's

:53:45.:53:48.

coming so fast. All I could feel was someone pushing me. Then it was

:53:49.:53:54.

chaos. It was chaos, and the only thing I could think of was checking

:53:55.:53:59.

I didn't have any broken bones. I got up and started looking for

:54:00.:54:04.

markers. I new Courtney was OK. I found Marcus. Then we started

:54:05.:54:15.

looking for Heather. We never found Heather. 32 year Heather Heyer was

:54:16.:54:21.

in Charlottesville and Virginia when a car was driven into the crowd.

:54:22.:54:28.

Next Monday at noon, the famous bongs of Big Ben

:54:29.:54:31.

will sound for the final time until 2021, as the clock tower falls

:54:32.:54:34.

silent to undergo major renovation work which will safeguard it

:54:35.:54:36.

Members of the public have been invited to gather

:54:37.:54:40.

in Parliament Square at midday on Monday the 21st of August

:54:41.:54:42.

to mark the final sounding of the famous bell until 2021.

:54:43.:54:45.

We can go now to our correspondent Leila Nathoo who is on the roof

:54:46.:54:48.

This is a fantastic view from up on the Parliamentary roof terrace. I

:54:49.:54:59.

have to say it will be a very strange thing not to have those

:55:00.:55:02.

familiar and reassuring bonds every hour. It will feel very strange

:55:03.:55:11.

indeed. The bell of Big Ben is going to be silent about these renovations

:55:12.:55:14.

to take place. Its renovations on the clock as well as the tower

:55:15.:55:18.

itself. There will be strikes for New Year's Eve and Remembrance Day.

:55:19.:55:30.

Just tell us a bit about what is wrong with the clock and why it

:55:31.:55:35.

needs such work. Its 160 years old. It needs maintenance. It's a regular

:55:36.:55:39.

maintenance and we're going to be looking at a view things we have

:55:40.:55:43.

spotted that are starting to wear. Gears and the pendulum is one of our

:55:44.:55:48.

major concerns. Is the clock going to stop working? It will. We won't

:55:49.:55:53.

stop the clock until January this year, just the bells are stopping

:55:54.:55:58.

next Monday. We will still drive at least one of the dials so there will

:55:59.:56:01.

be a dialogue with the ball. So people will still be able to set

:56:02.:56:08.

their watches by Big Ben? Yes. This is part of wider work that is taking

:56:09.:56:13.

place on the tower itself. The bells are being silenced first to protect

:56:14.:56:19.

the workers. That's correct. As the scaffolding goes up, the bells will

:56:20.:56:24.

be silenced. Give us an idea of what needs to be done, why is it so

:56:25.:56:29.

important the renovation is carried out? It needs maintenance and we're

:56:30.:56:33.

going to start at the top with the reefs which leak. Then we'll work

:56:34.:56:38.

our way down. There's various problems with stonework, the bell

:56:39.:56:43.

frame, condensation inside. We'll also provide new amenities for the

:56:44.:56:47.

clock makers. We'll install AWC and kitchen up there. We are also going

:56:48.:56:55.

to put in a lift. There are several shafts that go up and a shaft at the

:56:56.:56:59.

back into which we can fit a lift which will help us to get emergency

:57:00.:57:02.

evacuation and people up there quicker. Thank you. These

:57:03.:57:07.

renovations will start soon after the bells stop. The scaffolding has

:57:08.:57:11.

already reached a certain height. The tower in the clock will be

:57:12.:57:16.

almost entirely obscured in the weeks to come. As you said, people

:57:17.:57:20.

are being asked to come to Parliament Square next Monday at

:57:21.:57:24.

noon to mark the final bell's tolling at midday. We've had some

:57:25.:57:32.

e-mails on IPPs, those prison sentences that mean people are still

:57:33.:57:35.

in jail sometime after the sentence was served. "We Sat watching your

:57:36.:57:42.

programme about James who is still in prison, he is obviously being

:57:43.:57:47.

abused in prison and is seriously unwell. It's a disgrace he hasn't

:57:48.:57:52.

been helped and is left to rot. It's like watching a prison horror movie,

:57:53.:57:56.

get in the help he needs. This is the first time we've ever e-mailed a

:57:57.:58:01.

TV programme, we feel so frustrated about this investigation".

:58:02.:58:03.

Let's get the latest weather update with Carol.

:58:04.:58:08.

Good morning. We've had a variety of weather across the British Isles.

:58:09.:58:17.

Our Weather Watchers have sent us in some beautiful pictures. This is

:58:18.:58:21.

from Northern Ireland, it was wet overnight there. This one is from

:58:22.:58:25.

South Lanarkshire. Quite a murky start of the day with some rain. As

:58:26.:58:30.

we push into Norfolk, brighter start to the day. Some bits of blue sky

:58:31.:58:34.

coming through there. We had some heavy rain around, courtesy of this

:58:35.:58:39.

array of weather fronts, moving from west to east and drifting across the

:58:40.:58:43.

north-east as well, introducing that rain. On the radar you'll be able to

:58:44.:58:50.

see how much rain we've had as we've gone through the morning. Heavy rain

:58:51.:58:53.

in Northern Ireland and western Scotland, and we've had posters of

:58:54.:58:56.

heavy rain across parts of England and Wales. The whole lot moving

:58:57.:59:00.

eastwards, continuing to fragment. The further east you are, the

:59:01.:59:04.

brighter the skies. Just ahead of the weather front you'll notice the

:59:05.:59:08.

cloud building. Right behind the weather front more cloud around and

:59:09.:59:13.

also some coastal drizzle and drizzle on the hills as well. A new

:59:14.:59:17.

line of rain coming up. We could hit 25 degrees in parts of East Anglia

:59:18.:59:24.

and Kent. Here is the rain coming up across the Channel Islands, pouring

:59:25.:59:28.

up through central southern England. Patchy rain across south-west

:59:29.:59:34.

England and Wales. The northern England again some bright spells

:59:35.:59:37.

with showers moving towards the east. For Northern Ireland a mixture

:59:38.:59:40.

of bright spells, sunshine and showers. Some of them heavy and

:59:41.:59:45.

boundary. For Scotland the band of rain moving north-east, fragmenting.

:59:46.:59:52.

We should see highs of 20 degrees here. Down east coast, there will be

:59:53.:59:57.

spots of rain here and there. For many of us it will be dry. Through

:59:58.:00:01.

the evening and overnight, another band of rain moving in from the

:00:02.:00:06.

south-west. Some of this could be heavy and possibly thundery as well.

:00:07.:00:10.

In its wake there will be a lot of cloud and showers. It's not going to

:00:11.:00:16.

be a cold night, tomorrow morning we could see some thunderstorms coming

:00:17.:00:19.

out of the rain in the south-east. That leaves the way, as does the

:00:20.:00:25.

rain across north-east England and eastern Scotland, leaving sunshine

:00:26.:00:27.

and showers. Some of the shovels will be heavy, especially in the

:00:28.:00:31.

north. We could see that combination further south as well. Many of us

:00:32.:00:37.

will miss them all together and see some sunshine. Temperatures tomorrow

:00:38.:00:43.

could hit 26 in East Anglia and the south-east.

:00:44.:00:45.

Hello it's Monday, it's 10am, I'm Joanna Gosling in for Victoria.

:00:46.:00:47.

