17/01/2018 Victoria Derbyshire


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17/01/2018

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Hello it's Wednesday, it's 9

o'clock, I'm Victoria Derbyshire,

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welcome to the programme.

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Tens of thousands of nurses

are leaving the NHS in England every

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year, piling pressure

on over-stretched wards

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and community services.

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And the number leaving is greater

than the number of nurses training.

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At the moment we are struggling

because now nurses have

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lost their bursary it's

a struggle to get them in.

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When you've got to pay £9000

and also have the privilege

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of working nights and shifts,

that's really difficult.

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We'll be live at Birmingham

Children's Hospital.

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As police release more details

about the 13 siblings held

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captive in California,

we'll speak to people with personal

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experience of being kidnapped.

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And held captive.

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Also this morning -

would you be more productive

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if you worked less?

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We meet the UK companies who say

business is booming since they gave

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staff more time off.

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Workers in Germany can stop

working on Thursday and yet

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still produce more than we do.

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So therefore greater and longer

working hours doesn't means

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So therefore greater and longer

working hours doesn't mean

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we are more productive,

especially when it negatively

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impacts our health and our

ability to do our job.

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We'll hear from companies pioneering

new approaches to improve

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people's work-life balance.

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Hello.

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Welcome to the programme, we're live

until 11:00am this morning.

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Clearly this morning we want to know

about your work-life balance.

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Do you, have you, worked crazy hours

and done something about that?

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Is it worth it?

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If you are a boss, how do you work

with your staff?

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Have you been able to come

up with a solution.

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Use the hashtag VictoriaLive, send

me an email

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[email protected] or

there's Facebook too.

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Our top story today,

more nurses left the NHS in England

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last year than joined.

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The statistics - given

exclusively to the BBC -

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reveal that more than 33,000 gave up

jobs with the service -

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that's 3000 more than signed up.

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The Royal College of Nursing says

more must be done to support

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younger nurses at the start

of their careers.

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Here's our health

correspondent, Dominic Hughes.

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Nursing is a profession

under pressure.

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Now a new analysis of nurses working

in the NHS in England shows

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a worrying number are choosing

to leave the profession.

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Last year, more than

33,000 nurses walked away

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from their health service jobs.

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That's a 20% rise compared with four

years ago and those leaving

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outnumber those joining.

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One in four of those

leaving are relatively

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young, under 30.

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This has potentially

serious implications

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for a sustainable

nursing profession.

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Unless we can improve the number

of nurses there to support

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the new ones coming in, it becomes

a continuous vicious cycle

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where people will not want to stay

because they have not got

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the support within the workplace.

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Ministers in England say more nurses

are working in the NHS today

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than 2010 and they have launched

a programme to help organisations

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keep hold of experienced and highly

skilled staff but retaining nurses

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is a problem across the UK

and the pressures of a tough winter

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on an already stretched health

service will not help.

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Dominic Hughes, BBC News.

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And we can speak now

to Dominic, who's at

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Birmingham Children's hospital.

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Is this a problem right across the

UK?

It is. We know from the latest

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statistics we have from Northern

Ireland and Scotland, that the

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number of those leaving is rising,

so more than 7% of the nursing

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workforce left in both Northern

Ireland and Scotland. But still

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there, joiners outnumbered those

leaving. They are still in positive

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territory. In Wales, a Freedom of

information request revealed the

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reverse was true with more people

leaving the profession and joining.

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A similar picture to England. The

Department of Health does say that

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apart from the claim that there are

more nurses working on hospital

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wards today than in 2010, that is

true. But if you look across the

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piece, mental health services and

community services, for example,

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there is an issue there. They have

created an extra 5000 nursing places

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for trainee nurses, an increase of

25% on last it, but those nurses

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will take three years to qualify.

And the NHS is supporting

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organisations to try to hang onto

these highly qualified and skilled

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staff. But it's clearly an issue

across the UK.

We will hear more

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from Dominik and nurses at

Birmingham children's Hospital in

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around 15 minutes time. If you are a

nurse considering leaving the

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profession or have recently left,

let me know why this morning. To the

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rest of this morning's news now.

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Documents seen by the BBC show

the services and construction giant,

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Carillion, was left with just

£29 million in cash when it

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collapsed on Monday -

but owed more than £1.3 billion

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to its banks.

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The figures are from a witness

statement to the insolvency court

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made by the company's

interim chief executive.

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The statement also details

how repeated efforts

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to save the firm failed.

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The revelations will worry

businesses owed money by Carillion,

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which is one of the biggest public

sector contractors in the UK.

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Snow and ice are causing

serious problems on roads

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across Scotland, Northern Ireland

and Northern England,

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with drivers stranded in long queues

on the M74 motorway.

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Mountain rescue teams

are helping trapped motorists,

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and people in Dumfries and Galloway

are being advised not to drive.

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Snow has also caused problems

in Northern Ireland,

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forcing schools to close

and disrupting public transport.

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Ian Palmer reports.

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Rescuing the drivers trapped

in their cars overnight

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on the main motorway

between England and Scotland.

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Heavy snow meant treacherous

conditions for the emergency

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services on the M74.

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The icy weather kept some

motorists in freezing cars

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for more than eight hours.

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Very little has been

happening, I'm afraid.

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We've barely moved.

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I'm not that far away

from Motherwell still.

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In total, very little movement.

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The M74 runs from

Gretna Green to Glasgow.

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The main problems were from Junction

12 to 15 and the wild

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weather is not going away.

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The Met Office has issued

a number of warnings for:

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On the Isle of Skye,

the main road was closed for several

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hours in both directions

by a jackknifed lorry.

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Two buses carrying pupils

were forced to return

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to school for the night.

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We have had people stuck for a good

six or eight hours in their

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vehicles. Quite a long time. We have

assisted at least one or two

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vehicles that had completely run out

of fuel and managed to get fuel back

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to them, but mostly it has been just

checking the welfare of people in

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their cars.

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their cars.

Dozens of schools were

closed yesterday in Scotland are

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affecting thousands of children.

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But it wasn't all doom and gloom.

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In Selkirk, the scene was worthy

of a seasonal postcard with people

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living on higher ground witnessing

the heaviest snowfall.

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In Dumfries, snowploughs

worked around the clock

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to keep motorists moving.

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This was the picture in Glasgow.

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And in Edinburgh, only the most

determined ventured out in our cars.

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Gritters have been out

through the night to avoid a repeat

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of the problems for drivers

on the M74 but Police Scotland

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say if you can avoid

travelling this morning,

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you should do so.

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Ian Palmer, BBC News.

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A Conservative MP has apologised

for a blog post he wrote in 2012

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suggesting that unemployed people

on benefits should have vasectomies

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if they couldn't afford

to have more children.

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Ben Bradley, who's 28,

was made Conservative vice chairman

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for youth in Theresa May's reshuffle

last week.

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The High Court is to hear a legal

challenge against the Home Office,

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brought on behalf of women who were

once involved in prostitution.

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They'll argue it's unlawful

for details of their convictions

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for soliciting to be stored

and disclosed to potential

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future employers.

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Police in California have praised

the bravery of the 17-year-old girl

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who escaped from the home

where she and her 12 siblings

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were allegedly being held

captive by their parents.

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David and Louise Turpin -

whose children range

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in age from 2 to 29 -

are due to appear in court

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later this week, charged

with torture and child endangerment.

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Our North America Correspondent,

James Cook, reports.

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In public, they looked like a big,

happy family, devoutly Christian.

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Renewing their wedding vows in Las

Vegas, David and Louise Turpin

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played the part of proud parents.

But in private, say police, the

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family had a dark secret. Before

dawn on Sunday, 17-year-old girl

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escaped through from the south

through a window. She had taken a

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deactivated mobile phone and used it

to call the police. Inside, officers

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found her 12 brothers and sisters,

dirty and malnourished. Three were

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shackled to their beds with chains

and padlocks. The home was dark and

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foul smelling. Neighbours said the

Turpins were originally from West

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Virginia. The father was an engineer

on a good salary but had twice

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declared bankruptcy. Police say the

siblings were so small that they

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were shocked to discover seven were

adults, the eldest 29. They are now

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being treated in hospital.

I can

tell you they are very friendly.

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They are very cooperative. And I

believe they are hopeful life will

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get better for them.

As for David

and Louise Turpin, they are now

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under arrest charged with torture

and child endangerment. Doctors say

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they are determined to keep all 13

siblings out of the media spotlight.

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They are focused on feeding them to

try to improve their physical

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condition, and on offering them

psychological help as they try to

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come to terms with their ordeal

inside this home will stop James

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Cook,

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Cook, BBC News, Perris in

California.

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Hundreds of the most

vulnerable victims of crime

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are being prevented from testifying

against their attackers,

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because of a shortage of experts

to help them give evidence.

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That's according to a report

from the victims' commissioner,

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Baroness Newlove.

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She's calling for extra support

and funding for registered

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intermediaries who give a voice

in court to people who have

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problems communicating.

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One in eight people are working

in excess of 48 hours per work,

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according to analysis

given exclusively to this

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programme by the TUC.

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The EU working time directive sets

a limit of 48 hours work a week,

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although some jobs require staff

to sign an exemption.

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The TUC says working long hours can

have a severe impact

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on people's health.

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And stay with us for a special

report on companies which are trying

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out new approaches to improve

the work-life balance

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for their staff.

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The Bayeux Tapestry is set to be

displayed in Britain for the first

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time since it was made

in the 11th century.

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The French President Emmanuel Macron

is due to confirm the loan

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when he meets Theresa May

at Sandhurst tomorrow.

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It's not clear where or when

the artwork will be displayed,

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and tests will need to be carried

out first to ensure it can be

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moved without damage.

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That's a summary of the latest BBC

News - more at 9.30.

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A message from a nurse who doesn't

give their name. I'm a registered

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nurse who works in Wales. I left

after becoming disillusioned and

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immoral liars. Increasing workloads

because of staff shortages and

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underfunding played a big part in my

decision. I felt the environment I

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worked in was unsafe because of a

lack of experienced nurses, and I

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was unable to continue to give the

high standards of care I had

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previously provided. If you are a

nurse considering leaving or has

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recently left the profession, tell

us why.

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Do get in touch with us

throughout the morning -

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use the hashtag Victoria LIVE

and If you text, you will be charged

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at the standard network rate.

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There is also Facebook and e-mails.

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Let's get some sport with Hugh.

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An historic moment in English

football last night

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football last night if you are a

quiz fan, pay attention.

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Who scored the first goal in English

football history to be awarded by

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VAR, the new video assistant

referee. The answer is Leicester

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City's Kelechi Iheanacho. He scored

both goals in their 2- 0/3-round

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replay win over League 1 side

Fleetwood town last night. His

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second goal provided the slice of

history. Originally ruled out for

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offside after Riyad Mahrez had

played him in. The video assistant

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referee thought it was worth

checking on. It was the right

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choice, the decision rightly

overturned, and it helped Leicester

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City moving to the fourth round.

Historic moment at the King Power

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Stadium. Joined by another Premier

League side, West Ham United, who

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needed 120 minutes to get past

Shrewsbury town of League 1. Reece

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Burke scoring his first West Ham

goal.

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No real shocks in terms of results -

Cardiff, Sheffield Wednesday

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and Reading from the Championship

all winners last night as well...

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The tennis, Australian open in

Melbourne. What's the latest there?

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Well I'm sure there's a little bit

of disappointment not to see

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Andy Murray at the Australian Open

but so far British number 2

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Kyle Edmund is making it look

like he's the former

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Grand Slam winner.

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He's reached round 3 for the

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first time in Melbourne -

barely giving Denis Istomin a chance

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with in the 6-2 6-2 6-4 victory

overnight to back up that win over

0:14:290:14:33

the number 11 seed in the opening

round and a good chance to go even

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further, he'll take

on Georgia's Nikoloz Basilashvili.

0:14:360:14:42

He is joined by the 2009 champion -

Rafa Nadal who had a straight sets

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victory of his own over

Argentina's Leonardo Mayer.

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He reaches round 3 for the 12th

time in his career.

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On the women's side of things,

Former World Number One Caroline

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Wozniacki had an incredible three

set win against Jana Fett of Croatia

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saving 2 match points and came back

from 5-1 down in the deciding set

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to make it into round three.

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But what about this for a story -

15 year old qualifier Marta Kostyuk

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is the youngest player to reach

the third round at a Grand Slam

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in more than 20 years.

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The World Number 521 came past

Olivia Rogowska in straight sets

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to face her fellow Ukranian -

the fourth seed Elina

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Svitolina in the last 32.

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And that's a fitting reward

for a fantastic performance so far,

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we could be looking at a serious

star of the future.

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Thank you, you. We are going to talk

about the NHS again today.

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At a time when the NHS is under

extraordinary pressure,

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with long waiting times

and cancelled operations,

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it's perhaps no surprise that

thousands of nurses are choosing

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to leave the profession.

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Figures for England given to the BBC

show the numbers leaving outnumbered

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new joiners by 3,000 last year.

