13/11/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


13/11/2017

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Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello it's Monday, it's nine

o'clock, I'm Victoria Derbyshire,

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welcome to the programme.

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Business leaders from the UK

and Europe are meeting

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with the prime minister today.

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They want to get some sort of deal

in place to ensure that trade is not

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badly affected after Britain leaves

the EU.

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Also - in Britain, they're

the silent minority -

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Chinese people rarely feature

in the national conversation;

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but we've learned that their silence

when it comes to health can be

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a matter of life and death;

and old cultural traditions can see

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new mums confined for a month

in their homes following childbirth

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You shouldn't drink cold drinks

during the month, shouldn't really

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shower will stop hair washing is not

allowed. And not going outside the

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boundaries of your house.

We will

bring you our film in 15 minutes. It

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is fascinating and gives such

insight.

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A British woman imprisoned in Iran

is close to a mental breakdown

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and is having tests for breast

cancer according her husband.

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Nazanin Zaghari-Radcliffe

was arrested last year accused

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of trying to overthrow the regime.

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Her husband tells this programme

how his wife reacted

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to the Froegin Secretary's

inaccurate comments

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about why she was in Iran.

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She was pretty cross, said things

that I couldn't repeat on

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television. She also, you know,

yeah, I think, I think, was angry

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with all sorts of people - with me,

with the campaign, with the

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Government having done nothing.

She's just angry and it is just

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unfair.

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Richard Ratcliffe tells us

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he is hopeful his wife could be

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released on humanitarian grounds -

we'll hear from him after 9.30.

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Hello.

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Welcome to the programme,

we're live until 11 this morning.

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Monday morning and I have

this question for you -

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how stressed are you?

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New research today suggests that

over 80 per cent of us feel stressed

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at some point during the week -

is that you?

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What I'm really interested

in hearing from you this morning,

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is how you manage stress?

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What you do to de-stress?

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Let me know - and if you want

to come on air and talk about this,

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put CALL ME in your email.

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We will talk to you between half

past ten and half past 11.

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Victoria@bbc.co.uk.

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So we are talking about that

and all the latest breaking news

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including that earthquake in Iran.

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Our top story today: Businesses

from across Europe will be

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in Downing Street today

to voice their concerns

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about trade after Brexit.

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The CBI and the Institute

of Directors will be represented -

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as will business organisations

from Germany, France,

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Spain and seven other countries.

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They will press Theresa May

and the Brexit Secretary,

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David Davis, to clarify the future

relationship between the UK

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and the rest of the EU -

and demand they maintain current

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arrangements.

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Chris Mason is at Westminster.

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They really want some clarity, and

they definitely don't have it, do

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they?

Good morning. They want

clarity. They want to be

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de-stressed. We have this bus-load

of business leaders from Europe,

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various groups having their say.

Urgency is the watchword we keep

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hearing from them. They are saying

that the growing number of them are

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enacting contingency plans around

Brexit, fearful that as the clock

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ticks down there might not be an

arrangement put in place. They are

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also uncertain as to exactly what

that arrangement might look like.

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The Government is keen to reach out

to these groups, but given that they

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are logjams over the initial

discussions about the divorce, it is

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unlikely they will leave with more

clarity.

Just remind us why the

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talks are logjams at the moment.

The

European Union has said that in

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order to move on to the future

relationship that the UK can have

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with the EU and trade, there has to

be sufficient progress, to use their

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ill-defined idea, around the three

things on the table at the moment:

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The Irish border, citizens' rights,

and what is seen as the divorce

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payment. There is optimism that some

kind of deal can be arrived at, but

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that hurdle of sufficient progress

-- that that hard goal can be

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cleared before Christmas, but we saw

a delay at the October summit, the

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first opportunity where that hurdle

may have been overcome. Until the EU

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agrees that there has been progress,

their world with -- there will not

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be any discussion about the future

trade agreement. The businesses say

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they need clarity on that, and

quickly.

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Annita McVeigh is in the BBC

Newsroom with a summary

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of the rest of the day's news.

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An earthquake has killed more

than 300 people in Iran -

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more than 2500 have been injured.

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Another four people have

been killed in Iraq.

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The quake hit the border area

between the two countries,

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around 30 kilometres south

of Halabja, with a magnitude of 7.3.

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It was so powerful, it was felt

as far away as Lebanon and Turkey.

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Andrew Plant has more.

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Carried

into hospital amid the chaos

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at this clinic in Iran.

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Victims of the earthquake

on stretchers, others,

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walking wounded, as more and more

of the injured arrived.

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The earthquake struck after dark.

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For rural villages in the affected

areas, the search is beginning

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in torchlight for any

survivors that may be buried

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in the fallen buildings.

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The shocks were felt in towns, too.

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People out for the evening running

to safety, finding a way outside

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away from the danger,

scared there could be more to come.

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The first reports are

that the centre of the earthquake

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was near the border

between Iran and Iraq,

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somewhere close to

the city of Halabja.

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The US Geological Survey said

that the epicentre was about 20

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miles south-west of the border.

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Many people have lost their homes

and don't know where to sleep in the

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coming days and weeks. That will

lead to a huge crisis, because there

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are also issues with electricity in

the water supply. It has all been

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damaged.

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The moment the earthquake struck

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was even captured on live TV.

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These news broadcasters

feeling the tremors

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as their programme played out.

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Local media is now showing

emergency shelters and beds

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being set up outside.

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15 emergency teams, they say,

are now helping treat the injured

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and search for survivors.

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The number of dead is still

climbing, but it could be many days

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before the real extent

of the damage done here

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is fully clear.

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Andrew Plant, BBC News.

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Hundreds of people have marched

in Hollywood in support of victims

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of sexual assault and harassment,

inspired by the 'MeToo'

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social media campaign.

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The march follows a series

of assault and harassment

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allegations against public figures,

set off by revelations about

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the movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.

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The marchers started

on Hollywood Boulevard and walked

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along the "Walk of Fame" to CNN's

headquarters.

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The family of Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe,

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the British-Iranian woman jailed

in Tehran, say they're increasingly

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concerned about her wellbeing.

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In a statement last night her

husband Richard said his wife

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appeared to be "on the verge

of a nervous breakdown"

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and is seeking treatment

after finding lumps in her breasts.

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The Foreign Secretary,

Boris Johnson, and his cabinet

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colleague Michael Gove have both

been criticised for their

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comments about the case.

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The key thing to understand is that

we're working very very hard and

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intensively and impartially on all

those cases. Thank you very much.

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Thank you. See you later. Thank you.

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The Church of England

is telling its schools that

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children should be free

to explore their identity and both

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boys and girls should be

allowed to wear a tutu,

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tiara or superhero cloak

without judgement from

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teachers or other pupils.

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The new guidelines aim to prevent

children being bullied

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because of their sexual orientation

or gender identity.

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Jon Donnison reports:

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The Church of England first issued

guidance on homophobic bullying

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in its schools three years ago.

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Today, those guidelines

are being updated to include

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bullying against children

and adolescents who identify

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as transgender or bisexual.

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It comes after a controversial case

on the Isle of Wight where one

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couple withdrew their son

from a Church of England primary

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school because another pupil asked

to be accepted as transgender.

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Our child came home

from school one day and said,

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"Daddy, I am confused."

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There was a boy in his class

who is sometimes coming as a boy

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and sometimes coming as a girl.

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We were concerned about that

because it is very confusing.

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How do they deal with that?

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Let us remember, these

are primary school children,

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they are six years of age.

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But the new guidance stresses

children should be able to play

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with what it calls the many

cloaks of identity.

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It says children are at

the trying-on stage of life,

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so no labels need to be fixed.

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And the Archbishop of Canterbury,

Justin Welby, writes

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in the new guidance...

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But the Church is by no means united

on the issue of human sexuality,

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and this latest guidance is likely

to divide opinion.

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Jon Donnison, BBC News.

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Gun owners in England and Wales

are being encouraged to hand

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in their weapons to the police

as part of a two week long

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gun surrender scheme.

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People giving up their firearms

won't face prosecution

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for illegal possession,

but could be questioned if a gun

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is found to be linked to a crime.

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Sima Kotecha reports.

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Hand

in your guns, and no

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questions will be asked.

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That is what police forces

across England and Wales are calling

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upon people to do.

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The last firearms surrender

was in 2014, when 6000 handguns,

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rifles and imitation

firearms were handed in.

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It is targeted at those who may have

forgotten about owning a gun,

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or may be too scared to tell

officers they have got one,

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in case they are arrested.

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The deal is, no questions will be

asked at the point of surrender.

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However, if the weapon is traced

back to a crime scene,

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they could be called

in for questioning.

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We're realistic enough to realise

that we're not going to get hardened

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gang members, in possession

of weapons they intend to use,

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hand in a gun.

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But this is part of our response,

to try and make it as difficult

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as possible for those people to come

into possession of any type

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of weapon at all.

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Latest figures show that there

were almost 7000 crimes involving

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firearms in England

and Wales last year.

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That is an increase of 27%

on the year before.

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But the number of crimes

is still far less than a decade ago,

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when it was 31% higher.

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Critics say those who want to use

a gun will do so, and the surrender

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won't make a difference.

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It begins today, and

lasts for two weeks.

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Bob Geldof says he is handing back

his Freedom of the City of Dublin -

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because the same honour has been

granted to the Burmese political

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leader, Aung San Suu Kyi.

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He's described the treatment

by Myanmar's military

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of the Rohingya Muslim

minority community as "mass

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ethnic cleansing."

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The Live Aid organiser said his home

city had honoured Aung San Suu Kyi -

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but now she had appalled and shamed

Dublin.

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Jupiter and Venus -

the two brightest planets -

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have been appearing very close

together in the morning sky.

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Both have been visible

to the naked eye across the UK.

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The best viewing time was 40

minutes before sunrise.

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While the planets are visible

to the naked eye, viewers

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with a telescope have also been able

to see Jupiter's

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four Galilean moons.

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That's a summary of the latest BBC

News - more at 9.30.

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Thank you very much.

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Do get in touch with us

throughout the morning -

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use the hashtag Victoria LIVE

and If you text, you will be charged

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at the standard network rate.

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You research suggests that most of

us get stressed at least once a

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week. Zane says, hope this e-mail

finds you well. Maybe it sounds

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crazy, but I cancel myself in front

of the mirror and bring myself down.

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My life is full of stress, and I'm

not the type of person to discuss my

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issues with others. I definitely try

to avoid therapists. Bruce says,

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this is an easy one for me. In order

to de-stressed, I get on my

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motorbike and ride around the Kent

countryside where there is little

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traffic and great scenery. That gets

rid of any stress with ease. Thank

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you for those. I am interested to

find out what you do to de-stress.

0:13:560:14:02

How do you manage your stress? If

you want to talk to me between half

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past ten and how past 11, put in

your e-mail call me, and we will.

0:14:070:14:13

Time for some sport now -

and Jessica Creighton is in Basel

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for us, where Northern Ireland

suffered heartbreak last night -

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they won't be going to the World Cup

- and all because of one penalty,

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Jessica?

0:14:220:14:24

Good morning, Victoria. It is a

cruel way for it all to end for

0:14:240:14:30

Northern Ireland. One controversial

penalty decision that they conceded

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in the first leg for a supposed

handball. Many people have

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questioned that because it seemed to

strike the Northern Ireland player

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on the back of the shoulder, but it

was judged as handball, the referee

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gave a penalty. And because of that,

it seems, the Northern Ireland World

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Cup dream is over. In the second

leg, they gave it their all. Such a

0:14:500:14:54

brave performance. They had a few

chances. They came so close in the

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dying moments when Jonny Evans'

header was cleared off the line.

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They were utterly devastated, the

players on their knees. Some of them

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were fighting tears, I guess,

reflecting what might have been, had

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that controversial penalty decision

not gone against them. Here is what

0:15:150:15:18

the manager, Michael O'Neill, had to

say.

It would be too strong a word

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to say cheated, but you do feel

there is a certain injustice to

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going out of a tournament in this

page. A lot of people said

0:15:290:15:32

Switzerland were far superior to us

in the first leg, but they only

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scored the penalty, not anything

else, so we could have come here

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0-0, could still have been playing,

playing extra time now, so there is

0:15:410:15:47

an injustice there, a huge

injustice, given the nature of what

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has divided the teams.

What next for

Michael O'Neill and Northern

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Ireland? This was seen as their best

chance of making it to a World Cup,

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wasn't it?

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Exactly. 80 years ago if you have

said they were close to making a

0:16:070:16:10

World Cup the few people would have

laughed only. -- a few years ago.

0:16:100:16:14

Been on a journey -- they have been

on a journey. They are ranked just

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outside the top 20. They had this

incredible run and they got the last

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16 last year. So they are incredible

competition on the world stage. Now

0:16:290:16:34

they have failed to qualify, you

wonder what might happen to some of

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their veteran players, the likes of

the Captain Steven Davis and Gareth

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McAuley. Will that be the last time

we see them in the green and white

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of Northern Ireland? And the

manager, Michael O'Neill, has

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received so much praise for the

transformation Northern Ireland have

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undergone. But he has been touted as

the person to fill the vacant

0:16:540:16:59

Scotland manager position. It might

be all change for Northern Ireland

0:16:590:17:03

in the future.

Thanks very much.

Welcome to the programme. I really

0:17:030:17:10

would urge you to watch our first

film today. It is about the minority

0:17:100:17:16

in Britain which is practically

invisible.

0:17:160:17:25

Chinese people make up

0.9% of our population.

0:17:250:17:27

They rarely speak out,

let alone feature in

0:17:270:17:29

the national conversation.

0:17:290:17:30

This really matters when it

comes to their health -

0:17:300:17:32

that's when it can become

about life or death.

0:17:320:17:35

This programme has learned that

those in the Chinese community often

0:17:350:17:37

hide or ignore illnesses

because of their culture.

0:17:370:17:39

We've heard how women

are being encouraged to "confine"

0:17:390:17:42

themselves in their homes

for a whole month after having

0:17:420:17:44

a baby - and how the elderly

are suffering in silence

0:17:440:17:47

because of pressure to be

"stoic" and "endure" pain.

0:17:470:17:50

But as one health expert

tells our reporter Amber Haque -

0:17:500:17:53

"Just because we're silent

and polite doesn't mean

0:17:530:17:54

we should be ignored".

0:17:540:18:04

Chinese is well known to be

invisible and silent,

0:18:040:18:06

we all know that.