Drugged, kidnapped and told she would be auctioned

:00:48.:00:49.

We talk to the agent of model Chloe Ayling,

:00:50.:00:54.

who says she was abducted in Milan and held for six days.

:00:55.:01:00.

Urgent action is called for to free thousands of prisoners

:01:01.:01:03.

who are still inside serving indeterminate "Public

:01:04.:01:04.

Protection" sentences, years after they were abolished.

:01:05.:01:08.

The families of these prisoners have told this programme

:01:09.:01:10.

they fear for the safety of their relatives still inside.

:01:11.:01:15.

He's literally lost all hope - he's got nothing left -

:01:16.:01:23.

physically and emotionally he's drained.

:01:24.:01:24.

And 70 years ago 200 years of British colonial rule in India

:01:25.:01:34.

came to an end when the country was partitioned into

:01:35.:01:36.

Pakistan and India - hundreds of thousands of people

:01:37.:01:39.

were killed as violence erupted on both sides.

:01:40.:01:45.

Here's Rachel in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:01:46.:01:48.

The US Vice President, Mike Pence, has condemned far-right groups

:01:49.:01:52.

in response to the violence over the weekend in Virginia.

:01:53.:01:55.

A woman was killed and 19 people were injured

:01:56.:01:57.

when a car was driven into a crowd protesting against a far-right rally

:01:58.:02:00.

Demonstrations and vigils have been held in cities

:02:01.:02:04.

The chairman of the Parole Board Nick Hardwick says ministers "must

:02:05.:02:14.

act now" to address the backlog of prisoners serving

:02:15.:02:16.

The sentence - known as Imprisonment for Public Protection -

:02:17.:02:27.

was abolished in 2012 but more than 3,000 people in England

:02:28.:02:29.

and Wales are still being held with no release date.

:02:30.:02:32.

The Ministry of Justice says it's working to process these cases

:02:33.:02:34.

Arrests of passengers suspected of being drunk at UK airports

:02:35.:02:42.

and on flights have risen by 50% in the past year, according

:02:43.:02:46.

to an investigation carried out by Panorama.

:02:47.:02:49.

Critics of the airline industry say a voluntary code on alcohol

:02:50.:02:53.

sales isn't working, and want the government

:02:54.:02:55.

A spokesman for the Home Office said they will respond in due course.

:02:56.:03:01.

A man has been charged with the murder of a grandfather

:03:02.:03:04.

who was attacked as he walked his dogs in Norfolk.

:03:05.:03:07.

The body of 83-year-old Peter Wrighton was found

:03:08.:03:09.

in woodland near the village of East Harling last Saturday.

:03:10.:03:12.

Police say he had been repeatedly stabbed.

:03:13.:03:18.

Alexander Palmer, who's 23, is due in court later today.

:03:19.:03:53.

Security forces in Burkina Faso have killed two suspected jihadist gunmen

:03:54.:03:56.

after a terrorist attack in the capital.

:03:57.:03:58.

The country's communications minister says

:03:59.:03:59.

a number of hostages were trapped inside a restaurant after gunmen

:04:00.:04:02.

At least 18 people are believed to have been killed

:04:03.:04:06.

in the attack and another 8 were wounded.

:04:07.:04:10.

South Korea's President has urged both the US and North Korea to act

:04:11.:04:13.

reasonably and peacefully in the current nuclear stand off.

:04:14.:04:16.

Moon Jae-in said, "There must be no more war

:04:17.:04:18.

His comments come after a week of ratcheting up of tensions by the US

:04:19.:04:22.

China has tightened sanctions on North Korea -

:04:23.:04:31.

banning several key industrial imports from the country.

:04:32.:04:35.

And it is arguably one of the most distinctive sounds in the world.

:04:36.:04:39.

However, next Monday at midday Big Ben

:04:40.:04:47.

will chime for the final time until 2021 to allow repair work

:04:48.:04:50.

to take place on the clock in Elizabeth Tower.

:04:51.:04:54.

The bells will still ring out on Remembrance Sunday

:04:55.:04:57.

and at New Year but will otherwise fall silent for only

:04:58.:05:00.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News.

:05:01.:05:13.

Britain won five medals in just over 24 hours to meet their medal target

:05:14.:05:28.

at the World Athletics Championships.

:05:29.:05:29.

Thanks mainly to four out of four in the relays.

:05:30.:05:37.

The women's 4 by 400 metres won a silver medal on the final night

:05:38.:05:40.

The seventh medal in seven championships in this event.

:05:41.:05:44.

With the men's quartet adding a bronze a few minutes later.

:05:45.:05:47.

Prior to the weekend the team had only picked up one medal.

:05:48.:05:50.

Coming back after the Olympic Games it is hard to follow that, but I

:05:51.:05:54.

think the team did so well, if you look across the board, the top eight

:05:55.:05:57.

finishes and so Moli people finishing in fourth and we hit the

:05:58.:06:01.

medal target last night -- so many people. There will be many people

:06:02.:06:07.

here featuring on the podium in Tokyo in 2020.

:06:08.:06:21.

Manchester United's new striker got their new Premier League season

:06:22.:06:23.

Romelu Lukaku scored twice on his home debut to give his team

:06:24.:06:27.

a 4-0 win over West Ham at Old Trafford.

:06:28.:06:34.

The 75 million signing scored one in each half.

:06:35.:06:36.

Paul Pogba then rounded off the victory to put

:06:37.:06:39.

United top after the first round of fixtures.

:06:40.:06:41.

Elsewhere Spurs also won their opening game.

:06:42.:06:43.

Meanwhile the world's most expensive player also made

:06:44.:06:55.

Neymar cost Paris Saint Germain ?200 million and scored

:06:56.:07:02.

in their 3-0l league win over Guingamp.

:07:03.:07:03.

He also set up one of the other goals.

:07:04.:07:13.

Cristiano Ronaldo helped Real Madrid to beat Barcelona in the first leg

:07:14.:07:16.

But that wasn't the half of it at Camp Nou.

:07:17.:07:19.

It cost him a yellow card for removing his shirt.

:07:20.:07:24.

Then later he was booked again for diving.

:07:25.:07:26.

And it might not be the end of the trouble either as Ronaldo

:07:27.:07:32.

pushed the referee in the back before leaving the pitch.

:07:33.:07:34.

Justin Thomas has become the eighth first time winner in the last nine

:07:35.:07:44.

golf majors after his victory at the US PGA Championship

:07:45.:07:46.

At one point in the final round five players had a share

:07:47.:07:50.

of the lead but Thomas sunk this one from 40 feet to establish a two shot

:07:51.:07:54.

The American hit six birdies in his 68 on Sunday.

:07:55.:07:58.

And he'll move up to sixth in the world rankings.

:07:59.:08:00.