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The Government says action

is being taken to solve the shortage

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and points to a big increase

in training places.

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But the Royal College of Nursing

says many of those leaving

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are demoralised and that

won't change without better

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pay and conditions.

0:16:170:16:22

If you are a nurse continuing

leaving the profession or have

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recently left, do let me know your

reasons why.

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In a moment, we'll speak

to our correspondent

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Dominic Hughes who is at

Birmingham's Children hospital.

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But first, let's hear from a nurse

who felt she had no choice

0:16:360:16:39

Let's speak to our health

correspondent Dominic Hughes

0:18:140:18:16

at Birmingham Children's Hospital.

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Hi, Dominik.

Yes, good morning. We

are in the clinical research

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facility here at Birmingham

Children's Hospital where the aim is

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to try to produce new drugs and

treatments to help sick children. We

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are looking at the work of the UK's

meat right across the BBC today and

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I'm delighted to say I am joined by

one of those nurses, Lucy Cooper.

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Thank you for joining us. You are a

research advanced nurse

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practitioner. That is a great job

title.

What does that mean? So,

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working in the research facility

have allowed me to advance my

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nursing skills whilst maintaining

patient focus, so I can undertake

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advanced skills and still maintain

and look after patients.

What do you

0:19:030:19:06

actually do?

So, I bridge the gap

between the doctors and the nurses,

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so supporting research nurses but

also taking on some doctors

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responsibilities, undertaking

cannulation, blood sampling, and

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other advanced nursing skills.

Quite

advanced stuff you are doing. What

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is the ultimate aim here?

It is

generally to improve their health

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and wealth of the whole of the

nation, and we're doing that by

0:19:330:19:36

seeing patients to not just locally

and nationally but internationally

0:19:360:19:41

as well here in this department.

And

I think you'll roll is quite unique?

0:19:410:19:49

Yes, to my knowledge, I am the only

one doing what I do in the whole of

0:19:490:19:54

the UK.

When you started out in the

NHS, did you envisage you would end

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up in this job? It is quite

different to a standard nursing job.

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Yes, I did, actually. When I bested

by training, my passion was -- when

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I first started my training, my

passion was in research and that is

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where I wanted my career to go. I

came here ten years ago when this

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facility first opened and have

allowed me to advance my skills and

0:20:210:20:25

undertake new training.

How

important is it then that there are

0:20:250:20:28

opportunities like the one you

seized and some of the other nurses

0:20:280:20:31

we have heard from this morning who

have taken on those roles, how

0:20:310:20:35

important is it that those roles are

there to encourage people to stay in

0:20:350:20:38

the profession?

It is so important.

We are nurses, that is what we're

0:20:380:20:43

here for, we love the patient

contact. This role has allowed me to

0:20:430:20:47

take on my career and pursue a

higher level but also stay really

0:20:470:20:51

focus to being an nurse and that is

really important to me. Still see

0:20:510:20:56

the patients, give the reassuring

hand on a patient's shoulder, a

0:20:560:21:00

family 's shoulder, but also develop

my skills and give a strong research

0:21:000:21:06

role.

20 years ago, this role may

not have been there? You would have

0:21:060:21:13

had to go into management.

Yes, and

this is what is great, because I can

0:21:130:21:19

stay in nursing but advance my

career.

Do you think that is what

0:21:190:21:23

will help nurses coming into the

profession now to stay focused?

0:21:230:21:31

Absolutely. There are roles now

where you can stay really patient

0:21:310:21:36

focused.

Can you appreciate that

some younger nurses try it for a

0:21:360:21:40

couple of years and then then, this

isn't me? Because it a hard job.

It

0:21:400:21:46

is hard, the shift work, the patient

demands. It ever-changing, the

0:21:460:21:52

goalposts are always moving but we

like to think we are active do that

0:21:520:21:55

and that opportunities like this

will spur people to stay in the

0:21:550:21:58

profession and give them a goal to

work forward with a lifelong career

0:21:580:22:03

in nursing.

What do you think are

the qualities you need to make a go

0:22:030:22:08

of this career, because it is not

easy?

Within research, you have your

0:22:080:22:13

normal core skills that any generic

Naz has, but above that in research

0:22:130:22:16

you need meticulous skills are

maintaining patient safety, IT and

0:22:160:22:22

leadership skills that we ask of.

Lucy, thank you very much for

0:22:220:22:30

joining us and sharing your wisdom

that you have garnered over your

0:22:300:22:33

career as a nurse. We will be

looking at nurses across the UK

0:22:330:22:38

across BBC News today, so stay tuned

for that.

0:22:380:22:41

Thanks Dominic and Lucy.

0:22:410:22:42

Here with us now are two nurses

who have both spent twenty

0:22:420:22:45

years working in the NHS.

0:22:450:22:53

Joanne Szczyglowski -

0:23:020:23:03

who is considering giving

up her job.

0:23:030:23:10

And we have Rohit Sagoo,

who now teaches student nurses.

0:23:100:23:12

He's also the founder

of British Sikh Nurses.

0:23:120:23:16

You are considering leaving. Are you

going to?

Yes.

Why?

I started my

0:23:160:23:26

training in 1994. At that point, we

had Project 2004 nurses, we had our

0:23:260:23:36

bursary, we even had subsidised

living so I was living in the

0:23:360:23:40

nursing home surrounded by nurses

and it was amazing. I qualified in

0:23:400:23:44

1997 and went on to work in

haematology and intensive care. I

0:23:440:23:51

felt valued and I felt supported.

Over the years, as the pressures on

0:23:510:23:55

the NHS have got greater, that

support and that value has changed

0:23:550:24:01

for me. I have worked in many

different areas. I had a time where

0:24:010:24:05

I actually went into the corporate

world, but after awhile I realised

0:24:050:24:11

that I missed the hands-on nursing

and that's when I went back into the

0:24:110:24:14

NHS.

But when she missed that now?

I

think I will but what it is is that

0:24:140:24:23

I feel that the level of care I'm

giving has been compromised. I work

0:24:230:24:26

in a busy GP's surgery. We literally

have ten minutes to see patients and

0:24:260:24:31

now I feel that I'm not being true

to myself because, I'll give you an

0:24:310:24:38

example, recently I had a lady who

came in for a simple injection but I

0:24:380:24:42

had read her medical notes and I

knew that she was suffering from

0:24:420:24:46

cancer and it was terminal. I

literally had less than ten minutes

0:24:460:24:52

because of the pressures, so I knew

that I had to get this patient in

0:24:520:24:57

and out of my room. Now, how is that

being a health care professional,

0:24:570:25:02

caring for people?

And you had to do

that because you had a queue of

0:25:020:25:07

people presumably also waiting to

see you?

Yes, so I felt that I

0:25:070:25:13

wasn't being authentic, I wasn't

giving the care that that lady

0:25:130:25:17

needed and really, probably, she

just needed a little bit of a chat,

0:25:170:25:21

a little bit of time to talk, but

that's not something I was able to

0:25:210:25:25

offer her.

Let me

0:25:250:25:31

offer her.

Let me bring in Rohit.

First of all, how do you react that

0:25:320:25:35

a colleague of yours is leaving

after 20 years?

It's very sad to see

0:25:350:25:39

you leaving the profession. As a

nurse myself, I think it's great,

0:25:390:25:50

with a vast amount of nursing, as we

have seen, and it's a career, a

0:25:500:25:55

profession that is fast, and it's

really sad, it will be a loss to

0:25:550:26:00

nursing, just like many others who

leave.

And it's not just people like

0:26:000:26:07

Jalan who have left -- who are

leaving the profession, new student

0:26:070:26:15

nurses are leaving as well. You

train them. Why do you think it is?

0:26:150:26:21

The training is robust, so they are

prepared for the realities of the

0:26:210:26:28

NHS. When they go to their jobs and

they qualify as well, they are

0:26:280:26:31

relatively doing the jobs that they

were doing and most places, actually

0:26:310:26:36

their last placements that they

have, most wards take them on for a

0:26:360:26:41

permanent job within their last

training practice areas.

So why are

0:26:410:26:44

they going them?

They are

challenging times at the moment in

0:26:440:26:51

the NHS, I think we all know that.

It is busy, it is getting busier.

0:26:510:26:56

The ageing population, a lot more

people using the service as much as

0:26:560:27:00

possible.

Janine has e-mailed. I am

a highly experienced nurse

0:27:000:27:04

practitioner. I have just left the

profession after 38 years, I am

0:27:040:27:11

constantly being asked to return but

I feel exhausted. It is sad to say

0:27:110:27:18

my profession has deteriorated to

such an extent that I am ashamed of

0:27:180:27:21

what it stands for now and the

appalling care I am forced to give

0:27:210:27:25

due to lack of staff. You will know

the Department of Health says that

0:27:250:27:28

around only 12,000 more nurses are

now was -- our wards since May 20

0:27:280:27:35

ten. What would you say to that?

I

think it is evident that nurses like

0:27:350:27:40

myself are having to make the

decision and I myself have decided

0:27:400:27:44

that I am no longer going to put

myself through the stress and leave

0:27:440:27:49

work at the end of the day feeling

dissatisfied. So, I am probably one

0:27:490:27:55

of the lucky ones in the fact that

I've come up with a plan. So I

0:27:550:27:59

actually last year decided to

retrain and I picked a company

0:27:590:28:04

called Digital mums, who offer women

like me, mothers, the opportunity to

0:28:040:28:13

retrain, so I've retrained in social

media marketing and this new role is

0:28:130:28:18

going to offer me the flexibility,

it's going to offer me the worklife

0:28:180:28:23

balance that I need now.

A subject

that we are covering in the next

0:28:230:28:27

half-hour. Rohit 12,000 more nurses

are now wards since 2010?

That says

0:28:270:28:35

a lot in terms of it and what we

need to think about, I know we have

0:28:350:28:39

seen figures about nurses leaving

the profession, but what we need to

0:28:390:28:42

think about is retention. How do we

retain those 12,000?

How do we do

0:28:420:28:47

it?

Strategically, we need to

explore opportunities for enhancing

0:28:470:28:53

our training, just as we hassle with

Lucy. Das just as we saw with Lucy.

0:28:530:29:00

That's what we need to concentrate

on and that is what the government

0:29:000:29:03

needs to concentrate on as well.

Both of you, thank you very much

0:29:030:29:07

indeed. If you are considering or

have recently left the profession,

0:29:070:29:13

do let me know why.

0:29:130:29:18

Still to come.

0:29:180:29:19

As police in California release more

details about the 13 siblings

0:29:190:29:21

imprisoned in their home,

we'll speak to a woman who was held

0:29:210:29:26

captive as a 13-year-old

about how she recovered

0:29:260:29:28

from the horrific experience.

0:29:280:29:29

Would you be more productive

if you worked less?

0:29:290:29:31

We meet the UK companies who say

business is booming since they gave

0:29:310:29:34

staff more time off.

0:29:340:29:37

Time for the latest

news - here's Annita.

0:29:430:29:51

NHS figures show 3000 more nurses

left the health service in England

0:29:510:29:54

last year than joined. In each of

the past three years more than 10%

0:29:540:29:59

of the nursing workforce left. The

government insists there are more

0:29:590:30:02

nurses than 2010 and two measures

are being taken to retain

0:30:020:30:07

experienced staff.

0:30:070:30:11

Documents seen by the BBC show

the services and construction giant

0:30:110:30:14

Carillion, was left with just

£29 million in cash when it

0:30:140:30:16

collapsed on Monday -

but owed more than £1.3 billion

0:30:160:30:19

to its banks.

0:30:190:30:20

The figures are from a witness

statement to the insolvency court

0:30:200:30:28

The revelations will worry

businesses owed money by Carillion,

0:30:290:30:31

which is one of the biggest public

sector contractors in the UK.

0:30:310:30:34

Snow and ice have caused problems

on roads across Scotland,

0:30:340:30:36

Northern Ireland and Northern

England.

0:30:360:30:37

The main motorway between Scotland

and England - the M74 -

0:30:370:30:40

was closed in parts because of snow

and some drivers already on the road

0:30:400:30:44

were stuck overnight.

0:30:440:30:45

It's since re-opened.

0:30:450:30:48

A Conservative MP has apologised

for a blog post he wrote in 2012,

0:30:480:30:50

suggesting that unemployed people

on benefits should have vasectomies

0:30:500:30:54

if they couldn't afford

to have more children.

0:30:540:30:56

Ben Bradley, who's 28,

was made Conservative vice chairman

0:30:560:30:58

for youth in Theresa May's

reshuffle last week.

0:30:580:31:06

The Home and Away actress

Jessica Falkholt has died

0:31:170:31:19

from injuries she suffered in a car

crash three weeks ago.

0:31:190:31:26

The 29-year-old actress

played Hope Morrison

0:31:260:31:27

in the Australian series.

0:31:270:31:28

The accident in New South Wales

on Boxing Day had already

0:31:280:31:31

killed her parents, sister

and the other driver.