0:18:060:18:12

Just because we are silent

and polite, doesn't mean

0:18:120:18:14

we should be ignored.

0:18:140:18:18

TRANSLATION:

They work longer hours,

where work takes number one

0:18:180:18:21

and health takes a back-seat.

0:18:210:18:25

They feel that, if I've got cancer,

it's a given, I should endure pain.

0:18:250:18:31

I feel like crying because we're

talking about really serious stuff

0:18:310:18:33

and it's really like a big deal

for mum to be doing this.

0:18:330:18:38

TRANSLATION:

At one point,

I thought of committing suicide,

0:18:380:18:40

because I thought there's no hope.

0:18:400:18:50

They came here in the early 19th

century, and now the Chinese

0:19:130:19:16

community make-up 0.9%

of our population.

0:19:160:19:19

In 2015, more Chinese people

immigrated to the UK than any other

0:19:190:19:22

country apart from India.

0:19:220:19:25

Sometimes they are referred

to as the silent minority

0:19:250:19:28

because they keep their heads down

and work hard.

0:19:280:19:31

But, as a result, health experts

tell us that some in the Chinese

0:19:310:19:34

community are being overlooked

and failing to get

0:19:340:19:35

access to treatment.

0:19:350:19:45

Dr Kip Wu is a neurologist

at Kings College Hospital.

0:19:490:19:52

She's been concerned

by the lack of British Chinese

0:19:520:19:54

engaging with the NHS.

0:19:540:19:55

And she's decided to set

up her own voluntary service.

0:19:550:19:57

Those people could actually be

accessing NHS health

0:19:570:19:59

care, but they weren't.

0:19:590:20:05

There are cultural practices

and beliefs that hinder them

0:20:050:20:07

from getting the best service

that they require.

0:20:070:20:11

One of the Chinese cultural beliefs

is saving face and keeping

0:20:110:20:13

illnesses to yourself,

within the family,

0:20:130:20:15

to avoid embarrassment.

0:20:150:20:16

And I see that quite often

in Chinese families.

0:20:160:20:21

And these cultural expectations

start right from the beginning,

0:20:210:20:23

when a mum gives birth to a baby.

0:20:230:20:33

Sitting month, as in confinement

after childbirth, is a tradition

0:20:430:20:47

so ingrained in Chinese culture that

even I did it myself,

0:20:470:20:50

some practices.

0:20:500:20:53

Some of the very strict rules

are that you shouldn't drink cold

0:20:530:20:58

drinks during the month,

you shouldn't really shower,

0:20:580:21:01

hair washing is not allowed,

and obviously not going outside

0:21:010:21:04

the boundaries of your house.

0:21:040:21:08

Do you think the rest of the country

know that some Chinese women

0:21:080:21:11

are confining themselves for a month

after giving birth?

0:21:110:21:14

No, they don't, and especially

in the health profession.

0:21:140:21:21

Today we are going to cook a black

fungus chicken for a mum

0:21:210:21:24

who is currently practising Chinese

postnatal confinement

0:21:240:21:28

period in London.

0:21:280:21:37

Just turning brown now.

0:21:370:21:39

So, mums who are doing this don't

leave the house for a whole month.

0:21:390:21:42

They don't have any guests,

sometimes they don't actually

0:21:420:21:44

wash their hair or have a shower,

and they have to eat only

0:21:440:21:48

certain types of food.

0:21:480:21:49

Why is this believed to be

so healing for the mother?

0:21:490:21:51

They believe it will reset the body,

they believe in ying and yang

0:21:510:21:54

and they want to keep the body warm

and ignore the cold food.

0:21:540:21:58

Black fungus.

0:21:580:22:00

So the black fungus,

they have the properties

0:22:000:22:02

of cleansing the womb.

0:22:020:22:03

Smells good.

0:22:030:22:07

How many Chinese women that live

here in the UK do you think actually

0:22:070:22:10

carry confinement out?

0:22:100:22:11

I think plenty.

0:22:110:22:12

Plenty of them will be carrying

out this confinement,

0:22:120:22:14

if they have the chance.

0:22:140:22:16

Basically they are just delighted

that they can actually practice

0:22:160:22:19

postnatal confinement the Chinese

way here in the UK without shipping

0:22:190:22:25

the mother or their aunt

or a confinement lady

0:22:250:22:27

across from Asia.

0:22:270:22:30

Make it modern.

0:22:300:22:32

Postnatal your way,

in the city, you know?

0:22:320:22:34

It's not ancient any more.

0:22:340:22:39

So, for obvious reasons,

we're not allowed to film

0:22:390:22:41

with the mum in her house when she's

doing the confinement period,

0:22:410:22:44

but I have found one mum who's

willing to talk to me via Skype.

0:22:440:22:47

Her name's Ching, and she actually

hasn't left the house

0:22:470:22:50

for nearly 28 days.

0:22:500:22:51

Hi, Ching.

0:22:510:22:52

Hi there.

0:22:520:22:55

Did it ever cross your mind to not

do the confinement period?

0:22:550:22:58

Not at all, actually.

0:22:580:23:01

I come originally from Singapore

and it's part of our culture

0:23:010:23:04

to definitely do confinement,

so it was more about making sure

0:23:040:23:07

I can import that over to the UK

since I'm doing it here.

0:23:070:23:12

Being confined in your flat actually

is important because, for us,

0:23:120:23:17

if you don't practice it,

then you are just disadvantaging

0:23:170:23:19

yourself, kind of thing.

0:23:190:23:21

So, your husband is English,

what did he think when you told him

0:23:210:23:25

you were going to go a whole month

without leaving the house

0:23:250:23:28

or having any visitors?

0:23:280:23:29

I don't think he realised that it

came with a whole set

0:23:290:23:33

of practices and rules,

and it was a bit difficult for him

0:23:330:23:36

because he wanted to show

off his baby.

0:23:360:23:39

My husband didn't really know

what was going when I said, "Oh,

0:23:390:23:42

I need to practice confinement."

0:23:420:23:43

And his family as well.

0:23:430:23:47

So it is quite obvious that there's

a lack of understanding or even

0:23:470:23:50

awareness that it even exists.

0:23:500:23:51

But I can see why

it can be isolating.

0:23:510:23:55

Although Ching has employed her own

private health visitor,

0:23:550:24:00

there is a concern confinement means

babies aren't being

0:24:000:24:02

seen by professionals.

0:24:020:24:03

Dr Wu thinks the health

of mum and baby could

0:24:030:24:06

sometimes be compromised.

0:24:060:24:07

New mums can often be left

in isolation, and that's quite

0:24:070:24:10

difficult for them to cope.

0:24:100:24:14

When they have medical problems,

they try to solve it

0:24:140:24:16

within themselves, and sometimes

that can have detrimental effects

0:24:160:24:18

to the health of themselves

and to the baby.

0:24:180:24:22

It's almost as though we're

not allowed to be sad

0:24:220:24:25

or unhappy during confinement,

and having negative emotions around

0:24:250:24:27

the mum is almost discouraged.

0:24:270:24:28

Sometimes signs of baby blues

or postnatal depression are missed.

0:24:280:24:38

Into adulthood, some Chinese

people aren't seeking help

0:24:550:24:58

because they feel they should

endure problems themselves.

0:24:580:25:03

They are one of the most dispersed

communities in Britain,

0:25:030:25:06

and when language is a barrier it

makes the isolation even harder.

0:25:060:25:12

I forgot, sorry.

0:25:210:25:24

Cheers!

0:25:240:25:25

Thank you.

0:25:250:25:31

Elly Lee's worked in the catering

trade in rural Worcestershire

0:25:310:25:35

since moving from Hong Kong

with a son and daughter in the 90s.

0:25:350:25:40

She's got stage four cancer,

meaning it's advanced,

0:25:400:25:42

and it's spread round her body.

0:25:420:25:47

TRANSLATION:

It came back

that the cancer had spread

0:25:530:25:56

in my lungs, my liver

and my sternum.

0:25:560:26:01

So it was several shocks over

the course of a few weeks.

0:26:010:26:06

The Chinese community can have

stigma around cancer,

0:26:060:26:08

and some may not even

tell their families.

0:26:080:26:15

It was like a movie unfolding.

0:26:150:26:20

It was a bit difficult

to accept all of a sudden.

0:26:200:26:26

I think cancer is already

a really lonely experience,

0:26:260:26:31

but if you feel that you're not able

to attend cancer support groups,

0:26:310:26:34

then it becomes more of a problem.

0:26:340:26:37

I'm coming, I'm coming!

0:26:370:26:42

TRANSLATION:

The majority

of the Chinese community here work

0:26:510:26:53

predominantly in the catering trade.

0:26:530:27:02

They work long hours

where work takes number one,

0:27:020:27:04

and health takes a back-seat.

0:27:040:27:06

I'm speaking out to help Chinese

people have an awareness of health.

0:27:060:27:16

I feel like crying,

because we're talking

0:27:230:27:25

about really serious stuff,

and it's really...

0:27:250:27:28

It's really...

0:27:280:27:32

It's really, like, a big deal

for mum to be doing this.

0:27:320:27:42

There is still some degree

of fatalism when you hear the word

0:27:450:27:48

cancer, often they associate it

with death and they sometimes don't

0:27:480:27:51

realise that certain cancers,

if detected early or if managed

0:27:510:27:55

in the right way, could be

potential for cure,

0:27:550:27:59

and even if the doctor asked

directly, sometimes they will deny

0:27:590:28:02

to say that they are in pain,

when they may be in pain,

0:28:020:28:05

and they feel that, if I've got

cancer, it's a given,

0:28:050:28:07

I should endure pain,

or they will try to treat it

0:28:070:28:10

with traditional Chinese medicine.

0:28:100:28:20

There are certain attitudes

within the Chinese community,

0:28:200:28:22

especially the family members,

who feel that perhaps

0:28:220:28:24

information should be

restricted from the patient,

0:28:240:28:26

whereas the patient themselves may

actually want to have all the facts.

0:28:260:28:35

I came across a Chinese lady

who was in her mid-50s.

0:28:350:28:37

The scan showed that she had a brain

tumour, and when I went

0:28:370:28:41

to speak to the family,

the son was there and he asked

0:28:410:28:44

the mum to go out and then he said

to me, "Doctor, is it cancer,

0:28:440:28:48

because I really don't

want my mum to know."

0:28:480:28:55

It is difficult to try to convince

them that, yes, we can help

0:28:550:28:58

you fight the battle with cancer,

but you do not need

0:28:580:29:00

to suffer in the process.

0:29:000:29:10

Good morning, everyone here,

welcome to our centre.

0:29:200:29:25

I'm here to talk to you

today about dementia.

0:29:250:29:31

The original, the old translation

of dementia in Chinese is horrific.

0:29:310:29:39

It means you are old,

you're dilapidated, you've gone

0:29:390:29:41

mad, you've gone nutty.

0:29:410:29:48

There are a whole generation

of first-generation migrants

0:29:480:29:50

now living in the UK,

and they are very isolated.

0:29:500:29:55

The fortunate ones will have

the spouse still living with them,

0:29:550:29:59

but we know lots and lots

of the elderly Chinese are living

0:29:590:30:01

alone, and they will find it very,

very difficult to actually find any

0:30:010:30:05

mainstream services that cater

for them, their needs.

0:30:050:30:12

Six o'clock on a cold

night in London.

0:30:120:30:21

Mr Tang's 73 and lives

on his own in a tiny bedsit.

0:30:260:30:32

He's got prostate cancer, and he's

decided against any treatment.

0:30:320:30:36

He's in pain and he can't walk.

0:30:360:30:38

Volunteer carers from

the Chinese Centre come

0:30:380:30:41

to see him when they can,

but some days Mr Tang

0:30:410:30:44

says he won't eat.

0:30:440:30:46

TRANSLATION:

I only went

to the doctor when I had signs

0:30:460:30:49

of pain when urinating.

0:30:490:30:53

Only when I had trouble

going to the toilet,

0:30:530:30:55

I went to the doctors.

0:30:550:31:00

I wouldn't go before.

0:31:000:31:01

What did the doctors say

to you when you chose not

0:31:010:31:04

to have chemotherapy?

0:31:040:31:08

TRANSLATION:

One doctor tried

to tell me to have chemotherapy,

0:31:080:31:11

as I will certainly die if I don't.

0:31:110:31:15

I said, no, as with almost

all cancers you're certain to die,

0:31:150:31:22

or you won't last long,

as there's no cure.

0:31:220:31:30

My children have grown

up, left the family.

0:31:310:31:35

They are well-educated,

I've done my duty.

0:31:350:31:41

So, even if I live longer or die,

it doesn't make a difference.

0:31:410:31:44

I've done my duty.

0:31:440:31:47

There are elderly ladies and

gentlemen who are in their own home,

0:31:540:31:59

literally not going out,

trying to confine the problem

0:31:590:32:01

within themselves.

0:32:010:32:03

They don't want to bother, let's

say, an outsider with what they fear

0:32:030:32:06

is their own problem.

0:32:060:32:07

Are you OK?

0:32:070:32:08

Yeah.

0:32:080:32:12

No-one would know that

you are in so much pain,

0:32:120:32:15

not able to speak English

to communicate with anyone.

0:32:150:32:23

It must just be such

a lonely experience for you.

0:32:230:32:25

TRANSLATION:

At one point,

I thought of committing suicide.

0:32:250:32:28

Because I thought, there's no hope.

0:32:280:32:35

There's a clear lack

of representation of

0:32:400:32:41

the British Chinese in the media,

politics and the arts.

0:32:410:32:46

But for some in the community,

that silence can deafening.

0:32:460:32:50

Chinese is well known to be

invisible and silent.

0:32:500:32:55

We all know that that must be

related to our own culture as well.

0:32:550:32:58

We do not like to make

complaint or make a fuss,

0:32:580:33:01

even if we're not very happy

with the situation.

0:33:010:33:03

We're quiet, we don't make a noise.

0:33:030:33:05

Politicians don't take much notice.

0:33:050:33:09

Public Health England have told us

they are aware some in the Chinese

0:33:090:33:14

community aren't accessing health

care, and say they are improving

0:33:140:33:16

the way they collect information

about them as a group.

0:33:160:33:21

We're often grouped in a box along

with other ethnicities

0:33:210:33:24

on statistical data collection

forms, and that means our specific

0:33:240:33:27

needs are not being looked into,

and the fact that we had to set up

0:33:270:33:31

an online medical advisory

service off our own back

0:33:310:33:33

is a reflection of that.