This tournament has a special place in my heart, and I want to win every

:08:01.:08:04.

tournament, but this is really cool for me, to be my first one, to have

:08:05.:08:08.

my dad here, and my grandfather was watching at home, I was able to talk

:08:09.:08:12.

to him and that was pretty core macro. I know what you are thinking,

:08:13.:08:21.

that trophy is absolutely massive -- that was pretty cool. Thanks for

:08:22.:08:25.

joining us. Prime Minister Theresa May returns

:08:26.:08:28.

to work after her walking holiday this week, just as two leading

:08:29.:08:31.

cabinet ministers have declared the UK will need a transition

:08:32.:08:34.

period to help businesses Liam Fox, the international trade

:08:35.:08:36.

secretary, and Philip Hammond, the chancellor, made the declaration

:08:37.:08:39.

in a joint article for the Sunday Telegraph intended

:08:40.:08:41.

to quash speculation that the cabinet is divided over

:08:42.:08:43.

how to implement Brexit and what will happen

:08:44.:08:46.

during the transitional period. The Prime Minister's summer holiday

:08:47.:08:47.

has been plagued by Tory rows over Over the next ten days,

:08:48.:08:50.

ministers will also publish papers on Britain's Brexit plans covering

:08:51.:08:57.

the Irish border, the customs union, But does this joint article show

:08:58.:08:59.

a genuine platform for progress? Joining us now, Owen Jones,

:09:00.:09:05.

a columnist for The Guardian who believes there is no unity

:09:06.:09:10.

within the Conservative Party. And Jo-Anne Nadler,

:09:11.:09:13.

a political journalist and communications consultant,

:09:14.:09:17.

who worked as a senior Conservative press officer

:09:18.:09:19.

during the John Major years. She thinks this was the right

:09:20.:09:21.

moment for Liam Fox What we are hearing from them is

:09:22.:09:37.

that there will be no staying in the customs union but there will be a

:09:38.:09:41.

transition period, is this a position that the party can get

:09:42.:09:45.

behind? I think so, they have got to get hide it. To a certain extent

:09:46.:09:50.

this is a PR move -- they have got to get behind it. We have heard so

:09:51.:09:56.

many noises off and so much squabbling that it has obscured the

:09:57.:10:01.

essential direction of travel towards leaving the single market

:10:02.:10:04.

and the customs union, it has been very important that these ministers

:10:05.:10:07.

who represent different sides of the argument come together at this

:10:08.:10:11.

point, partly to reassure their own party and also the country and

:10:12.:10:16.

business essentially, that they will work together to this end. What do

:10:17.:10:22.

you think? Is this a position that Labour can get around? No sooner had

:10:23.:10:28.

the article being published in the Daily Telegraph, a Tory minister

:10:29.:10:31.

said the pact wouldn't last and that Philip Hammond had contempt for lame

:10:32.:10:37.

Fox, the Tory party is riven with division -- Liam Fox. David Davis

:10:38.:10:43.

called Boris Johnson a failure and there were Tory MPs threatening to

:10:44.:10:48.

kick each other in various pieces of anatomy. Philip Hammond repeatedly

:10:49.:11:02.

briefed against. Anna Super -- Soubry now talking about leaving the

:11:03.:11:08.

party. It is easy for my position, someone who supports the Labour

:11:09.:11:11.

Party and it is for me to have a partisan enjoyment in the Tories

:11:12.:11:16.

ripping themselves to shreds, but Chris Patten said the disastrous

:11:17.:11:21.

decisions have left the country in a terrible mess and already because we

:11:22.:11:28.

have the referendum to Sage the internal divisions of the Tory

:11:29.:11:32.

party, and we have the snap general election to destroy the Labour

:11:33.:11:37.

Party, but these internal divisions within the Conservative Party have

:11:38.:11:40.

left this country a laughing stock in Europe and that is my fear, that

:11:41.:11:45.

we don't have a united government, we have a Prime Minister without

:11:46.:11:51.

authority and Brexit negotiations have not even begun. What you think

:11:52.:11:57.

about Soubry saying she is thinking about joining another party? That is

:11:58.:12:04.

not that surprising, there are some people in the Conservative Party who

:12:05.:12:08.

are passionately in favour of Remain and they can argue their case as

:12:09.:12:17.

they wish, but they do not represent a minority within the Conservative

:12:18.:12:20.

Party and they don't represent the majority in the party. The majority

:12:21.:12:25.

voted to leave the European Union, and an essential part of that is to

:12:26.:12:29.

leave the single market and the customs union, so that Britain can

:12:30.:12:32.

be more competitive and forge a more successful economic future for

:12:33.:12:38.

itself but also a more successful economy than we are seeing in Europe

:12:39.:12:44.

and that is the point. It would be difficult for MPs to force a

:12:45.:12:46.

position where the government doesn't come out completely when

:12:47.:12:51.

there are enough numbers of MPs who want a position where we stay in the

:12:52.:12:56.

single market and the customs union? What has happened, because of the

:12:57.:13:01.

squabbling, and some of this is over important points of policy, and some

:13:02.:13:07.

of it is personal, as Owen indicated, but we have got

:13:08.:13:09.

distracted from what the government needs to do which is make the case

:13:10.:13:17.

again, and Remainers have been effective arguing their case since

:13:18.:13:23.

the result, almost putting down the result but rich a million more

:13:24.:13:30.

people voted for. -- at which. We haven't on the Leave side being

:13:31.:13:36.

clear about the advantage and we haven't been clear about the fact

:13:37.:13:42.

that this can be a great thing for Britain. Our correspondent is

:13:43.:13:51.

joining us from Westminster, is the joint positioning going to put a lid

:13:52.:13:55.

on everything? Is this a sign of a new unity? For now, yes, this is

:13:56.:14:03.

seen as a attempt to show unity because there has been so much

:14:04.:14:06.

speculation and squabbling while Theresa May has been on holiday, and

:14:07.:14:10.

this is an attempt to bring together the two sides of the Cabinet, Liam

:14:11.:14:16.

Fox, in favour Brexit, and Philip Hammond who is in favour of a soft

:14:17.:14:19.

approach for the both of them have said that the government does not

:14:20.:14:24.

want a cliff edge when we leave the EU in 2019 and they spoke about the

:14:25.:14:29.

agreement and the need for a transitional deal but they have said

:14:30.:14:33.

it must be time limited. As to whether it will end the speculation,

:14:34.:14:36.

I think they will be some bubbling around for while but this is a

:14:37.:14:41.

moment of unity ahead of Theresa May returning from holiday this week.

:14:42.:14:44.

She has been enjoying three weeks in Italy. She is coming back sometime

:14:45.:14:52.

this week. Thank you. David Miliband has been speaking this weekend. He

:14:53.:14:57.

has said there must be a vote on a Brexit deal to allow the country to

:14:58.:15:06.

potentially reject Brexit and stay in the EU, but the Labour position

:15:07.:15:10.

is all over the place as well. The position of Labour is that they have

:15:11.:15:14.

got to find a way of clearing up the mess caused by the Conservative

:15:15.:15:18.

Party, there was a decision by David Cameron to have a referendum and

:15:19.:15:23.

they waged a disastrous campaign and they lost and now the country is in

:15:24.:15:27.

a mess. We are where we are, though. Yes, I campaigned for Remain but we

:15:28.:15:33.

lost the referendum and now it is about what kind of Brexit we have,

:15:34.:15:38.

and my fear is if you start saying at this stage that Brexit needs to

:15:39.:15:45.

be overturned, then people who voted Leave will regard this as

:15:46.:15:48.

contemptuous of their democratic position and many people who voted

:15:49.:15:53.