0:31:310:31:33

The Bayeux Tapestry is set to be

displayed in Britain for the first

0:31:330:31:36

time since it was made

in the 11th century.

0:31:360:31:38

The French President Emmanuel Macron

is due to confirm the loan

0:31:380:31:41

when he meets Theresa May

at Sandhurst tomorrow.

0:31:410:31:42

It's not clear where or when

the artwork will be displayed,

0:31:420:31:45

and tests will need to be carried

out to ensure it can be

0:31:450:31:48

moved without damage.

0:31:480:31:49

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

0:31:490:31:51

Here's some sport now.

0:31:510:31:52

There was a piece of footballing

history last night as the VAR system

0:31:520:31:55

was responsible for awarding a goal

for the first time.

0:31:550:31:58

It came in Leicester City's 2-0 win

over Fleetwood Town in their FA

0:31:580:32:01

Cup third round replay.

0:32:010:32:02

Reece Burke scored his

first West Ham goal.

0:32:020:32:10

But they needed extra time to get

past League 1 side Shrewsbury town.

0:32:100:32:17

Reading, Cardiff and Sheffield

Wednesday are also through to round

0:32:170:32:25

four.

0:32:250:32:30

At the Australian Open tennis

there's been another good win

0:32:320:32:34

for British number 2 Kyle Edmund.

0:32:340:32:36

He cruised past Denis Istomin

in straight sets to reach

0:32:360:32:38

the Third Round for the first time.

0:32:380:32:45

But the win of the day went to 15

year old Marta Kostyuk -

0:32:450:32:48

she's the youngest player to reach

the third round at a Grand Slam

0:32:480:32:51

in more than 20 years after coming

past Olivia Rogowska

0:32:510:32:54

Each morning at this time we bring

you up to date on the latest

0:32:540:32:57

in the trial of former football

coach Barry Bennell.

0:32:570:32:59

The court heard yesterday

he was treated as "a God" on visits

0:32:590:33:02

to Manchester City's ground,

according to one of

0:33:020:33:04

his alleged victims.

0:33:040:33:05

Our reporter Jim Reed has

been following the trial

0:33:050:33:07

at Liverpool Crown Court.

0:33:070:33:08

He's here now.

0:33:080:33:09

Yes, this is the trial

of Barry Bennell, a former youth

0:33:090:33:12

football coach linked to clubs

including Manchester City

0:33:120:33:14

and Crewe Alexandra.

0:33:140:33:15

He's charged with a total of 48

counts of historic abuse

0:33:150:33:18

between 1979 and 1991,

cahrges which he denies.

0:33:180:33:20

between 1979 and 1991,

charges which he denies.

0:33:200:33:22

He's appearing in court by video

link because of ill health.

0:33:220:33:30

Yesterday was day five of the trial.

0:33:300:33:32

The jury heard from an alleged

victim in the case -

0:33:320:33:35

a man now in his 40s who gave

evidence anonymously

0:33:350:33:37

from behind a screen.

0:33:370:33:41

He said he was spotted

by Barry Bennell playing

0:33:410:33:45

for his school team,

then taken to Man City's training

0:33:450:33:48

ground and to the club's then home

ground at Maine Road.

0:33:480:33:52

He told the jury: "I thought 'this

is it, I've made my dream,

0:33:520:33:56

I'm going to be a footballer',

as everybody wants to at that age."

0:33:560:34:00

And what did the court hear

about Bennell's links

0:34:000:34:02

with Manchester City itself?

0:34:020:34:06

Well, the alleged victim

did talk about that.

0:34:060:34:13

He said that Bennell was treated -

as he put it - as a God

0:34:140:34:17

by everyone from security up

to senior members

0:34:170:34:19

of staff at the club.

0:34:190:34:24

Later, he said he was invited

to Mr Bennell's home.

0:34:240:34:32

And he says he was abused

there as well as in Mr Bennell's car

0:34:330:34:36

and on a trip to North Wales.

0:34:360:34:38

He told the jury: "I knew

it was wrong but I also knew you had

0:34:380:34:42

to keep Barry happy."

0:34:420:34:43

Because of the abuse,

he claimed he started making excuses

0:34:430:34:45

to miss training and matches around

this time and went "off

0:34:450:34:48

the rails" as he put it.

0:34:480:34:49

And what happened under

cross examination?

0:34:490:34:54

Well, he was asked by Eleanor Laws

QC, who is representing Mr Bennell,

0:34:540:34:57

whether he had discussed any

compensation for the abuse.

0:34:570:34:59

He said, "You keep talking

to me about money.

0:34:590:35:04

I'm not here for money,

I'm here for closure and justice."

0:35:040:35:07

Earlier in the day, the court

was read a transcript of a police

0:35:070:35:11

interview given by Mr Bennell

in which he described grooming

0:35:110:35:13

another alleged victim.

0:35:130:35:15

He said, "I got friendly

with him so he'd trust me,

0:35:150:35:18

it was my usual procedure."

0:35:180:35:20

But when officers told him

about the precise allegations

0:35:200:35:24

made by that person,

he described him as an "absolute

0:35:240:35:27

liar" who was "jumping

on the bandwagon."

0:35:270:35:31

As I said earlier, Mr Bennell

denies 48 counts of abuse.

0:35:310:35:34

The trial continues this morning.

0:35:340:35:39

Thank you very much.

0:35:390:35:43

Analysis given exclusively to this

programme by the workers union

0:35:430:35:51

the TUC has found 1 in 8 of us

are working in excess of 48 hours

0:35:510:35:55

a week, something they warn can

have a severe impact on our health.

0:35:550:35:58

Cutting our hours would be good

for us, but could it also be good

0:35:580:36:01

for the companies we work for?

0:36:010:36:03

Our reporter Michael Cowan has been

to meet the firms pioneering

0:36:030:36:06

new approaches to improve

the work-life balance.

0:36:060:36:08

Over 32 million of us

are employed in Britain.

0:36:080:36:12

One in eight work more

than 48 hours a week.

0:36:120:36:14

But compared to our

European neighbours,

0:36:140:36:16

we're not very productive.

0:36:160:36:20

Workers in Germany, for example,

can actually stop working

0:36:200:36:22

on the Thursday and yet

still produce more than we do.

0:36:220:36:26

Some companies think the answer

to greater productivity

0:36:260:36:28

lies in working less.

0:36:280:36:34

We managed to work so efficiently

that we can be as profitable in four

0:36:340:36:38

days as we could be in five.

0:36:380:36:40

I don't ever foresee us moving

back to a five-day week.

0:36:400:36:46

Other businesses are about to follow

suit, in a bid to achieve balance.

0:36:460:36:50

I think there's a risk

involved for me.

0:36:500:36:52

I mean, this isn't a job for me.

0:36:520:36:53

This is everything.

0:36:530:36:56

It's the perennial question

of modern Britain - how do

0:36:560:37:01

we achieve a work-life balance?

0:37:010:37:06

Eight hours labour, eight hours

recreation and eight hours rest.

0:37:060:37:09

That was the ethos of industrialist

Robert Owen in 1817.

0:37:090:37:13

And for much of the last two

centuries, we haven't

0:37:130:37:15

deviated from his vision.

0:37:150:37:19

But for many, the work-life balance

has become a little bit unbalanced.

0:37:190:37:22

But some companies are drastically

changing the way we work.

0:37:220:37:30

We start in London, at a design

company called Normally.

0:37:300:37:35

It was founded by Marei,

Tim, Chris and Mark,

0:37:350:37:38

who believe a four-day week

is the key to their

0:37:380:37:40

company's success.

0:37:400:37:45

We've observed that lots of people

wait for their whole life for that

0:37:450:37:48

big moment when they retire.

0:37:480:37:50

But we've seen that in a few cases,

that never happens,

0:37:500:37:53

because you get ill,

or you, you know,

0:37:530:37:55

you're older by then.

0:37:550:37:56

You're not as agile.

0:37:560:37:59

You don't have the energy to really

appreciate that time any more.

0:37:590:38:02

Maybe we can just flip that round.

0:38:020:38:05

Maybe we can just take that time

and move it forward,

0:38:050:38:10

and give it back to ourselves

and our employees.

0:38:100:38:13

So that's when we decided, we're

going to go for a four-day week.

0:38:130:38:16

Do you keep to just four days,

or do you ever send a few sneaky

0:38:160:38:19

e-mails on the fifth day?

0:38:190:38:21

It's not seen as a positive.

0:38:210:38:24

Anything that happens

outside of you being

0:38:240:38:28

physically in the studio

is usually frowned upon.

0:38:280:38:33

And if I see that happen regularly,

I know this person is up doing

0:38:330:38:36

stuff, I get worried.

0:38:360:38:39

I think, there's something wrong

there, and so we should

0:38:390:38:42

have a conversation.

0:38:420:38:44

Some of the superheroes of our time,

they're the guys who say,

0:38:440:38:47

I work 90 hours, 100

hours, 120 hours.

0:38:470:38:49

So people think...

0:38:490:38:50

They read those figures

and they say, that's what's

0:38:500:38:52

going to make me successful.

0:38:520:38:54

I'm going to do the same and then

I'm going to be Elon Musk,

0:38:540:38:58

or I'm going to be, you know,

I'm going to have the

0:38:580:39:00

Facebook of the future.

0:39:000:39:01

But that's not true.

0:39:010:39:03

Do your employees get

paid the same amount

0:39:030:39:05

as if they were working

a five-day week?

0:39:050:39:07

Yes.

0:39:070:39:09

They get paid above

market rate, actually,

0:39:090:39:11

which we're really proud of.

0:39:110:39:14

And it's all because we manage

to work so efficiently that we can

0:39:140:39:21

be as profitable in the four days

as we could be in five.

0:39:210:39:27

This is Basil.

0:39:270:39:29

He's been at the company

for two-and-a-half years.

0:39:290:39:32

One of the things that

everyone, before they join,

0:39:320:39:35

is concerned about is,

are you squeezing five days' amount

0:39:350:39:37

of stress into four days?

0:39:370:39:41

Like, does everything

actually push out?

0:39:410:39:43

For whatever reason,

we've managed to...

0:39:430:39:45

Like, that just doesn't happen here.

0:39:450:39:48

So occasionally, there is a late

one, but I think I can

0:39:480:39:52

probably count two or three

in the two-and-a-half years

0:39:520:39:54

that I've been here.

0:39:540:39:55

Do you ever find yourself

inadvertently taking the odd call

0:39:550:39:57

or sending the odd e-mail

on that fifth day?

0:39:570:40:00

The funny thing is,

there's like a, a social...

0:40:000:40:04

Pressure's not quite the right word,

but encouragement to make sure that

0:40:040:40:09

you use that fifth day for yourself

and not to do work.

0:40:090:40:12

Like, you're not going to get

brownie points for replying

0:40:120:40:14

to e-mails on the fifth day.

0:40:140:40:17

But on a larger scale,

are there any economic benefits?

0:40:170:40:20

Do longer working hours lead

to greater productivity?

0:40:200:40:25

In the UK, we have a bit of a puzzle

when it comes to our productivity.

0:40:250:40:29

Workers in Germany, for example,

can actually stop working

0:40:290:40:31

on a Thursday and yet still produce

more than we do.

0:40:310:40:35

So therefore, greater and longer

working hours doesn't necessarily

0:40:350:40:38

mean that we're more productive.

0:40:380:40:39

Especially when it negatively

impacts our health and our

0:40:390:40:42

ability to do our job.

0:40:420:40:43

Do initiatives like the four-day

week, or the six-hour day,

0:40:430:40:46

impact on our economy?

0:40:460:40:49

Cutting our working hours isn't

going to be a simple solution,

0:40:490:40:53

because it's about looking

at the employee

0:40:530:40:54

well-being as a whole.

0:40:540:40:55

So, how are we looking

after our employees?

0:40:550:40:58

Are we also offering

lifestyle benefits?

0:40:580:41:00

Are we harnessing modern technology,

to be able to offer greater

0:41:000:41:04

flexibility, as well as making sure

that people still deliver?

0:41:040:41:07

Because that's what's going to drive

corporate profits and, therefore,

0:41:070:41:10

economic growth more broadly.

0:41:100:41:14

Edinburgh is home to over 3,000

restaurants and cafes,

0:41:140:41:20

and one of the city's most popular

is about to make a major shift

0:41:200:41:23

to the way they work.

0:41:230:41:27

Stuart is the chef behind Aizle.

0:41:270:41:30

He trained under Gordon Ramsay

in New York and, this year,

0:41:300:41:33

his restaurant is going from five

days a week to four.

0:41:330:41:37

So we've decided to close

the restaurant one day

0:41:370:41:41

a week more than we did.

0:41:410:41:44

So now, we're only open for four

days, four operational days.

0:41:440:41:47

And we extended the opening times

a little bit to try and cover that.

0:41:470:41:51

You know, selfishly,

I want to spend more time at home.

0:41:510:41:53

You know, I need to have that

time with my family now.

0:41:530:41:56

And I also want it for my staff.

0:41:560:41:58

Is that selfish?