0:33:330:33:36

Just because we are silent

and polite, doesn't mean

0:33:360:33:38

we should be ignored.

0:33:380:33:48

Karen says: It's not just Chinese

mums you do this. It took me a month

0:33:480:33:53

to break the outside world after my

son was born after emergency

0:33:530:33:57

Caesarean. You are both adapting to

this time together. I don't think

0:33:570:34:01

it's unique or an unusual process

for new parents. Trevor says girl on

0:34:010:34:06

my daughter-in-law is Chinese. She

did not mention or comply with this

0:34:060:34:09

tradition and was active within a

couple of days of giving birth.

0:34:090:34:12

In the next half hour

we are going to talk to Eddie Tang

0:34:120:34:15

whose family shunned him

when his son got cancer as a child

0:34:150:34:20

And to a woman whose mum refused to

seek help for cervical cancer until

0:34:200:34:24

she collapsed one day. She has asked

to remain anonymous because she

0:34:240:34:28

thinks there may be a backlash from

her family for speaking out. This

0:34:280:34:32

story came from a viewer who

contacted me. If you think there is

0:34:320:34:35

a story or issue we should

potentially look at, please send us

0:34:350:34:39

an e-mail.

0:34:390:34:40

Still to come:

0:34:400:34:47

As fears grow for British- Iranian

mum Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe grow,

0:34:470:34:51

we will hear the latest on her

detention from her husband Richard.

0:34:510:34:56

And as business leaders from around

Europe prepared to meet Theresa May,

0:34:560:34:59

we will hear from both sides of the

Brexit divide.

0:34:590:35:02

Time for the latest

news - here's Annita.

0:35:020:35:12

Business leaders will be in Downing

Street to press the Government to

0:35:190:35:26

clarify the future relationship

between the UK and the rest of the

0:35:260:35:29

EU and to demand that they maintain

current arrangements.

0:35:290:35:41

An earthquake has killed more

than 300 people in Iran -

0:35:450:35:48

more than 2500 have been injured.

0:35:480:35:49

Another four people have

been killed in Iraq.

0:35:490:35:51

The quake hit the border area

between the two countries,

0:35:510:35:54

around 30 kilometres south

of Halabja, with a magnitude of 7.3.

0:35:540:35:56

It was so powerful, it was felt

as far away as Lebanon and Turkey.

0:35:560:36:00

The family of Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe,

0:36:000:36:01

the British-Iranian woman jailed

in Tehran, say they're increasingly

0:36:010:36:03

concerned about her wellbeing.

0:36:030:36:04

In a statement last night her

husband Richard said his wife

0:36:040:36:07

appeared to be "on the verge

of a nervous breakdown"

0:36:070:36:09

and is seeking treatment

after finding lumps in her breasts.

0:36:090:36:12

The Foreign Secretary,

Boris Johnson, and his cabinet

0:36:120:36:13

colleague Michael Gove have both

been criticised for their

0:36:130:36:16

comments about the case.

0:36:160:36:19

Bob Geldof says he is handing back

his Freedom of the City of Dublin -

0:36:190:36:22

because the same honour has been

granted to the Burmese political

0:36:220:36:25

leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

0:36:250:36:27

He's described the treatment

by Myanmar's military

0:36:270:36:28

of the Rohingya Muslim

minority community as "mass

0:36:280:36:30

ethnic cleansing."

0:36:300:36:32

The Live Aid organiser said his home

city had honoured Aung San Suu Kyi -

0:36:320:36:36

but now she had appalled and shamed

Dublin.

0:36:360:36:43

That is a summary of the latest

news.

0:36:430:36:51

Thank you for your e-mails and tweet

about stress. New research suggests

0:36:510:36:57

that four out of five of us are

stressed each week. A woman says,

0:36:570:37:03

after being made redundant through

every job I've had through company

0:37:030:37:07

closures, I am currently in a job I

don't enjoy. Through that and other

0:37:070:37:10

things I am stressed on a daily

basis. I am starting my own

0:37:100:37:17

business, in course, and relaxing in

a hot bubble bath every night. I am

0:37:170:37:20

trying to invest in my own

happiness. And a couple more fun

0:37:200:37:26

now, Kayla says, when I'm stressed

that, I lie on my bed with my eyes

0:37:260:37:32

closed and I listen to some ocean

music. When they introduced that on

0:37:320:37:36

this programme soon. Whalley says, I

divert focus from myself. I swim

0:37:360:37:45

frequently, Dahlia possible, learned

to play a musical instrument and

0:37:450:37:49

join a band or orchestra. Do jobs in

the garden or care for my house

0:37:490:37:53

plans. Have someone to love and work

hard to ensure that that person

0:37:530:37:57

loves you. Thank you for those. Keep

them coming in. We are interested to

0:37:570:38:02

hear how you manage your stress how

you try to de-stress. If you want to

0:38:020:38:06

have a chat about how he do it, put

call me in e-mail. Type a spot now.

0:38:060:38:15

We start with Northern Ireland,

because as we heard, they won't be

0:38:150:38:18

going to Russia next summer after

their goalless draw with

0:38:180:38:23

Switzerland. Their manager Michael

O'Neill described their performance

0:38:230:38:28

is amazing.

Katie Archibald and Elinor Barker

0:38:280:38:34

got their second winds of the

weekend in team pursuit.

0:38:340:38:39

Lewis Hamilton was driver of the day

at the Brazilian Grand Prix. He

0:38:390:38:42

started last in the race but

finished fourth, as Sebastian Vettel

0:38:420:38:46

took the honours.

And Roger Federer opened with a

0:38:460:38:51

straight sets win over Jack Sock at

the ATP tour finals in London. At

0:38:510:38:58

the age of 36, Roger Federer is

playing in this event for the 15th

0:38:580:39:02

time. That is always my answer to

beating stress, Victoria - get out

0:39:020:39:07

and take some exercise.

And a lot of people agree with you!

0:39:070:39:14

The husband of Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe -

0:39:140:39:15

the British woman jailed in Iran -

says the Foreign Secretary,

0:39:150:39:18

Boris Johnson, has told him he's

considering whether she could be

0:39:180:39:21

granted "diplomatic

protection" status.

0:39:210:39:22

Her family say she's on the verge

of a nervous breakdown,

0:39:220:39:24

and has seen doctors about lumps

in her breasts.

0:39:240:39:32

In April 2016, Nazanin was arrested

while visiting Iran to visit family

0:39:320:39:35

and for her daughter

to meet her grandparents.

0:39:350:39:39

On the 1st of November Mr Johnson

wrongly said she had been training

0:39:390:39:42

journalists in Iran.

0:39:420:39:48

When you look at what Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe was doing, it's

0:39:480:39:52

just, she was simply teaching people

journalism, as I understand it.

Four

0:39:520:39:59

days later, Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe

was re-called to court in Iran. Mr

0:39:590:40:03

Johnson's remark was cited as new

evidence against her, prompting

0:40:030:40:07

fears that her five-year jail

sentence could be extended. By the

0:40:070:40:13

7th of November, Boris Johnson was

forced to clarify his remarks to MPs

0:40:130:40:16

and said he was sorry if his remarks

caused anxiety.

The UK Government

0:40:160:40:23

has no doubt that she was on holiday

in Iran when she was arrested last

0:40:230:40:28

year, and that was the sole purpose

of her visit. I accept that my

0:40:280:40:33

remarks could have been clearer in

that respect, and I'm glad to

0:40:330:40:39

provide this clarification.

On

Saturday, Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe's

0:40:390:40:43

family said she was taken to

hospital for an ultrasound, saying

0:40:430:40:47

she had been complaining of sharp

stabbing pains in her breasts for

0:40:470:40:51

more than a year. Yesterday, the

environment secretary came under

0:40:510:40:55

fire for saying he didn't know what

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe was doing

0:40:550:40:59

in Iran when she was arrested in

2016. Speaking in Brussels this

0:40:590:41:04

morning, Boris Johnson says the case

as the be handled sensitively.

The

0:41:040:41:08

key thing to understand is that

we're working very, very hard and

0:41:080:41:14

intensively, and impartially, on all

those cases. Thank you very much.

0:41:140:41:17

Thank you. See you later. Thank you.

I've been speaking to Richard

0:41:170:41:23

Radcliffe, who told me he felt

compelled to e-mail the foreign

0:41:230:41:31

office.

Following Michael Gove's

comments, which I didn't pick up on

0:41:310:41:35

and the time -- at the time, so I

wrote to our main contact the

0:41:350:41:45

foreign office and said, listen, can

you please remind all cabinet

0:41:450:41:47

members that the UK Government has

no doubt that Nazanin was there on

0:41:470:41:52

holiday? That is the UK policy and

it is not my job to police, but

0:41:520:41:56

these things shouldn't be spread

around. Let's be honest, it's

0:41:560:42:00

unlikely that Michael Gove's

comments would suddenly be appearing

0:42:000:42:04

in the Iranians media, but if it

goes to trial, they collect all this

0:42:040:42:08

evidence and it gets piled up.

Obviously, the most important person

0:42:080:42:12

at this point is the Foreign

Secretary, who is the voice and

0:42:120:42:16

presence of the UK. It is important

that the battles for Nazanin, and it

0:42:160:42:22

was important that he clarified.

Less important for Michael Gove to

0:42:220:42:24

do it.

Michael Gove is the

environment secretary, and he was

0:42:240:42:29

asked about your wife's case

yesterday on the Andrew Marr

0:42:290:42:33

programme. I want to play the

relevant clip of the audience so

0:42:330:42:36

they know what we're talking about.

What was she doing when she went to

0:42:360:42:40

Iran?

I don't know. One of the

things I want to stress is that

0:42:400:42:44

there is no reason why Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe should be

0:42:440:42:50

imprisoned in Iran as far as any of

us know. No evidence has been

0:42:500:42:54

produced which suggests she should

be detained. We know the Iranians

0:42:540:42:59

regime is capable of abusing the

human rights of its own citizens. It

0:42:590:43:02

appears here to be harming the human

rights of someone whose plight

0:43:020:43:06

necessarily moves us all.

You say

you don't know what she was doing.

0:43:060:43:10

Her husband is clear that she was on

holiday with her child.

In her case,

0:43:100:43:13

I take -- in that case, I take her

husband's assurance in that regard.

0:43:130:43:20

The problem with that exchanges that

Mr Gove said he did not know why

0:43:200:43:23

your wife was there. You said you

did not see that interview live, but

0:43:230:43:27

members of your family were pretty

cross.

And it was picked up on in

0:43:270:43:31

social media and lots of other

people were responding. What he says

0:43:310:43:35

is reasonable and helpful, it's just

the emphatic, I don't know, at the

0:43:350:43:40

beginning. And the fact that he says

he is happy to take my word for it.

0:43:400:43:45

The Foreign Secretary said in

Parliament that the UK Government

0:43:450:43:47

has no doubt.

Were you surprised? Mr

Gove is usually very precise with

0:43:470:43:53

his words, very well briefed.

So

much happened that there were bigger

0:43:530:44:00

things. I spoke to the Foreign

Secretary. It's the first time I've

0:44:000:44:03

done that in a long time. That is

not an intimidating. -- that is not

0:44:030:44:14

not intimidating.

In terms of your

conversation with the Foreign

0:44:140:44:19

Secretary, did he apologise for his

inaccurate, it's a couple of weeks

0:44:190:44:23

ago which could potentially make

your wife's situation and jail

0:44:230:44:26

sentence longer?

He didn't mention

the comments. He said he was sorry

0:44:260:44:32

for Nazanin's suffering and that all

the country was behind her. We

0:44:320:44:36

talked about meeting soon. We talked

about me going to Iran with him and

0:44:360:44:40

he said he would look at it

seriously. I asked him to look at

0:44:400:44:44

him personally offering her

diplomatic protection, which would

0:44:440:44:46

mean that there would be much more

protection given to her by the

0:44:460:44:50

British Government.

Are you

surprised that it has taken this

0:44:500:44:53

long for the Foreign Secretary to

pick up the phone?

I've been

0:44:530:44:57

complaining on your show and others

that I want the Government to be

0:44:570:45:01

doing more, and publicly will stop

the foreign office have been saying

0:45:010:45:07

they think it is important that they

don't.

It has taken a gaffe for the

0:45:070:45:12

Foreign Secretary to pick up the

phone to you.

We are in a different

0:45:120:45:15

place now, clearly, where his words

are being used by the Iranians, and

0:45:150:45:19

it is important that he stands up

for her, that I stand alongside him,

0:45:190:45:23

and that together, we try to bring

her home as soon as possible.

Did Mr

0:45:230:45:28

Johnson give your potential

timescale when it comes of this --

0:45:280:45:31

comes to this possibility of a trip

to Iran?

He said, let's meet in a

0:45:310:45:36

few days and we can talk about it. I

imagine, when we come to meet, it

0:45:360:45:40

will be clearer.

Is the meeting

scheduled?

Not yet, but hopefully

0:45:400:45:44

soon.

Let's talk about the health of

your wife, because you say that

0:45:440:45:49

lumps have been found in both her

breast. What other information do

0:45:490:45:52

you have?

Exactly that. She had a

mammography a few months ago. You

0:45:520:46:05

have two fight quite hard to get

outside services. She was told by

0:46:050:46:11

the specialist that they thought it

was OK but she should probably come

0:46:110:46:15

back. But this needs to be tucked up

on. Beyond that, I am holding on to

0:46:150:46:23

the specialist saying it is probably

benign, and let's take it from

0:46:230:46:27

there. I'm much more sensitive to

this, sort of, wider, I don't know,

0:46:270:46:33

emotional... I said a number of

times that I'm on the verge of a

0:46:330:46:38

nervous breakdown. -- she said a

number of times. She is very up and

0:46:380:46:42

down. There were times on the phone

yesterday where she was laughing,

0:46:420:46:46

really angry, and crying Comanche

talks about not being able to

0:46:460:46:49

control her emotions. She gets angry

over the smallest things. -- and

0:46:490:46:57

crying, and she talks about. I think

it is what has happened in the last

0:46:570:47:03

few months, and compounded by what

happened over the last couple of

0:47:030:47:08

weeks, watching our family being

used to propagate her as a spy. Then

0:47:080:47:14

fellow prisoners ask why are you on

the TV all the time, what about us?

