11/01/2018 Victoria Derbyshire


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


11/01/2018

The Conservative MP Nick Boles who has had cancer twice tells Victoria that a 'National Health Insurance' would encourage people to pay more for the NHS.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 11/01/2018. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, it's Thursday,

it's nine o'clock,

0:00:060:00:07

I'm Victoria Derbyshire,

welcome to the programme

0:00:070:00:10

Our top story this morning -

the NHS is facing a watershed moment

0:00:100:00:13

where patients will be

failed unless the Government

0:00:130:00:15

provides more cash.

0:00:150:00:18

That's according to hospitals

and Ambulance Service leaders,

0:00:180:00:20

who say they can't cope

with the pressure they're under.

0:00:200:00:23

We've now reached a point

where we have to make a choice,

0:00:230:00:26

which is, do we want to preserve

those standards,

0:00:260:00:29

and that's what everybody in the NHS

would want, or do we abandon them?

0:00:290:00:33

And the only way we can preserve

those standards is if the NHS

0:00:330:00:36

and the health and care system

more widely

0:00:360:00:38

gets the long-term funding

settlement that it needs.

0:00:380:00:42

We'll ask doctors and health experts

what changes they'd like to see.

0:00:420:00:48

We will talk to a Conservative MP

who has had cancer twice as well.

0:00:480:00:52

Also this morning, plastic-free

aisles for supermarkets,

0:00:520:00:54

just one of the Government's ideas

for cracking down on waste.

0:00:540:00:57

But without tough laws to force

people to change their habits,

0:00:570:00:59

does the plan go far enough?

0:00:590:01:04

I quite understand, people

are impatient for change, so am I,

0:01:040:01:07

but we just needed to make sure

that every change

0:01:070:01:10

that we make we get right,

0:01:100:01:11

and that we carry people with us

in order to make sure

0:01:110:01:14

that it's lasting.

0:01:140:01:15

We'll have more details,

plus live coverage of Theresa May

0:01:150:01:18

as she unveils her full strategy

for the environment.

0:01:180:01:21

Plus YouTube cuts its business

ties with Logan Paul,

0:01:210:01:24

despite his apology

for posting a video of a body

0:01:240:01:29

at a suicide hotspot in Japan.

0:01:290:01:37

Hello, welcome to the programme,

we're live until 11 this morning.

0:01:410:01:45

Two things I want your

own experiences on today -

0:01:450:01:48

if you've been in hospital

this winter,

0:01:480:01:50

tell me your experiences -

good and bad.

0:01:500:01:53

And if you work in the NHS,

what's it been like

0:01:530:01:56

from your point of view?

0:01:560:02:00

What is it like right now? Plenty of

NHS workers watch our programme.

0:02:000:02:07

Plus, we definitely want

your reaction

0:02:070:02:10

to the Government's plans

for cutting plastic pollution.

0:02:100:02:12

Our top story today -

0:02:120:02:14

dire warnings from the people

who run England's hospitals.

0:02:140:02:16

Patients left for hours

on trollies in corridors,

0:02:160:02:18

a critical shortage of beds and sick

people stuck in ambulances

0:02:180:02:20

unable even to get inside.

0:02:200:02:22

Today's warning from NHS Providers

is the latest of several over recent

0:02:220:02:25

days and paints a grim picture

of doctors and nurses

0:02:250:02:28

working in unsafe conditions.

0:02:280:02:32

The Government says plans

are in place to cope,

0:02:320:02:35

but practitioners say this

is a watershed moment for the NHS.

0:02:350:02:39

Our health correspondent

Dominic Hughes has more.

0:02:390:02:43

It's already been a tough few weeks

for the NHS across the UK.

0:02:430:02:47

Cold weather and a rising number

of flu cases have contributed

0:02:470:02:52

to pressures that A&E staff

have described as the worst

0:02:520:02:54

they've ever seen.

0:02:540:02:57

The Prime Minister and the First

Minister in Scotland have both had

0:02:570:03:00

to apologise to patients

who've faced cancelled operations

0:03:000:03:02

and long waits.

0:03:020:03:05

The pressure of winter on the NHS

has been unrelenting.

0:03:050:03:08

In Scotland, at the end of December,

just 78% of patients at A&E

0:03:080:03:12

were seen within four hours,

well below the 95% target.

0:03:120:03:17

Across the UK, the number of people

coming down with flu has increased

0:03:170:03:22

dramatically in recent weeks,

and many of the patients attending

0:03:220:03:25

A&E are older and sicker,

meaning they require more care.

0:03:250:03:29

Now, according to the organisation

that represents health providers,

0:03:290:03:32

such as hospitals and ambulance

trusts in England,

0:03:320:03:35

the whole service is at a watershed.

0:03:350:03:39

We have now clearly reached

the point where the NHS cannot meet

0:03:390:03:42

the standards of care that we would,

all of us at the NHS,

0:03:420:03:46

ministers included, want to provide.

0:03:460:03:47

So the key question is,

do we abandon those standards,

0:03:470:03:49

and none of us in the NHS want to

do that, or does the Government make

0:03:490:03:53

the decisions that it needs to make

about the long-term funding?

0:03:530:03:56

And it needs to make

those decisions quickly.

0:03:560:04:00

This is one of the strongest

warnings yet about the strain

0:04:000:04:05

being faced by the NHS this winter,

and it will add to the pressure

0:04:050:04:08

on ministers to build a consensus

over the long-term future

0:04:080:04:11

of the health and care service -

and to do so quickly.

0:04:110:04:14

Dominic Hughes, BBC News.

0:04:140:04:16

Nick Boles is Conservative MP for

Grantham.

0:04:160:04:18

He has been treated

by the NHS for cancer twice

0:04:180:04:20

and has an interest in how

the NHS should be funded.

0:04:200:04:28

As we all do, actually. Thank you

for talking to us. Do you agree the

0:04:290:04:33

NHS in England is in crisis?

It is

having a very difficult time. I

0:04:330:04:39

think that, in a sense, we have

these moments sometimes during

0:04:390:04:43

winters, and at least this time I

think that the NHS has prepared

0:04:430:04:48

early, has not pretended it is not

going to happen, they have thought

0:04:480:04:51

about it, but it is leading to a

whole load of decisions to delay

0:04:510:04:56

some treatments, cancel some

operations, that are hugely

0:04:560:05:00

unfortunate, incredibly distressing

to the people involved, and I won't

0:05:000:05:04

us to get way point where this

doesn't have to happen again.

How

0:05:040:05:08

big do think the gap is between what

the NHS has been ask to deliver and

0:05:080:05:13

the funding your government is

giving it?

We have put a lot more

0:05:130:05:17

money in, but clearly not enough.

Everyone says that. Don't you wonder

0:05:170:05:23

why the Government isn't putting in

what is necessary, then?

To be fair,

0:05:230:05:28

and there some intense conversations

with says Simon Stevens, who runs

0:05:280:05:34

the NHS, about what is required and

what could be delivered from

0:05:340:05:39

productivity and efficiency changes,

we did agree a great deal more money

0:05:390:05:46

for improvements in the NHS.

But

still not enough.

But it has not

0:05:460:05:51

been enough, partly because of an

ageing population and medical

0:05:510:05:54

technology is becoming more

expensive. Sometimes these things

0:05:540:05:59

are not always possible to

anticipate.

There is a suspicion

0:05:590:06:02

from some voters that the

Conservative government, when it

0:06:020:06:08

comes to decent long-term funding of

the NHS, sees it as a black hole,

0:06:080:06:15

rather than a good investment for

the health of its citizens.

I have

0:06:150:06:18

never met a Conservative politician

who has expressed that view in

0:06:180:06:24

private, let alone in public.

Make

the political decisions to put the

0:06:240:06:30

money there, you made a decision to

give £1 billion to the DUP, 3

0:06:300:06:35

billion but aside for Brexit. You

can find the money if you want to.

0:06:350:06:39

And the Chancellor made a decision

in the budget to put more money into

0:06:390:06:43

the NHS because he anticipated that

the winter would be difficult, so we

0:06:430:06:47

do make these decisions. What is

required is not individual decisions

0:06:470:06:53

that particular moments to bail out

a particular problem. What we need

0:06:530:06:56

is a long-term funding solution that

the British people can believe in

0:06:560:07:03

and trusting, and because they

believe in it and trust in it are

0:07:030:07:05

therefore prepared to pay a bit more

in tax to support it, and that is

0:07:050:07:10

what I am proposing today. There is

now a growing recognition that that

0:07:100:07:14

is what we need to move towards, we

cannot lurch from one funding crisis

0:07:140:07:19

to another, this problem will never

go away, the costs are only going to

0:07:190:07:23

go up over the next 20 years, and we

need to put in place a long-term

0:07:230:07:28

package of support for the NHS.

So

your idea is that national insurance

0:07:280:07:34

would become national health

insurance - how much extra would you

0:07:340:07:39

put on national insurance in order

to fund, in a sustainable way, the

0:07:390:07:45

NHS in England?

There is a debate

about this, and I am not myself an

0:07:450:07:50

expert, but we currently spend about

9% of national income on health and

0:07:500:07:56

the public element of social care,

so the taxpayer commitment to social

0:07:560:08:00

care. Over the next few years, most

people, most experts, most of the

0:08:000:08:05

studies believe we will have to move

to something of the order of 10-11%

0:08:050:08:11

of GDP. And that is a substantial

increase. Now, I believe that if

0:08:110:08:15

people knew that when they looked at

their payslip, there was a line that

0:08:150:08:20

said national health insurance, if

they knew that money could only go

0:08:200:08:26

to support national health care and

social care, that they would be

0:08:260:08:29

willing to pay a bit more. And it is

not going to have to be an enormous

0:08:290:08:33

amount more, but there will have to

be some increases. We might have to

0:08:330:08:37

extend national health insurance to

unand

0:08:370:08:48

unand income. -- unearned. There are

extensions that might be necessary

0:08:480:08:54

to ensure the NHS has this money.

As

I said in the introduction, you have

0:08:540:09:00

had cancer twice. What do you think

when you hear that a hospital in

0:09:000:09:04

Oxford is thinking of cutting

chemotherapy cycles for its

0:09:040:09:08

patients?

It would be appalling that

were necessary, and we need to make

0:09:080:09:11

sure that we don't ever find

ourselves in that situation again,

0:09:110:09:15

but we will not do that by just

having a short-term row about money

0:09:150:09:19

that is or is not going in this

year. We need to have a long-term

0:09:190:09:23

solution.

Thank you very much, good

to see you well.

Thank you very

0:09:230:09:28

much.

Nick Boles, Conservative MP

for Grantham.

0:09:280:09:31

Annita McVeigh is in the BBC

Newsroom with a summary

0:09:310:09:33

of the rest of the day's news.

0:09:330:09:35

The Prime Minister's setting out

plans to tackle plastic pollution,

0:09:350:09:37

by eradicating all avoidable waste

within 25 years.

0:09:370:09:39

Two ideas among the proposals

include asking every supermarket

0:09:390:09:42

to have an aisle of goods

with no plastic wrappings,

0:09:420:09:47

as well as extending the 5p

charge for carrier bags

0:09:470:09:50

to all retailers in England.

0:09:500:09:54

But environmentalists say

Theresa May's plans are worthless

0:09:540:09:56

unless they're written into law.

0:09:560:09:57

Here's our environment

correspondent Roger Harribin.

0:09:570:10:03

A pod of short-finned pilot whales.

0:10:030:10:06

In the Atlantic waters off Europe,

as elsewhere,

0:10:060:10:09

they have to share

the ocean with plastic.

0:10:090:10:14

There's huge public concern

about plastic litter since

0:10:140:10:17

David Attenborough's Blue Planet

series showed sea creatures

0:10:170:10:19

eating plastic waste.

0:10:190:10:22

The Prime Minister will surf

that wave of concern

0:10:220:10:25

with her first environment speech.

0:10:250:10:27

She's setting out a timetable

to abolish single-use plastics.

0:10:270:10:30

There'll be money for research

into smarter plastics and more

0:10:300:10:33

plastic-free aisles in supermarkets.

0:10:330:10:40

The countryside should also benefit

from the 25-year-old environment

0:10:400:10:44

plan also being published.

0:10:440:10:45

This is the UK's prime site

for nightingales in Kent.

0:10:450:10:48

The local council wants

to build much-needed homes

0:10:480:10:51

on part of this site.

0:10:510:10:52

But green groups are expecting

the Government to protect

0:10:520:10:58

existing sites like this.

0:10:580:10:59

They also want the Government

to follow its promise to improve

0:10:590:11:02

other areas degraded by

development or careless farming.

0:11:020:11:05

They want commitments that ministers

can't wriggle out of.

0:11:050:11:10

Environmentalists welcome

the Government's plans

0:11:100:11:14

to restore Britain's nature.

0:11:140:11:16

But the problem, they say,

is that so far it's just a plan.

0:11:160:11:19

To really convince them,

ministers would need

0:11:190:11:20

to introduce legislation,

and there seems no sign of that.

0:11:200:11:23

Roger Harrabin, BBC News, Kent.

0:11:230:11:31

A woman whose father has been

missing for years has been

0:11:310:11:33

charged with murder after a body

was discovered in the garden

0:11:330:11:36

of her home in Stockport.

0:11:360:11:38

Barbara Coombes' father has been

missing for more than a decade.

0:11:380:11:40

The 63-year-old has also been

charged with preventing

0:11:400:11:42

a lawful burial and fraud.

0:11:420:11:47

During their investigation police

officers have told neighbours

0:11:470:11:50

that Mr Coombes would have

been in his 80s

0:11:500:11:52

when he disappeared in 2005.

0:11:520:11:56

Police in Paris are

hunting two armed robbers

0:11:560:11:58

who stole jewellery worth

millions of pounds

0:11:580:11:59

from the city's Ritz Hotel.

0:11:590:12:01

Armed with small axes,

thieves smashed windows

0:12:010:12:03

to gain access to display cases,

0:12:030:12:05

before snatching the jewels

from the ground floor of the hotel.

0:12:050:12:07

Three people were arrested

while trying to flee the scene.

0:12:070:12:15

Rescue teams in southern California

are searching for survivors of the

0:12:180:12:21

mudslides that swept away homes in

the town of Montecito. 17 people are

0:12:210:12:25

known to have died in Santa Barbara

County, and more than 20 others are

0:12:250:12:30

still and accounted for. Many places

remain inaccessible, and more than

0:12:300:12:34

100 homes have been destroyed.

0:12:340:12:35

YouTube has cut business ties

with the popular vlogger Logan Paul,

0:12:350:12:38

after he posted a video showing

the body of an apparent

0:12:380:12:40

suicide victim in Japan.

0:12:400:12:41

The US star's channels were removed

from its Google Preferred programme,

0:12:410:12:44

which is lucrative for advertising.

0:12:440:12:51

YouTube says it has also put on hold

original projects with him.

0:12:510:12:54

Paul posted the footage

with a man's body on December 31st,

0:12:540:12:57

triggering widespread criticism.

0:12:570:13:05

Mixed news on the high street as the

Christmas trading figures are

0:13:050:13:08

released.

0:13:080:13:09

Marks and Spencer reported a fall

in sales of both clothing

0:13:090:13:12

and food in the run-up to Christmas.

0:13:120:13:13

The high-street giant

blamed a tough October.

0:13:130:13:15

Meanwhile, sales at John Lewis grew,

but its owner warned profits will be

0:13:150:13:18

dragged down by attempts to maintain

competitive against its rivals.

0:13:180:13:24

More figure are due

out this morning.

0:13:240:13:30

That's a summary of the latest

BBC News, more at 9:30.

0:13:300:13:37

I want to hear from you this morning

if you have been in hospital this

0:13:370:13:41

winter, or a member of your family

has, tell us your experience, good

0:13:410:13:45

or bad. Chris says my wife's mother

was admitted in December, eight and

0:13:450:13:51

a half hours later she had a CT scan

and then an emergency operation. I

0:13:510:13:56

have to agree with the headlines

that A&E felt and looked like a

0:13:560:14:03

battle ground surgery. I saw one

female doctor so stressed that she

0:14:030:14:06

was running up and down looking for

her next patient, saying, why didn't

0:14:060:14:11

they tell me where he is? Total

chaos. So yes, your experiences, if

0:14:110:14:15

you or a member of your family have

been in hospital this winter, good

0:14:150:14:20

and bad. You can e-mail tweet,

WhatsApp, Facebook, and if you text,

0:14:200:14:27

we will have to charge you, we

apologise for that!