0:41:580:41:59

Should we not be prioritising

our life over work?

0:41:590:42:02

We definitely shouldn't see it

as selfish, but that's how it feels

0:42:020:42:04

when you're used to working

a certain way, I think.

0:42:040:42:08

I think if it doesn't work,

you know, the immediate

0:42:080:42:11

response would be, OK,

potentially, we can go back

0:42:110:42:15

to opening some days

within the higher season points.

0:42:150:42:18

The Festival times,

the Christmas times.

0:42:180:42:20

We can go back up to five days then

and see if that works.

0:42:200:42:23

And long-term, if it doesn't work,

then the restaurant was never

0:42:230:42:26

sustainable enough anyway.

0:42:260:42:28

Jade is the restaurant's manager.

0:42:280:42:32

How did you first react

when you were told you were going

0:42:320:42:35

from a five-day week

to a four-day week?

0:42:350:42:37

Overjoyed.

0:42:370:42:39

It's a huge benefit to our actual

social life to be able to have

0:42:390:42:43

some extra time off.

0:42:430:42:45

I mean, you're the restaurant

manager and it's essentially losing

0:42:450:42:47

20% of the profits from the business

because you're taking

0:42:470:42:50

away 20% of the hours.

0:42:500:42:51

That must concern you on some level?

0:42:510:42:53

Totally.

0:42:530:42:54

It's such a stupid move, so stupid.

0:42:540:42:56

It's the worst thing that

a business could do.

0:42:560:42:59

We spent a whole year trying

to take that same revenue

0:42:590:43:02

and trying, in some way,

to have a better life balance.

0:43:020:43:05

Like, Stuart's son's two

and a half, and he's had three

0:43:050:43:07

services off in four years.

0:43:070:43:09

That's crazy.

0:43:090:43:10

Do you think it's going to work?

0:43:100:43:12

I think it will either

crash and burn very

0:43:120:43:14

quickly or totally work.

0:43:140:43:16

And I think we'll know

in the first month.

0:43:160:43:20

But one size doesn't fit all.

0:43:200:43:27

This is Agent Marketing,

in Liverpool.

0:43:270:43:30

They have a company dog,

and bikes to ride to meetings on.

0:43:300:43:33

And two years ago,

they trialled a six-hour day.

0:43:330:43:36

We have that opportunity

and the flexibility to be able

0:43:360:43:38

to try a new initiative.

0:43:380:43:41

So we'd seen about a company

in Sweden that were trialling it,

0:43:410:43:44

and various other companies,

and we thought, do you know what,

0:43:440:43:46

why not give it a go?

0:43:460:43:48

It didn't quite work

for your business.

0:43:480:43:49

It didn't quite work

for your clients.

0:43:490:43:51

Why do you think that was?

0:43:510:43:52

We always said that

when we did the trial,

0:43:520:43:55

the most important thing was,

obviously, that client

0:43:550:43:56

work would not suffer.

0:43:560:43:58

We'd always meet deadlines.

0:43:580:43:59

And if we had to sacrifice

a six-hour working day some

0:43:590:44:01

days to meet deadlines,

we would do that.

0:44:010:44:03

So how we do it now is,

we have two shorter days.

0:44:030:44:06

So we finish...

0:44:060:44:07

We do a six-hour day on a Friday,

and then one day in the week -

0:44:070:44:11

based on deadlines and workload -

a team member can

0:44:110:44:13

finish at four o'clock.

0:44:130:44:14

So they can do an early.

0:44:140:44:16

So essentially, we're gaining

three-and-a-half hours per week.

0:44:160:44:22

Research has shown that a poor

work-life balance can severely

0:44:220:44:24

impact on our health,

and one of the main ways this can

0:44:240:44:28

manifest is on our mental health.

0:44:280:44:33

How big of a problem is a poor

work-life balance in Britain?

0:44:330:44:37

We know that poor work-life balance

can lead to poor mental

0:44:370:44:40

health in the workplace.

0:44:400:44:42

And we know that poor mental health

in the workplace is costing the UK

0:44:420:44:46

economy up to £100 billion a year.

0:44:460:44:47

What does work-related stress do

to our mental health?

0:44:470:44:52

So what that can look

like in an employee is,

0:44:520:44:54

somebody that's extremely stressed,

somebody that's unable

0:44:540:44:56

to concentrate, somebody

who might not be as motivated

0:44:560:44:59

as they usually are,

and somebody who is actually

0:44:590:45:02

working very long hours,

but not actually

0:45:020:45:04

being very productive.

0:45:040:45:10

Over a year ago, a marketing firm

in Glasgow thought they'd

0:45:120:45:14

trial a four-day week.

0:45:140:45:17

The results surprised them

because not only did working less

0:45:170:45:20

maximise productivity,

it also boosted profits.

0:45:200:45:21

Lorraine is one of the executives

behind Pursuit Marketing.

0:45:210:45:25

They employ over a hundred staff

and work a four-day week.

0:45:250:45:28

When did you decide to move

to a four-day week?

0:45:280:45:33

We ran a trial of different kind

of flexible working patterns

0:45:330:45:36

and in the three months that we ran

that programme, the people

0:45:360:45:39

working the four-day week

were the most productive,

0:45:390:45:43

happier in their role and really

reporting great things

0:45:430:45:45

about the time they were getting

at home with their family.

0:45:450:45:48

From the business perspective,

what are the benefits?

0:45:480:45:51

When our staff are in the office,

they're far more productive.

0:45:510:45:53

They're focused on

what they need to do.

0:45:530:45:55

And they want to enjoy that

three-day weekend every weekend

0:45:550:45:58

and not be worried about work.

0:45:580:46:00

So productivity increased

initially by about 38%.

0:46:000:46:02

And over the last year or so, it's

settled down to about 30% overall.

0:46:020:46:07

Our business has grown

substantially, so we entered 2017

0:46:070:46:10

on 2.2 million turnover.

0:46:100:46:14

We're about to enter 2018

in a 5-million turnover year and,

0:46:140:46:17

what's more, internationally,

so it's been an exciting

0:46:170:46:19

thing for us.

0:46:190:46:21

How much do you think that success

is due to the flexible working

0:46:210:46:24

initiatives you have?

0:46:240:46:26

It's a huge factor because

the culture in the workplace

0:46:260:46:29

drives better results,

better performance,

0:46:290:46:31

a happier workforce.

0:46:310:46:34

So our retention rates are really

high and we can attract the best

0:46:340:46:37

talent to our teams.

0:46:370:46:40

And our clients can invest

in training these people,

0:46:400:46:42

knowing they'll be here in the long

term and they're not

0:46:420:46:44

going to disappear.

0:46:440:46:45

So, we work with the world's largest

IT companies and they choose

0:46:450:46:48

us over other agencies

because of the culture and how

0:46:480:46:51

well we treat our staff.

0:46:510:46:53

Do you pay your staff a full-time

salary for working four days?

0:46:530:46:55

Yes.

0:46:550:46:59

So, our salaries, basic salaries,

are around 25-28 K per annum.

0:46:590:47:01

On target to 45-50 K.

0:47:010:47:04

When we launched the four-day week,

we actually increased our basic

0:47:040:47:07

salaries for some, but their working

hours were reduced to four days.

0:47:070:47:11

Do you envisage a time

where you would revert

0:47:110:47:14

back to a five-day week?

0:47:140:47:16

Definitely not.

0:47:160:47:19

I think in terms of the exceptional

productivity results we've got,

0:47:190:47:21

how happy our staff are,

our staff retention rates,

0:47:210:47:23

our clients have all bought into it

now and they're trialling it

0:47:230:47:26

themselves in some areas,

so I don't ever foresee us moving

0:47:260:47:29

back to a five-day week.

0:47:290:47:32

All the businesses we met had

one thing in common -

0:47:320:47:35

they weren't afraid to experiment.

0:47:350:47:37

And whether they were successful

or not, their sheer willingness

0:47:370:47:40

to try new things is what's

going to drive forward innovation,

0:47:400:47:43

and that will create a better

work-life balance for workers

0:47:430:47:47

across the country.

0:47:470:47:50

Thank you for your messages on this.

This you said I am a dairy farmer

0:47:550:48:03

working 94 hours a week. I have a

young son that I hardly see. Another

0:48:030:48:08

viewers as I work in tech. I was

working a 12 hour day. I decided to

0:48:080:48:14

leave, setup own IT recruitment

company from home and the rest as

0:48:140:48:18

they say is history. I am more

productive, more able to focus on

0:48:180:48:23

fitness, I am enjoying family life

more and not stressed out. Mark says

0:48:230:48:29

people and their teams need to work

smarter but this only happens with

0:48:290:48:34

decent management. Every company I

have worked for has operated

0:48:340:48:39

chaotically with weak management. Do

let me know if you have managed to

0:48:390:48:46

find some worklife balance? If you

are a boss, what have you brought in

0:48:460:48:50

to make sure people aren't stressed

out and working productively?

0:48:500:48:58

out and working productively? We are

going to get the latest from

0:48:580:49:00

California now on the parents who

were allegedly holding their 13th

0:49:000:49:05

children captive.

0:49:050:49:07

Police in California have praised

the bravery of the 17-year-old girl

0:49:070:49:10

who escaped from the home

where she and her 12 siblings

0:49:100:49:12

were allegedly being held

captive by their parents.

0:49:120:49:14

The brothers and sisters -

aged between 2 and 29 -

0:49:140:49:17

are now being cared

for while their parents,

0:49:170:49:19

David and Louise Turpin,

are facing charges of torture.

0:49:190:49:21

Louise Turpin's aunt has been

speaking of her reaction

0:49:210:49:23

to the allegations.

0:49:230:49:24

Never been so shocked in my life.

0:49:240:49:26

It broke my heart.

0:49:260:49:27

It broke all of our hearts.

0:49:270:49:28

I just pray that they take care

of the kids,

0:49:280:49:31

and I hope they prosecute them

to the fullest extent of the law,

0:49:310:49:34

even if she is my niece.

0:49:340:49:35

Because them kids don't deserve it.

0:49:350:49:37

Is it possible to recover

from such an ordeal?

0:49:370:49:40

We're going to talk now

to Alicia Kozakiewicz in New York,

0:49:400:49:43

who was held captive

when she was 13 years old

0:49:430:49:47

and raped, beaten and

tortured for four days.

0:49:470:49:49

She now runs the Alicia Project,

to raise awareness of child sexual

0:49:490:49:55

exploitation and abduction;

Professor Peter Ayton,

0:49:550:49:56

a professor of psychology

at City University London;

0:49:560:50:00

and in northern California

is Dr Rebecca Bailey,

0:50:000:50:03

a therapist who worked

with Jaycee Dugard after her release

0:50:030:50:05

from 18 years in captivity.

0:50:050:50:13

Thank you very much for talking to

us, particularly given the time

0:50:130:50:17

where you are in the States. Alicia,

as I said, you were 13 when you were

0:50:170:50:22

abducted. Tell our British audience

have that experience changed your

0:50:220:50:26

life.

Well, it changes everything.

It takes the familiar into the

0:50:260:50:32

unfamiliar. There's the horrific

event and then there's the aftermath

0:50:320:50:37

and the healing, which is difficult.

It's not impossible, but it's

0:50:370:50:44

difficult and it takes time.

Can you

give us some insight, Alicia, into

0:50:440:50:51

how you began the process of

recovery?

Like I said, it does take

0:50:510:50:57

time and it's different for

everybody. And time is a big factor,

0:50:570:51:02

time really does help. But what's

really important is to find

0:51:020:51:07

something that gives you a moment of

peace and a moment of joy, be it art

0:51:070:51:14

or photography or writing poems or

whatever it may be, and of course,

0:51:140:51:22

to seek help, to seek therapeutic

services. But to do it in your way,

0:51:220:51:27

in your time. There is no timeline

in this.

Rebecca Bailey, as I said,

0:51:270:51:33

you worked with Jaycee do guard,

kidnapped at the age of 11 and kept

0:51:330:51:37

as a hostage for 18 years,

eventually, in a couple's back

0:51:370:51:46

garden will stop -- essentially, in

a couple's back garden. So you will

0:51:460:51:54

have some insight into this.

I think

it's very important that we

0:51:540:51:59

understand that everybody goes

through this in their own time.

0:51:590:52:03

Immediately, you will have different

people with different responses and

0:52:030:52:07

a great deal of shock. It's

extremely important that people

0:52:070:52:11

understand the shocking nature of

coming out of being sequestered into

0:52:110:52:15

the greater world. We do have some

thought, and I have not met these

0:52:150:52:20

people directly, that if they have

been out and about -- that they have

0:52:200:52:27

been out and about, there are

pictures in a chapel in Las Vegas,

0:52:270:52:31

so they haven't been completely cut

off, but regardless, they have been

0:52:310:52:36

living in an extremely intense,

horrible situation from everything

0:52:360:52:40

we hear. The immediate challenge is

their physical nutrition and their

0:52:400:52:46

physical well-being from everything

I am hearing and seeing.