0:47:140:47:19

You mean it has lent to resentment?

Yes, because nobody has an easy life

0:47:190:47:26

there, everybody takes it as they

can and that is where it is.

How did

0:47:260:47:31

she react to Mr Johnson's errors?

She was pretty cross. She said

0:47:310:47:36

things I could not repeat on

television. She also, you know, was

0:47:360:47:43

angry. Angry with me, angry with the

campaign, angry with the government

0:47:430:47:47

having done nothing, then the

government messing up. She's just

0:47:470:47:50

angry that it is unfair.

You hope

your wife will be released on

0:47:500:47:59

humanitarian grounds, potentially

because of the recent health

0:47:590:48:02

problems you have just described,

how realistic is that?

It's hard to

0:48:020:48:08

know what's realistic at all. It's

certainly possible. It is certainly

0:48:080:48:14

important I keep battling and that

the government keeps battling. If

0:48:140:48:17

you go back one month we were having

noise is being said, listen, she

0:48:170:48:22

will be eligible for humanitarian

release, and she would be entitled

0:48:220:48:27

to it next week -- eligible for it

next week. Really, I will hold on to

0:48:270:48:31

that and I will hope the Foreign

Secretary is able to engage, focus,

0:48:310:48:35

and worked his magic and bring her

home.

Before Christmas?

Yes.

0:48:350:48:44

The Prime Minister will meet leaders

from European business organisations

0:48:440:48:46

today as the UK prepares

to leave the EU.

0:48:460:48:48

The business leaders are expected

to demand an urgent breakthrough

0:48:480:48:51

on Brexit from Theresa May to kick

start the stalled

0:48:510:48:53

negotiations in Brussels.

0:48:530:48:54

Over the weekend, the EU's chief

negotiator, Michel Barnier,

0:48:540:48:56

said he was preparing

for the possible collapse

0:48:560:49:00

of negotiations with the UK,

but said he hoped it

0:49:000:49:02

wouldn't happen.

0:49:020:49:03

Today the Prime Minister will again

talk about the UK's commitment

0:49:030:49:06

to securing an implementation period

of around two years once Britain

0:49:060:49:09

leaves the EU in March 2019.

0:49:090:49:11

Our political correspondent Chris

Mason is in Westminster for us.

0:49:110:49:18

Let's talk about the bigger picture,

which is Mrs May is weak, she has a

0:49:180:49:24

lot on her hands, trying to sort out

Brexit and trying to appease the

0:49:240:49:27

competing interest in her own party,

hasn't she?

She has. This whole

0:49:270:49:33

issue of Brexit is going to become

again, front and centre this week

0:49:330:49:36

after a couple of weeks of it not

dominating the headlines as it has

0:49:360:49:41

for the best part of the last two

years. Yet, Theresa May, which ever

0:49:410:49:46

way she looks, has compromises to

consider and arms to twist. You look

0:49:460:49:51

at the conclusion of that round of

talks in Brussels at the ten end of

0:49:510:49:54

last week between Michel Barnier and

David Davis, there wasn't some huge

0:49:540:50:01

leap forward. There is optimism that

come the next summit in Brussels it

0:50:010:50:06

could be that the three issues being

looked at at the moment around the

0:50:060:50:12

divorce of the Irish border, and the

divorce settlement will make

0:50:120:50:16

sufficient progress to allow

movement onto the next stage. At the

0:50:160:50:19

same time, and there were headlines

over the weekend that illustrated

0:50:190:50:22

this, that the Prime Minister has to

keep her country and her party

0:50:220:50:28

onside. Ultimately because this was

a binary referendum forcing people

0:50:280:50:33

to fall on one side or the other,

but reaching some agreement as to

0:50:330:50:37

compete with the common interests of

those inclined one way and those

0:50:370:50:40

inclined the other. But compromise

is something that everybody will

0:50:400:50:45

find easy to swallow.

Thanks very

much. Wait, let me ask you about the

0:50:450:50:51

report yesterday in one of the

Sunday papers that around 40

0:50:510:50:55

Conservative MPs are ready to sign a

letter, emotion, a letter of no

0:50:550:50:58

confidence, I should say, in the PM,

not enough to trigger any kind of

0:50:580:51:03

leadership contest. But do you think

it's true?

Westminster is a postcode

0:51:030:51:08

which perpetually harms to the sound

of gossip. You get these figures

0:51:080:51:12

which float around now and again. We

had similar numbers which were

0:51:120:51:15

kicked around in the immediate

aftermath of the cough -fest which

0:51:150:51:20

was the Prime Minister's conference

speech a couple of weeks ago.

0:51:200:51:24

Depending on who you speak to. Some

people dismiss that figure out of

0:51:240:51:28

hand. Others entertain it might be

broadly right. Crucially it isn't

0:51:280:51:32

sufficient to clear the threshold

that will be required to imperil

0:51:320:51:35

Theresa May's position. But we could

park all of those numbers. The

0:51:350:51:41

simple reality is that Theresa May

knows that after the general

0:51:410:51:45

election, in which she hopes to

stride forwards, but in reality

0:51:450:51:50

crunched backwards, is that she

governs at the consent of her

0:51:500:51:54

parliamentary party. -- she hoped to

stride forward. If senior members

0:51:540:52:00

say your time is up, then she is a

corner. But the clock is ticking

0:52:000:52:05

down. There is a complete lack and

-- lack of agreement about who she

0:52:050:52:14

would be replaced by if she toppled.

But you hear the argument that she

0:52:140:52:18

might be weak but she can also be

stable, because those forces, the

0:52:180:52:23

challenge of Brexit, the absence of

an obvious successor, might just

0:52:230:52:27

hold her in place despite

everything.

Thanks, weak but stable,

0:52:270:52:33

that's the Prime Minister, said

Chris, but not christen himself. --

0:52:330:52:38

but not Chris himself.

0:52:380:52:42

Edwin Morgan, from the Institute

of Directors, whose colleagues

0:52:420:52:44

will be at the meeting

with Theresa May, Labour MP

0:52:440:52:46

Mary Creagh a remainer,

and Conservative MP

0:52:460:52:48

Michael Fabricant a Brexiteer.

0:52:480:52:50

Good morning. Edwin, do your members

comedy businesses, have any clarity

0:52:500:52:59

on the transitional deal that we are

facing, any clarity on the end trade

0:52:590:53:03

deal that we seek? -- do your

members, businesses.

We don't. It's

0:53:030:53:11

a serious problem for businesses

because they need to know in the

0:53:110:53:14

next three months, latest, watch the

transition deal is going to look

0:53:140:53:18

like. They need to know that so they

can find. If we get that agreed

0:53:180:53:22

pretty soon that will settle the

nerves and enable businesses not to

0:53:220:53:27

trigger any serious contingency

plans now. It's in the government's

0:53:270:53:31

interest to say to businesses, this

is what it will look like, this will

0:53:310:53:34

be the status quo in March 2019, you

won't have to move any of your

0:53:340:53:42

operations, move your staff...

Businesses do not want to map

0:53:420:53:46

adjustments. An adjustment to a new

transitional deal, and an adjustment

0:53:460:53:52

to the Brexit deal. -- do not want

two adjustments.

Exactly. Just got

0:53:520:54:00

to be given a bit of time to say,

look, this is the final position you

0:54:000:54:04

will be in. Get used to it, check

your systems if you must, and make

0:54:040:54:09

your processes as smooth as you can.

Baby is a suggestion of a bridge to

0:54:090:54:14

something else, a Brexit deal for

example, but what if there isn't

0:54:140:54:19

one? -- there is a suggestion.

That

would be bad from a business point

0:54:190:54:24

of view. Most of our members don't

even know what world trade deals

0:54:240:54:30

would look like with new customs

procedures. Frankly there is a big

0:54:300:54:34

job for businesses to prepare

anyway. But really they don't want

0:54:340:54:38

that crashed out scenario from where

we are now, which is very integrated

0:54:380:54:44

to just like everywhere else in the

world.

Michael Fabricant, time seems

0:54:440:54:49

to be running out for a transitional

deal and a Brexit deal, would you

0:54:490:54:54

agree?

Yes, and everybody expected

that. I used to set up radio

0:54:540:55:00

stations all round the world, and

Chris Mason got it right, he said

0:55:000:55:05

there is arm-twisting to do and

compromises to be made.

Why doesn't

0:55:050:55:08

the Prime Minister do something to

get things moving?

If we did that we

0:55:080:55:17

would be offering something more

than perhaps we needed to do. Let's

0:55:170:55:20

talk about the plight of British

people in Europe, living in Europe.

0:55:200:55:25

We are saying we want to guarantee

the rights of people from the

0:55:250:55:29

European Union...

That's not the

major sticking point...

It's one of

0:55:290:55:34

them...

Theresa May has offered 20

billion euros, that's not enough, so

0:55:340:55:38

why do she not up it and then trade

talks can begin?

Because I don't

0:55:380:55:45

think negotiation is surrendering.

You could set off a 100 billion, 200

0:55:450:55:49

billion, do you think the taxpayer

would find that practical?

You have

0:55:490:55:53

got to be practical of the time

limit for a good trade deal.

0:55:530:55:57

Negotiations take time. Don't

forget, the United Kingdom isn't

0:55:570:56:02

picked on Steyn or Andorra, or even

Luxembourg, the UK is the major

0:56:020:56:08

importer of German cars and four

French agriculture in Europe. -- the

0:56:080:56:12

United Kingdom isn't Lichtenstein.

Time is not only tough on ours. It

0:56:120:56:20

is. And it is also tough on the

Europeans, as well, and we have got

0:56:200:56:24

to work on this. -- time is not only

tough on us.

Should the Prime

0:56:240:56:29

Minister negotiate for more time?

You can't do that.

You can, you can

0:56:290:56:34

just put it into words!

The Lisbon

Treaty says it will be the 19th of

0:56:340:56:41

March 2000 19. But we will have a

transition period. 11 o'clock in the

0:56:410:56:46

evening, perhaps. -- March 2019. We

have signed something, we need to

0:56:460:56:54

stick to that.

What needs to happen

to get talks started again?

Theresa

0:56:540:56:58

May needs to get her cabinet in

order. Michel Barnier doesn't care

0:56:580:57:01

about what happens in the Cabinet.

Well it does.

It makes no

0:57:010:57:08

difference. We have a worrying

situation where our EU negotiating

0:57:080:57:12

partners are concerned Theresa May

may not be in there in eight weeks'

0:57:120:57:15

time. Her confidence has been

drained and authority shattered.

0:57:150:57:19

Does not look good for her. We have

a cabinet within a cabinet with

0:57:190:57:23

Michael Gove and Boris Johnson

trying to do this Orwellian grip of

0:57:230:57:29

people not internalising the logical

Brexit. We have two resignations.

0:57:290:57:36

Another two cabinet ministers whose

position hangs in the balance. She

0:57:360:57:38

is weak. She needs to get on with

David Davis and get down to the

0:57:380:57:42

financials you have been talking

about. Exit day is the 29th of

0:57:420:57:47

March, not the 19th of March...

Whatever.

Should Mrs May ask for

0:57:470:57:55

Article 50 to be extended, should

she ask for more time?

She needs

0:57:550:58:00

more time.

Would it be a good idea?

I think so.

Brexiteers and people

0:58:000:58:07

who voted for Brexit think that when

you suggest it might be a good idea

0:58:070:58:11

to extend the time, the timeline,

then what you are actually trying to

0:58:110:58:15

do is put off leaving.

What I'm

trying to do is to safeguard the

0:58:150:58:20

jobs and incomes of people in my

constituency. I visited a bedding

0:58:200:58:25

manufacturer in my constituency on

Friday whose prices have gone up 30%

0:58:250:58:29

since the referendum. They are

finding it impossible to hire

0:58:290:58:31

people. That's one business in one

constituency.

That is to do with

0:58:310:58:39

employment...

That's because after

the referendum, four of their

0:58:390:58:43

employees shut up shop and went back

to Poland.

They didn't have to do

0:58:430:58:46

that.

Nobody told them that. This is

the culture that has been created in

0:58:460:58:52

the post-referendum climate. People

think the pound has gone down 25%, I

0:58:520:58:56

can earn more money in Ireland...

The post-referendum climate for some

0:58:560:59:01

people is that they suspect Brexit

is going to be betrayed and you are

0:59:010:59:05

the kind of person who wants to do

that.

I want to see a good deal for

0:59:050:59:10

British jobs, British manufacturers,

and the British economy.

Weren't you

0:59:100:59:15

arguing we should join the euro?

Exactly the same...

I don't want to

0:59:150:59:22

go back into history...

Want to make

sure that chemical businesses, our

0:59:220:59:25

second largest export in this

country, are able to trade on the

0:59:250:59:29

29th of March. Your government is

unable to tell the chemicals

0:59:290:59:32

industry, our second largest

manufacturer...

Because it is

0:59:320:59:38

negotiations... You would surrender

everything...

It's not about

0:59:380:59:43

surrendering, it isn't a war, it is

a negotiation...

And a negotiation

0:59:430:59:48

does not mean agreeing to everything

you want...

What about the chemicals

0:59:480:59:53

industry...

They are in business,

the chemicals industry is...

One in

0:59:530:59:58

five businesses has already made

moves to move abroad. Rather than

0:59:581:00:02

getting on some sort of

nationalistic...

Hang on a minute...

1:00:021:00:07

It's to do with pragmatism...

You

have both major points. Are you one

1:00:071:00:12

of the 40 Conservative MPs

considering signing this?

I don't

1:00:121:00:16

even think there are 40.

How many do

you think there are?

I was a

1:00:161:00:22

government whip. Even in the days of

David Cameron there were usually 12,

1:00:221:00:26

15, almost a given.

What would you

say to your colleagues who are

1:00:261:00:30

thinking of signing this

no-confidence letter?

I would say,

1:00:301:00:35

let's have some stability. Jeremy

Corbyn survived when his entire

1:00:351:00:37

cabinet more or less to resign. We

can all agree that we want a good

1:00:371:00:45

deal for the United Kingdom out of

Brexit.

OK, thank you.

1:00:451:00:54

We will bring you the latest news

and sport in a minute, but first,

1:00:541:00:58

the weather.

1:00:581:00:59

A Chilean frosty start this morning,

the third chilly Monday in a row.

1:01:031:01:09

There was brightness in the south

this morning, which meant it was

1:01:091:01:12

possible to see Venus and Jupiter

first thing. -- HAV and frosty

1:01:121:01:16

start. -- a chilly and frosty start.