0:14:270:14:36

Jess with the sport now. We're going

to talk about the video assistant

0:14:360:14:40

referee last night.

0-0 it finished between Chelsea and

0:14:400:14:46

Arsenal in the league cup. The

referee consulted the video

0:14:460:14:51

assistant referee on two occasions.

Here is one of them. The referee was

0:14:510:14:59

happy with his original decision not

to award a penalty in this case. A

0:14:590:15:03

similar system is used in rugby and

cricket and has become part of the

0:15:030:15:07

fun experience. But in football,

fans are not able to watch the Var

0:15:070:15:16

process, which some fans say is

frustrating. We will wait to see if

0:15:160:15:21

fans think this is a positive step.

Let's talk about cricket. England

0:15:210:15:26

have named their test squad to face

New Zealand?

0:15:260:15:29

Yes, I think it was clear after the

loss of the Ashes that England were

0:15:290:15:32

struggling with click bowlers Down

Under. They have we called Mark

0:15:320:15:36

Wood. Liam Livingstone from

Lancashire has also been named.

0:15:360:15:45

James Vince keeps its place in the

squad.

0:15:450:15:47

But Gary Ballance has been dropped.

Just a few weeks after entertaining

0:15:470:15:55

us in I'm a celebrity, Amir Khan is

going back into the ring?

0:15:550:16:00

Yes, two years out of the ring. He

is ready to make a comeback. His

0:16:000:16:05

opponent will be named next week for

the fight in April in Liverpool. It

0:16:050:16:09

is interesting how, after years of

slapping each other off and

0:16:090:16:13

supposedly not liking each other,

Khan and promoter Eddie Hearn have

0:16:130:16:17

decided to work together. He has

signed a three fight deal with

0:16:170:16:22

Matchroom promotions. Khan has

enjoyed a surge in popularity in

0:16:220:16:27

recent weeks after appearing on the

reality TV show.

0:16:270:16:32

You are going to be anxious, you are

going to be nervous. Maybe people

0:16:320:16:36

saw more of that in the real side of

me. Maybe they thought I was

0:16:360:16:42

arrogant. I had to be confident in

front of my opponent, otherwise

0:16:420:16:45

people would think, who is -- he

would think, who is this when I'm

0:16:450:16:49

fighting? People got to see the real

side of me away from boxing. It is

0:16:490:16:54

lovely to come back and have so much

love from the British public.

This

0:16:540:16:59

is all the more exciting because we

may be moving closer to the British

0:16:590:17:03

super fight between him and Kell

Brook.

0:17:030:17:06

I have not forgotten strawberry

gate! Thank you.

0:17:060:17:10

In just over an hour,

the Prime Minister will set out how

0:17:100:17:13

the Government plans to safeguard

the Environment for the next 25

0:17:130:17:16

years, in what is being seen

as a new focus on green issues.

0:17:160:17:19

One of the key elements of today's

speech will be on how we can

0:17:190:17:22

reduce our plastic waste.

0:17:220:17:23

Measures include plastic-free

aisles in supermarkets,

0:17:230:17:25

possible charges for single-use

items like takeaway containers,

0:17:250:17:28

the extension of the 5p plastic bag

charge to small shops in England

0:17:280:17:31

and Government funding

for plastics innovation.

0:17:310:17:33

Labour claim the proposals

are "cynical attempt at rebranding

0:17:330:17:36

the Tories' image" in order

to woo young voters.

0:17:360:17:40

Well, Theresa May is not the only

Conservative leader to make

0:17:400:17:42

commitments on the environment.

0:17:420:17:44

David Cameron promised

his Government would be

0:17:440:17:46

the "greenest ever".

0:17:460:17:50

But despite despite this famous "hug

a husky" moment, he faced criticism

0:17:500:17:53

for not doing enough.

0:17:530:17:55

Let's talk to Laura Round

from the conservative

0:17:550:17:57

think tank, Bright Blue.

0:17:570:17:58

Dustin Benton from the Green

Alliance, which campaigns

0:17:580:18:01

on environmental policy,

0:18:010:18:04

and has been critical

of previous government's

0:18:040:18:05

achievements in the area.

0:18:050:18:08

And the chair of the parliamentary

Environmental Audit Committee,

0:18:080:18:10

the Labour MP Mary Creagh.

0:18:100:18:14

Welcome all of you. Why is Mrs May

talking about the environment for

0:18:140:18:20

the first time?

I think the election

last year showed the Conservatives

0:18:200:18:25

have lost a lot of support from

younger voters, especially voters

0:18:250:18:30

based in metropolitan areas who are

more socially liberal, and which

0:18:300:18:37

polling shows, really care about

environmental issues. When we asked

0:18:370:18:40

under 40 voters what issues they

would like politicians to speak more

0:18:400:18:47

about, the environment was second,

well ahead of housing. For under 28

0:18:470:18:53

euros, climate change was the top

issue.

So really important for

0:18:530:18:58

potential future electoral success.

Theresa May's former director of

0:18:580:19:03

human occasions said today that

Andrea Leadsom was told to make the

0:19:030:19:09

plan brilliant parliament as boring

as possible, Mary Creagh, do you

0:19:090:19:14

welcome the plans?

We have been

waiting nearly three years. It is a

0:19:140:19:21

22 year environment plan. You

mentioned in your introduction the

0:19:210:19:24

hog a husky moment, that manifested

as cut the group -- cut the green

0:19:240:19:31

clap.

Let's talk about the ideas

being talked about today.

Do you

0:19:310:19:37

welcome them? The Prime Minister has

a target to end voidable plastic.

0:19:370:19:43

Booing it is difficult to find one.

Is a plastic tampon applicators?

0:19:430:19:51

Lawro, do you know what I voidable

plastic is?

This is the problem. We

0:19:510:19:59

have had is the pre-briefing. In 25

years I will be 75, the Prime

0:19:590:20:04

Minister will be 86. We can't wait

to tackle the tide of plastic waste

0:20:040:20:10

in our ocean. We also need to be

looking holistically at how we

0:20:100:20:16

tackle climate change and how we

meet the current recycling targets,

0:20:160:20:21

which is 50% recycled by 2020, which

we are currently set to miss.

Mary

0:20:210:20:27

is right. There is a short-term

needs to get things done. If

0:20:270:20:30

government wants to solve a big part

of the plastics waste problem, they

0:20:300:20:35

can introduce a return scheme. You

could do that today. We know from

0:20:350:20:38

our research that would cut a third

of the plastic going into the

0:20:380:20:43

oceans. That is really effective and

achievable. But I don't think we

0:20:430:20:49

should start entirely with cynicism.

This is the first major speech are

0:20:490:20:54

sitting Prime Minister has made

since 1984. The ambition, we hope,

0:20:540:20:58

will be really good. I am keen the

Prime Minister is moving the UK in

0:20:580:21:04

the right direction. The real

challenge will be, what will this

0:21:040:21:08

deliver within the lifetime of this

set of ministers? We don't need to

0:21:080:21:14

wait 25 years.

The young voters that

Mrs May desperately needs, if 25

0:21:140:21:19

years really is the target, the

running time, they will be in their

0:21:190:21:25

mid-40s, 50s, once they?

I suppose

that's true but it is also about

0:21:250:21:31

people growing up now learning more

about politics.

525 years? Is that

0:21:310:21:37

the nature of her personality or is

there something else going on? --

0:21:370:21:42

Whiley 25 years?

It is an ambitious

plan. It is a positive thing.

Could

0:21:420:21:49

it be done in ten or 15 years?

There

were things we need to get done. It

0:21:490:21:57

has taken us a long time to get to

the point where we have got 10% of

0:21:570:22:01

the UK species at risk of extension.

It will take some time to get us out

0:22:010:22:05

of this. We have to make sure we

don't wait 25 years to start making

0:22:050:22:09

a difference. We could, for example,

bring forward the 2040 petrol and

0:22:090:22:14

diesel vehicles ban to 2030. That

would cut UK oil imports in half and

0:22:140:22:22

massively improve air quality. That

is achievable now.

It is unfair to

0:22:220:22:30

say that everything won't happen for

25 years.

I didn't mean that. I

0:22:300:22:34

didn't express it very well. It

could be a ten year plan. It will be

0:22:340:22:40

difficult to hold this government

accountable in 25 years to see what

0:22:400:22:43

they have achieved, as Mary says,

Theresa May will be 80 odd.

We have

0:22:430:22:50

had the green growth strategy before

Christmas. We have got the carbon

0:22:500:22:54

plans every five years. We have to

look at climate change targets. The

0:22:540:23:01

government needs to look at itself

as the largest purchaser of goods

0:23:010:23:05

and services in the country. We have

just done an audit of the Ministry

0:23:050:23:09

of Justice. 1% of their vehicles

across the prison and probationers

0:23:090:23:14

state are electric. They are missing

their own targets internally now. I

0:23:140:23:18

am keen to see the details of this

plant, not just the headlines, which

0:23:180:23:24

are about plastic. We want to know

about biodiversity, landscape

0:23:240:23:28

restoration, forestry.

We may get

some of that in the speech.

0:23:280:23:36

Extending the 5p charge is one of

the measures being introduced.

We

0:23:360:23:42

called her that.

Millions into

research to develop less harmful

0:23:420:23:47

plastic.

We have bio plastics. We

have Oxy degradable additives that

0:23:470:23:52

go into plastic bags.

The entire

plastics system needs remodelling.

0:23:520:24:02

Are we using the ingenuity that we

have got? The biggest threat to the

0:24:020:24:07

environment is Brexit, which sets

are air pollution targets, waste

0:24:070:24:11

targets. We need an environmental

protection act, which my committee

0:24:110:24:15

called for a year ago, to make sure

we don't lose those protections as

0:24:150:24:18

we leave.

Mary is absolutely right

about that. We need the commitments

0:24:180:24:24

that have been made. We need to get

on and do what we can do today. We

0:24:240:24:30

know that right and manufacturers

mixed lots of different types of

0:24:300:24:33

plastics together and make products

that are not recyclable. We could do

0:24:330:24:38

with that today.

What about using

some of the International aid budget

0:24:380:24:41

to help countries reduce plastic

pollution in the sea, most of which

0:24:410:24:47

comes from rivers in Africa and

Asia?

That is a positive

0:24:470:24:52

announcement that will resonate with

a lot of voters. Again, because I

0:24:520:24:57

have done a lot of polling on this,

the British population are very

0:24:570:25:00

proud of our commitment and are

setting a global example on these

0:25:000:25:05

issues.

0:25:050:25:12

issues. Especially conservative

voters who voted Remain. It is a

0:25:120:25:14

good way of reaching out to those

voters and show that we not moving

0:25:140:25:19

away it.

We want the aid budget to

go to the poorest people on the

0:25:190:25:25

planet. Eight of those ten rivers

are in middle income countries,

0:25:250:25:29

China and Vietnam. We don't want the

aid budget going to China. We want

0:25:290:25:32

the aid budget going to Niger and

Nigeria, which are pollution

0:25:320:25:38

problems. We can ask middle-income

countries to do with themselves.

We

0:25:380:25:43

are told that most of these are just

plans, which will be consulted on.

0:25:430:25:47

There is no talk of legislation.

Will that be enough to change

0:25:470:25:51

things?

It won't be enough. We need

legal commitments and a new

0:25:510:25:56

environmental regulator that will

hold the government to account. We

0:25:560:26:00

need to replicate some of the

structures of the EU to give

0:26:000:26:04

citizens the right to hold the

government to account.

Looking

0:26:040:26:10

forward to hearing what our viewers

think. The Prime Minister expected

0:26:100:26:17

to give her speech at about half

past ten. We will bring that to you

0:26:170:26:20

live.

0:26:200:26:23

The trial is resuming

in the case of Barry Bennell,

0:26:230:26:26

the former football coach who's

accused of sexually abusing boys.

0:26:260:26:28

Bennell, who's now known

as Richard Jones, faces 48

0:26:280:26:30

sex offence charges,

which he denies.

0:26:300:26:33

We can speak now to our sports news

reporter, David Ornstein,

0:26:330:26:36

who's outside Liverpool Crown Court.

0:26:360:26:41

What happpened in court yesterday?

0:26:410:26:48

Victoria, yesterday marked the start

of evidence against Mr Bennell, with

0:26:480:26:53

the prosecution described as a

predatory and devious paedophile.

0:26:530:26:57

The testimony of the first witness

was harrowing, emotional and it was

0:26:570:27:02

played out to the court by an

interview he conducted with the

0:27:020:27:05

police. He met Mr Bennell, he said,

when he played for a youth team in

0:27:050:27:11

the north-west of England in the

early 1980s, aged between 11 and 12,

0:27:110:27:16

and Bennell was said to be a scout

from Manchester City. He would

0:27:160:27:21

always flashes eyes at you and make

you feel like you are special will

0:27:210:27:25

stop everybody wanted to be in

football, everybody wanted to please

0:27:250:27:28

him. This man said that he and a

number of other top players were

0:27:280:27:33

hand-picked by Mr Bennell to stay at

his home above a video shop he

0:27:330:27:37

owned. But it is where the alleged

abuse began. He said there were two

0:27:370:27:41

bunk beds and a double bed in a room

which Mr Bennell would share with

0:27:410:27:45

two boys. They would play fight,

watch movies, then the lights went

0:27:450:27:50

out and live music started. He

talked of songs by Billy Joe well

0:27:500:27:54

and the Steve Miller band, but

mostly incantation, the song. That

0:27:540:28:01

was playing well the abuse was

taking place. He said that music

0:28:010:28:05

still sends chills down his spine. I

cannot stand chorus, and aftershave

0:28:050:28:10

he alleged Mr Bennell would wear. He

was also abused at eight to at

0:28:100:28:19

Butlins in North Wales. He woke to

find Mr Bennell behind him. He also

0:28:190:28:22

talked of experiences when he felt

the bed vibrating on Mr Bennell's

0:28:220:28:29

property vibrating as others were

abused. Nobody spoke about this but

0:28:290:28:34

he said there was a distinctive look

among the boys. It was almost like

0:28:340:28:39

an untold rule. We didn't want to

spoil our chances. I want to make

0:28:390:28:43

it, I want to play for City. You

knew you didn't say anything. He had

0:28:430:28:48

a big power hold over us, which was

pretty horrific. He said he was

0:28:480:28:53

abused tens if not hundreds of times

over a three-year period. He learned

0:28:530:28:58

how to shut down his body and

emotions. He would have tears

0:28:580:29:02

running down his cheeks. It didn't

stop him. Other than his wife, this

0:29:020:29:06

witness said nobody knew of his

experience until November of 2016,

0:29:060:29:11

when he was watching this very

programme, the Victoria Derbyshire

0:29:110:29:16

show, when other alleged victims

talk of their experiences. Under

0:29:160:29:22

cross-examination yesterday, he

rejected the idea there were

0:29:220:29:24

financial motives behind his case.

He said he was not in this for

0:29:240:29:28

money. The court was later played

the transcript of police interviews

0:29:280:29:35

with Mr Bennell, in which he denied

abusing this individual. He said he

0:29:350:29:39

was one who got away with it. He

thought he might be one who would

0:29:390:29:44

succumb to his grooming process. He

was not a victim though. He was the

0:29:440:29:51

priority... The priority, Mr Bennell

said, was another boy, who he

0:29:510:29:55

described as his favourite.

What are

we expecting in court today?

We are

0:29:550:30:01

expecting further evidence. We

should hear from another witness.

0:30:010:30:04

Let's recapture. Before this trial

Mr Bennell admitted seven charges of

0:30:040:30:10

child six abuse involving three boys

aged between 11 and 14. He denies a

0:30:100:30:17

further 48 charges against 11 boys

ranging between eight and 14, and

0:30:170:30:27

between 1979 and 1991. The court

heard earlier in this trial that Mr

0:30:270:30:33

Bennell served sentences in prison

in England and the USA for abusing

0:30:330:30:36

children. But he claims with this

particular trial, that he is a

0:30:360:30:41

victim of a malicious campaign. The

trial continues and is expected to

0:30:410:30:45

last around eight weeks.

Thank you.

0:30:450:30:51

Still to come,

as NHS bosses say they're struggling

0:30:520:30:55

to cope, we'll ask if the only

0:30:550:30:56

answer is to pump more money

into the service.

0:30:560:30:58

We want your experiences, if you or

a family member has been in

0:30:580:31:01

hospital, what is it like for you?