Let me

0:52:460:52:51

bring in Peter Ayton. Rebecca talked

about the images we have seen when

0:52:510:52:54

the children were in Las Vegas, as

the parents apparently renewed their

0:52:540:53:00

wedding vows. Pictures of them at

Disneyland in red T-shirts. All

0:53:000:53:05

smiling, of course, in contrast to

what was going on in reality.

So, I

0:53:050:53:10

don't think we would have seen those

images have they not been smiling.

0:53:100:53:13

There are all sorts of questions

that arise and we don't know almost

0:53:130:53:17

any of the facts here, about the

extent to which they were able to

0:53:170:53:23

behave as they actually felt. To the

point where they were rescued,

0:53:230:53:27

several of them were obviously being

coerced, if they are chained up.

So

0:53:270:53:34

you mean those photos were chosen

carefully and specifically to

0:53:340:53:38

portray an image potentially?

Well,

I know none of the facts, let me be

0:53:380:53:42

quite clear about that. I don't

think anyone knows much yet about

0:53:420:53:45

what actually happened but that

image is very provocative because it

0:53:450:53:50

suggested some way that the children

were well balanced and living in a

0:53:500:53:54

happy environment and so on. I mean,

I wouldn't trust that at all. But

0:53:540:53:59

the way it informs the story, the

way that I think some journalists

0:53:590:54:03

will react, I am waiting to read the

accounts of the stockholder syndrome

0:54:030:54:08

and how people are complicit with

their captors and even in some way

0:54:080:54:13

encourage and induce their captors

to treat them as they do. You know,

0:54:130:54:17

Stockholm syndrome is very much a

journalistic mean. It doesn't have

0:54:170:54:23

any

0:54:230:54:28

any psychiatric definition, I know

defence counsel are keen on using it

0:54:280:54:31

in some cases over the years, but

it's clear to me that there is a

0:54:310:54:35

very big question mark over the

extent in which these and others

0:54:350:54:44

mentioned in the same breath were

able to express themselves freely.

0:54:440:54:47

They were living under extreme

coercion.

Alicia, coming back to you

0:54:470:54:52

for a moment, how do you reflect on

what happened to you as a

0:54:520:54:55

13-year-old now?

Well, I guess that

it certainly changed my life in so

0:54:550:55:01

many ways and it has been a very

long, hard road to recovery and

0:55:010:55:08

thereafter or good days and there

are still bad days -- there are

0:55:080:55:14

still good days and there are still

bad days. And that's OK. It's OK

0:55:140:55:20

years and years later to instil

experience pain from what you

0:55:200:55:23

experienced when you are younger.

Rebecca, you worked as I said with

0:55:230:55:32

Jay-Z -- with Jaycee Dugard. How

would it differ with a large group

0:55:320:55:39

of siblings?

I think early on,

getting a read on each individual

0:55:390:55:45

person. I am going to echo the fact

that there are facts we do not know.

0:55:450:55:50

For example, are we sure they are

raw blood siblings? I can't know

0:55:500:55:54

that for sure and I can't imagine

that we would be able to say that

0:55:540:55:59

definitively at this stage. What we

do know is that we have a group of

0:55:590:56:03

closely connected people, very

likely that they are genetically

0:56:030:56:06

connected. They are all going to

have different reactions and

0:56:060:56:10

different needs and so the pace of

the work has to go at each

0:56:100:56:16

individual person. Also, 100%

hallelujah about the stockholder. --

0:56:160:56:27

at the Stockholm syndrome comments.

I have never worked with anyone who

0:56:330:56:40

has been quite an quake in love with

their captors.

It it possible to

0:56:400:56:47

recover from this and live a happy,

fulfilled life in the future?

As you

0:56:470:56:53

might imagine, it's difficult to do

research on all these kinds of cases

0:56:530:56:56

which have different and

idiosyncratic features, but there is

0:56:560:57:01

research about how people have

adapted to being kept in captivity

0:57:010:57:05

and conditions of extreme cruelty.

Notably, a lot of research on

0:57:050:57:11

survivors of the Holocaust and

whilst there are, you know, there is

0:57:110:57:15

no way of denying that there are

negative symptoms that people often

0:57:150:57:18

carry with them for many years after

these events, really, the story that

0:57:180:57:24

I think should be given more

attention is the resilience that

0:57:240:57:27

people show in adapting. So many

people actually who often are not

0:57:270:57:34

picked up in the more journalistic

explanations of these things

0:57:340:57:38

actually live very successful lives.

There are, of course, questions

0:57:380:57:44

about can they develop successful

relationships which involve trust

0:57:440:57:49

and their one and there is evidence

that people can have difficulties

0:57:490:57:52

with this but it's a mixed picture.

What ought to be optimised --

0:57:520:57:57

emphasised more, in some ways, is

the optimistic fact that given time,

0:57:570:58:04

as we heard earlier, people are able

to make very successful transitions

0:58:040:58:08

into so-called normal, happy and

healthy lives.

Thank you, thank you

0:58:080:58:13

all very much. We really appreciate

you coming onto the programme and

0:58:130:58:17

talking to our British audience,

Alicia, Rebecca and Peter.

0:58:170:58:25

Coming up.

0:58:270:58:29

After 10am, we hear from a business

trying to improve their staff's

0:58:290:58:32

life-work balance -

as well as a woman who worked 90

0:58:320:58:35

hours a week when she started

working for herself.

0:58:350:58:37

The latest news and sport on the

way. Before that, all the weather.

0:58:370:58:40

The latest news and sport on the

way. Before that, all the weather.

0:58:400:58:43

We saw a lot of snow last night. We

currently have 38 centimetres in

0:58:430:58:51

places in Dumfries and Galloway.

That is going on for 15 inches and

0:58:510:58:55

not too far-away from the M74 where

we saw

0:58:550:59:04

we saw all the problems. You can see

sheltered areas have much lower

0:59:060:59:15

depths of snow. In Northern Ireland,

where the hills are not as high, you

0:59:150:59:21

can see 20 centimetres and ten

centimetres, a more even

0:59:210:59:24

distribution. Although of course I

acknowledge that that is twice as

0:59:240:59:28

much. What we have this morning is

some snow around and also some eyes.

0:59:280:59:32

The snow is still falling but it has

lost its intensity and also it is

0:59:320:59:36

not as widespread as it was earlier.

The other thing is the wind will

0:59:360:59:40

ease down a touch compared to

earlier but still we will have snow

0:59:400:59:45

showers and it still will be windy.

South of the snow showers, showers

0:59:450:59:52

will tend to be rain and somewhere

and we may see Hale and sleet. In

0:59:521:00:01

between, we will see some sunshine.

It's the same in Northern Ireland.

1:00:011:00:05

Some showers, some bright spots,

some of them wintry especially with

1:00:051:00:09

height, and for Northern England,

the showers not as prolific this

1:00:091:00:13

morning. There will be some around

which will still be wintry. Some of

1:00:131:00:17

us getting away with a dry day, as

is their nature with showers. East

1:00:171:00:21

Anglia, the Midlands, Kent,

Hampshire into Wales and the

1:00:211:00:25

south-west, a lot of dry weather and

sunshine, but big waves crashing on

1:00:251:00:30

shore in the West. Then the next

system comes our way, a deep area of

1:00:301:00:35

low pressure. I have stopped this

chart that 8pm this evening to show

1:00:351:00:39

you what is happening. There is a

lot of rain coming our way, some

1:00:391:00:42

heavy rain, we will see snow in

places in the hills of Wales and

1:00:421:00:49

Northern Ireland. As this rain

pushes through, I will run the chart

1:00:491:00:54

to buy they tomorrow, you can see

further heavy snow across northern

1:00:541:00:58

England, also through southern and

possibly Central Scotland. At the

1:00:581:01:01

same time, heavy rain moves across

Northern Ireland, Wales and all of

1:01:011:01:05

England away from where we have the

snow. It will be driven on by gale

1:01:051:01:09

force winds. You will have a period

of about three hours of heavy rain.

1:01:091:01:13

The wind in and will be gusting 40,

50 mph. Around the coast, we are

1:01:131:01:21

looking at wind strength of up to 70

mph. Again, there is the risk of

1:01:211:01:24

ice, and this time tomorrow morning,

we will still have some of that low

1:01:241:01:27

pressure affecting Eastham parts of

the UK with snow and rain. It will

1:01:271:01:32

clear quickly and by mid-morning it

will be in Germany. With that

1:01:321:01:36

combination, we are looking at

further likely travel disruption. We

1:01:361:01:40

had severe gales, heavy rain and

snow as well. But look how quickly

1:01:401:01:44

it clears. It pushes off into the

North Sea, the strongest winds go

1:01:441:01:48

with it, they hide it we have a

mixture of showers and sunshine and

1:01:481:01:55

once again, it will feel cool.

1:01:551:02:01

Thank you very much.

1:02:011:02:02

Hello.

1:02:021:02:03

It's Wednesday, it's 10 o'clock,

I'm Victoria Derbyshire.

1:02:031:02:05

Tens of thousands of nurses

are leaving the NHS in England every

1:02:051:02:08

year, piling pressure

on over-stretched wards

1:02:081:02:13

When I graduated, I was so excited,

I really wanted to do a job

1:02:131:02:21

where I could make a difference.

1:02:211:02:27

And to help people.

1:02:271:02:32

But I've found that things have got

more and more stressful and we've

1:02:331:02:36

been under more and more pressure.

1:02:361:02:38

The Royal College of Nursing says

pay and training need to improve.

1:02:381:02:42

Heidi tells us she is a midwife of

four years and actively looking for

1:02:421:02:46

a new job.

1:02:461:02:47

There's a warning that numerous

children and vulnerable witnesses

1:02:471:02:50

are being denied proper justice

in England and Wales,

1:02:501:02:52

because there aren't enough

specially-trained intermediaries

1:02:521:02:53

to guide them through the process

of giving evidence in court.

1:02:531:02:56

We will bring you the story. Would

you be more productive if you worked

1:02:561:03:01

less? Companies who say businesses

booming since they gave staff more

1:03:011:03:06

time off.

Workers in Germany can

stop working on the Thursday and yet

1:03:061:03:10

still produce more than we do. So

dapper, greater and longer working

1:03:101:03:15

hours does not necessarily mean we

are more productive, especially when

1:03:151:03:20

it affects our health and ability to

do our job.

Tell us about your

1:03:201:03:25

phone, there is the right work-life

balance that allows you to be more

1:03:251:03:29

productive. Let me know.

1:03:291:03:31

And the Bayeux Tapestry is set to be

displayed in Britain for the first

1:03:311:03:34

time since it was made in the 11th

Century.

1:03:341:03:36

We will talk to a man from the

British Museum who is really,

1:03:361:03:40

really, really excited about this.

1:03:401:03:46

Here's Annita, in the BBC Newsroom,

with a summary of today's news.

1:03:461:03:49

Thank you, good morning.

1:03:491:03:51

NHS figures show that 3,000 more

nurses left the health service

1:03:511:03:53

in England last year than joined.

1:03:531:03:55

In each of the past three

years, more than 10%

1:03:551:03:58

of the nursing workforce left.

1:03:581:04:00

The Government insists

there are more nurses than in 2010,

1:04:001:04:02

and that measures are being taken

to retain experienced staff.

1:04:021:04:07

One nurse told Victoria why she was

planning -- planning to give up the

1:04:071:04:13

career she used to look.

I feel that

the level of care that I am giving

1:04:131:04:19

has been compromised. I work in a

busy GP surgery, we literally have

1:04:191:04:22

ten minutes to see patients. And now

I feel that I am not being treated

1:04:221:04:28

myself. -- true to myself.

1:04:281:04:33

Documents seen by the BBC show

the services and construction giant

1:04:331:04:35

Carillion was left with just

£29 million in cash when it

1:04:351:04:38

collapsed on Monday,

but owed more than £1.3 billion

1:04:381:04:40

to its banks.

1:04:401:04:41

The figures are shown in a company

statement to the insolvency court.

1:04:411:04:45

The revelations will worry

businesses owed money by Carillion,

1:04:451:04:47

one of the biggest public-sector

contractors in the UK.

1:04:471:04:52

Snow and ice have caused problems

on roads across Scotland,

1:04:521:04:55

Northern Ireland and Northern

England.

1:04:551:04:58

The main motorway between Scotland

and England - the M74 -

1:04:581:05:02

was closed in parts because of snow,

and some drivers already on the road

1:05:021:05:05

were stuck overnight.

1:05:051:05:06

It's since re-opened.

1:05:061:05:09

The Government's appointed

a Minister for Loneliness,

1:05:091:05:11

as part of a project championed

by the murdered MP Jo Cox.

1:05:111:05:15

Tracey Crouch, who's

Civil Society Minister,

1:05:151:05:18

will take on the role,

to find ways of combating

1:05:181:05:21

the isolation felt by millions

of people across the UK.

1:05:211:05:26

A Conservative MP has apologised

for a blog post he wrote in 2012,

1:05:261:05:32

suggesting that unemployed people

on benefits should have vasectomies

1:05:321:05:34

if they couldn't afford

to have more children.