Remain accept the decision and want to find the best possible way, but

:15:54.:15:58.

my fear regarding David Miliband, I think it is up for grabs as to

:15:59.:16:02.

whether we stay in the single market, I would prefer that, even

:16:03.:16:05.

though there are problems because the danger is we end up with the

:16:06.:16:08.

worst of both worlds where we have do accept EU laws but we can't

:16:09.:16:13.

contribute to them, but if we crashed out of the customs union the

:16:14.:16:17.

economic damage could be considerable and hurt a lot of

:16:18.:16:24.

people. A lot of people said this on Twitter all the time, it was only

:16:25.:16:28.

advisory, the referendum, but that would cause uproar, however, to call

:16:29.:16:33.

for a second referendum at this point, before there has been a big

:16:34.:16:36.

backlash, I think many people will find that contemptuous of their

:16:37.:16:41.

democratic decision and it means those of us who want to soft Brexit

:16:42.:16:45.

will walk off the pitch and leave the hard Brexit motion to decide

:16:46.:16:55.

what kind of Brexit we have -- the hard Brexit throw.

:16:56.:16:59.

David Davis has said that the MPs are there to exercise judgment --

:17:00.:17:02.

David Miliband. He has said let's have another

:17:03.:17:17.

election now, because we didn't do too well to three months ago, it's

:17:18.:17:23.

like that. The decision was taken. The real question now is what other

:17:24.:17:28.

policies that are going to underpin the way we carry out Brexit. On that

:17:29.:17:37.

point, I think we can agree. There's been an awful lot of destruction

:17:38.:17:42.

because of, sometimes personality clashes but sometimes genuine issues

:17:43.:17:45.

over policy differences in the Conservative Party. What happened

:17:46.:17:48.

this week is these two ministers have come together to say we need to

:17:49.:17:54.

pull together and give Theresa May her head. She's coming back this

:17:55.:17:59.

week, she's going to make a big policy statement, we are going to

:18:00.:18:04.

look at various of Brexit, like how we will manage outside the customs

:18:05.:18:09.

union, what's going to happen with the border inside Ireland for

:18:10.:18:13.

instance. Those kind of policies, they need to be scrutinised. The

:18:14.:18:21.

danger with the Tory Brexit is not only are we going to crash out of

:18:22.:18:25.

the single market, but we may end up with no deal whatsoever. That's not

:18:26.:18:31.

a Tory Brexit. Your party are going to have to own this, I can assure

:18:32.:18:38.

you. We'll end up with tariffs imposed on our goods which will

:18:39.:18:41.

cause potentially enormous damage to the British economy. Wages are

:18:42.:18:44.

already falling in this country all over again. The danger is that with

:18:45.:18:49.

that sort of Brexit, it will hit the living standards of those who voted

:18:50.:18:53.

to leave incidentally and jobs. We've got this compromise position

:18:54.:18:57.

outlined this weekend, in spite of all the divisions you are talking

:18:58.:19:02.

about, is it something MPs could unite around? Frankly there is a lot

:19:03.:19:06.

of detail that could be delineated and hasn't yet been so. As a

:19:07.:19:11.

statement of we need to pull together, it is significant in that

:19:12.:19:14.

regard. That doesn't mean we shouldn't continue to scrutinise the

:19:15.:19:18.

detail within that. How long will this transition period B and what's

:19:19.:19:23.

at the end of the transition period? We haven't yet heard what the vision

:19:24.:19:27.

is for the end of the transition period. The Tory infighting has

:19:28.:19:34.

become before the difficulties of the negotiations have got underway.

:19:35.:19:39.

That is why the Telegraph have been briefed that this pact isn't going

:19:40.:19:44.

to last. I do think the Telegraph just invented it, give them some

:19:45.:19:49.

respect. The truth is, Philip Hammond, David Davis, Liam Fox,

:19:50.:19:53.

Theresa May, they are all fundamentally in quite different

:19:54.:19:56.

places. Philip Hammond earlier in the summer was arguing for a soft

:19:57.:20:04.

Brexit and to have... I don't think fundamentally that has happened and

:20:05.:20:09.

when Brexit negotiations happen and we start suffering genuine economic

:20:10.:20:13.

problems and turmoil and turbulence, and our position in Europe which is

:20:14.:20:18.

weak... Like vast swathes of the continent. The reason a lot of

:20:19.:20:24.

people voted to leave... EU diplomats regard our country as a

:20:25.:20:28.

bit of a laughing stock at the moment. Great to have you in, thank

:20:29.:20:29.

you. Across the UK, arrests of airline

:20:30.:20:40.

passengers suspected of being drunk have risen by 50% in the last year.

:20:41.:20:44.

Those in the industry are calling on the government to do more.

:20:45.:20:47.

The Metropolitan Police are giving head mounted cameras

:20:48.:20:48.

The cameras are being issued to all Armed Response Units to wear

:20:49.:20:53.

on their baseball caps and ballistic helmets.

:20:54.:20:54.

The Met's already rolled out over 17,000 bodycams

:20:55.:20:56.

to officers across the force, but there have been issues finding

:20:57.:20:59.

an operationally suitable camera for firearms officers.

:21:00.:21:00.

It's hoped the presence of cameras will help address concerns over

:21:01.:21:03.

the transparency of operations involving armed officers,

:21:04.:21:05.

such as the shootings of Mark Duggan and Jermaine Baker.

:21:06.:21:12.

Martin Harding is a former superintendent and firearms officer

:21:13.:21:23.

with Greater Manchester Police. Nick Howe, a former firearms

:21:24.:21:36.

commander and now a criminologist This reinforces the commitment of

:21:37.:21:46.

the police service. As a largely an armed police service, we do police

:21:47.:21:50.

with the consensus of the community and we must do everything we can to

:21:51.:21:55.

retain that consent. What is your perspective? I think Martin's view

:21:56.:22:00.

is spot on. It's all about transparency and I think police

:22:01.:22:04.

officers have got far more to gain and benefit from the transparency of

:22:05.:22:08.

evidence recorded by video cameras. Why do you think it's taken so long?

:22:09.:22:13.

We talked about technical issues but there are other operational

:22:14.:22:20.

considerations to take into account. First of all, why has it taken so

:22:21.:22:25.

long. It's only in the last 8-9 years in small pilots that body

:22:26.:22:29.

cameras have been used as a credible form of evidence gathering. It was

:22:30.:22:35.

only as far ago as 2014 that the Met started to roll it out more fully

:22:36.:22:40.

based upon the trials elsewhere in the country. It is still relatively

:22:41.:22:45.

recent technology. In terms firearms officers, the difficulty was the

:22:46.:22:52.

technology was generally worn on the upper chest and shoulder area. When

:22:53.:22:55.

firearms officers bring their firearms up to the ready, that was

:22:56.:22:59.

masking some of the imagery and the quality of what they could record at

:23:00.:23:04.

the time. As technology has moved on, it's more by stealth than

:23:05.:23:12.

revolution. These developments are incremental. They have experimented

:23:13.:23:17.

with head worn cameras which gives a far better panoramic view of what

:23:18.:23:23.

they are dealing with at the time. Martin, there is research from

:23:24.:23:28.