0:31:010:31:04

And we'll be discussing equal pay,

after the resignation of the BBC's

0:31:040:31:07

China editor in protest at the fact

that she wasn't being paid the same

0:31:070:31:11

as the two other male

international editors.

0:31:110:31:13

We will talk to one professor.

0:31:130:31:16

Time for the latest

news - here's Annita.

0:31:160:31:18

The BBC News

headlines this morning.

0:31:180:31:22

Hospitals are struggling to cope

and need long-term funding,

0:31:220:31:26

according to health bosses.

0:31:260:31:29

NHS Providers, which represents

acute hospitals and

0:31:290:31:32

Ambulance Services in England,

says standards of care cannot be

0:31:320:31:34

met without without more money.

0:31:340:31:36

The Department of Health

and Social Care says

0:31:360:31:38

the NHS was given top priority

in the last budget.

0:31:380:31:40

One Conservative MP says he wants

to see a change in the way

0:31:400:31:44

in which the NHS is funded.

0:31:440:31:49

If people knew when they looked at

their payslip that there was a line

0:31:490:31:53

that said national health insurance,

if they knew that that money,

0:31:530:31:58

legally, could only go to support

the national health care and social

0:31:580:32:03

care, they would be willing to pay a

bit more. It is not going to have to

0:32:030:32:07

be an enormous amount more, but

there will have to be some

0:32:070:32:10

increases.

0:32:100:32:10

A woman whose father has been

missing for years has been

0:32:100:32:13

charged with murder after a body

was discovered in the garden

0:32:130:32:15

of her home in Stockport.

0:32:150:32:16

Barbara Coombes' father has been

missing for more than a decade.

0:32:160:32:19

The 63-year-old has also been

charged with preventing

0:32:190:32:21

a lawful burial and fraud.

0:32:210:32:23

During their investigation police

officers have told neighbours

0:32:230:32:25

that Mr Coombes would have

been in his 80s

0:32:250:32:27

when he disappeared in 2005.

0:32:270:32:32

Police in Paris are

hunting two armed robbers

0:32:320:32:35

who stole jewellery worth

millions of pounds

0:32:350:32:36

from the city's Ritz Hotel.

0:32:360:32:39

Armed with small axes,

thieves smashed windows

0:32:390:32:42

to gain access to display cases,

0:32:420:32:44

before snatching the jewels

from the ground floor of the hotel.

0:32:440:32:46

Three people were arrested

while trying to flee the scene.

0:32:460:32:51

Rescue teams in southern California

are searching for survivors

0:32:510:32:53

of the mudslides that swept away

homes in the town of Montecito.

0:32:530:32:56

17 people are known to have

died in Santa Barbara County,

0:32:560:32:59

and more than 20 others

are still unaccounted for.

0:32:590:33:04

Many places remain inaccessible,

0:33:040:33:06

and more than 100 homes

have been destroyed.

0:33:060:33:11

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

0:33:110:33:18

Thank you very much, Annita. Summary

messages about your experiences of

0:33:180:33:23

being in

hospital, Margaret says, I

broke my wrist and went to Aberdeen

0:33:230:33:28

A&E, my wrist was manipulated into

praise and sedation. The attention I

0:33:280:33:32

received was first class. Javad says

I broke both legs, the staff were

0:33:320:33:38

brilliant, but I could see there was

a lot of pressure on them, I would

0:33:380:33:42

love to pay extra money through

national insurance contributions,

0:33:420:33:45

but I believe the Government was

taking us towards private health

0:33:450:33:48

insurance. Alan says, if every GP

surgery opened longer each day, that

0:33:480:33:58

would take pressure off A&E.

Kimberly says, so again those who

0:33:580:34:02

pay taxes need to pay more, but what

is not fine is those who do not work

0:34:020:34:09

will receive the same services

without paying into the system. That

0:34:090:34:11

is not a plan, by the way, Kimberly,

it is a suggestion from one

0:34:110:34:16

Conservative MP. More about the NHS

in the next half-hour, your

0:34:160:34:21

experiences are very welcome. But

Jessica is back with the sport.

0:34:210:34:24

Headlines this morning: the draw for

the first Grand Slam of the year,

0:34:240:34:32

the Australian Open, have taken

place. Johanna Konta will play

0:34:320:34:35

Madison Brengle in the first-round,

and in the men's single straw, no

0:34:350:34:42

Andy Murray, recovering from

surgery, Kyle Edmund will be

0:34:420:34:47

Britain's male representative,

playing US Open finalist Kevin

0:34:470:34:49

Anderson, a big match. No goals in

the first leg of the EFL Cup

0:34:490:34:55

semifinal between Arsenal and

Chelsea, the video assistant referee

0:34:550:34:59

system created the biggest talking

point. Martin Andersson consulted it

0:34:590:35:04

for two penalty claims but was

satisfied with the evidence not to

0:35:040:35:09

award a spot kick. And England have

called up Lancashire batsman Liam

0:35:090:35:14

Livingstone for their series against

New Zealand next month. Fast bowler

0:35:140:35:18

Mark Wood has also been recalled

after injury. A full bulletin for

0:35:180:35:22

you just after ten o'clock.

0:35:220:35:25

Good morning, Thursday morning,

welcome to the programme. Give us

0:35:250:35:29

more money or patients will suffer,

that is what NHS bosses in England

0:35:290:35:33

are saying today. The warning comes

amid reports of patients being left

0:35:330:35:40

on trolleys while ambulances queue

up outside.

0:35:400:35:51

The Royal College of Nursing says

there are currently 40,000 vacant

0:35:530:35:58

posts. Then there is these zoo of

money. NHS Providers say they got

0:35:580:36:02

less than they needed in November's

budget. -- the issue of money. The

0:36:020:36:11

Government says the NHS is a top

priority. The number of doctors

0:36:110:36:14

being trained is up by a quarter.

But Chris Hobson from NHS Providers

0:36:140:36:24

explains how the current situation

is affecting patients.

The NHS can

0:36:240:36:32

no longer deliver the standards of

care in the constitution, so we have

0:36:320:36:35

an important decision to make, do we

abandon those standards, which were

0:36:350:36:40

incredibly hard fought to gain those

standards in the 2000s, or do we

0:36:400:36:45

make decisions on the long-term

funding of the NHS and social care

0:36:450:36:48

to ensure it has enough money to

meet those standards? We need the

0:36:480:36:52

Government to make those decisions

this year, by the time of the Budget

0:36:520:36:56

at the latest. For the first time

ever last, the NHS missed all of the

0:36:560:37:03

key standards on A&E, elected

surgery, ambulance waiting times,

0:37:030:37:07

cancer waiting times. We set a new

trajectory to recover the A&E

0:37:070:37:11

standard, which we will now miss. We

have reached the point where the NHS

0:37:110:37:16

cannot meet the standards of care

that we would all of us, ministers

0:37:160:37:20

included, want to provide.

0:37:200:37:23

Olivia Szepietowski

is a doctoral researcher

0:37:230:37:24

who specialises in obesity.

0:37:240:37:26

Tim Gardner is from

the Health Foundation,

0:37:260:37:29

a charity which carries

out research and policy

0:37:290:37:31

analysis into health care.

0:37:310:37:34

We are also hoping to talk to

underneath assist, but he is

0:37:340:37:40

slightly delayed, will talk to him

after ten o'clock. -- hoping to talk

0:37:400:37:44

to an anaesthetist. Do you agree

with NHS Providers that this is a

0:37:440:37:49

watershed moment for the NHS?

So

research has found that the NHS is

0:37:490:37:56

going through the most steer decade

in all of its history. It is seven

0:37:560:38:02

years into a massive funding

squeeze. -- most

0:38:020:38:10

squeeze. -- most austere. The

Government did provide more money in

0:38:100:38:14

the Budget, but that is less than

half of the minimum funding gap that

0:38:140:38:18

our analysis found was going to hit

services.

How much extra would be

0:38:180:38:26

NHS need, 28-19, for example?

0:38:260:38:33

NHS need, 28-19, for example? --

2018-19.

Before the Budget, there

0:38:340:38:36

was a gap of £4 billion, and the

Government found some money, but

0:38:360:38:41

still at least £2 billion, and that

is before we start asking the NHS to

0:38:410:38:45

do more, rather than just maintain

current standards for more people.

0:38:450:38:50

Can you describe your experiences of

working alongside doctors, nurses

0:38:500:38:54

and patients, treating people with

obesity?

Absolutely. Conditions are

0:38:540:39:00

extremely stretched in hospitals at

the moment. As we have heard on the

0:39:000:39:05

news, patients are struggling to get

a bed when they need it, and it is

0:39:050:39:11

affecting my specialty, bariatric

surgery, surgery for weight loss,

0:39:110:39:14

and to improve other things like

diabetes and high blood pressure and

0:39:140:39:21

cholesterol. Unfortunately, these

kind of surgeries are not seen as

0:39:210:39:26

essential to many different local

authorities and trusts, and despite

0:39:260:39:32

the amazing effects that they have,

and the people that they can really

0:39:320:39:37

help, we are seeing that the

surgeries are being delayed or

0:39:370:39:41

cancelled, and often not just once

but multiple times for one

0:39:410:39:45

individual.

Because they are not

urgent?

Exactly, they are not seen

0:39:450:39:50

as urgent, but at what point does it

become agent? When someone needs an

0:39:500:39:55

operation, they need that operation.

They have been found to have the

0:39:550:39:59

requirements, and so it should

really be that people should not be

0:39:590:40:05

delayed so much.

Should patients pay

for things like gastric bands, for

0:40:050:40:09

example?

It is an interesting

argument. Gastric bands have been

0:40:090:40:15

shown to be hugely effective in

treating people with obesity, and

0:40:150:40:21

particularly gastric bypass and

sleeves. Unfortunately, there is

0:40:210:40:24

this huge stigma around obesity, and

it is seen as being the individual's

0:40:240:40:29

fault. My research focuses on

genetic factors in obesity and

0:40:290:40:35

diabetes. One of the amazing results

we see is that, within hours or days

0:40:350:40:40

of a surgery, somebody who was

diabetic before is no longer

0:40:400:40:44

diabetic, and that can save huge

amounts of money for the NHS. So

0:40:440:40:49

these operations, whilst they do

have an overhead for the surgery

0:40:490:40:53

itself and the follow-up, they

actually save the NHS loads of

0:40:530:40:56

money, because those people don't

have diabetes, they don't require

0:40:560:41:00

blood pressure medication and so on.

Is there anything else that the NHS,

0:41:000:41:05

putting money to one side, which is

difficult in this conversation, but

0:41:050:41:09

anything else the NHS could be doing

to help itself?

So as Olivia

0:41:090:41:16

mentioned, things are incredibly

tough within the health service at

0:41:160:41:19

the moment, we have seen it on the

news throughout the last few days.

0:41:190:41:23

Unfortunately, in terms of quick fix

solutions, the NHS has done?

0:41:230:41:27

Everything can do. Part of that

response is to cancel some of the

0:41:270:41:32

less urgent but still very important

procedures that we know patients can

0:41:320:41:37

benefit from and that have big cost

and complications for patients

0:41:370:41:42

themselves, but it is the only

realistic option, in order to cope

0:41:420:41:46

with the tide of urgency needed that

it is being presented with.

And it

0:41:460:41:51

is not just the less urgent stuff, I

take your point, a hospital in

0:41:510:41:58

Oxford potentially considering

getting chemotherapy sessions. In

0:41:580:42:01

order to free up staff, for example.

They have not made the main -- final

0:42:010:42:11

decision, but it must be drastic.

This is not simply about money, the

0:42:110:42:16

Government did find extra funding,

specifically for winter pressures,

0:42:160:42:20

but it was only announced, really,

less than a week before winter

0:42:200:42:24

began.

350 million.

That is right,

so not that helpful. So one of the

0:42:240:42:32

big issues facing the health service

is staffing. We need to have a

0:42:320:42:39

robust, long-term plan, and a

long-term approach for how we train,

0:42:390:42:42

recruit the right staff with the

right skills and get them in the

0:42:420:42:48

right places. We also need to do

better at retaining the staff that

0:42:480:42:51

we have got, and that seemed to be

the problem in Oxford, not not

0:42:510:42:56

enough money, but simply not enough

staff to be able to run the service

0:42:560:43:00

safely.

A spokesman for the

Department of Health and Social Care

0:43:000:43:04

are acknowledged there were

problems, we know there is pressure

0:43:040:43:07

on A&E departments, we are grateful

to all the staff for their work in

0:43:070:43:12

challenging circumstances. It says

plans are in place for extra money

0:43:120:43:18

for council run test and was so

people can be moved out of hospital

0:43:180:43:21

more quickly, and the single biggest

expansion in the number of doctor

0:43:210:43:28

training places, 25% in the coming

years. The current model does not

0:43:280:43:34

work, that seems to be the

consensus, and Jeremy Hunt,

0:43:340:43:38

England's Health Secretary, has

talked about a long-term sustainable

0:43:380:43:43

model. What might that look like?

You might not have the answer, it is

0:43:430:43:47

fair enough to say it, because it

may be above all of our pay grades,

0:43:470:43:51

but what do think?

I am not sure

there is consensus that the model

0:43:510:43:54

does not work. Easy is that the NHS

is currently facing, funding

0:43:540:44:01

shortfall, staffing shortages, the

growing needs of an ageing, growing,

0:44:010:44:06

more sick population, no country in

Europe is immune from any of these

0:44:060:44:09

issues. And all of these countries

are facing the same issues as we

0:44:090:44:14

are. The model is fundamentally

sound, there is quite a lot of

0:44:140:44:21

research that shows that no type of

health system performs universally

0:44:210:44:25

better than any other type of health

system. Go back 20 years, when there

0:44:250:44:32

was quite substantial funding and

staffing increases for the NHS in

0:44:320:44:35

England, and we saw some quite big

improvements in quality of care

0:44:350:44:39

flowing from that, some other big

advances.

So it is mostly about more

0:44:390:44:42

money.

The model is fine, it is

about staffing and funding it

0:44:420:44:48

properly.

What I would add is that

it should not be a party political

0:44:480:44:54

view, it should be about

coordinating a cross-party and

0:44:540:44:57

moving forward to try and make the

NHS a sustainable as possible. It is

0:44:570:45:02

reaching its 70th anniversary this

year, and we want to see a blast for

0:45:020:45:06

another 70.

Thank you both very

much.

0:45:060:45:13

Police have arrested two men after

CCTV stills were circulated as part

0:45:130:45:18

of the investigation into the murder

of the Jay Patel in North London.

0:45:180:45:23

The two men, aged 15 and 16, were

arrested on suspicion of violent

0:45:230:45:29

disorder. Mr Patel died in hospital

last week after being attacked

0:45:290:45:34

outside his shop. Two teenagers have

been arrested.

0:45:340:45:38

Coming up,

0:45:380:45:39

YouTube has cut business

ties with Logan Paul,

0:45:390:45:41

the hugely popular vlogger

who posted a video showing

0:45:410:45:43

the body of an apparent

suicide victim in Japan.

0:45:430:45:50

We will talk about that before ten.

0:45:500:45:53

Equal pay has been in the news again

this week after the high-profile

0:45:530:45:57

resignation of the BBC's

China Editor and the publication

0:45:570:45:59

of figures showing a number of large

companies have gender pay gaps.

0:45:590:46:02

Anyone who thinks they are being

treated unfairly can take their case

0:46:020:46:06

to an employment tribunal,

but figures seen by the BBC's

0:46:060:46:09

Reality Check show very few of these

cases are actually resolved

0:46:090:46:12

by the courts.

0:46:120:46:16

Chris Morris from the BBC's Reality

Check is here to explain why.

0:46:160:46:23

Really interesting what you found.

Yeah, you can go to employment

0:46:230:46:30

tribunal is for a variety of

reasons. We were looking at cases of

0:46:300:46:34

equal pay. In data stretching back

to 20 11,000 and thousands of people

0:46:340:46:40

every year have begun cases relating

to equal pay. -- stretching back to

0:46:400:46:48

2000 11,000 and thousands of cases.

We know very little about the

0:46:480:46:52

outcomes because the number of

successful complaints in that

0:46:520:46:56

period, since 2011, are so small,

just a handful, but statistically

0:46:560:47:01

they are recorded as 0% every year.

0% are successful every year. But

0:47:010:47:09

when you look at on successful

complaints, that is also 0%. So none

0:47:090:47:15

of these cases come to a public

conclusion. What is happening is

0:47:150:47:18

something called dismissal on

withdrawal. What that means is

0:47:180:47:24

perhaps the two parties come to a

private conclusion outside the

0:47:240:47:30

tribunal, or simply the employee

withdraws the case. We don't know

0:47:300:47:33

very much at all about those

outcomes.