1:05:341:05:36

Ben Bradley, who's 28,

was made Conservative Vice-Chairman

1:05:361:05:39

for Youth in Theresa May's

reshuffle last week.

1:05:391:05:46

The High Court is to hear a legal

challenge against the Home Office,

1:05:461:05:50

brought on behalf of women

who were once involved

1:05:501:05:52

in prostitution.

1:05:521:05:53

They'll argue it's unlawful

for details of their convictions

1:05:531:05:55

for soliciting to be stored

and disclosed to potential

1:05:551:05:57

future employers.

1:05:571:05:59

The Home and Away actress

Jessica Falkholt has died

1:05:591:06:01

from injuries she suffered in a car

crash three weeks ago.

1:06:011:06:06

The 29-year-old actress

played Hope Morrison

1:06:061:06:07

in the Australian series.

1:06:071:06:13

The accident, in New South Wales

on Boxing Day, had already

1:06:131:06:16

killed her parents, sister

and another driver.

1:06:161:06:18

The Bayeux Tapestry is set to be

displayed in Britain for the first

1:06:181:06:21

time since it was made in the 11th

Century.

1:06:211:06:24

The French President,

Emmanuel Macron, is due to confirm

1:06:241:06:26

the loan when he meets Theresa May

at Sandhurst tomorrow.

1:06:261:06:28

It's not clear where, or when,

the artwork will be displayed.

1:06:281:06:33

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

1:06:331:06:35

More at 10:30.

1:06:351:06:38

Thank you very much.

1:06:381:06:41

Many comments from you, but yet

again, my tablet has frozen. I will

1:06:411:06:46

sort that and read that out. Really

interested to hear from you if you

1:06:461:06:51

are a nurse who has recently left

the profession or considering it and

1:06:511:06:55

the reasons why, and you work-life

balance, have you achieved that? If

1:06:551:07:00

so, how? Judging by your messages,

plenty of you working crazy hours.

1:07:001:07:04

Send me an e-mail or message is on

Facebook or Twitter. Sport now.

1:07:041:07:12

Leicester City's Kelechi Iheanacho

scored the first goal in English

1:07:121:07:15

football history to be awarded

by VAR - the Video

1:07:151:07:17

Assistant Referee.

1:07:171:07:20

He scored both goals in the 2-0

third-round replay win over

1:07:201:07:24

League One side Fleetwood Town.

1:07:241:07:29

His second provided

the slice of history.

1:07:291:07:36

Originally ruled out for offside.

1:07:361:07:41

The Video Assistant Referee thought

it was worth checking on.

1:07:411:07:44

And, as you can see,

that was the right choice -

1:07:441:07:47

the decision rightly overturned,

to help Leicester

1:07:471:07:48

ease into Round Four.

1:07:481:07:49

We are a lot better from the first

leg. We knew that we had to perform

1:07:491:07:53

a lot better and be a bit more

professional on the pitch. We have

1:07:531:07:55

done that night and got the result.

And this man has got the girls and

1:07:551:07:58

it shows that VAR does work.

1:07:581:08:03

They were joined by another

Premier League side,

1:08:031:08:05

in the shape of West Ham United,

but they needed the full 120 minutes

1:08:051:08:08

to get past Shrewsbury,

another League 1 side.

1:08:081:08:10

With Reece Burke scoring his

first West Ham goal.

1:08:101:08:12

Cardiff, Sheffield Wednesday and

Reading all went through as well.

1:08:121:08:16

Well, I'm sure there's a little bit

of disappointment not to see

1:08:161:08:19

Andy Murray at the Australian Open

but, so far, British Number 2

1:08:191:08:22

Kyle Edmund is making it look

like he's the former

1:08:221:08:24

Grand Slam winner.

1:08:241:08:28

He's reached Round 3.

1:08:281:08:33

For the first time in Melbourne.

1:08:331:08:35

Barely giving Denis Istomin

a chance with in the 6-2 6-2

1:08:351:08:37

6-4 victory overnight,

to back up that win over

1:08:371:08:40

the number-11 seed in the opening

round and a good chance

1:08:401:08:42

to go even further.

1:08:421:08:43

He'll take on Georgia's

Nikoloz Basilashvili.

1:08:431:08:48

He is joined by the 2009 champion,

Rafa Nadal, who had a straight-sets

1:08:481:08:51

victory of his own over

Argentina's Leonardo Mayer.

1:08:511:08:56

He reaches Round 3 for the 12th

time in his career.

1:08:561:09:02

On the women's side of things,

Former World Number One Caroline

1:09:021:09:05

Wozniacki had an incredible

three-set win against Jana

1:09:051:09:07

Fett, of Croatia.

1:09:071:09:09

She saved two match points and came

back from 5-1 down in the deciding

1:09:091:09:12

set to make it into Round 3.

1:09:121:09:20

But this was the winner of the day.

1:09:211:09:24

15-year-old qualifier Marta Kostyuk

is the youngest player to reach

1:09:241:09:26

the third round at a Grand Slam

in more than 20 years.

1:09:261:09:29

The World Number 521 came past

Olivia Rogowska in straight sets

1:09:291:09:33

to face her fellow Ukranian -

the fourth seed, Elina Svitolina -

1:09:331:09:36

in the last 32.

1:09:361:09:44

England's Rugby union head coach

Eddie Jones has signed a contract

1:09:451:09:49

extension to stay until 2020 on, but

not beyond that. He took over just

1:09:491:09:52

over two years ago, winning 22 of

his 23 tests so far. His original

1:09:521:09:59

deal would end after next year's

Rugby World Cup in Japan. That is

1:09:591:10:05

all the sport for now, more later

on.

1:10:051:10:08

Good morning, thank you for

watching.

1:10:081:10:10

When a child, or adult,

who finds it hard to communicate

1:10:101:10:13

appears in court, they can call

on people called 'registered

1:10:131:10:18

intermediaries' to help

them give evidence.

1:10:181:10:19

But there could be up to 250

children and vulnerable people every

1:10:191:10:22

year missing out on this service.

1:10:221:10:26

Let's speak now to our legal

eagle, Clive Coleman.

1:10:261:10:29

There has been a review, what does

it say? This is by the Victims'

1:10:291:10:33

Commissioner Baroness Newlove and it

is currently a scheme rather than a

1:10:331:10:37

service and she has found that

around 250 children and vulnerable

1:10:371:10:42

adults who need a registered in the

mutually. Don't forget, going to

1:10:421:10:47

court, the criminal justice system

is bewildering for the best of us,

1:10:471:10:50

but for the very young and

vulnerable, it can be incredibly

1:10:501:10:55

bewildering and difficult to unlock

critical key evidence they may have.

1:10:551:11:00

What registered intermediaries do,

and they are specialists in

1:11:001:11:04

communication, bassist police in

something called the achieving best

1:11:041:11:07

evidence interview, that is the

first interview with the child or

1:11:071:11:11

vulnerable witness -- they assist

police. Baroness Newlove gives the

1:11:111:11:16

example of a two-year-old who with

the assistance of the registered

1:11:161:11:20

intermediary could give an achieving

the best evidence interview that led

1:11:201:11:25

to her assailant, her attacker, and

this was a sexual assault case,

1:11:251:11:29

pleading guilty and getting ten

years. It is astonishing, isn't it?

1:11:291:11:34

It means this effectively is a voice

for the voiceless. And it can be

1:11:341:11:39

incredibly effective and without

that, it can be that those

1:11:391:11:44

witnesses, those victims, never get

access to justice. This is the issue

1:11:441:11:48

she has highlighted. First, 250 a

year probably not getting that. It

1:11:481:11:54

does not mean the cases will not go

ahead, but it could be without a

1:11:541:11:58

registered intermediary. The take-up

is patchy so five times more likely

1:11:581:12:02

in Cumbria to have a registered

intermediary in the case compared

1:12:021:12:06

with the Metropolitan Police force,

Greater Manchester, and there are

1:12:061:12:09

also issues with training, issues

with payment. What Baroness Newlove

1:12:091:12:14

is calling for is the creation of a

National Service, to become part of

1:12:141:12:19

the architecture of the criminal

justice system, with a national lead

1:12:191:12:22

to lobby government on behalf of

registered intermediaries, to ensure

1:12:221:12:28

that vulnerable people that need

them get them. And there is a time

1:12:281:12:31

lag of four weeks. This places

police and prosecutors in a

1:12:311:12:36

difficult position because you want

the evidence as quickly as possible,

1:12:361:12:39

to get it as fresh and possible,

Sergei go on and just do the

1:12:391:12:45

interviewing yourself or do you wait

for the expert, the registered

1:12:451:12:49

intermediary, to get on board and

get a better quality of evidence? It

1:12:491:12:53

is a really difficult problem and

that is why she is calling for a

1:12:531:12:56

National Service.

Quick word from

the Ministry of Justice?

They say,

1:12:561:13:01

we have doubled the scheme. We have

increased the scheme. In recent

1:13:011:13:04

times. And having said that, they

will look very carefully at this

1:13:041:13:09

report and study it.

They give very

much. -- thank you very much.

1:13:091:13:14

Now we can speak to two

registered intermediaries.

1:13:141:13:16

Esther Rumble works with children

or adults with learning

1:13:161:13:20

difficulties, who witness

an alleged sex offence.

1:13:201:13:23

Naomi Mason, whose agency works

with adult defendants

1:13:231:13:25

with learning difficulties.

1:13:251:13:28

And Jane, whose son has

Asperger's Syndrome and had

1:13:281:13:30

a registered intermediary

when he gave evidence

1:13:301:13:34

about a serious assault he suffered.

1:13:341:13:38

Thank you very much, good morning.

Jane, thank you so much for joining

1:13:381:13:42

us. Tell us how the intermediary

helped your son.

Initially, she was

1:13:421:13:50

introduced to us by the police, she

was hand-picked specifically. And it

1:13:501:13:56

took nearly two years for my son to

gain the ability to speak to someone

1:13:561:14:05

properly. She empowered him to have

a voice and gave him support. To

1:14:051:14:11

find a way forward and be believed.

And without her, would this have

1:14:111:14:16

been possible?

No, not at all. Not

at all, she was his strength and

1:14:161:14:24

support.

And I can feel it feels

like you are emotional talking about

1:14:241:14:32

this, can you tell is why?

It was a

very long case. We could not have

1:14:321:14:36

done it without the police and the

intermediary. And it gave us closure

1:14:361:14:41

in a way that we would never have

had if we had not had the

1:14:411:14:48

intermediary. They are invaluable to

people like ourselves. Very much

1:14:481:14:53

required and needed, I believe.

Thank you for sharing that, Jane.

1:14:531:14:58

Can you give an example of the work

you have done, Esther, which has led

1:14:581:15:03

to a vulnerable or a young witness

being able to give evidence?

1:15:031:15:08

Absolutely. I am a speech and

language therapist by profession. My

1:15:081:15:14

day-to-day experience is working

with children and adults whose

1:15:141:15:18

communication is different. And that

means I can talk to them in really

1:15:181:15:21

simple words. And often, I have

strategies which are second nature

1:15:211:15:26

to me because of my training. So to

change the length of a sentence, to

1:15:261:15:31

help them sit down in a way that

does not feel threatening or

1:15:311:15:35

demanding. So I am thinking about a

little girl I worked with who had

1:15:351:15:41

been interviewed by the police. She

was six. She had not had a

1:15:411:15:45

registered intermediary with her and

the officer really had to their

1:15:451:15:48

best. But the result was a girl who

really did not want to talk and was

1:15:481:15:54

pretty much just curled up on a sofa

in the interview suite.

1:15:541:16:04

When I met her for the first time,

it was in school, a comfortable

1:16:041:16:09

environment, in a

1:16:091:16:10

it was in school, a comfortable

environment, in a room she liked and

1:16:101:16:11

had chosen. I did a really simple

but informed play -based assessment

1:16:111:16:16

of her. I got a feel for where she

was at with her language, her

1:16:161:16:21

interest, what thoughts she could

put into words and what things she

1:16:211:16:24

needed help with. With the police

officer's support and on video, we

1:16:241:16:31

made little kind of setups of the

places that she was going to be

1:16:311:16:35

talking about so that she had

something real in front of her and

1:16:351:16:39

then when she was explaining what

had happened, she could talk about

1:16:391:16:43

where people were in dreams in the

house, in beds who were there, and

1:16:431:16:49

actually it led to a case where she

gave evidence about things that had

1:16:491:16:54

happened to her but also to her

siblings, so it really opened a

1:16:541:16:58

gateway.

It is so significant. What

about your examples?