Cambridge University that shows officers who are wearing body

:23:29.:23:33.

cameras get 93% fewer complaints from the public. Would you expect it

:23:34.:23:40.

to be a similar result when the head cameras come in? When you're talking

:23:41.:23:44.

about firearms officers it something entirely different. The operational

:23:45.:23:50.

officers have got 93% ratings from the public. In the last year there

:23:51.:23:54.

were 16,000 deployments of armed officers to incidents, in those

:23:55.:24:02.

deployments firearms were only discharged ten times. I think

:24:03.:24:06.

firearms officers by and large have the confidence and support of the

:24:07.:24:10.

public. They are very well trained in what they do. How will they feel

:24:11.:24:16.

about having them? I think there has got to be a confidence issue with

:24:17.:24:22.

firearms officers themselves. Of all they are volunteers to carry out

:24:23.:24:25.

that role. Now they are placing themselves in a position where they

:24:26.:24:30.

are making decisions in split seconds. Those decisions can now be

:24:31.:24:34.

replayed over and over and over again in a court of law. So they

:24:35.:24:38.

need the confidence that the equipment will truly portray what

:24:39.:24:43.

took place and support their decision-making. It is possible that

:24:44.:24:49.

sometimes people might make wrong decisions but if you look at the

:24:50.:24:52.

numbers of times officers have discharged weapons, I've got

:24:53.:24:57.

confidence they do the right things. Where would the risk be in the

:24:58.:25:02.

footage not giving a clear image of what happened? The risk is that they

:25:03.:25:06.

have a split second to make a decision. At the time they make that

:25:07.:25:10.

decision, there is noise, there's confusion, there's testosterone,

:25:11.:25:15.

there is fear. They see an incident that only they might see from their

:25:16.:25:21.

position. Bear in mind there are numerous officers attending a scene.

:25:22.:25:24.

Numerous angles to view a situation. They might see something their

:25:25.:25:29.

colleagues haven't seen. When they take that decision to shoot, and

:25:30.:25:33.

it's a decision which remains purely there is, they need to be sure that

:25:34.:25:39.

when it goes to court, or they need the confidence that when it goes to

:25:40.:25:44.

court, if that decision isn't supported by the evidence, the

:25:45.:25:47.

implications are absolutely horrendous in terms of loss of

:25:48.:25:51.

liberty, loss of career, loss of life. The implications pulling the

:25:52.:25:59.

trigger massive. All the actions and decision-making will be captured on

:26:00.:26:05.

camera. Nick, how much pressure is put on firearms officers who, as you

:26:06.:26:12.

say, volunteered to be armed, how much pressure is on them when they

:26:13.:26:18.

think about the scrutiny and having to replay an event that has to

:26:19.:26:21.

happen in a split second? I think they do but they've also got to have

:26:22.:26:25.

faith and confidence in the training that they get over a period of time.

:26:26.:26:30.

It's a graduated process before they actually get to the front line in

:26:31.:26:34.

these situations. I've got a great deal of confidence in the training

:26:35.:26:38.

and support they get within the firearms community and the broader

:26:39.:26:42.

police community. Going back to one of your earlier question is,

:26:43.:26:48.

speaking to officers in recent times regarding this development, I think

:26:49.:26:52.

the concern isn't so much upon the added pressure or the transparency

:26:53.:26:58.

of evidence as it may come out on the day, but there is an underlying

:26:59.:27:01.

fear that potentially the capturing by video of police tactics somehow

:27:02.:27:07.

will enhance the challenges presented to them by the criminal

:27:08.:27:11.

community. I actually don't agree with that particular view, but there

:27:12.:27:15.

is a concern among some officers that may be the visibility of their

:27:16.:27:21.

tactics may somehow give away their operational advantage. Martin, what

:27:22.:27:27.

about the perspective of the public? Will this be a reassuring step? I

:27:28.:27:34.

think so. Every time there is a weapon discharged there are

:27:35.:27:38.

questions from all parties. From the police service, the IPCC, and the

:27:39.:27:43.

families are people who have been shot. This will go a long way to

:27:44.:27:46.

being able to answer those questions. I think in lots of cases,

:27:47.:27:50.

it will totally vindicate the decision of the officer who made the

:27:51.:27:55.

decision, and show their decision was right. Going back to the point

:27:56.:28:01.

earlier that Nick made about tactics given out in court, I think we've

:28:02.:28:06.

got a long history of being able to give sensitive evidence in court

:28:07.:28:12.

proceedings. Where tactics might be given out, I'm sure that the court

:28:13.:28:16.

will allow certain evidence to be heard in secret, so that we get best

:28:17.:28:21.

evidence, and we get to the truth of what actually took place. Thank you.

:28:22.:28:29.

Still to come. 70 years ago India was partitioned and ended British

:28:30.:28:34.

colonial rule. We are talking to families whose lives were affected

:28:35.:28:38.

and their stories of what it meant and still means for them today.

:28:39.:28:43.

We will talk to space journalist and author Sarah Cruddas. About the

:28:44.:28:53.

Cassini space probe. With the news, here's Rachel

:28:54.:28:57.

in the BBC Newsroom. The US Vice President, Mike Pence,

:28:58.:29:00.

has condemned far-right groups in response to the violence over

:29:01.:29:02.

the weekend in Virginia. A woman was killed and 19

:29:03.:29:05.

people were injured when a car was driven into a crowd

:29:06.:29:07.

protesting against a far-right rally Demonstrations and vigils

:29:08.:29:10.

have been held in cities The chairman of the Parole Board,

:29:11.:29:13.

Nick Hardwick says ministers "must act now" to address the backlog

:29:14.:29:22.

of prisoners serving The sentence - known as Imprisonment

:29:23.:29:24.

for Public Protection - was abolished in 2012 but more

:29:25.:29:33.

than 3,000 people in England and Wales are still being held

:29:34.:29:36.

with no release date. The Ministry of Justice says it's

:29:37.:29:38.

working to process these cases Arrests of passengers suspected

:29:39.:29:41.

of being drunk at UK airports and on flights have risen by 50%

:29:42.:29:48.

in the past year, according to an investigation

:29:49.:29:51.

carried out by Panorama. Critics of the airline industry say

:29:52.:29:58.

a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working,

:29:59.:30:00.

and want the government A spokesman for the Home Office said

:30:01.:30:02.

they will respond in due course. A man has been charged

:30:03.:30:13.

with the murder of a grandfather who was attacked as he walked his

:30:14.:30:19.

dogs in Norfolk. The body of 83-year-old

:30:20.:30:26.

Peter Wrighton was found in woodland near the village

:30:27.:30:27.

of East Harling last Saturday. Police say he had been

:30:28.:30:30.

repeatedly stabbed. Alexander Palmer, who's 23,

:30:31.:30:31.

is due in court later today. Security forces in Burkina Faso have

:30:32.:30:43.

killed two suspected jihadist gunmen after a terrorist attack

:30:44.:30:46.

in the capital. At least eighteen people

:30:47.:30:51.

are believed to have been killed in the attack and another

:30:52.:30:53.

8 were wounded. The dead and injured were from

:30:54.:30:58.

several countries. South Korea's President has urged

:30:59.:31:02.

both the US and North Korea to act reasonably and peacefully

:31:03.:31:05.

in the current nuclear stand off. Moon Jae-in said, "There

:31:06.:31:07.

must be no more war His comments come after a week of

:31:08.:31:09.

ratcheting up of tensions by the US China has tightened

:31:10.:31:16.

sanctions on North Korea - banning several key industrial

:31:17.:31:23.

imports from the country. And - It is arguably one of the most

:31:24.:31:26.

distinctive sounds in the world. However, next Monday

:31:27.:31:30.

at midday Big Ben will chime for the final time

:31:31.:31:37.

until 2021 to allow repair work to take place on the clock

:31:38.:31:39.

in Elizabeth Tower. The bells will still ring out

:31:40.:31:42.

on Remembrance Sunday and at New Year but will otherwise

:31:43.:31:44.

fall silent for only That's a summary of

:31:45.:31:46.

the latest BBC News. That's a summary of the latest news,

:31:47.:32:04.

join me for BBC Newsroom Britain won five medals in just over

:32:05.:32:07.