When they settle out of

0:47:330:47:38

the tribunal environment, they are

usually subject to confidentiality

0:47:380:47:43

clauses?

Yes. There is no

requirement to make that conclusion

0:47:430:47:46

public. And of course what that

means is we know very little about

0:47:460:47:51

how many cases of unequal pay are

actually onerous. If you look at

0:47:510:47:57

other tribunal on things like

discrimination on age or disability,

0:47:570:48:02

at least there is a proportion of

cases that do come to a public

0:48:020:48:06

conclusion in one way or another.

For equal pay, 0% successful and

0:48:060:48:13

unsuccessful.

Incredible. Thank you.

0:48:130:48:18

Professor Elizabeth Schafer

launched legal proceedings

0:48:180:48:19

against Royal Holloway,

University of London, over the pay

0:48:190:48:21

gaps between professors.

0:48:210:48:22

Caroline Underhill is the head

of equal pay at Thompsons

0:48:220:48:25

Solicitors, has worked

0:48:250:48:26

on thousands of equal pay cases,

and has over 30 years' experience

0:48:260:48:28

working as a barrister.

0:48:280:48:30

Doreen Reeves, employment solicitor

at Slater and Gordon,

0:48:300:48:33

believes the answer is having a more

open culture around

0:48:330:48:35

talking about pay rather

than using tribunals.

0:48:350:48:42

Welcome all of you. I will start

with Professor Schaeffer. You have

0:48:420:48:46

gone through the tribunal process

yourself, briefly. What were you

0:48:460:48:53

arguing?

Yes, I went to the tribunal

about equal pay. I was on average

0:48:530:49:02

being paid, I was looking out of the

averages and I worked out I was well

0:49:020:49:07

adrift of the male professorial

average salary. I went to the

0:49:070:49:13

tribunal about that. I'm not

surprised at the figures you have

0:49:130:49:20

quoted. Going to the tribunal is a

very tough process. It is tough

0:49:200:49:28

emotionally and intellectually, and

you have to be incredibly tenacious.

0:49:280:49:33

You collected information and

evidence that amounted to, that

0:49:330:49:39

filled 120 files. Then you have to

be cross-examined. Then you have to

0:49:390:49:43

hear employer say potentially not

good enough to be paid as paid as

0:49:430:49:48

much as your employers. That does

sound challenging? It is

0:49:480:49:53

extraordinary the amount of evidence

you need. You are trying to prove a

0:49:530:49:56

point. You have to be comic and

historian, document yourself, look

0:49:560:50:00

at everything you have ever done and

prove how valuable you are. -- you

0:50:000:50:05

have to become and historian.

0:50:050:50:12

have to become and historian. My

judgment rent to 95 pages as well.

0:50:120:50:14

Not exactly a light read. Dealing

with the sheer amount of evidence. I

0:50:140:50:20

am used to conference situations,

being in public and speeding and

0:50:200:50:26

then being asked to defend my point

of view. That process for some

0:50:260:50:31

people would be, I think, quite

difficult. The whole process of the

0:50:310:50:36

tribunal is very challenging, yeah.

Let's bring in Caroline Underhill.

0:50:360:50:45

Statistically from 2011 no cases

were successful or on successful.

0:50:450:50:50

What does that suggest we should do

in the future?

We should make the

0:50:500:50:56

procedure simpler. We should look at

trying to make the law simpler. And

0:50:560:51:04

we should also look at placing

greater emphasis on pay transparency

0:51:040:51:13

and negotiation within employers,

because one of the reasons that we

0:51:130:51:17

don't have many cases that go

through to full hearing is the

0:51:170:51:24

length of time it takes to get to a

final resolution on an equal pay

0:51:240:51:31

case. 11 years is not uncommon.

It

took four years to get a judgment in

0:51:310:51:39

the Professor's case. Doreen, do you

think judgment should be avoided

0:51:390:51:43

altogether?

We need to work towards

a culture where there is less of a

0:51:430:51:50

cloak of pay secrecy in the

industry.

Do you think we are doing

0:51:500:51:56

this because big companies will have

to reveal a gender pay gap by April?

0:51:560:52:01

Yes, that is one way they assess

average salaries for men and women

0:52:010:52:05

over a period of time. But with

equal pay it is about looking at

0:52:050:52:09

what you are being paid at the same

time as you are in a job as a male.

0:52:090:52:14

We need to work towards a culture

where there is more transparency

0:52:140:52:18

about how much you are being paid at

work.

So employees simply talk to

0:52:180:52:24

each other?

Yes, at the moment you

can only ask a male employee about

0:52:240:52:29

your pay if you believe you are

discriminated against on the grounds

0:52:290:52:32

of your six. It is not as if you can

have a culture where you are openly

0:52:320:52:38

discussing your pay.

You smile that

that when Doreen suggested that. ?

0:52:380:52:46

Don't think it is just about

employees talking to each other.

0:52:460:52:52

Employees -- employers have

responsibility to be more

0:52:520:52:55

transparent not only about what

individuals are paid but why they

0:52:550:52:58

are paid what they are paid, what

the rate is for the job. What is it

0:52:580:53:04

that makes somebody worth more than

another? These are very difficult

0:53:040:53:07

questions.

They are. It is very

subjective.

It is. That is one of

0:53:070:53:15

the unfairness is. Because generally

speaking people believe when they

0:53:150:53:21

work for an employer that they will

be treated fairly and it won't be

0:53:210:53:25

completely subjective.

0:53:250:53:30

completely subjective. One of the

problems with equal pay is the

0:53:300:53:34

pressure and force of the market.

The market is not fair.

Professor,

0:53:340:53:40

briefly tell's the outcome for your

case -- Mike Towell us. And I would

0:53:400:53:47

ask you for your advice to others.

I

would also add that fairness is not

0:53:470:53:58

what the employment tribunal deals

with. The employment tribunal deals

0:53:580:54:01

with law and equal pay. One of the

first things the judge said in my

0:54:010:54:08

tribunal, if you want to argue about

fair pay, this is not the place to

0:54:080:54:11

do it.

You wanted to argue about

equal pay, didn't you?

Yes. But what

0:54:110:54:19

I was really after was a transparent

system. The situation, when I went

0:54:190:54:28

to the tribunal, was there were no

criteria whatsoever to indicate why

0:54:280:54:34

anyone might get a pay rise. Of

course what was happening was people

0:54:340:54:38

who felt more confident about what

they were doing, they were stating

0:54:380:54:44

pay rises in confident terms and

indeed securing pay rises, whereas

0:54:440:54:51

other people, who tended to be

women, not exclusively, were not

0:54:510:54:54

doing that. So actually getting the

judge to say there needs to be

0:54:540:55:02

transparent criteria for pay, that

is what I was going to the tribunal

0:55:020:55:05

for.

And he said that?

O yeah, he

said it loud and clear in my

0:55:050:55:15

judgment.

Was it worth it?

It was

worth it but it was an extraordinary

0:55:150:55:21

journey. Personally I found it quite

empowering. I found that at the end

0:55:210:55:25

I felt more confident about the

value I was delivering. But I would

0:55:250:55:31

say that if you are going to even

think about going to the employment

0:55:310:55:36

tribunal, you need to think like a

lawyer. You may be very upset but

0:55:360:55:41

you have to think like you are

playing chess, you have to construct

0:55:410:55:46

a case, documented, get evidence,

produce an argument, ask questions

0:55:460:55:49

of people around informally... What

do you get paid? Asked over coffee,

0:55:490:55:58

if you can. Very difficult to do in

our culture. And you have to be

0:55:580:56:03

absolutely tenacious. One of my

friends, who is a lawyer, said the

0:56:030:56:08

whole system expects you to give up.

If you haven't given up they were

0:56:080:56:13

probably offer you a settlement the

day beef your -- before the tribunal

0:56:130:56:17

starts. The important piece of

advice he gave me was, do not take

0:56:170:56:22

it personally. It is like a chess

game.

Thank you very much.

0:56:220:56:31

Thank you all. We will bring you the

latest news and sport in a moment.

0:56:310:56:42

YouTube vlogger Logan Paul as had

his channels downgraded by YouTube.

0:56:450:56:56

He was on a trip to Japan. He and

his friends were at the base of

0:56:560:57:01

Mount Fuji, where people are known

to take their own lives. As part of

0:57:010:57:05

a video he was blogging, you showed

a video of somebody who had

0:57:050:57:10

apparently taken their own life. He

said later on that it was to raise

0:57:100:57:14

awareness for suicide and suicide

prevention. But in the video it

0:57:140:57:18

shows in joking and looking shocked.

The video stayed up for quite a

0:57:180:57:23

while and got millions of views.

YouTube didn't actually take it

0:57:230:57:27

down. It was Logan Paul who took it

down after much criticism from the

0:57:270:57:35

YouTube and vlogger community. Now

YouTube have come out and said they

0:57:350:57:39

will no longer effectively promote

his work on what they call their

0:57:390:57:45

Google Preferred programme, where

brands target big stars with

0:57:450:57:50

advertising. His channel is still

up. He has still got millions of

0:57:500:57:55

subscribers. And since that video

was posted he gained more than

0:57:550:58:00

80,000 more subscribers. Technically

speaking because the video is still

0:58:000:58:04

up, he can still make money from

advertising, just not as much.

0:58:040:58:09

YouTube have said they will no

longer allow him to have him appear

0:58:090:58:12

in a show and his originals, which

include a sequel to one of his

0:58:120:58:19

films, will not be happening any

more. Yes, Logan Paul has been

0:58:190:58:25

reprimanded by YouTube but YouTube

has gotten criticism because it has

0:58:250:58:29

taken effectively between nine and

11 days since this happened for them

0:58:290:58:32

to respond.

Thank you. You may remember we spoke

0:58:320:58:38

to Dan before Christmas. He is a

phenomenally successful star on

0:58:380:58:42

YouTube. He owns a lot of money from

it. He said we have a responsibility

0:58:420:58:49

to our young audiences.

Now

0:58:490:58:51

to our young audiences.

Now the weather. Good morning. We

0:58:510:58:55

have seen quite a lot of fog around

this morning. As you can see from

0:58:550:58:58

one of our Weather Watchers, it has

been across parts of the West,

0:58:580:59:04

Central England and eastern areas as

well. But not everywhere. Look at

0:59:040:59:08

this lovely Sunrise in East Sussex.

The fog is already starting to lift.

0:59:080:59:13

We have some around Glasgow,

Northern Ireland, pockets of

0:59:130:59:21

north-west England, Wales and the

south-west of England. As the rises

0:59:210:59:24

it will lift into low cloud and

eventually it will break and we will

0:59:240:59:27

see some sunshine. In the east, more

cloud, we have got some patchy rain

0:59:270:59:33

and drizzle. This afternoon across

south-west England, we are looking

0:59:330:59:37

at sunny spells. A similar story

across Wales. You may find some fog

0:59:370:59:44

as you will across Northern Ireland.

If that happens, that will peg the

0:59:440:59:50

temperatures back to close to

freezing. In north-west Scotland, a

0:59:500:59:55

sunny day ahead. In the east, a bit

more cloud. The fog will lift from

0:59:551:00:00

the Central lowlands and south-west.

It should also lived in north-west

1:00:001:00:04

England. Dundee East of thing than

through the Midlands, there will be

1:00:041:00:07

more cloud. -- down the East of

England. Low cloud and drizzle

1:00:071:00:13

lifting into low cloud. This evening

and overnight but you will find is

1:00:131:00:18

we will hang on to the cloud. More

will form. Patchy fog forming

1:00:181:00:23

tonight. Not quite as widespread as

the night just gone. Where there are

1:00:231:00:28

breaks in the cloud, it will be cold

enough for a frost. Those are the

1:00:281:00:32

temperatures in towns and cities.

Lower in rural areas. A cold and

1:00:321:00:37

frosty start for some tomorrow. The

fog lifting into low cloud. Tomorrow

1:00:371:00:42

will be a cloudy day again with a

spot of drizzle. We will see some

1:00:421:00:47

brighter breaks, more notably in the

north of Scotland, parts of Wales,

1:00:471:00:51

Cornwall, Dorset and Hampshire. For

a Saturday, we have a weather front

1:00:511:00:57

coming in from the worst that will

introduce some rain and

1:00:571:01:01

strengthening winds. The further

east you travel, the try and the

1:01:011:01:05

brighter the weather is likely to

be. As we head into Sunday, there

1:01:051:01:09

will be dry and bright weather

around. The weather front producing

1:01:091:01:14

cloud in parts of western England

and Wales. A new, more active system

1:01:141:01:20

from the north-west later in the day

will introduce wetter and windy

1:01:201:01:22

weather.

1:01:221:01:29

Hello, it's Thursday, it's ten

o'clock, I'm Victoria Derbyshire.

1:01:301:01:32

Our top story this morning -

One of the strongest warnings yet

1:01:321:01:35

about the NHS in England.

1:01:351:01:38

This time hospital bosses say

services are at breaking point

1:01:381:01:40

and that the Government

must spend more.

1:01:401:01:46

85% of patients was seen in four

hours, well below the target.

The

1:01:461:01:56

NHS is seven years into a massively

austere decade, the worst in its

1:01:571:02:02

history, and we cannot go on like

this.

The details from our

1:02:021:02:07

correspondent shortly. And we want

to hear from you about your

1:02:071:02:10

experiences if you have been in

hospital, or a family member has.

1:02:101:02:18

Also today, Theresa May wants to

eliminate plastic from supermarkets,

1:02:181:02:23

including, among other things,

plastic free aisles in supermarkets.

1:02:231:02:30

In 25 years' time

I will be 75, we

can't wait to 25 years to tackle

1:02:301:02:36

this tide of plastic waste.

1:02:361:02:39

And we'll hear the story

of the twin sisters from Syria

1:02:391:02:41

who were burnt when a shell

hit their home six years ago.

1:02:411:02:44

The conflict in their country has

now being going on for eight years.

1:02:441:02:52

Good morning.

1:02:531:02:55

Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom

with a summary of today's news.

1:02:551:03:01

Thank you, Victoria, good morning.

Hospitals are in need of long-term

1:03:011:03:08

funding according to health bosses,

a warning made by NHS Providers. In

1:03:081:03:15

the last few minutes, figures have

revealed weights in accident and

1:03:151:03:18

emergency in England during December

were the worst since the target was

1:03:181:03:23

introduced in 2004. The Department

of Health and Social Care says the

1:03:231:03:27

NHS was given top priority in the

last Budget but acknowledged there

1:03:271:03:30

was pressure. The Prime Minister has

set out plans to tackle, or is

1:03:301:03:36

setting out plans to tackle plastic

pollution by wiping out all

1:03:361:03:39

avoidable waste by 2042. The

proposals include asking every

1:03:391:03:43

supermarket to have an aisle of

goods with no plastic wrappings, as

1:03:431:03:49

well as extending the charge for

carrier bags to all retailers in

1:03:491:03:53

England. Environmentalists have

called the plan is worthless unless

1:03:531:03:55

they are written into law.

1:03:551:03:57

A woman whose father has been

missing for years has been

1:03:571:03:59

charged with murder after a body

was discovered in the garden

1:03:591:04:02

of her home in Stockport.

1:04:021:04:03

Barbara Coombes' father has been

missing for more than a decade.

1:04:031:04:06

The 63-year-old has also been

charged with preventing

1:04:061:04:08

a lawful burial and fraud.

1:04:081:04:09

During their investigation police

officers have told neighbours

1:04:091:04:11

that Mr Coombes' would have been

in his 80s

1:04:111:04:13

when he disappeared in 2005.

1:04:131:04:18

Rescue teams in southern

California are searching

1:04:181:04:20

for survivors of the mudslides

that swept away homes

1:04:201:04:24

in the town of Montecito.

1:04:241:04:28

17 people are known to have died

in Santa Barbara County,

1:04:281:04:32

and more than 20 others

are still unaccounted for.

1:04:321:04:36

Many places remain inaccessible,

1:04:361:04:37

and more than 100 homes

have been destroyed.

1:04:371:04:39

That's a summary of the latest

BBC News, more at 10:30.

1:04:391:04:46

We will talk about those figures

that Annita was reporting from A&E

1:04:461:04:51

units in hospitals in England from

December, more in a moment, your

1:04:511:04:56

experiences are very welcome. Sport

now with Jessica.