I am also a

1:16:581:17:08

speech and language therapist but in

the NHS, I worked with adults with

1:17:081:17:15

learning difficulties and people

with the autistic spectrum condition

1:17:151:17:23

and one women with autistic spectrum

to condition that I assessed, I

1:17:231:17:27

found her understanding of language

was very literal. We did a police

1:17:271:17:31

interview and she had already told

the police a little bit about what

1:17:311:17:34

had happened, but during the

interview, she was asked by the

1:17:341:17:39

police officer, did he touch you on

top of or underneath your bra? And

1:17:391:17:44

she said, neither. And I looked at

the police others as if to say,

1:17:441:17:48

well, this is a bit odd. And I

suddenly realised she had

1:17:481:17:52

misunderstood that it wasn't on top

of or underneath her bra, but by

1:17:521:17:58

rephrasing inside or outside your

bra, she was then able to get clear

1:17:581:18:02

evidence. Had an intermediary not

been there to clear up that

1:18:021:18:06

misunderstanding, it may have

sounded like a very different events

1:18:061:18:08

had taken place.

And it would appear

that according to Baroness new love,

1:18:081:18:13

there are some people who would

really benefit from your help, your

1:18:131:18:19

services, but they are just not

getting access because of this

1:18:191:18:23

postcode lottery around the country.

Would you agree with that?

1:18:231:18:30

Absolutely. Quite often when I work

with somebody they say, well, I wish

1:18:301:18:34

I had had you last week or the week

before. And police officers suddenly

1:18:341:18:38

realise there are lots of cases

where they may have been able to get

1:18:381:18:41

much better evidence had they had an

intermediary helping them at the

1:18:411:18:44

interview stage. One of my concerns

is that in the 12 years I have been

1:18:441:18:50

a registered intermediary, things

have changed considerably, in that

1:18:501:18:53

we used to be involved far more at

the police stage and involved in the

1:18:531:18:59

interview. Now, it's very often that

we are not involved until... Sorry,

1:18:591:19:06

the achieving best interests --

achieving best results interview.

1:19:061:19:19

Now, we are generally that at trial

stage. Maybe it is to do with police

1:19:191:19:24

funding that we are not called upon

sooner but that must be cases where

1:19:241:19:30

the interview is not as good as it

could have been and then it doesn't

1:19:301:19:38

go to trial because the interview is

not as good as it could have been.

I

1:19:381:19:41

have had a couple of really good

practical world like that where the

1:19:411:19:45

case was not going to proceed and it

was my report where I was able to

1:19:451:19:49

explain what the person was able to

deal with their language that made

1:19:491:19:52

sense of what had happened to them,

the case proceeded to court and

1:19:521:19:56

actually the guy pleaded guilty --

guilty before we got to court.

That

1:19:561:20:02

was a great result. Thank you both,

thank you for talking to our

1:20:021:20:06

audience about your work, and Jane,

thank you for talking about your

1:20:061:20:10

experience and your son's.

After 1030, we were victims, not

1:20:101:20:16

offenders. We speak to a woman who

used to be involved in prostitution.

1:20:161:20:21

She says her previous convictions

are stopping her from getting a job

1:20:211:20:25

and her legal case starts today.

Next, let's bring you up-to-date

1:20:251:20:29

with the story we covered yesterday

about protesters outside and

1:20:291:20:35

abortion clinic in West London.

1:20:351:20:41

The demonstrators are accused

of "harassing" women attending

1:20:411:20:42

the Marie Stopes clinic in Ealing.

1:20:421:20:44

Last night, councillors

unanimously agreed to begin

1:20:441:20:46

a consultation on whether to bring

in a Public Space Protection Order -

1:20:461:20:49

known as a PSPO - to create a 'safe

zone' at the clinic.

1:20:491:20:54

If it's granted, it would be

the first time it's been used

1:20:541:20:57

in a situation involving

an abortion clinic.

1:20:571:20:58

Let's hear a little from our

discussion on the programme

1:20:581:21:01

yesterday, when a nurse and manager

from the Ealing centre described

1:21:011:21:04

what his clients were experiencing.

1:21:041:21:09

They tell us what they have

experienced, that they have been

1:21:091:21:12

called murderers, they have had

their paths blocked, they have felt

1:21:121:21:16

judged and shamed and we see it

happening not only on the way in but

1:21:161:21:20

on the way out as well, which is how

we know that this is not about

1:21:201:21:24

providing information and support,

it's about making people feel

1:21:241:21:28

ashamed, scared and intimidated

about accessing treatment that they

1:21:281:21:31

have in most cases thought long and

hard about and come to a firm

1:21:311:21:35

decision.

You have cameras outside?

It focuses on our property. We

1:21:351:21:43

cannot fill beyond that because it's

a public area.

The area is a step

1:21:431:21:50

closer. Ealing Council will decide

tonight. What effect do you think

1:21:501:21:56

this could have on the Ealing clinic

if it were brought in?

It would be

1:21:561:22:00

an incredible day for us to know

that our patients were coming into

1:22:001:22:04

the clinic free from that experience

on the way in and on the way out. It

1:22:041:22:08

would unfortunately create a bit of

a postcode lottery where it's

1:22:081:22:10

something that people can enjoy in

Ealing, but it's happening outside

1:22:101:22:15

clinics across the country. But it's

an important first step and we would

1:22:151:22:19

welcome it.

Clare, you have been

going to the clinic and standing

1:22:191:22:24

outside for several years, taking

part individuals. The last time --

1:22:241:22:28

taking part in the jewels. The last

time we spoke to, you denied taking

1:22:281:22:37

part in the things we are hearing

from the nurse from the clinic. Is

1:22:371:22:43

he lying?

Unfortunately, yes.

How do

you respond to that?

I think

1:22:431:22:52

unfortunately there has been a lot

of denial about how this affects our

1:22:521:22:55

clients, we hear it from our

patients and from neighbours who

1:22:551:23:01

phone us and say they can see people

outside distressed. Officers from

1:23:011:23:05

the council have heard it from women

that they themselves have felt

1:23:051:23:10

intimidated on the way in.

Claire,

you wouldn't know the impact on some

1:23:101:23:14

of the patients because once they

are inside, you don't see them, so

1:23:141:23:18

you have no idea what impact you are

having on those people.

When you

1:23:181:23:23

stand outside an abortion centre for

20 years, and many other women who

1:23:231:23:27

come with us are women who have had

abortions, women who have been

1:23:271:23:32

through abortion centres, who have

been passed people like us

1:23:321:23:35

themselves who didn't maybe agree us

at the time but now come have a good

1:23:351:23:42

idea of how we feel.

But do you

accept that however you are doing

1:23:421:23:46

it, but some women and their

partners, once you get inside the

1:23:461:23:50

Marie Stopes clinic, they are upset,

distressed, angry at you, not that

1:23:501:23:54

there are a decision to have a

termination.

I think abortion is

1:23:541:23:59

something that upsets women a lot.

It can take a sentenced to answer a

1:23:591:24:07

question. I accept that some women

who are already upset at a horrible

1:24:071:24:11

decision they feel they are having

to take do not like our presence

1:24:111:24:14

there.

I accept that. Obviously we

will keep you up-to-date on that

1:24:141:24:19

decision. More news from the

council, we will bring it to you.

1:24:191:24:26

Hundreds of thousands of us

are working crazy hours.

1:24:261:24:30

One in eight of us works more

than 48 hours every week according

1:24:301:24:33

to analysis of Government data

for this programme by the TUC.

1:24:331:24:36

It's bad for us, but it could also

be bad for business.

1:24:361:24:39

We've spoken to a number

of companies who have actually

1:24:391:24:41

seen productivity rise

when they give their

1:24:411:24:43

staff more time off.

1:24:431:24:44

Our report Michael Cowan has been

to meet the companies pioneering

1:24:441:24:47

new approaches to improve

work-life balance...

1:24:471:24:48

We brought you his full film

earlier. Here is a short extract

1:24:481:24:51

before we talk about this.

1:24:511:24:53

Eight hours labour, eight hours

recreation and eight hours rest -

1:24:531:24:56

that was the ethos of industrialist

Robert Owen in 1817.

1:24:561:24:58

And for much of the last two

centuries, we haven't

1:24:581:25:01

deviated from his vision.

1:25:011:25:02

But for many, the work-life balance

has become a little bit unbalanced.

1:25:021:25:05

But some companies are drastically

changing the way we work.

1:25:051:25:11

We start in London, at a design

company called Normally,

1:25:121:25:15

who believe a four-day week

is the key to their

1:25:151:25:18

company's success.

1:25:181:25:21

We've observed that lots of people

wait for their whole life for that

1:25:211:25:25

big moment when they retire.

1:25:251:25:27

But we've seen that in a few cases,

that never happens,

1:25:271:25:30

because you get ill,

or you, you know,

1:25:301:25:32

you're older by then.

1:25:321:25:33

You're not as agile.

1:25:331:25:35

You don't have the energy to really

appreciate that time any more.

1:25:351:25:38

Maybe we can just flip that round.

1:25:381:25:39

Maybe we can just take that time

and move it forward,

1:25:391:25:43

and give it back to ourselves

and our employees.

1:25:431:25:46

And so that's when we decided, we're

going to go for a four-day week.

1:25:461:25:51

But on a larger scale,

are there any economic benefits?

1:25:511:25:54

Do longer working hours lead

to greater productivity?

1:25:541:25:58

In the UK, we have a bit of a puzzle

when it comes to our productivity.

1:25:581:26:02

Workers in Germany, for example,

can actually stop working

1:26:021:26:04

on a Thursday and yet still produce

more than we do.

1:26:041:26:09

So therefore, greater and longer

working hours doesn't necessarily

1:26:091:26:11

mean that we're more productive.

1:26:111:26:13

Especially when it negatively

impacts our health and our

1:26:131:26:15

ability to do our job.

1:26:151:26:18

Over a year ago, a marketing firm

in Glasgow thought they'd

1:26:181:26:21

trial a four-day week.

1:26:211:26:22

The results surprised them

because not only did working less

1:26:221:26:25

maximise productivity,

it also boosted profits.

1:26:251:26:28

When did you decide to move

to a four-day week?

1:26:281:26:32

We ran a trial of different kind

of flexible working patterns

1:26:321:26:34

and in the three months that we ran

that programme, the people

1:26:341:26:37

working the four-day week

were the most productive.

1:26:371:26:41

From a business perspective,

what are the benefits?

1:26:411:26:44

So, productivity increased

initially by about 38%.

1:26:441:26:49

And over the last year or so, it's

settled down to about 30% overall.

1:26:491:26:52

Our business has

grown substantially.

1:26:521:26:55

We entered 2017 on 2.2

million turnover.

1:26:551:26:58

We entered 2018 in a

5-million turnover a year.

1:26:581:27:02

Do you envisage a time

where you would revert

1:27:021:27:04

back to a five-day week?

1:27:041:27:05

Definitely not.

1:27:051:27:07

But one size doesn't fit all.

1:27:071:27:09

This is Agent Marketing,

in Liverpool.

1:27:091:27:11

They have a company dog and bikes

to ride to meetings on.

1:27:111:27:15

And two years ago,

they trialled a six-hour day.

1:27:151:27:19

It didn't quite work

for your business, it didn't quite

1:27:191:27:21

work for your clients,

which you think that was?

1:27:211:27:29

-- why do you think that was?

1:27:311:27:32

We always said that when we did

the trial, the most important thing

1:27:321:27:36

was obviously that client work

would not suffer.

1:27:361:27:38

We would always meet deadlines.

1:27:381:27:41

And if we had to sacrifice

a six-hour working day some days,

1:27:411:27:43

to meet deadlines, we would do that.

1:27:431:27:45

So how we do it now is,

we have two shorter days.

1:27:451:27:48

So we finish, we do a six-hour day

on a Friday and then one

1:27:481:27:51

day in the week based

on deadlines and workload.

1:27:511:27:54

All the businesses we met had

one thing in common -

1:27:541:27:56

they weren't afraid to experiment.

1:27:561:27:57

And whether they were successful

or not, their sheer willingness

1:27:571:28:00

to try new things is what's

going to drive forward innovation,

1:28:001:28:02

and that will create a better

work-life balance for workers

1:28:021:28:05

across the country.

1:28:051:28:07

Let's talk to Naomi Gilmour,

who used to run a million pound

1:28:071:28:10

business that made her ill;

Elizabeth Varley who worked 90 hour

1:28:101:28:13

weeks when she set up her business

TechHub;

1:28:131:28:17

and Chris Shalliker who works

for Northern Gas and Power,

1:28:171:28:19

which is trying to improve

its staff's work life balance.

1:28:191:28:27

In what sort of way, Chris?

What

would you say? Already, I would say

1:28:271:28:33

that Northern gas and power started

as two people in a bedroom and one

1:28:331:28:36

of the nice things that have

happened is as new people have

1:28:361:28:43

joined, they have become friends and

we have maintained that feel within

1:28:431:28:46

the business, even now.

So the buses

are nice?

Yes. When we have events,

1:28:461:28:55

everyone is involved. We have full

staff meetings, all our senior

1:28:551:29:00

managers and directors are on the

floor amongst everyone else. There's

1:29:001:29:04

not so much a duty of care but a

genuine care around people because

1:29:041:29:07

we all know each other really well.

So how long are the hours though?