24 hours to meet their medal target at the World Athletics

:32:08.:32:16.

Championships. Thanks to four out

:32:17.:32:17.

of four in the relays. The women's 4 by 400

:32:18.:32:21.

metres won a silver medal. And the men won a bronze afterwards.

:32:22.:32:31.

Manchester United are top of the Premier League at a time when it

:32:32.:32:35.

doesn't really matter, but someone has to be. Romelu Lukaku scoring

:32:36.:32:41.

twice in the 4-0 victory over West Ham. Tottenham were also victorious

:32:42.:32:53.

2-0 over Newcastle. Cristiano Ronaldo scored but was sent off and

:32:54.:32:58.

could be in trouble after seemingly pushing the referee in the Spanish

:32:59.:33:02.

super cup first leg against Barcelona. And Justin Thomas claimed

:33:03.:33:07.

the US PGA trophy in America. Arrests of passengers suspected

:33:08.:33:13.

of being drunk at UK airports and on flights have risen

:33:14.:33:19.

by 50% in the past year, according to an investigation

:33:20.:33:22.

carried out by BBC Panorama. Critics of the airline industry say

:33:23.:33:24.

a voluntary code on alcohol sales isn't working,

:33:25.:33:27.

and want the government Where in the UK can you buy alcohol

:33:28.:33:28.

at 4am seven days a week? The answer is at an

:33:29.:33:37.

international airport. And it seems that it's leaving

:33:38.:33:41.

passengers and crew with a hangover. An investigation by BBC Panorama has

:33:42.:33:47.

revealed that arrests of those suspected of being drunk at UK

:33:48.:33:51.

airports and on flights have risen Half of the 4,000 cabin crew

:33:52.:33:55.

who took part in a survey carried out by Panorama and Unite,

:33:56.:34:03.

the union, said they had either experienced or witnessed verbal,

:34:04.:34:13.

physical, or sexual abuse People just see us as

:34:14.:34:15.

barmaids in the sky. They would touch your breasts, or

:34:16.:34:21.

they'd touch your bum or your legs. I mean, I've had hands

:34:22.:34:24.

going up my skirt before. Phil Ward, the managing director

:34:25.:34:27.

of low-cost airline, Jet2, has already banned alcohol sales

:34:28.:34:30.

on flights before 8am, and wants the industry

:34:31.:34:34.

to take tougher measures. Do you think airports

:34:35.:34:36.

are doing enough? I think the retailers

:34:37.:34:38.

could do more as well. Two litre steins of beer in bars,

:34:39.:34:45.

mixers and miniatures in duty-free shops, which can only be

:34:46.:34:49.

there for one reason. But the Airport Operators

:34:50.:34:51.

Association insists that their code I don't accept that the airports

:34:52.:34:54.

don't sell alcohol responsibly. The sale of alcohol

:34:55.:35:01.

per se is not a problem. It's the misuse of it and drinking

:35:02.:35:07.

to excess and then behaving badly. Earlier this year, a House of Lords

:35:08.:35:11.

committee called for airport licensing to be brought into line

:35:12.:35:14.

with pubs and bars. A government decision

:35:15.:35:18.

on whether to call time on early-morning drinking

:35:19.:35:21.

at airports is now And Panorama investigates

:35:22.:35:22.

the growing numbers of British passengers flying drunk tonight

:35:23.:35:35.

at 830pm on BBC One. 70 years ago tonight,

:35:36.:35:40.

200 years of British colonial rule in India came to an end

:35:41.:35:44.

and the country was partitioned into two independent nation states:

:35:45.:35:47.

Hindu-majority India It led to one of the largest mass

:35:48.:35:52.

migrations ever recorded with an estimated 12 million people

:35:53.:36:01.

on the move: Muslims journeyed While Hindus and Sikhs headed

:36:02.:36:04.

in the opposite direction. Communities that had co-existed

:36:05.:36:17.

for centuries succumbed Hundreds of thousands

:36:18.:36:19.

were killed, tens of thousands of women abducted -

:36:20.:36:22.

on all sides. India and Pakistan became

:36:23.:36:23.

independent at the same moment - at midnight as August 14th 1947 gave

:36:24.:36:26.

way to August 15th. Pakistan now celebrates

:36:27.:36:29.

its independence day on August 14th Former cricketer and Pakistani

:36:30.:36:31.

politician Imran Khan spoke to the BBC's Inzy Rashid -

:36:32.:36:36.

he says the situation between India and Pakistan

:36:37.:36:39.

is the "worst it's ever been". Partition was five years

:36:40.:36:46.

old when I was born so I vividly remember the trauma

:36:47.:36:49.

of the partition. Trauma suffered by the people

:36:50.:36:55.

all around us and we grew up with this hatred,

:36:56.:37:00.

there was this hatred against India. When you were playing cricket

:37:01.:37:21.

against India, what were the crowds like? The crowds were so passionate

:37:22.:37:26.

about you beating India and they forced the players to really play...

:37:27.:37:34.

It almost transcended it, as if it was no longer a cricket game, it was

:37:35.:37:37.

more than a cricket game when you played India and that was forced by

:37:38.:37:43.

the crowds. Did it ever get to a point where it turned violent? In

:37:44.:37:53.

1987 the crowds were hostile. I remember playing a Test match and it

:37:54.:37:55.

wasn't very pleasant because normally you expect rivalry and

:37:56.:38:02.

passion in the crowd but you don't expect them to be throwing stones at

:38:03.:38:08.

fielders standing on the boundary. I remember hostility and that was a

:38:09.:38:15.

surprise. Looking at the situation right now.

:38:16.:38:22.

Can you tell the people back in the UK what the situation is?

:38:23.:38:28.

The current situation is probably the worst it has been

:38:29.:38:30.

The main reason is because India has a Prime Minister who has not risen

:38:31.:38:37.

above what his communal thinking, his association with Hindu

:38:38.:38:43.

extremists, his background where this was this massacre

:38:44.:38:45.

in Gujarat of Muslims when he was the chief minister.

:38:46.:38:50.

Somehow we expected that when Narendra Modi would become

:38:51.:38:54.

the Prime Minister he would rise above this.

:38:55.:39:00.

But I have to say we are all so disappointed because Narendra Modi

:39:01.:39:04.

has not just disappointed Pakistanis, he has

:39:05.:39:05.

If we take the situation that is now then and we translate that

:39:06.:39:10.

There's British Indians and British Pakistanis

:39:11.:39:14.

who are probably hearing stories from both sides, how do you think

:39:15.:39:17.

The British Indian Pakistani society has power because they have

:39:18.:39:24.

resources, they are rich, they are influential.

:39:25.:39:32.

They are the ones that should force, especially

:39:33.:39:34.

someone like Narendra Modi, to move towards peace.

:39:35.:39:36.