1:04:561:05:02

The draw for the Australian Open,

which starts next week,

1:05:021:05:04

has been made in the last hour.

1:05:041:05:06

British number one Johanna Konta,

who reached the semifinals

1:05:061:05:08

of the tournament two years ago,

will play the American Madison

1:05:081:05:11

Brengle in the opening round.

1:05:111:05:12

Brengle is ranked number 92

in the world but has won three

1:05:121:05:15

of their four previous meetings

against the world number nine.

1:05:151:05:17

British number two

Heather Watson

1:05:171:05:18

will face Kazakhstan's

Yulia Putintseva.

1:05:181:05:26

In the men's draw, Kyle Edmund

is the only British representative

1:05:471:05:50

following Andy Murray's pulling out

as he's recovering from hip surgery.

1:05:501:05:55

He's been handed a tough opening

match, though, in Melbourne.

1:05:551:05:59

He'll have to get past 11th seed

and US Open finalist Kevin Anderson.

1:05:591:06:03

Other highlights in the men's draw

include top seed Rafael Nadal

1:06:031:06:07

up against Dominican world

number 81 Victor Estrella Burgos.

1:06:071:06:10

Swiss five-time champion

Roger Federer will open his title

1:06:101:06:13

defence against Slovenia's former

British player Aljaz Bedene.

1:06:131:06:18

Six-time champion

Novak Djokovic will open

1:06:181:06:21

against American Donald Young.

1:06:211:06:29

It was honours even

at Stamford Bridge as Chelsea

1:06:291:06:32

took on Arsenal in the first leg

of EFL Cup semifinal.

1:06:321:06:35

The video assistant referee

was consulted on two occassions.

1:06:351:06:37

Here's one of them.

1:06:371:06:41

Arsenal's Danny Welbeck challenged

Cesc Fabregas in the penalty area

1:06:411:06:43

in the closing minutes.

1:06:431:06:45

But the referee was happy

with his originial decision

1:06:451:06:47

not to award Chelsea a penalty.

1:06:471:06:50

Some fans have expressed

frustration at how long

1:06:501:06:51

the VAR decision process takes,

1:06:511:06:54

but Blues boss Antonio Conte said

the system is "very positive".

1:06:541:06:59

James Vince and Mark Stoneman have

kept their places in England's Test

1:06:591:07:02

squad for the tour of New Zealand,

despite their batting struggles

1:07:021:07:05

in the recent 4-0 Ashes

defeat by Australia.

1:07:051:07:10

Lancashire batsman Liam Livingstone

receives his first Test call-up,

1:07:101:07:14

with the 24-year-old having

impressed for England's B

1:07:141:07:16

team over the winter.

1:07:161:07:18

Fast bowler Mark Woods is also back

in the squad after injury,

1:07:181:07:21

but Gary Ballance has been dropped.

1:07:211:07:23

After almost two years out

of the ring,

1:07:231:07:26

former world light-welterweight

champion Amir Khan

1:07:261:07:28

says he's ready

to make a comeback.

1:07:281:07:31

His opponent will be named

next week,

1:07:311:07:35

for the fight

at Liverpool's Echo Arena in April.

1:07:351:07:41

Khan's last fight was in May 2016,

where he was knocked out

1:07:411:07:44

by Mexico's Saul Alvarez.

1:07:441:07:45

He's signed a three-fight deal

with Eddie Hearn's Matchroom stable,

1:07:451:07:49

which seems to increase

the likelihood of

1:07:491:07:50

a British super-fight between Khan

and his long-term rival Kell Brook,

1:07:501:07:53

possibly later in the year.

1:07:531:08:01

Something to look forward to in the

coming months. That is all the sport

1:08:011:08:05

for now. Thank you. Back to those

figures just out in the last few

1:08:051:08:09

minutes that show that waiting times

in A&E departments in December in

1:08:091:08:13

England were the worst since the

target was introduced in 2004. Our

1:08:131:08:18

health correspondent Catherine burns

can tell us more.

When you go to

1:08:181:08:23

A&E, the target is 95% of people

should be seen with in four hours,

1:08:231:08:27

that definitely didn't happen last

month, only 85.1% of people were

1:08:271:08:33

found in that time, and that adds up

to about 300,000 patients waiting

1:08:331:08:36

for longer than they should have

done.

Four hours is the target.

And

1:08:361:08:44

we have weekly statistics from last

week, when more than 20 hospital

1:08:441:08:48

trusts were on the highest level of

alert, so we have some figures to

1:08:481:08:52

show how they did. Two interesting

things, one was norovirus, there was

1:08:521:08:57

a spike in the number of beds being

closed due to norovirus, and the

1:08:571:09:01

other thing was bed occupancy

generally. Ideally, the NHS ones 85%

1:09:011:09:07

bed occupancy rates, last week it

95%, up from 91.7%.

Any stories from

1:09:071:09:19

you about your experiences of being

in hospital, Maria said, my

1:09:191:09:22

12-year-old daughter has a long-term

illness and often needs to attend

1:09:221:09:27

A&E as an emergency case. On

Christmas Day she was admitted, and

1:09:271:09:30

there were so many patients on

trolleys just waiting. There was

1:09:301:09:34

even a queue to get into

resuscitation. Staff were run off

1:09:341:09:39

their feet. Fortunately, we were

taken to the children's ward. The

1:09:391:09:43

staff there went out of their way to

try to make the day special. Let's

1:09:431:09:48

talk to Norman, who is at

Westminster. These figures, the

1:09:481:09:54

stories are putting even more

pressure on the Government, aren't

1:09:541:09:56

they?

Huge pressure, Vic, I am in a

rather more rural setting than

1:09:561:10:03

Westminster, because the PM is doing

a speech on the environment today,

1:10:031:10:07

but she will be asked about these

figures, and the timing could hardly

1:10:071:10:12

be worse, frankly, because yesterday

in the Commons she was saying that

1:10:121:10:15

the NHS was better prepared than

ever before and that the delayed

1:10:151:10:21

operations was all part of the plan.

Now we have got the guy who

1:10:211:10:26

basically represents all of the NHS

trusts, all of the NHS hospitals,

1:10:261:10:32

saying things cannot go on like

this, we have reached a watershed

1:10:321:10:35

moment, we have not got enough

staff, beds or money, and we can't

1:10:351:10:39

just push it down the road, we need

answers now, we need more cash in

1:10:391:10:44

the November Budget. When you put

all that together, that is beginning

1:10:441:10:51

to put real pressure on Mrs May,

because the accusation will be that

1:10:511:10:55

maybe she has taken her I off the

ball with Brexit, there is an

1:10:551:10:58

element of complacency. Speaking to

those close to Jeremy Hunt, their

1:10:581:11:04

take is that the NHS is getting more

cash next year, I think it is

1:11:041:11:09

getting about 1.7 billion more next

year, but even Mr Hunt accepts there

1:11:091:11:18

has to be a rethink about the NHS,

he has talked about a ten-year plan,

1:11:181:11:21

and there is a growing view that

everyone needs to think seriously

1:11:211:11:26

about how, in the long term, will go

to fund the NHS, given that we are

1:11:261:11:32

an increasingly ageing population

that cannot carry on in this sort of

1:11:321:11:36

piecemeal fashion.

Thank you very

much Norman, sorry, you obviously

1:11:361:11:41

there May's speech, which we will

bring to you live. Norman mentioned

1:11:411:11:45

Chris Hopson from NHS Providers, he

has been explaining how the

1:11:451:11:49

situation is affecting patients.

1:11:491:11:54

The NHS can no longer deliver

the standards of care

1:11:541:11:56

in the constitution,

so we have an important

1:11:561:11:59

decision to make -

do we abandon those standards,

1:11:591:12:01

which were incredibly hard

fought to gain those

1:12:011:12:03

standards in the 2000s,

or do we make decisions

1:12:031:12:05

on the long-term funding of the NHS

and social care to ensure

1:12:051:12:09

it has enough money to meet

those standards?

1:12:091:12:13

We need the Government to make those

decisions this year,

1:12:131:12:16

by the time of the Budget

at the latest.

1:12:161:12:20

For the first time ever last,

the NHS missed all of the key

1:12:201:12:26

standards on A&E, elective surgery,

ambulance waiting times,

1:12:261:12:28

cancer waiting times.

1:12:281:12:31

We set a new trajectory

to recover the A&E standard,

1:12:311:12:34

which we will now miss.

1:12:341:12:36

We have reached the point

where the NHS cannot meet

1:12:361:12:39

the standards of care

that we would all of us,

1:12:391:12:43

ministers included, want to provide.

1:12:431:12:47

Dr Tom Dolphin is an anesthetist

at a London hospital.

1:12:471:12:50

He's also a Labour member.

1:12:501:12:58

Of the latest figures show that

targets were missed in December, NHS

1:13:001:13:04

Providers saying this is a watershed

moment, do you agree?

It certainly

1:13:041:13:09

looks like it, it looks like it in

the figures and if you go to any A&E

1:13:091:13:14

in any hospital, people everywhere,

in cubicles, on chairs, they are

1:13:141:13:19

queueing up, they are being treated

in car parks around the country. It

1:13:191:13:23

feels like this is the worst it has

ever been.

Is there a mismatch

1:13:231:13:27

between what the NHS is expected to

deliver with the money it has got,

1:13:271:13:32

with the workforce available, and

what it is getting in in money?

1:13:321:13:39

Definitely. We have been told we are

supposed to be saving £20 billion

1:13:391:13:42

over the next couple of years from

the budget each year, and at the

1:13:421:13:46

same time we see more demand from

patients, who need to be treated,

1:13:461:13:50

and the funding does not match that

at all. We have also got gaps in

1:13:501:13:53

rotors across the country, 40,000

nursing places, 10,000 doctor places

1:13:531:14:00

unfilled. You cannot provide a

service that patients need

1:14:001:14:08

service that patients need with that

kind of gap.

What was Christmas

1:14:081:14:10

like?

It was horrendously busy.

Busier than this time last year or

1:14:101:14:13

the year before?

It certainly felt

like it. It got to the point where

1:14:131:14:18

you almost couldn't boot in A&E with

people waiting everywhere, trying to

1:14:181:14:21

get through with a trolley with a

sick patient, and you cap to keep

1:14:211:14:25

asking people to move to get through

with emergencies.

If there was a

1:14:251:14:30

major incident, how would your

hospital have coped?

We have managed

1:14:301:14:33

to cope so far, every hospital has,

by the extraordinary hard work that

1:14:331:14:38

NHS staff are putting in. They are

pulling out., moving patients to

1:14:381:14:44

extraordinary places, and some are

being left to sleep on floors,

1:14:441:14:48

cupboards are being turned into

rooms, that kind of thing. I am not

1:14:481:14:52

sure what the plans are to deal with

if there were a major incident. I

1:14:521:14:56

expect somehow we would cope, but I

do not know a family times we can

1:14:561:14:59

keep doing it before something

terrible happens.

Terrible meaning?

1:14:591:15:03

That we cannot provide the care all

need.

1:15:031:15:10

Philip is a disabled person with a

severe lung disorder. He recently

1:15:101:15:13

had a fall at home and spent two

hours on the floor. He called the

1:15:131:15:18

ambulance service and they said it

would take a few hours to get to

1:15:181:15:22

him. When he got to hospital he

waited 11 hours in a wheelchair with

1:15:221:15:27

a dislocated elbow, in pain and

suffering from a chest infection. It

1:15:271:15:32

was not until 11 o'clock the next

day when they got around to treating

1:15:321:15:35

him. He was left with people around

him coughing and sneezing.

That

1:15:351:15:42

sounds like the kind of pressures I

have been seeing and hearing. It is

1:15:421:15:47

a whole system problem. The A&E is

full, the rest of the hospital is

1:15:471:15:54

full. Community services are not

fair. General practices on its

1:15:541:15:57

knees. There are not enough GPs any

more. The whole system is congested

1:15:571:16:02

and grinding to a halt.

The

Department of Health say they have

1:16:021:16:08

put extra funding in, 350 billion

before Christmas. There is 1.6

1:16:081:16:12

billion coming down the track. They

have plans to increase Doctor

1:16:121:16:17

places.

That will be great for 2025

when they start work as doctors. But

1:16:171:16:23

we need them now. We need more

funding.

Where would you get the

1:16:231:16:29

doctors from, even if there was more

funding?

A lot of the hospitals are

1:16:291:16:34

struggling to staff what they have

got to pay for the staff they need

1:16:341:16:37

to have. There are staff available

out there. There needs to be a

1:16:371:16:47

longer term solution. In the

short-term hospitals are doing what

1:16:471:16:50

they can. There are bringing in

extra staff when they're available.

1:16:501:16:55

People are working where more shifts

than it is safe for them to do. They

1:16:551:16:59

are being asked to do shift after

shift.

Have you had to do that?

Yes.

1:16:591:17:05

There are lots of gaps in road. The

shift are limited in length but it

1:17:051:17:12

is more to do with the number of

them.

1:17:121:17:23

Still to come...

1:17:271:17:28

The story of the two young Syrian

girls, Rahaf and Qamar,

1:17:281:17:33

who've both been caught up

in the conflict which has

1:17:331:17:35

engulfed their country for eight

years.

1:17:351:17:43

Let's talk more about the Prime

Minister speech in the next quarter

1:17:431:17:46

of an hour.

1:17:461:17:47

The Prime Minister is

about to reveal plans

1:17:471:17:49

for how her government aims to,

and this is her quote,

1:17:491:17:52

"leave the environment in a better

position than they found it."

1:17:521:17:54

We will bring you that speech live.

There have been a lot of people

1:17:541:17:58

welcoming it but there has been a

lot of criticism of recent

1:17:581:18:03

Conservative governments for

breaking promises on environmental

1:18:031:18:05

policy.

1:18:051:18:09

But today Theresa May

will outline her 25-year plan

1:18:091:18:11

for a "cleaner, greener Britain".

1:18:111:18:12

Much of it will revolve

around plastics,

1:18:121:18:14

something we've covered

on the programme a number of times -

1:18:141:18:16

with a pledge to eliminate

all avoidable plastic waste by 2042.

1:18:161:18:23

Your definition of that welcome.

1:18:231:18:24

She wants Britain to be a beacon

for the developing world.

1:18:241:18:27

But can a shift in UK policy,

actually affect global change?

1:18:271:18:30

Let's talk to Lang

Banks, a campaigner

1:18:301:18:32

for the World Wide Fund for Nature.

1:18:321:18:34

He lobbies international governments

on environmental issues.

1:18:341:18:40

And Dr Alison Doig is

Christian Aid's head of policy.

1:18:401:18:43

She specialises in climate change.

1:18:431:18:48

Welcome to both of you. There is one

definite in this plan, extending

1:18:481:18:54

that 5p charge on plastic bags to

small shops. The other plans are

1:18:541:18:59

simply plans for a consultation. How

is that going to be good for the

1:18:591:19:03

environment when you look across the

world?

I think it is true to say

1:19:031:19:07

that those plans need to be firmed

up and we need to see more detail.

1:19:071:19:11

We are looking forward to that

speech. From what we have heard so

1:19:111:19:17

far, the UK wishes to play a

leadership role globally. That is

1:19:171:19:21

welcome. The UK has played a big

role historically when it comes to

1:19:211:19:25

climate change, illegal wildlife

trade, the poaching of elephants and

1:19:251:19:30

rhinos and tackling the ozone layer.

If the UK is to put its foot forward

1:19:301:19:35

once more and leave the world

issues, that is a good thing. Put

1:19:351:19:40

your own house in order first. That

is why what happens in the UK in the

1:19:401:19:45

25 year plan is critical and that it

gets delivered.

Mrs May will talk

1:19:451:19:50

about using the foreign aid budget

to help the performance of

1:19:501:19:54

developing countries. What do you

think about the use of that money?

1:19:541:19:57

Is it a good use?

It could be a very

good use of that money. If it is

1:19:571:20:03

used to put a ban on waste and a big

stick to hit people with, that would

1:20:031:20:08

not be good. It would not be a

sustainable solution. It is not a

1:20:081:20:13

question of saving the environment

and delivering development. Both of

1:20:131:20:16

those can be done effectively

together. An example I would use, I

1:20:161:20:21

worked a lot in delivering renewable

energy is to poor people off the

1:20:211:20:23

grid. Imagine having -- having no

lighting, using a wood stove every

1:20:231:20:29

day to cook? We worked with the

woman in that household to develop

1:20:291:20:35

the solution. We worked with

manufacturers in that country to

1:20:351:20:38

build the technologies they were

using, and with entrepreneurs to

1:20:381:20:40

make markets work.