Some of this rain coming into the

1:01:161:01:30

high North West of Scotland could

fall as snow at higher ground.

1:01:301:01:37

Largely dry and bright with sunshine

in the south, turning increasingly

1:01:371:01:41

hazy due to high level cloud. At

3pm, outbreaks of rain pushing in

1:01:411:01:47

from the north-west. The wind will

have up as well, Misty and murky

1:01:471:01:52

conditions and cool temperatures.

Outbreaks of rain for Northern

1:01:521:01:56

Ireland as well. A bit patchy rain

pushing into the far north of

1:01:561:02:00

England, but elsewhere, largely dry

and bright. A little high level

1:02:001:02:06

cloud will turn the sunshine hazy.

It doesn't feel quite as cool as

1:02:061:02:14

yesterday. The rain starts to work

its way south and east overnight,

1:02:141:02:19

pushing its way into central

England. Either side of it, we will

1:02:191:02:24

see clearer skies, allowing the

temperatures to fall away slightly.

1:02:241:02:29

It is this weather front slowly

sinking its way south that will

1:02:291:02:33

bring with it some milder air. Not

as chilly a night as we saw last

1:02:331:02:41

night. Tomorrow won't be quite as

Chile either. We are drawing in

1:02:411:02:45

milder air from the south-west.

Tomorrow starts bright in Scotland

1:02:451:02:48

with sunny spells and showers. One

or two back showers, largely in the

1:02:481:02:54

north, turning more frequent in the

afternoon. A cloudy day for Northern

1:02:541:02:59

Ireland, England and Wales, with

outbreaks of rain and drizzle.

1:02:591:03:03

Temperatures will be milder, in

double figures. A bright start in

1:03:031:03:07

Scotland on Wednesday, but more

clout than outbreaks of rain.

1:03:071:03:13

Temperatures in double figures in

the South. On Thursday, a cold front

1:03:131:03:21

sinks South East, bringing outbreaks

of rain to the north-west for a

1:03:211:03:24

time. It will alter in -- also bring

in cooler air. Feeling cool again by

1:03:241:03:31

Friday.

1:03:311:03:35

Hello it's Monday, it's 10 o'clock,

I'm Victoria Derbyshire.

1:03:351:03:41

The husband of a British woman

being held in Iran has told this

1:03:411:03:44

programme she's close to a mental

breakdown and is having

1:03:441:03:46

tests for breast cancer.

1:03:461:03:47

Nazanin Zaghari-Radcliffe

was arrested last year accused

1:03:471:03:49

of trying to overthrow the regime.

1:03:491:03:56

Her husband told us how the

implication of comments made by

1:03:561:04:00

environment Secretary Michael Gove

could affect the case.

It is not

1:04:001:04:04

likely that the comments will appear

in Iranians media, but if they go to

1:04:041:04:09

trial, they collect this evidence

and it gets piled up. The most

1:04:091:04:13

important person is the Foreign

Secretary, who is the voice and

1:04:131:04:16

presence of the UK. It is important

that he battles for Nazanin.

In the

1:04:161:04:21

next half an hour, we will talk to a

former Iranians diplomat who was a

1:04:211:04:25

minister in the country's Foreign

Ministry, and a former British

1:04:251:04:28

ambassador to Iran.

1:04:281:04:39

Also - in Britain, they're

the silent minority -

1:04:391:04:41

Chinese people rarely feature

in the national conversation;

1:04:411:04:43

but we've learned that their silence

in sharing health problems

1:04:431:04:45

with their families and accessing

health services can be

1:04:451:04:47

a matter of life and death.

1:04:471:04:49

TRANSLATION:

The Chinese community

can have stigma around cancer, and

1:04:491:04:51

some may not even tell their

families.

1:04:511:04:52

We'll speak to a woman

who lost her mum to cervical cancer,

1:04:521:04:55

and a Chinese community support

worker about attitudes to illness.

1:04:551:05:04

At least 300 people are killed and

thousands more are injured in an

1:05:041:05:11

earthquake on the border between

Iran and Iraq. Good morning.

1:05:111:05:18

Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom

with a summary of today's news.

1:05:181:05:22

Business leaders from across Europe

will be in Downing Street today

1:05:221:05:25

to voice their concerns

about trade after Brexit.

1:05:251:05:27

The CBI and the Institute

of Directors will be represented -

1:05:271:05:30

as will business organisations

from Germany, France,

1:05:301:05:32

Spain and seven other countries.

1:05:321:05:36

They will press the government

to clarify the future relationship

1:05:361:05:39

between the UK and the rest

of the EU - and demand they maintain

1:05:391:05:42

current arrangements.

1:05:421:05:44

A powerful earthquake has killed

more than three hundred

1:05:441:05:47

people in western Iran.

1:05:471:05:48

Thousands more have been injured.

1:05:481:05:58

The epicentre of the quake

which measured 7.3

1:06:011:06:03

was across the border in Iraq.

1:06:031:06:05

Electricity has been cut in a number

of towns and villages,

1:06:051:06:07

and blocked roads are said to be

preventing some rescue teams

1:06:071:06:10

from reaching areas affected.

1:06:101:06:11

The family of Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe,

1:06:111:06:12

the British-Iranian woman jailed

in Tehran, say they're increasingly

1:06:121:06:14

concerned about her wellbeing.

1:06:141:06:19

In a statement last night her

husband Richard said his wife

1:06:191:06:22

appeared to be "on the verge

of a nervous breakdown"

1:06:221:06:24

and is seeking treatment

after finding lumps in her breasts.

1:06:241:06:27

The Foreign Secretary,

Boris Johnson, and his cabinet

1:06:271:06:29

colleague Michael Gove have both

been criticised for their

1:06:291:06:31

comments about the case.

1:06:311:06:32

The key thing to understand is that

we're working very very hard and

1:06:321:06:35

intensively and impartially

on all those cases.

1:06:351:06:37

Thank you very much.

1:06:371:06:38

Thank you.

1:06:381:06:39

See you later.

1:06:391:06:40

Thank you.

1:06:401:06:41

Bob Geldof says he is handing back

his Freedom of the City of Dublin -

1:06:411:06:45

because the same honour has been

granted to the Burmese political

1:06:451:06:47

leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

1:06:471:06:48

He's described the treatment

by Myanmar's military

1:06:481:06:51

of the Rohingya Muslim

minority community as "mass

1:06:511:06:53

ethnic cleansing."

1:06:531:06:56

The Live Aid organiser said his home

city had honoured Aung San Suu Kyi -

1:06:561:07:00

but now she had appalled and shamed

Dublin.

1:07:001:07:05

Hundreds of people have marched

in Hollywood in support of victims

1:07:051:07:09

of sexual assault and harassment,

inspired by the 'MeToo'

1:07:091:07:11

social media campaign.

1:07:111:07:14

The march follows a series

of assault and harassment

1:07:141:07:16

allegations against public figures,

set off by revelations about

1:07:161:07:19

the movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.

1:07:191:07:23

The marchers started

on Hollywood Boulevard and walked

1:07:231:07:25

along the "Walk of Fame"

to CNN's headquarters.

1:07:251:07:28

The Church of England

is telling its schools that

1:07:281:07:30

children should be free

to explore their identity and both

1:07:301:07:32

boys and girls should be

allowed to wear a tutu,

1:07:321:07:35

tiara or superhero cloak

without judgement from

1:07:351:07:36

teachers or other pupils.

1:07:361:07:40

The new guidelines aim to prevent

children being bullied

1:07:401:07:43

because of their sexual orientation

or gender identity.

1:07:431:07:51

The report says school should ensure

they have an inclusive view for

1:07:511:08:01

education and make sure that all

children are respected.

1:08:011:08:04

Jupiter and Venus -

the two brightest planets -

1:08:041:08:06

have been appearing very close

together in the morning sky.

1:08:061:08:08

Both have been visible

to the naked eye across the UK.

1:08:081:08:11

The best viewing time was 40

minutes before sunrise.

1:08:111:08:13

While the planets are visible

to the naked eye, viewers

1:08:131:08:15

with a telescope have also been able

to see Jupiter's

1:08:151:08:18

four Galilean moons.

1:08:181:08:19

That's a summary of the latest BBC

News - more at 10.30.

1:08:191:08:26

Thanks for your messages about

stress and how you manage it. We

1:08:261:08:29

will talk about it more at 1030 AM.

Research out today suggest that four

1:08:291:08:34

out of five of us get stressed every

week. As it is Monday morning, a

1:08:341:08:40

number of you are already stressed.

Not necessarily the fault of our

1:08:401:08:43

programme, but anyway! Let me know

how you de-stress, and we will talk

1:08:431:08:49

about it after 10:30am.

1:08:491:08:57

Use the hashtag Victoria LIVE

and If you text, you will be charged

1:08:571:09:00

at the standard network rate.

1:09:001:09:02

Rebecca says, my experience of

stress is dealing with it with

1:09:021:09:07

clients. When we let go of the

emotions, we can let go of the

1:09:071:09:12

event, and it becomes wisdom. Do get

in touch.

1:09:121:09:19

Here's some sport

now with Katherine.

1:09:191:09:25

Northern Ireland boss Michael

O'Neill has described his side's

1:09:251:09:28

efforts as amazing, and he said the

players were emotional and upset

1:09:281:09:31

after their draw in Basel. A

controversial penalty in the first

1:09:311:09:37

leg gave Switzerland the advantage.

Northern Ireland got close last

1:09:371:09:40

night, but they won't be going to

next summer's World Cup in Russia.

1:09:401:09:45

It would be too strong a word to say

cheated, but you do feel that

1:09:451:09:49

there's a certain injustice to going

out of the tournament in this way. A

1:09:491:09:54

lot of people said Switzerland were

far superior to us in the first leg,

1:09:541:09:58

but they only scored from the

penalty, not else. -- not anything

1:09:581:10:06

else. We could have been playing

extra time now, so there is an

1:10:061:10:11

injustice there, a huge injustice,

given the nature of what has divided

1:10:111:10:14

the teams.

Ten days to go until the

battle for the Ashes begins. England

1:10:141:10:23

are preparing for the first test by

meeting some of the local wildlife.

1:10:231:10:28

Andy Swiss is following the tour.

Member to the North Queensland

1:10:281:10:33

close. Just ten days to go until the

first Ashes test in Brisbane, and

1:10:331:10:38

England have arrived hoping to fine

tune with the final warm up game on

1:10:381:10:43

Wednesday. Matches like this are a

chance for players to explore a bit

1:10:431:10:48

of the area. This morning, Moeen Ali

and Alastair Cook visited a local

1:10:481:10:54

wildlife sanctuary, where among

other things, they got to feed a

1:10:541:10:57

crocodile named Bully. The headline

writers might have fun with that.

1:10:571:11:02

Moeen Ali hasn't played in either of

England's tour matches because of a

1:11:021:11:08

side strain, but the good news is

that he says he is now fit and ready

1:11:081:11:12

for whatever Australia have to throw

at him.

It is part of the game. It's

1:11:121:11:17

not something I haven't had before.

These things happen. Australians

1:11:171:11:23

like to talk a lot and bigger

themselves up -- and big. I have

1:11:231:11:37

always had trust in my ability and

hopefully I will back that even more

1:11:371:11:40

in this series and do well for

England.

Moeen Ali, set to play in a

1:11:401:11:46

four-day match against a Cricket

Australia 11 starting on Wednesday.

1:11:461:11:50

England have plenty of questions to

answer, particularly over their

1:11:501:11:54

batting. No one has scored a century

so far on this tour, and there were

1:11:541:12:00

two pretty horrible collapses in

their last game in Adelaide. England

1:12:001:12:05

will hope to get a few runs and

wickets under their belt before the

1:12:051:12:08

first Ashes test in Brisbane on the

23rd of November.

1:12:081:12:14

Great Britain have won a third gold

medal at the track cycling World Cup

1:12:141:12:19

in Manchester. They won the team

pursuit, beating Italy by a huge

1:12:191:12:27

margin in the final. Two of the

riders also won the Madison. Back to

1:12:271:12:35

you, Victoria.

1:12:351:12:36

This morning we've brought

you an insight into a community

1:12:361:12:38

in Britain that is practically

invisible.

1:12:381:12:40

And that is a real issue when it

comes to their health.

1:12:401:12:43

This programme has learned that some

in the Chinese community are hiding

1:12:431:12:46

or ignoring illnesses

because of their culture - sometimes

1:12:461:12:49

putting their lives at risk.

1:12:491:12:53

We've heard how women are encouraged

to 'confine' themselves

1:12:531:12:55

in their homes for a whole month

after having a baby.

1:12:551:12:59

Some mums don't wash their hair

or shower and are discouraged

1:12:591:13:03

from crying, or having any visitors,

including health professionals.

1:13:031:13:07

With such little awareness

about the tradition,

1:13:071:13:10

there's a concern problems in mum

and baby might be being missed.

1:13:101:13:13

Our reporter Amber Haque brought

you the full story an hour ago -

1:13:131:13:16

here's a short extract.

1:13:161:13:24

Sitting month, as in confinement

after childbirth, is a tradition

1:13:241:13:28

so ingrained in Chinese culture that

even I did it myself,

1:13:281:13:30

some practices.

1:13:301:13:31

Some of the very strict rules

are that you shouldn't drink cold

1:13:311:13:34

drinks during the month,

you shouldn't really shower,

1:13:341:13:36

hair washing is not allowed,

and obviously not going outside

1:13:361:13:38

the boundaries of your house.

1:13:381:13:48

So, for obvious reasons,

we're not allowed to film

1:13:511:13:53

with the mum in her house when she's

doing the confinement period,

1:13:531:13:56

but I have found one mum who's

willing to talk to me via Skype.

1:13:561:13:59

Her name's Ching, and she actually

hasn't left the house

1:13:591:14:01

for nearly 28 days.

1:14:011:14:02

Hi, Ching.

1:14:021:14:04

Hi there.

1:14:041:14:04

I come originally from Singapore

and it's part of our culture

1:14:041:14:07

to definitely do confinement,

so it was more about making sure

1:14:071:14:11

I can import that over to the UK

since I'm doing it here.

1:14:111:14:15

Being confined in your flat actually

is important because, for us,

1:14:151:14:17

if you don't practice it,

then you are just disadvantaging

1:14:171:14:20

yourself, kind of thing.