But do you feel there's maybe a lack of education,

:39:37.:39:39.

a lack of understanding of exactly what the situation

:39:40.:39:41.

is like, even back to 1947, of how that developed?

:39:42.:39:47.

In the curriculum, there should be an attempt by the British

:39:48.:39:49.

authorities to make people understand what exactly

:39:50.:39:52.

And if they understand that, they will understand the genesis of this

:39:53.:40:05.

animosity between the countries. 70 years, it is a celebration, and how

:40:06.:40:09.

much of a special occasion is this? Very special occasion, and you will

:40:10.:40:13.

see that when you go out on the streets. People come out and

:40:14.:40:19.

celebrate. There is this desire in the people that they want to

:40:20.:40:26.

celebrate a Pakistan that it should have been and it hasn't been. Imran

:40:27.:40:29.

Khan, talking about partition. Many British Asians

:40:30.:40:37.

have a connection to the partition in some way -

:40:38.:40:39.

but how has it affected different generations who have lived

:40:40.:40:41.

through it firsthand, He was educated in Pakistan and says

:40:42.:40:43.

the way they were taught about partition was very different

:40:44.:40:49.

to the experiences of his grandparents who were

:40:50.:40:51.

affected directly by it. Daya Rani Chuhb, who is 88

:40:52.:40:53.

years-old, joins us from New Delhi She and her husband were forced

:40:54.:40:55.

to move from their home Also here is Sabeena Akhtar

:40:56.:41:00.

and her daughter Summayah Muhammad. Summayah recently went to India

:41:01.:41:06.

to find her great-grandmother's old home that she was forced out

:41:07.:41:08.

of during the partition. Welcome. You were 18 when the

:41:09.:41:20.

partition happened, you were engaged, what happened to you and

:41:21.:41:28.

your fiance? Good morning. When we got engaged... My husband was doing

:41:29.:41:42.

work in what is now Bangladesh, my parents were there, and there was so

:41:43.:41:46.

much tension. The whole night we couldn't sleep.

:41:47.:42:08.

We had men guarding our house to protect us and we were so worried,

:42:09.:42:20.

any time they could make riot. Normally we celebrate. But we are

:42:21.:42:35.

afraid. We were so scared. We thought people would come and take

:42:36.:42:39.

us away from our home and take our things away. We were scared, very

:42:40.:42:44.

much scared. What was it like living through that? Everything that you

:42:45.:42:55.

knew, it was turned upside down. Your life was turned upside down,

:42:56.:42:59.

what was it like? Very upsetting, we did not know where to do and where

:43:00.:43:08.

to go. One of my elder sisters was there in Bangladesh. Their brothers

:43:09.:43:17.

came over, left everything behind. You can go back. INAUDIBLE

:43:18.:43:34.

Only 100-200 people could go. Some were coming and we were so scared.

:43:35.:43:44.

So we decided to leave our house, family, everything behind, with my

:43:45.:43:54.

parents and my father stayed back. My father decided to stay in

:43:55.:44:02.

Pakistan and he gave me the name of and that I would be a Pakistan

:44:03.:44:07.

citizen. I would have a good job there. Look after my family. He

:44:08.:44:15.

stayed back. INAUDIBLE How much has this... It has totally

:44:16.:44:38.

schedule family, how much is it talked about? -- shaped your family.

:44:39.:44:47.

What I have been through and what our family has been through, it is

:44:48.:44:54.

like a dream. We still go to the old house and dream of the old house.

:44:55.:45:06.

Good house. Good job. Good family. But everything was left behind

:45:07.:45:07.

because we had no chance. I would say that it is a very

:45:08.:45:21.

intense story for all of us. I do believe that the partition shaped my

:45:22.:45:27.

parents' lives and their destiny, of course. It also shaped them as human

:45:28.:45:32.

beings. And the kind of learning that they had during that time, the

:45:33.:45:39.

kind of traits and characteristics that they were able to imbibe into

:45:40.:45:44.

their lives in that point in time had a great influence on everything

:45:45.:45:52.

later on. For instance I was born much, much later after partition,

:45:53.:45:56.

but the learnings and the teachings that my parents gained from that

:45:57.:46:00.

time, the way they were able to deal with the situation influenced them,

:46:01.:46:05.

and it has influenced all of us, me and my siblings as well. You set

:46:06.:46:15.

your daughter a challenge to go to India and learn about your

:46:16.:46:17.

grandmother, why did you want to do that and what did you find out? I

:46:18.:46:22.

thought it was really important to learn about this history. We aren't

:46:23.:46:26.

taught about it at school. If I wasn't going to teach it to my

:46:27.:46:32.

daughter, who would? Also, it's important for her personal history

:46:33.:46:36.

to know where we came from and that we have this story of this amazing

:46:37.:46:42.

woman and this journey she made. How much have been passed down through

:46:43.:46:47.

direct conversations? We had snippets of information and we have

:46:48.:46:50.

this treasure trove of her belongings which are letters and

:46:51.:46:57.

pictures, from when she got to Pakistan, including the refugee

:46:58.:47:01.

papers she filled in. We knew bits but nothing like what we discovered.

:47:02.:47:06.

We had never seen the house she left behind. She left the top production

:47:07.:47:17.

and came to Lahore in Pakistan. What did you find out in particular, what

:47:18.:47:22.

affected you when you learned about her? I learned that throughout

:47:23.:47:29.

history, loads of women's stories are forgotten. I'm really proud to

:47:30.:47:36.

have uncovered my great-grandmother's story. I think

:47:37.:47:43.

that if more people tried to learn about partition, and learn about the

:47:44.:47:51.

refugees that were made in their own country, then maybe they would be

:47:52.:47:54.

more sympathetic to the refugees coming into Europe today. Were you

:47:55.:48:00.

surprised to hear all the detail about it? How much had you been

:48:01.:48:05.

aware of before? I hadn't really been aware of that much, because I

:48:06.:48:11.

just thought that we had come from Pakistan and lived in Pakistan, but

:48:12.:48:15.

that wasn't the case. It was really surprising to find out my

:48:16.:48:20.

great-grandmother's story. Tell us more about her story, what did

:48:21.:48:28.

happen to her? She was alone in her house when she heard mobs outside.

:48:29.:48:34.

She decided to flee in the middle of the night. She was alone with about

:48:35.:48:40.

15 of her children. She had 19 children altogether but some were

:48:41.:48:44.

born after partition. She got up and she fled. She buried her wedding

:48:45.:48:49.

jewellery hoping that one day she would return to her house and her

:48:50.:48:54.

belongings. But she never did. She got on a train journey which we also

:48:55.:49:02.

took from Rampur. We went to Uttar Pradesh, where she was living in

:49:03.:49:05.

refugee camps for over a year. It had been a pretty well-to-do family,

:49:06.:49:11.

hadn't it? It was a huge contrast. My great-grandfather was quite

:49:12.:49:17.

active in the independence movement. I think you've got some stamps in

:49:18.:49:22.

your box. These are mementos you've picked up on your journey. This

:49:23.:49:28.

would have been my great-grandfather. He was part of

:49:29.:49:32.

the independence movement but sadly died... I mean, he wouldn't have

:49:33.:49:40.

been pro-partition I don't think. But he died before. She made that

:49:41.:49:44.

journey alone and they left all of that prestige and the life they were

:49:45.:49:49.

used to. As I said, they settled in camps in Lahore. Your grandparents

:49:50.:49:55.

had to move to Pakistan from India, how much were you told growing up

:49:56.:50:04.

about what happened? How much was passed on directly? I've never met

:50:05.:50:08.

my grandad but I've heard stories from a grandmother. Today, millions

:50:09.:50:15.

of people are celebrating it as an independent state, but for me, the

:50:16.:50:19.

stories which I heard from a grandmother, those horrific stories,

:50:20.:50:23.

they'll still in my head. What sort of stories? She had to migrate from

:50:24.:50:40.