1:20:401:20:45

make markets work. Similarly with

plastics, working to developing

1:20:481:20:50

solutions with the country and to

develop good green jobs, and an

1:20:501:20:55

environmental solution working

together is where it should be used.

1:20:551:20:59

If it is used well, I think it can

be a very good part of overseas

1:20:591:21:04

development.

OK. There will be

people watching now saying, let's

1:21:041:21:09

say all the things that Mrs May

promises actually come to pass in

1:21:091:21:13

this plan, it is a tiny dent in the

plastics problem when you look at

1:21:131:21:20

the problem globally. What do you

say to people who feel cynical?

1:21:201:21:24

Don't. You have to start somewhere.

There are 8 million tonnes of

1:21:241:21:30

plastic waste that end up NICs every

year. It is a global issue. That is

1:21:301:21:37

why countries like the UK need to

step and coordinate action locally

1:21:371:21:42

and globally. Tackling climate

change is an issue that needs

1:21:421:21:48

tackling by every country.

You say

every country but we have President

1:21:481:21:55

Trump rejecting the idea of climate

change.

The Paris agreement is

1:21:551:22:01

bigger than one country, bigger than

one president. The interesting thing

1:22:011:22:04

in the US is that many states,

companies, mayors are stepping up to

1:22:041:22:12

take the action needed.

President

Trump is isolating himself. Every

1:22:121:22:17

single country are joined up to the

Paris agreement. We -- within the US

1:22:171:22:26

there are companies, states and

cities holding to Paris. He is

1:22:261:22:32

increasingly marginalised. This is

where the UK can step in and step up

1:22:321:22:36

their leadership. And say, actually

Paris is good. To deliver a safe

1:22:361:22:41

climate we need to go a step

further. There is an opportunity for

1:22:411:22:47

countries to do more. The UK can

lead that discussion and support

1:22:471:22:51

poorer countries to step up. We

actually launched with Canada, the

1:22:511:23:00

UK, the power in past coal

initiative. That means countries

1:23:001:23:06

will give up coal by 2025. They are

helping developing countries do the

1:23:061:23:12

same. That is where the UK can be a

positive force, play that bigger

1:23:121:23:20

role globally.

Eid imported food, of

course, and we buy imported clothes.

1:23:201:23:25

How can our government forced the

people who grow those products in

1:23:251:23:30

the developing world, how can they

persuade them to do it in an

1:23:301:23:39

environmentally friendly way?

It is

an important point. We understand

1:23:391:23:44

the speech will contain an ambition

to be a global leader and make sure

1:23:441:23:47

it is not just the UK's backyard we

are protecting. It is really

1:23:471:23:51

important. The vast majority of the

commodities we use on a daily basis

1:23:511:23:58

are imported from other countries.

We must make sure that they are not

1:23:581:24:02

just exporting their environmental

damage, whether it is cotton, palm

1:24:021:24:09

oil etc, 50% of the fish on our

supermarket shelves comes from

1:24:091:24:12

outside the UK, yes, we must compel

businesses to make sure that they

1:24:121:24:17

are only taking sustainable

commodities. But they also must help

1:24:171:24:21

the countries and work with farmers

to make sure they can do this in a

1:24:211:24:25

sustainable way. I think it is

critical that we in the UK don't

1:24:251:24:28

simply sit here and say we will make

the UK and oasis of environment when

1:24:281:24:34

the rest of the world is going to

hell in a handcart. We are all

1:24:341:24:38

heading in the wrong direction. That

is why is 25 year plan is important.

1:24:381:24:42

It marks a turning point between

destroying the planet and starting

1:24:421:24:45

to restore the planet.

Thank you for

coming in.

1:24:451:24:56

We will bring you Theresa May's

speech on the environment just after

1:25:001:25:04

10:30am.

1:25:041:25:04

Next, please do watch this

next film about twin

1:25:041:25:07

sisters from Syria caught

up in the conflict

1:25:071:25:09

in their country, which has now

being going on for eight years.

1:25:091:25:13

Six years ago, a shell

hit their home,

1:25:131:25:16

and the pair were badly burned.

1:25:161:25:21

The children's charity Unicef says

that attacks on hospitals and

1:25:211:25:23

other health facilities have become

commonplace in Syria,

1:25:231:25:27

with less than half of the country's

health facilities operating

1:25:271:25:29

at full capacity.

1:25:291:25:32

They're struggling to

cope with the number

1:25:321:25:35

of children seriously injured.

1:25:351:25:36

We've been following the story

of the two young girls,

1:25:361:25:38

Rahaf and Qamar,

who've both undergone

1:25:381:25:42

operations in Jordan.

where they now live.

1:25:421:25:44

Our correspondent Caroline Hawley

has been back to to Jordan

1:25:441:25:47

to see how they're getting on,

1:25:471:25:48

and some of this film is upsetting.

1:25:481:25:55

Six years ago, the two

Syrian sisters' home

1:26:131:26:15

in Homs was hit by a shell.

1:26:151:26:22

They were asleep, and their

bedclothes caught fire.

1:26:221:26:30

Their burns left them so traumatised

they couldn't leave the house.

1:26:381:26:46

Qamar had to wear this mask

to help her skin heal.

1:26:461:26:50

Slowly, they got better.

1:26:501:26:52

Now, they're star students.

1:26:521:27:00

Their parents worry

about their future and the social

1:27:231:27:25

stigma they could face.

1:27:251:27:28

Qamar drew her dream house

for us, and a mosque.

1:27:281:27:34

What do they pray for?

1:27:341:27:40

Rahaf has now been discharged,

but Qamar's still waiting

1:27:551:27:57

for more operations.

1:27:571:28:00

All this from a single shell

fired in Syria's war.

1:28:001:28:08

Nine year old Rahaf and Qamer.

1:28:091:28:16

Let's talk to Caroline Hawley

who reported on that film.

1:28:161:28:20

Incredible girls. You have been

following them for some time. Tell

1:28:201:28:24

us about them?

I first met them

several years ago, the year that

1:28:241:28:30

they were injured. They were injured

six years ago this month when that

1:28:301:28:34

shells slammed into their bedroom.

Their father rushed in to rescue

1:28:341:28:38

them. He was badly burned. They fled

to Jordan. That is where I met them

1:28:381:28:43

first. This incredible hospital run

by MSF, where they do reconstructive

1:28:431:28:51

surgery on the victims of war from

around the Middle East. This project

1:28:511:28:55

started off treating Iraqis and then

it started treating Syrians in

1:28:551:29:00

Yemen. -- and Yemeni. They have come

a long way. Their parents said to me

1:29:001:29:09

the change has been incredible. For

example, they could not feed and

1:29:091:29:13

dress themselves because they had

some knee injuries to their hands.

1:29:131:29:16

They could not move them properly.

Their faces were in a much more

1:29:161:29:22

disfigured state. They have had a

lot of operations. Too many to count

1:29:221:29:26

between them.

What about the other

children in Syria who left injured

1:29:261:29:33

because they are harmed by shells

falling around their homes?

That is

1:29:331:29:38

the reality and the tragedy of

Syria. These bombs, these shells

1:29:381:29:44

don't discriminate. The problem is

no one knows how many people have

1:29:441:29:49

been killed and injured in the

Syrian war. A very conservative

1:29:491:29:54

estimate is at least 4000. 4000 kids

killed. And tens of thousands of

1:29:541:30:00

children injured. Some will have,

many will have a life changing

1:30:001:30:05

injuries. What happens to them? In a

sense they are looking they are

1:30:051:30:13

being treated at the MSF hospital,

where the treatment is free. But as

1:30:131:30:17

you can imagine, with all the wars

waiting -- waiting in the Middle

1:30:171:30:20

East, the waiting list is really

long.

1:30:201:30:27

What are the chances of being able

to be a doctor when she grows up?

1:30:271:30:31

Well, she is very bright, very keen,

she values her schooling because she

1:30:311:30:36

has missed out on so much of it. She

comes from a very supportive family,

1:30:361:30:41

her father believes in education,

but I know from the parents that

1:30:411:30:44

they worry about both girls. Even

though they believe in education, in

1:30:441:30:50

some parts of the Middle East, you

are defined by your marriage, and

1:30:501:30:55

the fear is that their marriage

prospects have been limited by what

1:30:551:30:59

has happened to them. And so one

thing Qamar's mum said to me, she

1:30:591:31:06

was so full of life before this

happened, and she changed a lot. And

1:31:061:31:12

although she is much better, I

really saw a sadness in her eyes,

1:31:121:31:17

and I think, I know that the family

really worry about their future. But

1:31:171:31:23

they are incredible, really brave,

really keen.

It is so upsetting in

1:31:231:31:27

one sense, though. Thank you for

bringing that to our audience, no

1:31:271:31:31

doubt you will continue to follow

them, Caroline Hawley.

1:31:311:31:35

Still to come, this is the scene

live in West London, where Theresa

1:31:351:31:38

May is about to unveil her plans

for the environment, the Government

1:31:381:31:41

say they will eradicate

all avoidable plastic waste by 2042.

1:31:411:31:49

She is due to speak any time now, we

will speak to her when she starts

1:31:501:31:54

talking.

1:31:541:31:54

Time for the latest

news, here's Annita.

1:31:541:31:59

The headlines on BBC News:

1:31:591:32:00

Waiting times at

England's A&E departments

1:32:001:32:02

during December were the longest

since targets were

1:32:021:32:04

introduced in 2004.

1:32:041:32:05

The latest figures coincide

with a warning made by NHS Providers

1:32:051:32:07

that hospitals are unsafe,

overcrowded

1:32:071:32:09

and in need of long term funding.

1:32:091:32:11

The organisation represents

acute hospitals and ambulance

1:32:111:32:13

providers in England.

1:32:131:32:17

The Department of Health

and Social Care says the NHS

1:32:171:32:21

was given top priority

in the last Budget,

1:32:211:32:22

but acknowledged that

services were under pressure.

1:32:221:32:26

The Prime Minister is

about to launch plans

1:32:261:32:28

to tackle plastic pollution

by wiping out all

1:32:281:32:30

avoidable waste by 2042.

1:32:301:32:32

Her proposals will include

asking every supermarket

1:32:321:32:36

to have a plastic-free aisle,

1:32:361:32:37

as well as extending the five pence

charge for carrier bags

1:32:371:32:40

to all retailers in England.

1:32:401:32:41

Environmentalists have called

Theresa May's plans worthless

1:32:411:32:43

unless they're written into law.

1:32:431:32:47

A woman whose father has been

missing for years has been

1:32:471:32:50

charged with murder after a body

was discovered in the garden

1:32:501:32:52

of her home in Stockport.

1:32:521:32:54

Barbara Coombes' father has been

missing for more than a decade.

1:32:541:32:59

The 63-year-old has

also been charged

1:32:591:33:00

with preventing

a lawful burial and fraud.

1:33:001:33:05

During their investigation,

police officers have told neighbours

1:33:051:33:07

that Mr Coombes'

would have been in his 80s

1:33:071:33:10

when he disappeared in 2005.

1:33:101:33:12

Rescue teams in southern

California are searching

1:33:121:33:13

for survivors of the mudslides

that swept away homes in

1:33:131:33:16

the town of Montecito.

1:33:161:33:19

17 people are known to have died

in Santa Barbara County,

1:33:191:33:22

and more than 20 others

are still unaccounted for.

1:33:221:33:24

Many places remain inaccessible,

1:33:241:33:25

and more than 100 homes

have been destroyed.

1:33:251:33:31

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

1:33:311:33:37

Jessica has the sport headlines now.

1:33:371:33:41

The draw for the first Grand Slam of

the year, the Australian Open, has

1:33:411:33:46

taken place.

Johanna Konta will play Madison

1:33:461:33:49

Brengle of the USA in the first

round. Heather Watson plays

1:33:491:33:53

Kazakhstan's Yulia Putintseva. In

the men's draw, no Andy Murray as he

1:33:531:33:58

recovers from hip surgery, so Kyle

Edmund will be the sole British male

1:33:581:34:03

representative, playing US Open

finalist Kevin Anderson, a tough

1:34:031:34:07

match. No goals in the first leg of

the EFL Cup semifinal. Martin

1:34:071:34:13

Atkinson consulted the VAR on two

Chelsea Pitman declaims but was

1:34:131:34:18

satisfied with the evidence not to

award a spot kick. That Chelsea and

1:34:181:34:24

declaims. Until Ian Livingstone has

been called up for the two match

1:34:241:34:31

series against New Zealand next

month.

1:34:311:34:34

Rescue teams in southern

California are searching

1:34:341:34:36

through debris for survivors

of the mudslides that have

1:34:361:34:38

killed at least 17 people.

1:34:381:34:39

It's thought that a similar

number are missing.

1:34:391:34:45

Heavy rain falling on ground burned

by wildfires in December,

1:34:451:34:53

resulted in streams of mud

which have destroyed at least

1:34:531:34:55

100 homes and damaged 300 more.

1:34:551:34:57

The flash floods struck

early on Tuesday morning,

1:34:571:35:00

with the worst affected areas

in Santa Barbara County,

1:35:001:35:03

including the towns

of Montecito and Carpinteria.

1:35:031:35:06

David Neels is the

Fire Brigade Chief

1:35:061:35:08

of Santa Barbara County.

1:35:081:35:09

He said he had never dealt

with anything on this scale before.

1:35:091:35:12

I've been a firefighter

for 26 years.

1:35:121:35:13

For most people that

are here on this incident,

1:35:131:35:16

we've never seen an event like this.

1:35:161:35:19

So this is very unusual,

to have something to this magnitude.

1:35:191:35:23

Kelsey McFarland, is a reporter with

KSBY News in California.

1:35:231:35:25

She's on the scene in Montecito.

1:35:251:35:33

So the latest from officials today,

they said that the death toll has

1:35:371:35:43

risen to 17, and seven people are

still reported missing. That being

1:35:431:35:47

said, they have made hundreds of

rescues, the devastation is

1:35:471:35:55

something like I've never seen, and

a lot of first responders that I

1:35:551:35:57

spoke to that have been doing this

for decades, it is unlike anything

1:35:571:36:01

they have ever seen. There are cars

that are completely crumpled,

1:36:011:36:06

boulders the size of houses have

moved down from the mountain and are

1:36:061:36:11

now in the middle-of-the-road, on

the highway. There is marred up to

1:36:111:36:18

my waist in a lot of areas. And this

is an area that is beautiful and has

1:36:181:36:25

mansions of the rich and famous, and

it now looks like a scene from World

1:36:251:36:30

War I, completely devastated

why has

this happened?

Well, just a few

1:36:301:36:40

weeks ago, we were actually

reporting on the Thomas Dyer, the

1:36:401:36:42

largest wildfire in California...

1:36:421:36:49

largest wildfire in California... --

fire.

The Prime Minister is just

1:36:491:36:52

about to speak, there she is.

This

is a true oasis in the heart of

1:36:521:36:57

London. In our election manifesto

last year, we made an important

1:36:571:37:02

pledge to make ours the first

generation to leave the natural

1:37:021:37:05

environment in a better state than

we found it. As we leave the

1:37:051:37:09

European Union, which for decades as

controlled as some of the most

1:37:091:37:14

important levers in environmental

policy, now is the right time to put

1:37:141:37:18

the question of how we protect and

enhance our natural environment

1:37:181:37:22

centre stage. And it is a central

priority for this government - our

1:37:221:37:28

mission is to build a Britain where

the next generation can enjoy a

1:37:281:37:32

better life than the one that went

before it. That means tackling the

1:37:321:37:36

deficit and dealing with our debts,

so they are not a burden for our

1:37:361:37:41

children and grandchildren, building

the houses that people need so the

1:37:411:37:44

dream of home ownership can be a

reality, ensuring every child has a

1:37:441:37:48

good school place and can get the

best start in life, and it also

1:37:481:37:51

means protecting and enhancing our

natural environment for the next

1:37:511:37:56

generation. So they have a healthy

and beautiful country in which to

1:37:561:37:59

build their lives. Making good on

the promise that each new generation

1:37:591:38:04

should be able to build a better

future is a fundamental Conservative

1:38:041:38:10

principle. And whilst every

political tradition has a stake in

1:38:101:38:14

our natural environment, speaking as

the leader of the Conservative

1:38:141:38:17

Party, I know I draw upon a proud

heritage. Because conservatism and

1:38:171:38:23

conservation are natural allies. The

fundamental understanding which lies

1:38:231:38:28

at the heart of our philosophical

tradition is that we in the present

1:38:281:38:34

our trustees charged with protecting

and improving what we have inherited

1:38:341:38:39

from those who went before us, and

it is our responsibility to pass on

1:38:391:38:44

that inheritance to the next

generation. That applies to the

1:38:441:38:49

great national institutions which we

have built up as a society over

1:38:491:38:52

generations, like our courts, our

parliament, the BBC and the NHS, and

1:38:521:38:57

it applies equally to our natural

heritage. Britain has always been a

1:38:571:39:04

world leader in understanding and

protecting the natural world. From

1:39:041:39:10

Gilbert white's vivid descriptions

of the ecology of his Hampshire

1:39:101:39:13

village in the first work of natural

history writing in the 18th century

1:39:131:39:16

to Sir David Attenborough landmark

TV series in the 21st century, which

1:39:161:39:22

have opened the eyes of millions of

people to the wonder of our planet

1:39:221:39:26

and the threats it faces. The appeal

of our natural world is universal

1:39:261:39:31

and has caught the imagination of

successive generations. In the

1:39:311:39:36

United Kingdom, we are blessed with

an abundance and a variety of

1:39:361:39:39

landscapes and habitats. These

natural assets are of immense value.