1:14:201:14:21

My husband didn't really know

what was going when I said, "Oh,

1:14:211:14:24

I need to practice confinement."

1:14:241:14:25

And his family as well.

1:14:251:14:26

So it is quite obvious that there's

a lack of understanding or even

1:14:261:14:29

awareness that it even exists.

1:14:291:14:31

But I can see why

it can be isolating.

1:14:311:14:33

New mums can often be left

in isolation, and that's quite

1:14:331:14:35

difficult for them to cope.

1:14:351:14:37

When they have medical problems,

they try to solve it

1:14:371:14:39

within themselves, and sometimes

that can have detrimental effects

1:14:391:14:41

to the health of themselves

and to the baby.

1:14:411:14:51

Into adulthood, some Chinese

people aren't seeking help

1:14:581:15:00

because they feel they should

endure problems themselves.

1:15:001:15:02

They are one of the most dispersed

communities in Britain,

1:15:021:15:04

and when language is a barrier it

makes the isolation even harder.

1:15:041:15:10

Elly Lee's worked in the catering

trade in rural Worcestershire

1:15:101:15:12

since moving from Hong Kong

with a son and daughter in the 90s.

1:15:121:15:15

She's got stage four cancer,

meaning it's advanced,

1:15:151:15:17

and it's spread round her body.

1:15:171:15:18

The Chinese community can have

stigma around cancer,

1:15:231:15:25

and some may not even

tell their families.

1:15:251:15:29

TRANSLATION:

The majority

of the Chinese community here work

1:15:291:15:31

predominantly in the catering trade.

1:15:311:15:32

They work long hours

where work takes number one,

1:15:321:15:34

and health takes a back-seat.

1:15:341:15:36

I'm speaking out to help Chinese

people have an awareness of health.

1:15:361:15:46

There's a clear lack

of representation of

1:15:481:15:50

the British Chinese in the media,

politics and the arts.

1:15:501:15:52

But for some in the community,

that silence can deafening.

1:15:521:16:02

We're often grouped in a box along

with other ethnicities

1:16:051:16:08

on statistical data collection

forms, and that means our specific

1:16:081:16:10

needs are not being looked into,

and the fact that we had to set up

1:16:101:16:14

an online medical advisory

service off our own back

1:16:141:16:16

is a reflection of that.

1:16:161:16:17

Just because we are silent

and polite, doesn't mean

1:16:171:16:19

we should be ignored.

1:16:191:16:20

Let's talk now to Georgine Leung -

she's a mum who did postnatal

1:16:201:16:23

confinement and is researching

the tradition for

1:16:231:16:25

University College London.

1:16:251:16:26

Eddie Chan is a Chinese community

support worker and says many

1:16:261:16:29

in the community think illness

is retribution for something they've

1:16:291:16:31

done wrong in the past.

1:16:311:16:32

Lucinda - that's not her real name,

lost her mum to cervical cancer

1:16:321:16:35

when Lucinda was 18.

1:16:351:16:38

Her mum didn't get help

until the disease was advanced

1:16:381:16:41

and in fact was diagnosed

in A&E after collapsing.

1:16:411:16:44

We're protecting Lucinda's identity

as she think her family in Hong Kong

1:16:441:16:47

would disown her for speaking out.

1:16:471:16:57

Why do you think your family might

shun new if you they thought you

1:16:581:17:01

were speaking out like this?

Probably because we don't really

1:17:011:17:06

talk about our feelings. We are

quite private people. You know, you

1:17:061:17:11

just wouldn't.

Is there some kind of

shame involved if you do speak out?

1:17:111:17:27

You can. You have a problem, you

don't feel proud any more.

You were

1:17:271:17:33

18 when your mum find out Peshmerga

found out she had cancer and she

1:17:331:17:37

wouldn't go to the doctor. -- when

your mum found out she had cancer.

1:17:371:17:46

She always went for a cervical smear

test. I remember I was 12 and

1:17:461:17:53

stopped a letter came back saying

that the test came back abnormal. --

1:17:531:17:57

I was 12. She never went back to get

it treated. Three years later

1:17:571:18:05

another letter came to the door

urging her to get it treated. I also

1:18:051:18:09

urged her to go to the doctors. She

abruptly told me she was fine. I was

1:18:091:18:19

18. Three years later I went to

university and then my mum was

1:18:191:18:24

getting really short of breath. I

actually thought she had high blood

1:18:241:18:30

pressure. I knew she didn't want to

go to the doctors. I kept begging

1:18:301:18:33

her to go. She wouldn't. When I was

at uni I went to the Chinese doctor.

1:18:331:18:40

I told him that I thought my mum had

high blood pressure, she won't go to

1:18:401:18:45

the Doctor, can you provide

something to treat it. She did. I

1:18:451:18:49

gave it to my mum. She accepted it.

She thanked me for it. But little

1:18:491:18:54

did I know she didn't have high

blood pressure, but in fact quite

1:18:541:18:58

the opposite. She had lost that much

blood because the disease had spread

1:18:581:19:02

so far into her body that she was

getting out of breath when moving

1:19:021:19:07

about.

How much pain do you think

she was in if she still wasn't

1:19:071:19:11

willing to seek help?

A lot. But he

just got on with it. We all do.

1:19:111:19:18

That's part of your tradition, that

you endure, you put up with things?

1:19:181:19:26

I'm quite emotional because I'm

British-born Chinese. My friends

1:19:261:19:30

would say I'm quite emotional. But

over big things like this, you know,

1:19:301:19:36

we just keep it ourselves, don't

speak about feelings and fears

1:19:361:19:41

because you want to be proud.

You

have a personal experience of the

1:19:411:19:49

stigma around cancer, Eddie, and not

speaking out, and not informing

1:19:491:19:53

family and friends, tell our

audience about your son.

This

1:19:531:19:57

happened 20 years ago now. When my

second son was five. He was

1:19:571:20:03

diagnosed with childhood cancerous

brain tumour. In those days my own

1:20:031:20:13

parents, 50% of the time in the UK,

50% of the time in Hong Kong, they

1:20:131:20:20

were in Hong Kong when he was

diagnosed with cancer. We told our

1:20:201:20:26

parents, my parents, and they didn't

react to it. In fact, they didn't

1:20:261:20:32

say anything. They didn't even call

me or send me a letter asking me

1:20:321:20:38

what happened to their grandchild.

Why didn't they want to know, why

1:20:381:20:47

didn't they want to react?

I think

it is a lot to do with the Chinese

1:20:471:20:52

traditional thinking of retribution,

stigma, you must have done something

1:20:521:20:55

wrong, that's why this has happened.

It is calmer related to the family.

1:20:551:21:04

With loss of people, they think the

family has done something wrong. It

1:21:041:21:12

could be due to the grandparents,

the parents, they could have done

1:21:121:21:17

something wrong, they believe that

would be reflected to the

1:21:171:21:21

generations further down the line.

What do you think of that?

1:21:211:21:25

Obviously, for myself, I'm a bit

more up-to-date, modern, I think it

1:21:251:21:33

is pure luck. Whether you are a good

person, bad person, you can still

1:21:331:21:38

get terminal illnesses. I know even

healthy people, really, really

1:21:381:21:44

healthy people, can die of coronary

heart disease or heart attack.

1:21:441:21:48

People are always encouraged in my

line of work to live a healthy

1:21:481:21:58

lifestyle.

Of course. The issue from

all of this, Georgie, is about

1:21:581:22:05

seeking medical help if you don't

have to put up with the pain. If you

1:22:051:22:08

don't have to put up with the

suffering. I want to talk to you

1:22:081:22:13

specifically about confinement, this

month that new mothers stay in their

1:22:131:22:16

house after giving birth. You are

researching this. I believe there is

1:22:161:22:23

a link that if you do confinement in

the wrong way then there will be

1:22:231:22:27

repercussions later on in life.

That's right. Not just by doing it,

1:22:271:22:33

but there is a certain way of doing

it. By not doing it well there will

1:22:331:22:39

be repercussions in later life and

that's why it is so important to do

1:22:391:22:42

it well during the month of

confinement.

But it's rubbish, isn't

1:22:421:22:47

it western green it's hard to say

whether or not any problems in later

1:22:471:22:52

life would be directly related to

the practice and confinement. -- but

1:22:521:22:57

it's rubbish, isn't it? It isn't

difficult to say. There is no link.

1:22:571:23:02

In a parallel universe? Eddie, you

are smiling.

I am smiling because I

1:23:021:23:08

know it's true. I know that a lot of

Chinese after giving birth they

1:23:081:23:14

could easily take their one-week-old

baby to the shops, the supermarket,

1:23:141:23:20

and I don't know why it is such a

tradition.

Is it offensive if I say

1:23:201:23:25

that? If I say it's rubbish, that

there is no link between the way you

1:23:251:23:29

do confinement, confinement at all,

something later in life, would that

1:23:291:23:33

be fair?

It goes back to the set of

traditional beliefs that mothers

1:23:331:23:38

would do all sorts of different

things to make sure they recover

1:23:381:23:41

very well. To avoid going into a

state of poor health in the future.

1:23:411:23:47

Of course we would never be able to

say in 30, 40 years' time if that

1:23:471:23:52

illness is to do with confinement.

There wouldn't be any evidence. But

1:23:521:23:57

the attention, the awareness, being

focused on the mother's health

1:23:571:24:03

during a period of vulnerability,

it's quite important because often

1:24:031:24:06

after childbirth the attention goes

on the baby. And very often we

1:24:061:24:09

forget about the mother's health.

Many people are agreeing, they say

1:24:091:24:15

that might be a really good time to

basically stay in and bond with the

1:24:151:24:19

baby. But tell me how not washing

your hair has an impact. That's one

1:24:191:24:23

of the police. How is that relevant?

After a woman has given birth her

1:24:231:24:30

body is seen to be of a cold state.

All of her joints are open. That's

1:24:301:24:35

the belief that a cold wind might

easily go into her body. So by not

1:24:351:24:41

doing anything which exacerbates the

coldness goes into the body can help

1:24:411:24:45

to protect her.

But we live in

Britain. We have central heating.

1:24:451:24:51

Gas fires. And stuff.

I think that's

the issue between how do you balance

1:24:511:25:00

traditional beliefs and modern

health practices. From the women

1:25:001:25:03

I've interviewed in the past, they

seem to actually do a bit of both.

1:25:031:25:09

They don't necessarily do all of the

restrictions, but they actually

1:25:091:25:11

adapt to some of the more modern

health practices. And they would

1:25:111:25:18

adapt to their own confinement.

In

China some mums don't get out of bed

1:25:181:25:25

for two weeks. They eat a diet rich

in calories to get, for what

1:25:251:25:32

purpose?

Food is important during

the month of confinement. That ties

1:25:321:25:37

into the traditional belief that

food is healing and warming foods

1:25:371:25:40

are particularly important. Women

are expected to follow a set of

1:25:401:25:46

rules. Particularly eating certain

foods, and not eating certain other

1:25:461:25:50

foods. For women who are eating

particularly nourishing foods, foods

1:25:501:25:55

which are calorie dense, sometimes

having, say, a rice dish at every

1:25:551:26:00

meal, three to four times a day, for

example, can be much more than their

1:26:001:26:04

typical diet would allow.

Which is

quite a difference, for example, to

1:26:041:26:12

sometimes the pressure that Western

women feel when they've given birth

1:26:121:26:15

to get back to being thin, lose the

baby weight, and all of the rest of

1:26:151:26:18

it.

Definitely. There does not seem

to be a pressure for them to lose

1:26:181:26:23

weight very quickly. The attention

would be for her to recover her body

1:26:231:26:28

to get back to normal. And after the

period of 30 days, or up to six

1:26:281:26:33

weeks, she can start thinking about

going out and exercising and losing

1:26:331:26:37

weight, but that isn't her priority

immediately after birth.

OK. A final

1:26:371:26:43

thought, from all of you, what would

you say to any members of the

1:26:431:26:47

Chinese community watching now who

might be in pain, might think there

1:26:471:26:51

is an issue with their health, but

are not going to their GPs, not

1:26:511:26:55

seeking help, because of the

traditional beliefs of putting up

1:26:551:26:59

with it, enduring, and maintaining

their privacy and dignity?

I would

1:26:591:27:05

say make an appointment to see your

GP. It's so important to seek help

1:27:051:27:12

when you are in pain and you don't

feel comfortable. And you know

1:27:121:27:15

something is not quite right with

you.

And there is no shame in

1:27:151:27:18

seeking help, is there?

No.

What

would you say Lucinda?

Just echoing

1:27:181:27:26

Eddie's thoughts, really, go to the

doctors, make that appointment if

1:27:261:27:30

you think something isn't right.

Seek medical help. And also listen

1:27:301:27:36

to your family, as well, they are

there to support you.

OK, thanks

1:27:361:27:40

very much, thanks all of you for

coming on the programme. Still to

1:27:401:27:45

come before 11 o'clock. 300 people

have been killed and thousands

1:27:451:27:49

injured following that earthquake

which measured 7.3. Our Persian

1:27:491:27:54

correspondent will bring us the

latest on what happened on the Iran

1:27:541:27:59

Iraq border. One in ten of us is

stressed all the time. Is that you?

1:27:591:28:04

We will talk about stress and how

you try to manage it.

1:28:041:28:12

Time to the latest news.

This is BBC News, our main stories:

1:28:131:28:20

A powerful earthquake has killed

more than 300 people in western

1:28:201:28:24

Iran.

Thousands more have been injured.

1:28:241:28:27

The epicentre of the quake which

measured 7.3 was across-the-board in

1:28:271:28:30

Iraq. Electricity has been cut in a

number of towns and villages and

1:28:301:28:35

blocked roads are said to be

preventing some rescue teams from

1:28:351:28:37

reaching the affected areas.

1:28:371:28:43

The husband of Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe has said Boris

1:28:431:28:48

Johnson is now personally engaged in

the case. Richard Ratcliffe said Mr

1:28:481:28:52

Johnson told him he was considering

whether his wife would be eligible

1:28:521:28:57

for diplomatic protection. Last week

the Foreign Secretary corrected in

1:28:571:29:00

earlier remark suggesting Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe had been training

1:29:001:29:06

journalists when she was arrested

last year.

1:29:061:29:09

Business leaders from across Europe

will be in Downing Street today

1:29:091:29:11

to voice their concerns

about trade after Brexit.