India. She was very settled the. My grandfather was serving as an Army

:50:41.:50:46.

officer. Even though he was asked to help the people who migrated from

:50:47.:50:53.

India, he still couldn't help his own family. My grandmother, she had

:50:54.:50:59.

to carry two of her sons, both under the age of five, all the way from

:51:00.:51:04.

India to Pakistan. All the time she had that fear someone would attack

:51:05.:51:08.

her. All she could take with her was her jewellery. She had wrapped that

:51:09.:51:14.

around her body. It was a risky job to carry all your jewellery. Mobs

:51:15.:51:22.

were all attacking each other. It was a risky business. The stories

:51:23.:51:27.

that are told subsequently through formal education, you feel quite

:51:28.:51:31.

strongly that it's not necessarily reflective of what you have been

:51:32.:51:36.

told that first-hand. A lot of people from my generation,

:51:37.:51:40.

especially those of the British Asian origin, they aren't very clear

:51:41.:51:45.

about why partition happened. Basically Pakistan was made around

:51:46.:51:50.

the notion that religion, which in Pakistan was Islam, was the basis of

:51:51.:52:04.

nationalism. Which is not the case, the Arabs are divided into 20

:52:05.:52:10.

countries. That was wrong because before partition, from 1857 when the

:52:11.:52:14.

war of Independence was fought up until the late 40s, the Muslims,

:52:15.:52:19.

Hindus and Sikhs were united against the fight against the British Raj.

:52:20.:52:24.

Within a matter of a few months, they started fighting each other.

:52:25.:52:30.

What triggered that was the Muslim leaders, they were making Pakistan a

:52:31.:52:37.

fortress for Islam rather than for Muslims. Even today in Pakistan,

:52:38.:52:43.

which was made for Muslims which were a minority in India, the

:52:44.:52:46.

religious minorities in Pakistan are not safe today. What's the best way

:52:47.:52:54.

to teach this stuff? You will obviously got your personal stories.

:52:55.:52:58.

You've had your personal journey. I think talking about it firstly is

:52:59.:53:03.

really important. Our children need to know about their history. Hassan

:53:04.:53:08.

was saying about his education which was pretty one-sided. I'm quite

:53:09.:53:14.

sceptical of a curriculum that ignores large swathes of history,

:53:15.:53:19.

and I find it incumbent on my daughter to know what clay pots the

:53:20.:53:25.

Romans were eating out of 2000 years ago but not who was taking food off

:53:26.:53:30.

a grandmother's table 100 years ago. It's really important to teach this

:53:31.:53:34.

history and there are various organisations who have come up with

:53:35.:53:40.

syllabuses and curriculum is to teach through drama. We don't have

:53:41.:53:44.

to share all the gory details with children but they do need to know

:53:45.:53:48.

that it was the largest displacement of people in history. You said you

:53:49.:53:51.

think it's good for people to know what happened. Obviously it will

:53:52.:53:57.

have impacted on you knowing this about your family. How do you feel

:53:58.:54:02.

now you know all about what happened? Well, I feel really sad

:54:03.:54:06.

that my great-grandmother had to go through all of that to make a

:54:07.:54:11.

journey to Pakistan. When she got there, hoping that she would find a

:54:12.:54:16.

home and settle in, she was made a refugee in harrowing country, which

:54:17.:54:22.

was really shocking to find out. I think that by telling more people

:54:23.:54:27.

about it, then as I said before, they will be more sympathetic to the

:54:28.:54:32.

refugees today. Your whole life has been left pretty much in the

:54:33.:54:41.

aftermath of partition. How has it affected you throughout your life?

:54:42.:54:44.

Have you ever got beyond what you went through? It is terrible to

:54:45.:55:04.

forget. It was shocking. My parents were shifted to refugee camps. There

:55:05.:55:16.

were millions of people living there. My father got a job there. He

:55:17.:55:30.

took the job to earn money and look after the family financially. It was

:55:31.:55:47.

terrible to live there... INAUDIBLE It was terrible in winter, summer

:55:48.:55:53.

also, and the rainy days also. I have not been there because my

:55:54.:55:59.

husband told me, you will not be able to bear seeing your parent

:56:00.:56:08.

suffering so much. Those days... INAUDIBLE Thank you so much.

:56:09.:56:15.

The American Cassini space probe is beginning its final phase

:56:16.:56:17.

of its two-decade-long mission to Saturn.

:56:18.:56:25.

Scientists know they're taking a risk, buffeting means Cassini

:56:26.:56:27.

must use its thrusters to maintain control.

:56:28.:56:29.

It promises unprecedented data on the chemical

:56:30.:56:31.

composition and the internal structure of Saturn.

:56:32.:56:32.

We can now speak talk to the space journalist and author Sarah Cruddas.

:56:33.:56:44.

It feels like we are in space! What are you hoping for from this

:56:45.:56:52.

mission? It's been incredible anyhow, one of the best things to

:56:53.:56:56.

come from this mission as always with going into space isn't the

:56:57.:57:00.

science we are doing in space, but simply looking back at Earth.

:57:01.:57:05.

Cassini has spent 20 years on its journey to Saturn and took this

:57:06.:57:09.

picture of Saturn's rings and in the distance is a pale dot and that dot

:57:10.:57:16.

is ours. In terms of science it's been a game changer. Saturn is the

:57:17.:57:21.

second largest planet in our solar system but think of it as a mini

:57:22.:57:24.

solar system in its own way. We don't know quite why it has those

:57:25.:57:30.

rings. It has at least 60 moons and other means we haven't yet

:57:31.:57:34.

identified. It's a world unto itself. Since this mission launched

:57:35.:57:39.

we've discovered two of the means might even have conditions which

:57:40.:57:43.

might mean there is life within our rain solar system. It is game

:57:44.:57:47.

changing stuff. Now we are coming into the final part of the mission

:57:48.:57:50.

which is to do something that no spacecraft has done before. We

:57:51.:57:55.

assume we know so much because we'd been going into space for more than

:57:56.:57:58.

50 years but actually we know so little. We've never been this close

:57:59.:58:02.

to Saturn and its a feat of engineering to use gravity from

:58:03.:58:07.

Saturn's largest moon to slingshot the spacecraft which is 20 years

:58:08.:58:11.

old, to the cloud tops around the gas planets. Thank you.

:58:12.:58:18.

# Clap your hands, clap your hands... #

:58:19.:58:46.

Joanna Gosling talks to the sisters of two men who have waited years to be released from prison, despite the abolition of indefinite 'public protection' sentences.

We look into a 50 per cent rise in the number of people arrested suspected of being drunk at UK airports and on flights.

And Joanna talks to three families about the legacy of partition, 70 years after British colonial rule came to an end in India.