1:39:391:39:45

Our countryside and coastal waters

are the means by which we sustain

1:39:451:39:49

our existence in these islands. They

are where we grow and harvest a

1:39:491:39:52

large proportion of the food we eat,

where the water we drink comes from.

1:39:521:39:57

Our green and blue places have

inspired some of our greatest

1:39:571:40:02

poetry, art and music, and have

become global cultural icons.

1:40:021:40:07

Shakespeare's Forest of Arden has

been recreated on stages across the

1:40:071:40:11

world, Beatrix potter's stories and

William Wordsworth's poetic

1:40:111:40:15

descriptions of the calm that nature

breeds among the hills has made the

1:40:151:40:20

Lake District world-renowned. He

suffered landscapes of John

1:40:201:40:23

Constable and the beautiful

defections of the River Thames in my

1:40:231:40:26

own constituency by Stanley Spencer

are iconic. People from every

1:40:261:40:32

continent are drawn to our shores to

enjoy these beautiful landscapes,

1:40:321:40:36

supporting hundreds of thousands of

jobs in tourism. Industries which

1:40:361:40:41

directly draw on our environment,

from agriculture and forestry, to

1:40:411:40:47

agriculture and fishing, support

hundreds of thousands of jobs and

1:40:471:40:49

contribute billions to our economy.

The natural environment is around us

1:40:491:40:54

wherever we are and getting closer

to it is good for our physical and

1:40:541:40:58

mental health and our emotional and

spiritual well-being. Millions of us

1:40:581:41:05

visit the countryside, the seaside,

a local park or places like this

1:41:051:41:09

every week to recharge our

batteries, spend time with friends

1:41:091:41:13

and family, and to exercise. So the

environment is something personal to

1:41:131:41:17

each of us, but it is also something

which, collectively, we hold in

1:41:171:41:21

trust for the next generation. And

we have sponsored the attack and

1:41:211:41:26

enhance it. -- we have a

responsibility to protect and

1:41:261:41:31

enhance it. It is sometimes thought

that a belief in a free-market

1:41:311:41:36

economy is not compatible with

taking the action necessary to

1:41:361:41:39

protect and enhance our natural

environment, that we need to give up

1:41:391:41:43

on the very idea of economic growth

itself as the price we have to pay

1:41:431:41:47

for sustainability. Others argue

that taking any action to protect

1:41:471:41:51

and improve our environment harm is

business and hold back growth. Both

1:41:511:41:56

are wrong. They present a false

choice, which I entirely reject. A

1:41:561:42:02

free-market economy, operating under

the right rules, regulations and

1:42:021:42:07

incentives, delivering sustainable

economic growth, is the single

1:42:071:42:10

greatest agent of collective human

progress we have ever known. Time

1:42:101:42:14

and again, it has lifted whole

societies out of abject poverty and

1:42:141:42:20

subsistence living, increased life

expectancy, widened literacy and

1:42:201:42:25

improved educational standards. More

than this, it is in free colonies

1:42:251:42:30

and free society is that the

technological and scientific

1:42:301:42:32

breakthroughs, which improve and

save lives, are made. -- free

1:42:321:42:37

economies. The innovation and

invention of a free enterprise

1:42:371:42:41

economy will help to deliver new

technology to drive a revolution in

1:42:411:42:45

clean growth. Around the world,

economies at all stages of

1:42:451:42:50

development are embracing new low

carbon technologies and a more

1:42:501:42:53

efficient use of resources to move

onto a path of clean and sustainable

1:42:531:42:58

growth. And our industrial strategy

puts harnessing the economic

1:42:581:43:03

potential of the clean growth

revolution at its heart, as one of

1:43:031:43:08

its four grand challenges. From how

we generate power and transport

1:43:081:43:12

people and goods to our industrial

processes, and how we grow our food,

1:43:121:43:17

new, clean technologies have the

potential to deliver more good jobs

1:43:171:43:20

and higher living standards. The UK

is already home to around 500,000

1:43:201:43:27

jobs in low carbon businesses and

their supply chain. We are a world

1:43:271:43:31

leader in the manufacture of

electric vehicles. We are the

1:43:311:43:34

biggest offshore wind energy

producer in the world, and we must

1:43:341:43:38

continue to press for sustainable

economic growth and the immense

1:43:381:43:42

benefits it brings. Now, of course,

for a market to function properly,

1:43:421:43:46

it has to be regulated, and

environmental protection is a vital

1:43:461:43:50

part of any good regulatory regime.

So where government needs to

1:43:501:43:55

intervene to ensure that high

standards are met, we will not

1:43:551:43:59

hesitate to do so. And that the

approach which underpins our

1:43:591:44:03

corporate governance reforms and our

plans to make the energy market work

1:44:031:44:06

better for consumers. Government,

stepping up to its proper role as an

1:44:061:44:13

engaged and active participant, he

finds our industrial strategy, and

1:44:131:44:16

it is the approach we are taking in

this environment plan too. --

1:44:161:44:21

defineds. Together, they combine to

form a coherent approach to boosting

1:44:211:44:26

economic productivity and growth,

while at the same time restoring and

1:44:261:44:31

enhancing our natural environment.

Conservative governments have always

1:44:311:44:36

taken our responsibility to the

natural environment seriously. In

1:44:361:44:41

the 19th century, it was Benjamin

Kayser ale and's Conservative

1:44:411:44:44

government which passed the river

pollution prevention act, providing

1:44:441:44:48

the first legal environmental and

for our waterways. -- Benjamin

1:44:481:44:53

Disraeli. A Conservative government

passed the clean air act, making the

1:44:531:44:56

great smog of London a thing of the

past. Margaret Thatcher was the

1:44:561:45:01

first world leader to recognise the

threat of global warming and helped

1:45:011:45:04

to protect our ozone layers through

their work on the Montreal protocol.

1:45:041:45:09

And David Cameron restored

environmentalism to a central place

1:45:091:45:11

in the Conservative agenda.

1:45:111:45:16

The measures set out in this plan

builds on this proud heritage and

1:45:161:45:20

the action we have taken in office

since 2010. We have seen some

1:45:201:45:27

notable successes. Thanks to

concerted action, our rivers and

1:45:271:45:30

beaches are cleaner than they have

been at any time since the

1:45:301:45:35

Industrial Revolution. Otters are

back in rivers in every English

1:45:351:45:37

county. We are releasing beavers to

the Forest of Dean to help reduce

1:45:371:45:41

the risk of flooding. Action at EU

level, of which the UK has

1:45:411:45:47

consistently been a champion, has

helped to drive these improvements.

1:45:471:45:52

Because we recognise their value, we

will incorporate all existing EU

1:45:521:45:56

environmental regulations into

domestic law when we leave. And let

1:45:561:46:02

me be very clear. Brexit will not

mean a lowering of the environmental

1:46:021:46:05

standards. We will set out our plans

for a new world leading independent

1:46:051:46:11

statutory body to hold government to

account and give the environment a

1:46:111:46:14

voice. And our work will be

underpinned by a strong set of

1:46:141:46:20

environmental principles. We will

consult widely on these proposals,

1:46:201:46:23

not least with many of the people in

this room. But be in no doubt, a

1:46:231:46:29

record shows we have already gone

further than EU regulation requires

1:46:291:46:33

us to protect our environment.

Thanks to action we have taken, 7886

1:46:331:46:41

square miles of coastal waters

around the UK and a Marine

1:46:411:46:45

conservation zones, protecting a

range of important a rare habitats

1:46:451:46:51

and species. Our ban on the use of

micro beads and cut -- in cosmetic

1:46:511:46:56

care products is another positive

step towards protecting the marine

1:46:561:47:01

environment. We want to further

restrict neo- knicker tonight. We

1:47:011:47:07

will use the opportunity Brexit

provides to enhance environmental

1:47:071:47:13

protections, not to weaken them. We

will development -- development of

1:47:131:47:17

new environmental land management

scheme which supports farmers. And

1:47:171:47:21

once we have taken that control of

our waters, we will implement a more

1:47:211:47:25

sustainable fishing policy that also

supports our vital coastal

1:47:251:47:30

communities. That is action for the

future. But we are also acting in

1:47:301:47:35

the here and now. When animals are

mistreated, are common humanity is

1:47:351:47:41

tarnished. We are pursuing policies

to make Britain a world leader in

1:47:411:47:44

tackling the abuse of animals. Here

at home we are introducing Iman

1:47:441:47:49

Baytree CCTV into slaughterhouses to

ensure standards of treatment are

1:47:491:47:55

upheld. -- we are introducing

mandatory. We recognise that animals

1:47:551:48:03

are sentient beings and we will

enshrine that understanding in

1:48:031:48:07

primary legislation. We have

consulted on plans to introduce a

1:48:071:48:10

total ban on UK sales of ivory that

contribute directly or indirectly to

1:48:101:48:15

the continued poaching of elephants.

In 2014, we convened the London

1:48:151:48:20

conference on the illegal wildlife

trade, the first of its kind, to

1:48:201:48:24

help eradicate an abhorrent crime

and to better protect the world's

1:48:241:48:29

most iconic species from the threat

of extinction. In October, we will

1:48:291:48:34

host this conference again and press

for further international action.

1:48:341:48:38

Whether they are pets, livestock or

wild life, animals deserved the

1:48:381:48:42

proper protection under the law and

they will receive that under the

1:48:421:48:49

Conservative government. I am proud

of the progress we have made but

1:48:491:48:51

recognise the challenges we face

remain acute. In England, changes in

1:48:511:48:55

patterns of land use have seen

habitats lost and species

1:48:551:49:00

threatened. Since 1970, there has

been a significant decline in the

1:49:001:49:04

numbers of woodland farm land birds.

Pollinating insects have declined

1:49:041:49:11

13% since 1980. While the water in

rivers and beaches are keener than

1:49:111:49:15

ever before, around the world 8

million tonnes of plastic makes its

1:49:151:49:19

way into the oceans each year. The

problem was vividly highlighted in

1:49:191:49:24

the recent Blue Planet series on the

BBC, which was public service

1:49:241:49:29

broadcasting at its finest. And I

also pay tribute to the Daily Mail

1:49:291:49:33

for its tireless campaigning on this

issue. The 25 year environment plan

1:49:331:49:39

for England, which we are publishing

today, said said the action

1:49:391:49:42

government will take to tackle all

of these challenges. I would like to

1:49:421:49:46

pay tribute to Michael Gove and his

team for their work on it and the

1:49:461:49:50

energy and enthusiasm they have

brought to it. It's goals are

1:49:501:49:55

simple. Clean air, clean and

plentiful water, plants and animals

1:49:551:50:00

which are thriving and a cleaner,

greener country. These are all

1:50:001:50:04

valuable in themselves. But together

they add up to something truly

1:50:041:50:10

profound. A better world for each of

us to live in and a better future

1:50:101:50:14

for the next generation. We have

worked closely with the devolved

1:50:141:50:17

administrations as we have developed

this plan, and we want to work

1:50:171:50:20

closely with them on these issues in

the years ahead. This is a plan for

1:50:201:50:25

the long-term. As our environment

changes, our plan will be updated to

1:50:251:50:29

ensure we are continuing to deliver

on our commitment to deliver healthy

1:50:291:50:33

natural environment. Nothing is more

emblematic of that natural

1:50:331:50:38

environment than our trees. A tree

is a home to countless organisms

1:50:381:50:42

from insects to small mammals, there

are natural air purifiers, their act

1:50:421:50:49

as flood defences. We have committed

to planting more trees. We also

1:50:491:50:56

support increased protections for

England's existing trees and forests

1:50:561:51:00

from inappropriate developments and

invasive pests and diseases. To make

1:51:001:51:04

more land available for the harms

our country needs, while at the same

1:51:041:51:08

time creating new habitats for

wildlife, we will embed the

1:51:081:51:13

principle of net environmental gain

for development, including housing

1:51:131:51:16

and infrastructure. And as we pursue

our Northern Powerhouse, connecting

1:51:161:51:21

the great cities of the North of

England to promote their economic

1:51:211:51:25

growth, we will also create a new

Northern Forest. It will be a new

1:51:251:51:31

committee woodland for Cheshire,

Yorkshire and Lancashire, provide a

1:51:311:51:35

new and enduring amenity for the

population of the North of England,

1:51:351:51:39

and act as a carbon sink for the UK.

Decades from now children as yet

1:51:391:51:44

unborn will be exploring this

forest, playing under the shade of

1:51:441:51:48

its trees, and learning about our

natural world from its flora and

1:51:481:51:51

fauna. But today, more than one in

ten young people do not spend time

1:51:511:51:59

in the countryside or in large urban

green spaces, meaning they are

1:51:591:52:02

denied the benefits which spending

time outdoors in the natural

1:52:021:52:05

environment brings. These young

people are disproportionately from

1:52:051:52:12

more deprived backgrounds and their

effective exclusion from our

1:52:121:52:15

countryside represents a social

injustice which I am determined to

1:52:151:52:17

tackle. The National Park Authority

is already engage directly with more

1:52:171:52:23

than 60,000 young people a year in

school visits, and they will now

1:52:231:52:28

double this figure to ensure even

more young people can learn about

1:52:281:52:32

our most precious environments. I

have seen for myself this morning

1:52:321:52:36

the excitement and enthusiasm of

children here learning about these

1:52:361:52:40

wetlands and the birds that inhabit

them. And to help more children lead

1:52:401:52:45

happy and healthy lives, we will

launch a new nature friendly schools

1:52:451:52:50

programme, targeting schools in

disadvantaged areas first. It will

1:52:501:52:55

create improved school grounds,

which allow young people to learn

1:52:551:52:57

about the natural world. It doesn't

have to be big, difficult or

1:52:571:53:01

expensive. It could be planting a

garden. Growing a vegetable patch.

1:53:011:53:07

Are setting up a bird feeder.

Whatever form it takes, it will put

1:53:071:53:12

nature in the lives of young people,

because everyone deserves to

1:53:121:53:16

experience it first hand. And this

work with schools will be supported

1:53:161:53:19

by £10 million of investment. We

look back in horror at some of the

1:53:191:53:25

damage done to our environment in

the past. And wonder how anyone

1:53:251:53:29

could have thought of that. For

example, dumping toxic chemicals or

1:53:291:53:33

untreated into rivers. How anybody

ever thought that was the right

1:53:331:53:38

thing to do. In years to come I

think people will be shocked at how

1:53:381:53:42

today we allow so much plastic to be

produced needlessly. In the UK

1:53:421:53:47

alone, the amount of single use

plastic wasted every year would fill

1:53:471:53:53

1000 Royal Albert Halls. This

plastic is ingested by dozens of

1:53:531:53:58

species of marine animals, and over

100 species of sea birds, causing

1:53:581:54:03

immense suffering to individual

creatures and degrading vital

1:54:031:54:06

habitats. 1 million birds and over

100,000 other sea mammals and

1:54:061:54:12

turtles die every year from eating

and getting tangled in plastic

1:54:121:54:15

waste. This truly is one of the

great environmental scourges of our

1:54:151:54:20

time. Today I can confirm that the

UK will demonstrate global

1:54:201:54:26

leadership. We must reduce the

demand for plastic. Reduce the

1:54:261:54:32

number of plastics in circulation.