1:29:111:29:15

They are pressing for a transitional

deal between Britain and the EU

1:29:151:29:21

which maintains trading

relationships. They also want the

1:29:211:29:23

future relationship clarified.

1:29:231:29:25

Bob Geldof says he is handing back

his Freedom of the City of Dublin,

1:29:251:29:29

because the same honour has been

granted to the Burmese political

1:29:291:29:31

leader, Aung San Suu Kyi.

1:29:311:29:33

He's described the treatment

by Myanmar's military

1:29:331:29:35

of the Rohingya muslim minority

community as "mass

1:29:351:29:36

ethnic cleansing."

1:29:361:29:37

The Live Aid organiser said his home

city had honoured Aung San Suu Kyi,

1:29:371:29:41

but now she had appalled and shamed

Dublin.

1:29:411:29:45

Jupiter and Venus, the two brightest

planets, have been appearing very

1:29:451:29:47

close together in the morning sky.

1:29:471:29:49

Both have been visible

to the naked eye across the UK.

1:29:491:29:53

The best viewing time was 40

minutes before sunrise.

1:29:531:29:55

While the planets are visible

to the naked eye, viewers

1:29:551:29:58

with a telescope have also been able

to see Jupiter's

1:29:581:30:00

four Galilean moons.

1:30:001:30:07

That's the latest.

1:30:091:30:14

We have some messages about stress.

Lydia said I was signed off because

1:30:141:30:20

of stress. I was watching TV, an

advert for choir came up, I knew

1:30:201:30:24

about the benefits of singing on

your health. I remember being

1:30:241:30:28

petrified beforehand but I enjoyed

every minute and I left feeling

1:30:281:30:30

fantastic. After 90 minutes of

singing all of my stress has left

1:30:301:30:35

me. I've been going for two years,

I've never looked back, it's the

1:30:351:30:38

best thing I've ever done.

Lisa says he said he wanted to know

1:30:381:30:44

how I manage stress. It's something

I have worked hard to deal with from

1:30:441:30:50

work to family issues. On one of

these occasions, all being together,

1:30:501:30:56

it was disempowering. I managed

stress by going to the gym, walking

1:30:561:31:00

every day, and doing yoga. I

wondered when Yoda would come up. --

1:31:001:31:07

yoga.

1:31:071:31:12

Time for the sport.

Northern Ireland will not be going

1:31:121:31:19

to the World Cup in Russia after

losing 1-0 to Switzerland.

1:31:191:31:25

Gold for Great Britain at the track

cycling World Cup in Manchester.

1:31:251:31:33

Lewis Hamilton was the driver of the

day at the Brazilian Grand Prix,

1:31:331:31:36

although he did not win the race. He

started last that finished fourth at

1:31:361:31:40

Sebastian Vettel took the honours.

Roger Federer started with a

1:31:401:31:46

straight sets win over Jack Sock at

the ATP tour finals in London, the

1:31:461:31:50

end of season event for the world's

top players. At 36, Roger Federer is

1:31:501:31:55

playing in this event for the 15th

time. He has quite a year, hasn't

1:31:551:31:59

he? Thank you.

1:31:591:32:11

Richard Ratcliffe, the husband of

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who is

1:32:131:32:18

imprisoned in Iran,... He has said

she's on the verge of a nervous

1:32:181:32:24

breakdown and has seen doctors about

lumps identified in her breast. In

1:32:241:32:28

April 2016, she was while visiting

Iran to see family and for her

1:32:281:32:33

daughter to meet her grandparents.

On the 1st of November this year,

1:32:331:32:37

Boris Johnson wrongly said she had

been training journalists while out

1:32:371:32:41

in Iran.

When you look at what

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe was doing,

1:32:411:32:45

it's just, you know, she was simply

teaching people journalism, as I

1:32:451:32:50

understand it.

Four days later, Mrs

Zaghari-Ratcliffe was recalled to

1:32:501:32:53

court in Iran and Mr Johnson's

statement was cited against her,

1:32:531:33:00

prompting fears that her five-year

jail term could be extended. By the

1:33:001:33:05

7th of November, Boris Johnson was

forced to clarify his remarks the

1:33:051:33:08

MPs and said he was sorry if the

remarks caused anxiety.

The UK

1:33:081:33:15

Government has no doubt that she was

on holiday in Iran when she was

1:33:151:33:18

arrested last year, and that was the

sole purpose of her visit. I accept

1:33:181:33:24

that my remarks could have been

clearer in that respect, and I'm

1:33:241:33:29

glad to provide this clarification.

On Saturday, Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe's

1:33:291:33:34

family said she was taken to

hospital for an ultrasound because

1:33:341:33:38

she had been campaigning of sharp

stabbing pains in her breasts for

1:33:381:33:42

more than a year. Yesterday, Michael

Gove came under fire for saying he

1:33:421:33:47

didn't know what Mrs

Zaghari-Ratcliffe was doing in Iran

1:33:471:33:50

one she was arrested last year.

Richard Ratcliffe told me he felt

1:33:501:33:56

compelled to e-mail the foreign

office after the interview Mr Gove

1:33:561:34:02

gave, reminding them of UK public

policy towards the detention of his

1:34:021:34:06

wife.

Following Michael go's

comments, I thought, -- Michael

1:34:061:34:14

Gove's comments, I thought, it needs

to be clarified, so I wrote to our

1:34:141:34:18

contact that the foreign office and

said, listen, can you please remind

1:34:181:34:21

all cabinet members that UK

Government has no doubt that Nazanin

1:34:211:34:25

was there on holiday? That is the UK

policy and it is not my job to

1:34:251:34:29

police but these things shouldn't...

Lets be honest, it's unlikely that

1:34:291:34:36

Michael Gove's comments will

suddenly be appearing in the

1:34:361:34:39

Iranians media, but if it goes to

trial, they collect this evidence

1:34:391:34:43

and it gets piled up, and obviously

the most important person at this

1:34:431:34:47

point is the Foreign Secretary, who

is the voice and presence of the UK.

1:34:471:34:52

It is important that he battles for

Nazanin, and that he clarifies the

1:34:521:34:58

parliament. If it goes to trial, it

is important that all this stuff is

1:34:581:35:02

nipped in the bud.

Michael Gove was

asked about your wife's case

1:35:021:35:07

yesterday on the Andrew Marr

programme. I want to play the

1:35:071:35:09

relevant clip so the audience know

what we are talking about.

1:35:091:35:13

What was she doing when she went to

Iran?

I don't know, and one of the

1:35:131:35:17

things I want to stress is that

there is no reason why Nazanin

1:35:171:35:22

Zaghari-Ratcliffe should beat in

prison in Iran, as far as any of us

1:35:221:35:27

know. No evidence has been produced

which suggests she should be

1:35:271:35:32

retained -- butane. We know that the

uranium regime is capable of harming

1:35:321:35:36

the human rights of its own

citizens, and it appears to be

1:35:361:35:38

harming the rights of someone whose

plight necessarily moves us all.

Her

1:35:381:35:43

husband is clear that she was there

on holiday with her child.

In that

1:35:431:35:49

case, I take exactly her husband's

assurance in that regard.

The

1:35:491:35:54

problem with that exchanges that Mr

Gove said he didn't know why your

1:35:541:35:57

wife was there. You said you didn't

see that interview live, but members

1:35:571:36:01

of your family were pretty cross.

And it was picked up on on social

1:36:011:36:06

media with other people responding.

What he says is reasonable and

1:36:061:36:11

helpful, it's just the emphatic, I

don't know, at the beginning. And

1:36:111:36:15

that he says he will

1:36:151:36:26

take my assurances. The Foreign

Secretary has said in Parliament

1:36:271:36:29

that the UK Government has no doubt.

Were you surprised? Mr Gove is

1:36:291:36:31

usually very precise with his words

and well briefed.

So much happened

1:36:311:36:35

that there were bigger things. I

spoke to the Foreign Secretary for

1:36:351:36:37

the first time in a long time. That

is intimidating. And I had a phone

1:36:371:36:43

call with Nazanin where I learned

about what she had gone through. It

1:36:431:36:46

was the third biggest thing of the

day.

In terms of the conversation

1:36:461:36:51

you had with the Foreign Secretary,

did he apologise for his inaccurate

1:36:511:36:55

comments to the committee a couple

of weeks ago which could potentially

1:36:551:36:58

make your wife's situation, her jail

sentence longer?

He said he was

1:36:581:37:04

sorry for the suffering and that all

the country was behind her. We

1:37:041:37:09

talked about meeting soon, talked

about me going to be run with him

1:37:091:37:13

and he said he would look at it

seriously. I asked him to look at

1:37:131:37:18

him personally offering her

diplomatic protection, which would

1:37:181:37:21

mean that there was much more

protection given to her by the

1:37:211:37:24

British Government.

Are you

surprised that it has taken this

1:37:241:37:28

long for the Foreign Secretary to

pick up the phone to you?

I had been

1:37:281:37:33

complaining on your show and others

that I want the Government to do

1:37:331:37:36

more, and publicly, and that the

foreign office, I have been saying I

1:37:361:37:40

think it is important that you do,

and they say it is important that

1:37:401:37:44

they don't.

It took a gaffe for the

Foreign Secretary to eventually pick

1:37:441:37:49

up the phone.

His words are being

used by the Iranians, and it is

1:37:491:37:54

important he stand up for her, that

I stand alongside him, and that

1:37:541:37:58

together we get her as soon as

possible.

Let's talk now to our

1:37:581:38:04

former Iranians diplomat and

Government minister in Iran's

1:38:041:38:07

Foreign Ministry. Thank you for

talking to us. If the Foreign

1:38:071:38:10

Secretary could achieve diplomatic

protection status for Mrs

1:38:101:38:17

Zaghari-Ratcliffe, what difference

might that make?

First of all, I

1:38:171:38:25

don't know what diplomatic

protection is, because Nazanin has

1:38:251:38:32

dual citizenship, and as far as the

Iranians authorities are concerned,

1:38:321:38:38

they do not recognise dual

citizenship, so she entered Iran

1:38:381:38:42

probably on her Iranians passport,

and she is being charged as an

1:38:421:38:46

Iranians citizen, so I don't see how

British diplomatic protection could

1:38:461:38:53

be extended to an Iranians citizen

who is being tried. I think that

1:38:531:38:56

this avenue, to me, based on what I

understand, is a nonstarter, and it

1:38:561:39:03

is just a matter of voicing some

sympathetic consideration is, and

1:39:031:39:09

nothing really more than that.

OK,

so what would be your advice to the

1:39:091:39:15

Foreign Secretary, then, in trying

to bring Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe home?

1:39:151:39:22

Well, I think that, obviously, the

Foreign Secretary's visit to Iran,

1:39:221:39:26

the forthcoming visit, his

discussions in Private with the

1:39:261:39:32

Iranians Foreign Minister, whom I

have to say that I believe has been

1:39:321:39:36

sympathetic to the cause of Nazanin,

is going to help. Inadvertently, the

1:39:361:39:47

Iranians regime may want some

consist -- concessions or assistance

1:39:471:39:51

from the United Kingdom that they do

not discuss openly. These all can be

1:39:511:39:57

discussed privately, and some kind

of arrangement may be able to be

1:39:571:40:00

made, but you have to bear in mind

that the Iranians Government, the

1:40:001:40:06

Iranians Foreign Ministry, with whom

the Foreign Secretary will be

1:40:061:40:08

dealing, they are basically not the

people who are in charge of

1:40:081:40:15

incarceration. This is the

judiciary, and the judiciary in Iran

1:40:151:40:21

is an adversary of the Government

and the Foreign Ministry. So,

1:40:211:40:26

domestic uranium politics, I'm

afraid, has played a significant

1:40:261:40:30

role in what has been handed out to

Nazanin, and to the suffering she

1:40:301:40:35

has had to endure in the course of

these past months.

Are you saying

1:40:351:40:39

that the Iranians Government can

have no influence over the

1:40:391:40:44

judiciary, irrespective of what the

Foreign Secretary concedes or

1:40:441:40:49

negotiates in some sort of deal?

Well, literally, the answer to that

1:40:491:40:56

is yes. The Government cannot force

the judiciary to change its verdict.

1:40:561:41:04

The judiciary may be persuaded to

make certain concessions in terms

1:41:041:41:10

of, you might say, dictates that

come from the supreme leader, from

1:41:101:41:16

the hardline elements who can

influence it, and that can only come

1:41:161:41:21

on the basis of some kind of deal

being struck behind the scenes in

1:41:211:41:27

terms of perhaps doing an exchange

of, I don't know if there are some

1:41:271:41:33

Iranians prisoners here, that sort

of thing, or bearing in mind that

1:41:331:41:37

there is a great deal of commotion

in the Middle East right now, where

1:41:371:41:43

Iran needs diplomatic support if

Iranians positions are supported or

1:41:431:41:50

Iranians causes are listened to,

there is a whole variation of

1:41:501:41:54

factors. But these are things that

have to be discussed, really, behind

1:41:541:41:58

and not in public, and I don't

believe that the highlighting of

1:41:581:42:04

this issue in the manner that it has

been done necessarily helps Nazanin

1:42:041:42:08

and her case for being sort of let

go.

OK. Just so that I am clear,

1:42:081:42:16

then, you've said that the

judiciary's independent of the

1:42:161:42:22

Government, but you've also

suggested that if the Foreign

1:42:221:42:25

Secretary goes there and comes up

with some sort of agreement, perhaps

1:42:251:42:28

agreeing to demands from the

Iranians Government, for example,

1:42:281:42:31

then that might lead to some sort of

big cat to the judiciary to

1:42:311:42:36

potentially release her. -- diktat.

How realistic is that scenario?

It

1:42:361:42:46

can happen. You have to bear in mind

that the judiciary is an adversary

1:42:461:42:50

of the Government and tries to sort

of oppose the Government at every

1:42:501:42:54

corner. That cannot be resolved

internally, but with the Foreign

1:42:541:42:59

Secretary visiting Iran, there is a

host of different issues that are

1:42:591:43:04

being discussed, and a whole series

of issues in which Iran wants the

1:43:041:43:08

support of the British Government,

especially in its dealings with in

1:43:081:43:12

the region, with Saudi Arabia, with

Syria and someone, so in the context

1:43:121:43:18

of our broader picture and a broader

understanding that can come about as

1:43:181:43:24

a consequence of discussions that

are held between the Foreign

1:43:241:43:28

Secretary and the Iranians Foreign

Minister, the Iranians political

1:43:281:43:32

system, headed by this imprint

leader, may want to make certain

1:43:321:43:35

concessions in order to try to sort

of help that sort of process, but

1:43:351:43:41

again, that is the best way, and

hide profiling this. You have to

1:43:411:43:48

bear in mind that the sentence that

was handed out to Mrs

1:43:481:43:53

Zaghari-Ratcliffe was done way

before this Foreign Secretary made

1:43:531:43:56

any comments, so putting everything

into context, I think that the

1:43:561:44:05

forthcoming visit to Iran by the

Foreign Secretary is a good thing.