And improve our recycling rates. We

1:54:321:54:36

will take action at every stage of

the production and consumption of

1:54:361:54:39

plastic. As it is produced, we will

encourage manufacturers to take

1:54:391:54:44

responsibility for the impacts of

their products and rationalise the

1:54:441:54:48

number of different plastics they

use. We will drive down the amount

1:54:481:54:55

of plastic in circulation through

reducing demand. Government will

1:54:551:55:00

lead the way by removing all

consumer single use plastic and

1:55:001:55:04

central government offices. And I

want to see other large

1:55:041:55:07

organisations committed to doing the

same. Supermarkets also need to do

1:55:071:55:11

much more to cut down on unnecessary

plastic packaging. So we will work

1:55:111:55:16

with them to explore introducing

plastic free aisles were all the

1:55:161:55:20

food is sold loose. And we will make

it easier for people to recycle

1:55:201:55:25

their plastics, saw less of it ends

up in landfill or water. I want us

1:55:251:55:32

to go a step further. We have seen a

powerful example over the last

1:55:321:55:37

couple of years of the difference

which a relatively simple policy can

1:55:371:55:40

make for our environment. We started

asking shoppers to pay a 5p charge

1:55:401:55:48

for using a plastic bag in 2015. As

a direct consequence we have used 9

1:55:481:55:53

billion fewer of them since the

charge was introduced. This means

1:55:531:55:57

the marine life around the shores of

the UK is safer, our local

1:55:571:56:02

communities are cleaner and fewer

plastic bags are ending up in

1:56:021:56:04

landfill sites. This success should

inspire us. It shows the difference

1:56:041:56:10

we can make. And it demonstrates

that the public is willing to play

1:56:101:56:14

its part to protect the environment.

So to help achieve our goal of

1:56:141:56:20

eliminating all avoidable plastic

waste, we will extend the 5p charge

1:56:201:56:24

to all retailers to further reduce

usage. And next month we will launch

1:56:241:56:29

a call for evidence on taxes and

charges on single use plastics. We

1:56:291:56:35

will also use the UK's International

influence to drive positive change

1:56:351:56:38

around the world. When we host the

Commonwealth Heads of Government

1:56:381:56:44

Meeting in April, we will put the

sustainable development of our

1:56:441:56:47

oceans firmly on the agenda. We will

work with partners to create a

1:56:471:56:52

Commonwealth blue Charter and pushed

her strong action to reduce plastic

1:56:521:56:56

waste in the oceans. And we will

direct development spending to help

1:56:561:56:59

developing nations reduce plastic

waste, increase our own marine

1:56:591:57:04

protected areas at home and

establish new blue belt protections

1:57:041:57:07

in our overseas territories. I want

the Britain of the future to be a

1:57:071:57:13

truly global Britain, which is a

force for good in the world.

1:57:131:57:18

Steadfast in upholding our values,

not least our fierce commitment to

1:57:181:57:21

protecting the natural environment.

You can see that commitment in our

1:57:211:57:26

work on climate change. Since 2012,

the carbon intensity of UK

1:57:261:57:32

electricity has fallen by more than

twice that of any other major

1:57:321:57:36

economy. In 2016, the UK succeeded

in decarbonising at a faster rate

1:57:361:57:41

than any other G20 country. And last

April, the UK had its first four-day

1:57:411:57:47

-- full-day without any coal-fired

electricity since the 1880s. We are

1:57:471:57:54

supporting the world's poorest as

they face the effects of rising sea

1:57:541:57:57

waters and the extreme weather

events associated with climate

1:57:571:58:00

change. Last month I attended the

one planet summit in Paris where I

1:58:001:58:05

announced new support for countries

in the Caribbean, Asia and Africa,

1:58:051:58:09

to help them build resilience

against natural disasters and

1:58:091:58:11

climate extremes. We will continue

to lead the world in delivering on

1:58:111:58:16

our commitments to planet from

fulfilling the environmental aspects

1:58:161:58:21

of the UN sustainable environment

goals to the Paris agreement. We set

1:58:211:58:27

our commitment to phase out unabated

coal-fired electricity by 2025. And

1:58:271:58:31

through the power past coal

alliance, which the UK established

1:58:311:58:36

with Canada, we are encouraging

other countries to do the same. 26

1:58:361:58:41

nations have already joined the

alliance. And I will carry on

1:58:411:58:44

oppressing others to join. We can be

proud of our success in facing up to

1:58:441:58:51

the reality of climate change. But

as the plan we are publishing today

1:58:511:58:55

demonstrates, we are not complacent

about the action needed to sustain

1:58:551:58:58

that success in the future. And we

are not complacent about the action

1:58:581:59:02

we need to take your in the UK to

improve the quality of the air in

1:59:021:59:07

towns and cities. Since 2010, air

quality has improved and will

1:59:071:59:11

continue to improve as a result of

the action we are taking, but I know

1:59:111:59:14

there is more to do. That is why we

have committed £3.5 billion to

1:59:141:59:19

support measures to improve air

quality. We are investing in

1:59:191:59:22

electric vehicle infrastructure and

new charging technologies,

1:59:221:59:27

supporting the roll-out of

low-carbon bosses and expanding

1:59:271:59:31

cycling and walking infrastructure.

In July, we published our plan to

1:59:311:59:34

tackle traffic pollution and we will

end the sale of new conventional

1:59:341:59:38

petrol and diesel cars by 2040. In

the last budget, we announced a £220

1:59:381:59:44

million clean-air fund, paid for by

tax changes to company car tax and

1:59:441:59:47

vehicle excise duty on new diesel

cars. This year we will set out how

1:59:471:59:53

government will support the

transition to almost all cars and

1:59:531:59:56

vans being zero emission by 2015. --

2050. The UK will host a summer

1:59:562:00:05

driving innovation towards cleaner

transport. I am determined we will

2:00:052:00:09

do what it takes to ensure our air

is clean and

2:00:092:00:12

The new year is a time to look

ahead, we are making good process on

2:00:152:00:24

discussions with EU withdrawal. We

are pursuing a modern industrial

2:00:242:00:29

strategy that will deliver

prosperity across the country. We

2:00:292:00:34

are improving standards in schools,

investing in the NHS and helping

2:00:342:00:38

more people own their own homes. In

that you are 25 environment plan,

2:00:382:00:43

we're setting out how we will

protect and renew our natural

2:00:432:00:48

inheritance for the next generation.

How we will make our air and water

2:00:482:00:53

clean our habitats more healthy and

create a better world for ourselves

2:00:532:00:58

and our children. It is a national

plan of action with international

2:00:582:01:02

ambitions. But what it speaks to is

something much more personal for

2:01:022:01:08

each of us. That is the impulse to

care for and nurture our own

2:01:082:01:13

surroundings. To protect what is

vulnerable and precious. To

2:01:132:01:17

safeguard and improve on our

inheritance to pass on something of

2:01:172:01:22

significance to those who come after

us. It what is Roger Scrutton has

2:01:222:01:29

described as the gold awards which

serious environmentalism and serious

2:01:292:01:35

conservatism point - namely home,

the place we are and share and

2:01:352:01:39

defines us, that we hold in trust

and that we don't want to spoil. Our

2:01:392:01:45

goal is a healthy and beautiful

natural environment, which we can

2:01:452:01:50

all enjoy and which we can be proud

to pass on to the next generation

2:01:502:01:54

and this plan is how we will achieve

it. Thank you.

2:01:542:02:00

APPLAUSE.

2:02:022:02:07

Now,

2:02:272:02:27

Now, I will take a number of

questions from the media. I saw

2:02:272:02:31

Laura's hand go up immediately.

Thank you Prime Minister, happy new

2:02:312:02:35

year. This plan was promise in the

2015, we read today it was designed

2:02:352:02:41

at the start to be boring and on

plastics you are talking about ideas

2:02:412:02:46

that will take place over 25 years

with no legal guarantees, if action

2:02:462:02:52

speaks louder than word, do you

believe this problem is acute and

2:02:522:02:56

urgent as you're suggesting and the

A&E figures out today are the worst

2:02:562:03:01

they have been, health bosses and

some in your party are saying the

2:03:012:03:05

health service can't go on like

this, are they wrong?

This is an

2:03:052:03:11

inspiring plan, it is a long-term

plan about the next 25 years, but

2:03:112:03:15

its a plan which speaks to everybody

who has an interest in our

2:03:152:03:19

environment, everybody who wants

tone sure that future -- to ensure

2:03:192:03:24

that future generations can enjoy a

beautiful place in which to live.

2:03:242:03:29

That is what this plan is about. You

say what about the here and now? I

2:03:292:03:34

have given you examples in the

speech we have legislated on

2:03:342:03:40

microbeads, that is coming into

action. That is an important step we

2:03:402:03:43

have taken. But just look at what's

happened since 2015 on plastic bags,

2:03:432:03:51

nine billion fewer plastic bags

being used as a result of that

2:03:512:03:55

simple measure to introduce the 5p

charge. I think we can go further.

2:03:552:04:01

What this plan does is it sets out

actions that will be taken here and

2:04:012:04:06

now and also sets a trajectory for

the future. But it is about

2:04:062:04:10

inspiring a new generation and

ensuring there is a better future

2:04:102:04:15

and a better environment for that

new generation. On the NHS, as we

2:04:152:04:22

know, every year in winter NHS comes

under additional pressure. And it

2:04:222:04:27

has, we have seen the extra

pressures that the NHS has come

2:04:272:04:30

under this year. One of the issues

which determines the extent of the

2:04:302:04:35

pressure is flu and we have seen in

recent days an increase in the

2:04:352:04:40

number of people presenting at A&E

from flu and the NHS has launched a

2:04:402:04:45

national flu campaign and I would

encourage people to act on the

2:04:452:04:48

advice that the NHS is giving and

encourage NHS staff who haven't had

2:04:482:04:53

the flu vaccine to have that

vaccine. We have put more funding

2:04:532:04:58

into the NHS for these winter

pressures and we are putting more

2:04:582:05:02

funding into the NHS over all, but

in terms of these winter pressures

2:05:022:05:06

that we see the NHS under, there

have been a number of measures that

2:05:062:05:10

have helped, for the first time

urgent GP appointments being

2:05:102:05:15

available throughout the Christmas

period. That was a decision taken to

2:05:152:05:19

improve the service for people, but

also to ensure that the NHS had that

2:05:192:05:24

better capacity to deal with these

winter pressures. Faisal?

Why does

2:05:242:05:33

the bulk of the immediate changes in

this plan refer to changes to

2:05:332:05:39

consumer behaviour, rather than

compelling changes for producers and

2:05:392:05:45

manufacturers and on the issue of

Brexit, the mayor of London has

2:05:452:05:50

issued an impact study saying there

will be a 3% hit on GDP. Do you

2:05:502:05:56

agree with that. Why haven't you

produced your own impact

2:05:562:05:59

assessments.

Can I also congratulate

Sky you have been running campaigns

2:05:592:06:05

on plastic use and your working

environments, you have banned single

2:06:052:06:09

use plastic from your working

environment, so well done to Sky for

2:06:092:06:12

that. But this is about everybody

playing their part. In the

2:06:122:06:17

environment. It is not about any one

group of people or one type of

2:06:172:06:21

organisation, it is about everybody

doing something. Individuals can

2:06:212:06:30

recycle more. Supermarkets I

referred to in the plan as well. But

2:06:302:06:35

one of the other things we want to

do as I have said part of our

2:06:352:06:41

industrial strategy is about

technological change, one other

2:06:412:06:44

thing we want to do is see us using

research and development funding to

2:06:442:06:51

see businesses developing, looking

at plastics and new plastics and new

2:06:512:06:54

products that can be used in the

future. So that we see

2:06:542:06:58

manufacturers, we see businesses

playing their part as well and of

2:06:582:07:02

course government plays its part. We

have talked about regulation and

2:07:022:07:06

legislation, so it is all of us,

everybody, has a role to play in

2:07:062:07:10

ensuring we are improving our

environment for the next generation.

2:07:102:07:14

On the Brexit issue, I understand I

haven't seen the details of the

2:07:142:07:17

mayor of London's report, but I

understand he has published figures

2:07:172:07:25

relating to various scenarios, I

think the figure you refer to was

2:07:252:07:28

his no deal scenario, we are working

for the best deal for the British

2:07:282:07:32

people for Brexit. You will have

seen from the fact that we achieved

2:07:322:07:37

that sufficient progress decision in

December that by working,

2:07:372:07:42

co-operatively by sitting and

negotiating and being clear about

2:07:422:07:45

what we want to achieve, we can

achieve arrangements with the EU and

2:07:452:07:50

I'm confident that we which be able

to achieve a good deal, that we're

2:07:502:07:55

clear that is what we're working

for. Do I see Jason?

REPORTER: Prime

2:07:552:08:08

Minister, you mentioned the daily

mail's campaign on this, the I

2:08:082:08:12

wonder if you could say what impact

you think that has had on shaping

2:08:122:08:18

public debate and public policy.

Loft loft. LAUGHTER.

I will work up

2:08:182:08:29

my stand up the routine. And whether

you and Philip plan to make changes

2:08:292:08:33

to your own lifestyle on this and

finally, drifting off topic, what do

2:08:332:08:37

you make of the House of Lords

voting to muzzle the press.

On the

2:08:372:08:45

first point you made, yes I did

obviously congratulate the daily

2:08:452:08:49

mail, I think the daily mail has

done a good job in alerting the

2:08:492:08:55

publish to this issue. I think the

blue planet Serry has led teem to

2:08:552:09:04

understand the impact of plastics.

The Daily Mail has shown this is an

2:09:042:09:11

important issue that they should

take account of. Today you were

2:09:112:09:15

showing people the uses of plastics

that couldn't be recycled and what

2:09:152:09:19

people might do to change their

behaviour. You asked about what I

2:09:192:09:25

and Philip are doing, we try to

recycle as much as possible, I was

2:09:252:09:33

discussing with officials about what

plastics the can be recycled. We

2:09:332:09:38

will be making sure we are recycling

as much as possible. I'm proud we

2:09:382:09:43

have put a barn owl box, bird boxes

and bat box up in our garden and so

2:09:432:09:47

we are trying to do our bit there as

well. And as you know, we love

2:09:472:09:54

walking in the countryside, although

you might not want me to suggest to

2:09:542:09:57

the journalists that I'm about to go

walking in Wales. I'm not - don't

2:09:572:10:02

worry! On the issue of House of

Lords vote, I think the impact of

2:10:022:10:09

this vote would undermine high

quality journalism and a free press.

2:10:092:10:13

It would have a negative impact on

local newspapers, which are an

2:10:132:10:18

important underpinning of our

democracy and I believe in a free

2:10:182:10:21

press, we want to have a free press

that is able to hold politicians and

2:10:212:10:25

others to account and we will be

looking to overturn this vote in the

2:10:252:10:29

House of Commons. Is Ben here? From

the Times. It must be the last

2:10:292:10:38

question.

REPORTER: Could I ask what

you think about the idea of plastic

2:10:382:10:45

bottle deposits, I know you have a

consultation on that, do you have a

2:10:452:10:49

view on that? And also it has been

suggested that this is a relatively

2:10:492:10:54

recent conversion for you to the

green cause, and it is more to do

2:10:542:11:00

with increasing popularity than

something genuine. Maybe you could

2:11:002:11:04

clarify that.

I have talked about

the things I do in my own life to

2:11:042:11:09

contribute to the environment and

this is an issue that I had looked

2:11:092:11:12

at before P, I have been shadow

Environment Secretary as well. It is

2:11:122:11:18

not new to me. On the issue of

bottle deposits, the point is what

2:11:182:11:23

we are looking at is what is the

best way, is it encouraging people

2:11:232:11:29

to recycle or through use through

that deposit. We want to look at the

2:11:292:11:33

evidence of what works. I'm old

enough to remember when Corona

2:11:332:11:41

bottles, you took it back. That was

glass, not plastic. But you were,

2:11:412:11:45

you took it back and you got your I

think it was 6 pence at the time,

2:11:452:11:52

that shows how old you like me who

are nodding are. This is not the

2:11:522:11:58

first time a scheme has been used.

But I think the important question

2:11:582:12:01

is, let's look at the evidence and

see what is going to have the

2:12:012:12:04

greatest

2:12:042:12:05

The Conservative MP Nick Boles who has had cancer twice tells Victoria that a 'National Health Insurance' would encourage people to pay more for the NHS.

Theresa May outlines plans to ease plastic pollution.

And YouTube cuts its business ties with Logan Paul - despite his apology for posting a video of a body at a suicide hotspot in Japan.