1:44:051:44:08

There is every prospect that

something could be worked out there

1:44:081:44:13

that can relieve this poor soul who

has had to suffer so much in the

1:44:131:44:17

course of the past year.

Thank you

very much for your insight. Really

1:44:171:44:20

appreciate it. A former Iranians

diplomat and former minister in

1:44:201:44:28

Iran's Foreign Ministry. We are

going to talk about stress. I

1:44:281:44:35

appreciate, with reference to that

last conversation, that the stress

1:44:351:44:37

that most of us might experience

Wheatley is nothing compared to what

1:44:371:44:41

is going on in the Zaghari-Ratcliffe

family right now. Anyway, there is a

1:44:411:44:46

lot of stress about and new research

suggest that four in five of us feel

1:44:461:44:50

stressed at some point in a typical

week. One in ten of us is stressed

1:44:501:44:54

all the time. Our health and

finances are pretty common causes,

1:44:541:44:59

but it is thought that work is a

common culprit, with many of us

1:44:591:45:04

checking e-mails and taking calls

outside of office hours. How

1:45:041:45:07

debilitating cancer be a stress B,

and how can we manage it? -- can

1:45:071:45:16

severe stress the

1:45:161:45:22

Let's talk now to Dr Philippa Kaye,

a GP in London, the fourth most

1:45:221:45:25

the fourth most stress

the

1:45:251:45:26

stressed city in the UK.

1:45:261:45:28

Leah Steele, who left her dream job

as a lawyer because of the stress

1:45:281:45:31

six months ago, and Jessica Carmody,

who says she's always

1:45:311:45:33

encountered stress but has now

learnt to manage it.

1:45:331:45:41

Welcome, all of you. I'd like to

start with you, if I may, as a

1:45:411:45:45

former lawyer, about why you left

your job.

I had always experienced a

1:45:451:45:55

high level of stress in my job. Par

for the course. You expect that. But

1:45:551:46:00

over a course of a number of years

I'd been working more and more

1:46:001:46:03

hours. It became quite usual for me

to work than the hours. I've

1:46:031:46:08

realised how many people around me

were struggling with the same

1:46:081:46:11

problems. So I spent a long time

investigating how I could handle it,

1:46:111:46:16

how I could build more resilience,

and are actually decided to leave to

1:46:161:46:20

help more women with exactly this

problem.

In terms of your job, you

1:46:201:46:28

would check your e-mails, I think,

six times a day when you were on

1:46:281:46:33

holiday.

Yes, I went away on one

holiday and it took me until two

1:46:331:46:37

days before I left to stop checking

my e-mail is six times a day, asking

1:46:371:46:41

if things had been sorted, trying to

keep on top of everything.

Philippa,

1:46:411:46:50

you are a GP, do you see more people

coming in with complaints about

1:46:501:46:55

stressed?

All day everyday about

stress. Some may not even realise

1:46:551:47:00

that what their physical complaint

is a sign of stress or worsened by

1:47:001:47:04

stress. They might come in with

headaches, jaw pain, IBS, a skin

1:47:041:47:10

condition, and when I ask about

stress, they are often very

1:47:101:47:15

surprised there can be a physical

component to what is normally a more

1:47:151:47:20

emotional state.

It's all relative.

It's the juxtaposition with our

1:47:201:47:25

previous story, isn't it? There are

grades of stress.

Yes, but it isn't

1:47:251:47:31

helpful for people to compare with

others. Otherwise everybody who is

1:47:311:47:35

depressed would say, I'm not hungry,

so I don't deserve to be stressed,

1:47:351:47:39

and that's part of the negative

feeling around that. Your body will

1:47:391:47:44

be experiencing the rushes of

adrenaline and cortisol making you

1:47:441:47:48

feel a typical way. But I feel like

I understand why we might feel like

1:47:481:47:55

that.

You say you've always been

somebody who is susceptible to

1:47:551:47:59

stress.

That's right. Even when I

was in my teens, doing exams, having

1:47:591:48:07

lots of pressure, lots of things on

my plate, I suddenly realised that a

1:48:071:48:12

number of different pressures would

build up and I found it difficult to

1:48:121:48:14

cope with, then I started to feel I

was stressed.

How have you managed

1:48:141:48:19

it?

I have to strike a balance

between having a number of things to

1:48:191:48:23

do so that I feel challenged to stop

having too little can make me

1:48:231:48:28

stressed, as well as having too

much. I try to strike a balance

1:48:281:48:33

between the two. It's not always

easy but that is what I tried to do.

1:48:331:48:37

You have a to-do list but it isn't

too long?

That's the idea. If I have

1:48:371:48:42

just about the right amount of

things to do. Enough social time,

1:48:421:48:46

enough work, that's good. I like to

be challenged. But if it starts

1:48:461:48:52

getting to too many things to do,

too many things on myself, it gets

1:48:521:48:57

too much.

At one period in your life

it got so bad that you had to take a

1:48:571:49:02

year out from university, didn't

you?

I did.

How would you describe

1:49:021:49:06

that period of your life?

It was

very difficult. I was frightened.

1:49:061:49:10

What Philippa is saying about the

physical things, that was definitely

1:49:101:49:18

there. I felt sick, I had a fever, I

couldn't do a simple thing without

1:49:181:49:23

finding it incredibly difficult,

like making a cup of tea. It

1:49:231:49:25

wouldn't be something I felt I could

do. I could do it but I didn't feel

1:49:251:49:32

like I could, so it was a very scary

time. It took me a long time to come

1:49:321:49:36

out of that, that's why I needed the

time off.

Let me talk to Lydia. Good

1:49:361:49:42

morning. Where are you talking to us

from in the country?

I am from

1:49:421:49:46

Devon.

Thank you for joining us on

the programme. You also had a period

1:49:461:49:52

of stress in your life, how did you

learn to manage it?

There was one

1:49:521:49:58

day I was really bad. I was in bed.

I got my computer out to do things

1:49:581:50:03

online and I saw an advert for a

choir. I thought this was my chance,

1:50:031:50:07

I love to sing. I signed up for a

session online. I went along. And it

1:50:071:50:13

was the best 90 minutes of my life.

I was happy, smiling, with people

1:50:131:50:17

there for the same reason. They

didn't know my background, they just

1:50:171:50:22

knew me for me. I left with a smile

on my face. For the first time in my

1:50:221:50:26

life I was really happy.

Seriously?

How old are you, if you don't mind?

1:50:261:50:33

I've just turned 21.

And that was

the happiest you had been in your

1:50:331:50:37

life?

Yes.

Wow, that makes me feel

sad. As a GP, can you understand why

1:50:371:50:47

singing might make somebody feel

happy and help manage stress?

1:50:471:50:51

Absolutely. Singing makes you happy.

It releases endorphins. And it's

1:50:511:50:56

also about doing something yourself,

prioritising yourself, and saying, I

1:50:561:51:00

am worth this. You would treat your

pet, your child, your family members

1:51:001:51:07

much kinder than you would treat

yourself. It's about having

1:51:071:51:10

compassion for yourself. It's about

saying, this is for me, and

1:51:101:51:15

prioritising that. We need to do

that. We need to say, it's 6pm, at

1:51:151:51:18

8pm, and my phone is turned off. And

if I miss something, that is a

1:51:181:51:25

request by somebody, I'm not

obligated to answer it now. I will

1:51:251:51:28

do that tomorrow. Taking that time.

Understanding that Instagram is an

1:51:281:51:33

unattainable thing, having those

standards isn't necessarily healthy.

1:51:331:51:40

And about getting outside in that

natural light. Exercise if you can.

1:51:401:51:46

When you get stressed at work, all

of those hormones are sending blood

1:51:461:51:50

to the muscles to run away.

Traditionally to run away from the

1:51:501:51:53

sabre-tooth tiger coming along to

kill you. We don't have that now,

1:51:531:51:58

obviously, but it means there is not

as much blood in your head, so you

1:51:581:52:01

can't make decisions. You can't

concentrate. Break the cycle. Get

1:52:011:52:06

out. Do something else, something

for yourself, then come back and you

1:52:061:52:11

will work smarter and harder.

Joining a choir, Lydia, having that

1:52:111:52:16

hump yourself, releasing those

endorphins has helped you get back

1:52:161:52:18

on track, would you say? -- having

that time for yourself.

It really

1:52:181:52:25

has.

Really nice to talk to you. We

had somebody contact us earlier, to

1:52:251:52:34

de-stress she lies on her back and

she listens to Ocean music, as she

1:52:341:52:39

put it, so, something like this.

MUSIC PLAYS

1:52:391:52:44

This does not sound like an ocean to

me?

It sounds like what you hear on

1:52:441:52:51

Blue Planet.

Good suggestion. Do you

find that soothing?

I don't think I

1:52:511:53:01

would if I was having a panic

attack. But it is nice to listen to.

1:53:011:53:05

It is about what works for you.

Something different will work for

1:53:051:53:09

different people. I like singing,

painting, running, as you say, find

1:53:091:53:17

something that works for you.

The

thing about this is, you are lying

1:53:171:53:21

on your bed, listening to this, and

you are focusing on your breathing,

1:53:211:53:24

the moment, and you are getting out

of your head.

That's mindfulness,

1:53:241:53:30

isn't it?

Yes. It is about being

able to turn off those racing

1:53:301:53:34

thoughts. Music can allow people to

do that. That was slow-paced. You

1:53:341:53:39

will slow your breathing with it.

Then you will feel more relaxed.

1:53:391:53:43

That is probably why it works for

her.

OK, thank you, thank you for

1:53:431:53:48

coming on the programme. And thank

you, Leah, we appreciate your time.

1:53:481:53:55

Next: The earthquake in Iran. At

least 320 people have been killed

1:53:551:54:03

when an earthquake hit the Iran-Iraq

border overnight. Thousands more

1:54:031:54:07

have been injured. Many left without

shelter. It's one of the largest

1:54:071:54:11

earthquakes to hit the region this

year with tremors felt as far away

1:54:111:54:15

as Lebanon and Turkey. Local

authorities have warned the death

1:54:151:54:18

toll is expected to rise.

1:54:181:54:23

We're joined now by BBC

Persian Service Correspondent

1:54:231:54:25

Siavash Ardalan.

1:54:251:54:26

Thank you for talking to us. Tell us

the latest.

In terms of casualties,

1:54:261:54:33

we've had over 340 deaths. Close to

4000 injured. The numbers of

1:54:331:54:39

casualties are rising fast. You can

get different accounts from news

1:54:391:54:45

agencies and social media because

many people are uploading videos of

1:54:451:54:50

collapsed buildings. Lots of people

asking for help, saying power has

1:54:501:54:53

been cut off, water has been cut

off, saying they are not getting

1:54:531:54:57

enough aid. Whereas official sources

are saying that help is being sent.

1:54:571:55:02

Iran is a very earthquake ridden

country. But in terms of the scale

1:55:021:55:07

of the devastation we still don't

know because many of the remote

1:55:071:55:10

areas typically are harder to get

to. Also, independent reporters and

1:55:101:55:18

foreign correspondents are not

present in the areas yet. People

1:55:181:55:21

have been requesting permission, but

they need official authorisation, so

1:55:211:55:29

it might take a few days before we

get more information. Many people

1:55:291:55:34

are complaining about the lack of

power and lack of water. Those

1:55:341:55:37

things might not be restored for

another 48 hours. The majority of

1:55:371:55:45

the casualties happened in a city in

the west of the country. The

1:55:451:55:51

hospital there collapsed. It buried

all of the hospital staff underneath

1:55:511:55:53

it. That was one of the most

heart-wrenching videos which emerged

1:55:531:55:57

after the earthquake, which happened

15 hours ago, 9pm local time.

What

1:55:571:56:03

are the authority saying about the

rescue operation?

They've sent the

1:56:031:56:07

commander of the regular army and --

regular army there. The president

1:56:071:56:15

doesn't want to go there. He is wary

of creating a distraction. They say

1:56:151:56:20

they've deployed all of their

resources to the area. We have heard

1:56:201:56:24

of sniffer dogs and success stories

of people being pulled from the

1:56:241:56:28

rubble still alive.

And it's just

the Iranians helping? There isn't

1:56:281:56:32

any help from Iraq?

Iraq have their

own casualties.

So they are not

1:56:321:56:41

working together necessarily?

Not

necessarily. But both countries have

1:56:411:56:46

been affected. On the Iranians eyed

the casualties are higher.

Tellers

1:56:461:56:51

about the area that was hit.

It is

in the western area of Iran, Kurdish

1:56:511:56:56

areas, both on the Iranians and Iraq

side. This has affected particularly

1:56:561:57:08

the West. It is the nightmare

scenario for Iranians come it's the

1:57:081:57:16

big earthquake they are expecting in

the capital. -- for the Iranians,

1:57:161:57:21

it's the big earthquake they are

expecting in the capital. There is

1:57:211:57:25

already social outcry on social

media about the lack of observance

1:57:251:57:34

to engineering practices. Many

social housing has collapsed. Every

1:57:341:57:39

time an earthquake happens there is

cause for enforcement of these

1:57:391:57:44

standards but it never seems to

happen.

-- there are calls for

1:57:441:57:50

enforcement of the standards. For

many people their homes have gone.

1:57:501:57:54

There were a lot of after-shocks and

tremors. Officials were asking

1:57:541:57:58

people to go out on the streets, not

stay at home because of

1:57:581:58:03

after-shocks. But this was happening

in the chill overnight. It was very

1:58:031:58:06

cold. Many people did not have time

to get blankets. Many people were

1:58:061:58:12

creating fires in the streets to

stand near and keep warm.

Thanks

1:58:121:58:16

very much.

1:58:161:58:20

Thank you for your company today.

1:58:201:58:21

BBC Newsroom live is coming up next.

1:58:211:58:23

Have a good day.

1:58:231:58:24