1:29:071:29:15

Our hours RE standard 9-5. If

somebody has something to finish,

1:29:151:29:19

obviously you would expect them to

finish it, however, what I would say

1:29:191:29:24

is that our guys really push

themselves very hard, because they

1:29:241:29:29

get so much back in reward from that

as well. And what happens in your

1:29:291:29:34

9-5 like Willow was affect what

happens outside and vice versa.

1:29:341:29:39

Naomi, this business that you used

to run that ended up with a lot of

1:29:391:29:44

stress for you, how many hours a

week and why?

OK, so, I don't know

1:29:441:29:51

exact hours but I know I was working

seven hours a day 20 47, so probably

1:29:511:29:57

hour days, pretty much seven days a

week. It had a massive impact on me

1:29:571:30:03

and my life and my kind of balance.

I had two small children at the

1:30:031:30:08

time. The business actually ended up

closing back in 2009.

After that,

1:30:081:30:15

you started up another company. Why?

You hadn't learned your lesson!

1:30:151:30:19

Obviously you've got to work, but go

on, what did you do differently the

1:30:191:30:23

second time?

1:30:231:30:28

I set up a business that allowed me

to be with my children and also, to

1:30:281:30:34

do what I love. I help businesses

create online presence, I am a web

1:30:341:30:40

designer and I help people succeed

online, something that I am good at.

1:30:401:30:46

I work predominantly with women in

business who have the same

1:30:461:30:52

challenges of being there for our

children, being a mother and also

1:30:521:30:56

having successful business.

Let me

read out the messages before I bring

1:30:561:31:01

in Elizabeth. Dave says, when I was

with a communication company, I did

1:31:011:31:05

ten hours a day, but the big bonus

was a day of each week and two every

1:31:051:31:11

fourth week. The team agreed this

gave them more quality family time.

1:31:111:31:16

This says, I used to work in a

bakery, 16 hour days six days a

1:31:161:31:20

week. I was fortunate and I loved

the work with a passion. One guy was

1:31:201:31:24

does not always mean you hate it.

Declan says, what about those in

1:31:241:31:29

service industries and

labour-intensive jobs? I sort of

1:31:291:31:32

this jobs in your report. Millions

that could not afford had a 40 hour

1:31:321:31:37

wage for a 32 hour week, their

point. And Karen says, much more

1:31:371:31:42

needs to be discussed about

work-life balance but each is, it

1:31:421:31:45

does not exist. I spent six hours

every day planning and assessing on

1:31:451:31:49

top of teaching six hours every day.

When it comes to being

1:31:491:31:53

self-employed, do you think you have

to sacrifice the lives side of it,

1:31:531:31:57

the quality family time?

I think it

really depends what you were doing.

1:31:571:32:02

There is a difference between being

self-employed as a freelance

1:32:021:32:08

employer and creating a business you

intend to grow. And you can do very

1:32:081:32:13

longer hours in both. But when you

are trying to make something new and

1:32:131:32:17

put that out to the world, you

really have to be very focused on

1:32:171:32:22

what you are doing. And we work with

other early stage technology

1:32:221:32:27

companies to help them do the same

thing. We see it again and again

1:32:271:32:33

with founders excited about putting

something new out to the world. And

1:32:331:32:36

that is one reason why they work so

hard.

So they are prepared to make

1:32:361:32:42

sacrifices, certainly in the early

stages, that would make sense.

And

1:32:421:32:45

your founders did the same? Yes, of

course, if you start a business with

1:32:451:32:49

just two business people, you work

the hours you can. As that goes,

1:32:491:32:54

maybe you can take your pot off the

gas a bit. We do push our guys

1:32:541:32:59

harder to read a week from nine to

five, but you look every month and

1:32:591:33:03

everybody its targets. -- hard every

week. Our guys are that good. We

1:33:031:33:11

have movie and pizza Fridays every

month. Does anyone go?

The entire

1:33:111:33:17

office! So it is not after work.

Every quarter, we have a Benz

1:33:171:33:22

everybody goes to which are

fantastic. We had wild raves.

That

1:33:221:33:28

is very 90s!

And we get December off

on top of your holidays.

So you are

1:33:281:33:38

working extra hard in the months up

to that?

Yes, everybody pushes

1:33:381:33:43

really hard, but there are rewards

on top of your salary and the other

1:33:431:33:46

benefits they get.

Quick final word,

Naomi, your advice to everybody

1:33:461:33:52

working crazy hours from your own

experience?

I would say to step away

1:33:521:33:58

and take a bit of self care as well,

especially when it is your business,

1:33:581:34:02

you cannot look after yourself, you

experience burn-out and if you do,

1:34:021:34:07

you cannot serve your customers

because the business is you. So it

1:34:071:34:11

is totally about creating those

boundaries for your own life.

By the

1:34:111:34:15

word from you, Elizabeth?

In the

early days, expecting to spend all

1:34:151:34:22

your time and focusing on something

is fine and that is great, but you

1:34:221:34:25

also need to take holidays and

weekends and evenings, which you

1:34:251:34:29

don't do at the beginning. And

really be able to rely on your team.

1:34:291:34:33

We have an incredible team and makes

a huge difference to an entrepreneur

1:34:331:34:37

in terms of doing a lot and being

able to take more time.

Thank you.

1:34:371:34:43

Your messages are very welcome, if

you have achieved work-life balance.

1:34:431:34:49

Still to come in the programme.

1:34:491:34:51

Could a simple, cheap and harmless

drink during labour reduce

1:34:511:34:53

the number of emergency caesareans?

1:34:531:34:59

This is such an interesting story.

1:34:591:35:01

Experts at the University of

Liverpool have been looking into it.

1:35:011:35:08

We will find out more.

1:35:081:35:12

NHS figures show that 3,000 more

nurses left the health service

1:35:121:35:15

in England last year than joined.

1:35:151:35:19

In each of the past three

years, more than 10%

1:35:191:35:21

of the nursing workforce left.

1:35:211:35:22

The Government insists

there are more nurses than in 2010 -

1:35:221:35:28

and that measures are being taken

to retain experienced staff.

1:35:281:35:31

Documents seen by the BBC show

the services and construction giant

1:35:311:35:34

Carillion was left with just

£29 million in cash when it

1:35:341:35:37

collapsed on Monday,

but owed more than £1.3

1:35:371:35:39

billion to its banks.

1:35:391:35:40

The figures are shown in a company

statement to the insolvency court.

1:35:401:35:43

The revelations will worry

businesses owed money by Carillion,

1:35:431:35:45

one of the biggest public-sector

contractors in the UK.

1:35:451:35:49

Snow and ice have caused problems

on roads across Scotland,

1:35:491:35:52

Northern Ireland and Northern

England.

1:35:521:35:53

The main motorway between Scotland

and England - the M74 -

1:35:531:35:56

was closed in parts because of snow,

and some drivers already on the road

1:35:561:35:59

were stuck overnight.

1:35:591:36:00

It's since re-opened.

1:36:001:36:08

The Home and Away actress

Jessica Falkholt has died

1:36:101:36:13

from injuries she suffered in a car

crash three weeks ago.

1:36:131:36:16

The 29-year-old actress

played Hope Morrison

1:36:161:36:17

in the Australian series.

1:36:171:36:20

The accident, in New South Wales

on Boxing Day, had already

1:36:201:36:22

killed her parents, sister

and the other driver.

1:36:221:36:30

The sport now. Hello again.

1:36:321:36:36

At the Australian Open tennis,

there's been another good win

1:36:361:36:41

for British Number Two Kyle Edmund.

1:36:411:36:42

He cruised past Denis Istomin

in straight sets to reach

1:36:421:36:45

the Third Round for the first time.

1:36:451:36:48

But the win of the day went

to 15-year-old Marta Kostyuk -

1:36:481:36:51

she's the youngest player to reach

the third round at a Grand Slam

1:36:511:36:54

in more than 20 years,

after coming past Olivia Rogowska.

1:36:541:36:59

It's been announced this morning

that Eddie Jones has signed

1:36:591:37:02

a two-year contract extension

to stay as England's

1:37:021:37:04

Rugby Union Head Coach.

1:37:041:37:05

His contract was due

to end after next year's

1:37:051:37:07

World Cup in Japan.

1:37:071:37:10

There was a piece of English

footballing history last night,

1:37:101:37:13

as the VAR system was responsible

for awarding a goal

1:37:131:37:15

for the first time.

1:37:151:37:17

It came in Leicester City's 2-0 win

over Fleetwood Town in their FA Cup

1:37:171:37:20

third-round replay.

1:37:201:37:22

That is all the board for now, I

will be back with more at 11

1:37:221:37:27

o'clock.

Thanks.

1:37:271:37:35

Back to the news that Carillion owed

enormous amounts and did not have

1:37:351:37:40

much money in the bank, what do the

figures tell us?

What a dire state

1:37:401:37:45

Carillion was in when it went into

insolvency on Monday. The only had

1:37:451:37:50

£29 million, this is a multi-billion

pound company. That is all the money

1:37:501:37:54

they had. It was so little that they

could not even stump up the fees

1:37:541:37:58

that you need in order to start

going through the insolvency

1:37:581:38:02

process. That is something the

Government had to provide. And on

1:38:021:38:06

the debt site, they owed the banks

£1.3 billion, which they could not

1:38:061:38:11

service. Adding in other things,

other ways in which they were in

1:38:111:38:16

hock to the banks, it was over £2

billion.

And that does not include

1:38:161:38:21

the deficit in the pension bond?

No,

that is not like a bank debt, it is

1:38:211:38:27

a long-term liability they could not

meet. Although that was put at

1:38:271:38:33

nearly £600 million, the pension

protection fund which is going to

1:38:331:38:37

have to take on the pensioners and

pay their pensions in the long run,

1:38:371:38:40

it says it looks more like a £900

million deficit. So huge gaps here.

1:38:401:38:46

And if you read through the court

documents that have come out since

1:38:461:38:51

yesterday evening about this

process, you can see how difficult a

1:38:511:38:55

job it is going to be to work

through this business and sort out

1:38:551:38:59

what can survive, what jobs can

survive, what work you can carry on.

1:38:591:39:04

Where there is a customer who still

wants work. There are hundreds of

1:39:041:39:09

contracts. All Carillion was, in a

sense, was a big organisation that

1:39:091:39:14

signed the contracts to provide

services and build things and bombed

1:39:141:39:18

out those contracts to smaller

suppliers. It is those connections

1:39:181:39:22

that have to be remade now. What is

going to happen today? The

1:39:221:39:26

Government said they were giving 48

hours from Monday, said that is

1:39:261:39:30

right now. The carry on supporting

where Carillion's business was

1:39:301:39:37

entirely in the private sector. It

was doing cleaning and maintenance

1:39:371:39:41

work for private sector customers.

And the Government said it would

1:39:411:39:44

carry on supporting the public

sector work, so in schools and

1:39:441:39:47

hospitals. And so people on

tenterhooks to find out what the 48

1:39:471:39:52

hours means. Whether work will to

stop at the minute. My impression

1:39:521:39:57

from speaking to the insolvency

service is that they do not see this

1:39:571:40:00

as a deadline as a cliff edge. Those

contracts I mentioned, they are

1:40:001:40:04

working through them. Over the next

days, we will get more clarity, but

1:40:041:40:10

today, we will hear again about

businesses having to stop work and

1:40:101:40:14

lay people off, some talking about

having to go into insolvency

1:40:141:40:17

themselves because they cannot carry

on without their business with

1:40:171:40:21

Carillion. So goes all.

Rees are

still coming through. Thank you,

1:40:211:40:26

Simon.

1:40:261:40:31

Last summer, we first brought

you news that women who used to be

1:40:311:40:34

involved in prostitution

were going to try and change the law

1:40:341:40:36

so that they wouldn't have

to disclose their past criminal

1:40:361:40:39

convictions - disclosures

they told us which were

1:40:391:40:41

stopping them getting jobs.

1:40:411:40:49

They argue as teenagers, they were

victims, not offenders.

1:40:511:40:53

Today, the judicial review begins.

1:40:531:40:56

I've speaking to one of those

bringing the case today -

1:40:561:40:58

Fiona Broadfoot, who has 50

convictions, and her

1:40:581:41:00

lawyer, Harriet Wistrich.

1:41:001:41:01

Well, as a child, I was convicted

as a common prostitute.

1:41:011:41:04

I was introduced to

prostitution by a pimp.

1:41:041:41:06

A much older man, who groomed me

and trafficked me from the North

1:41:061:41:10

down to London and coerced me

onto the street, into

1:41:101:41:12

prostitution on the streets.

1:41:121:41:19

So, as a result of that,

I became very entrenched

1:41:191:41:21

and have a catalogue of criminal

offences against me that,

1:41:211:41:24

30 years down the line,

are still impacting on my life.

1:41:241:41:32

In what way?

1:41:341:41:35

Well, it's...

1:41:351:41:39

I feel disgusted and humiliated and

degraded having to expose my past,

1:41:391:41:42

which was actually abusive.

1:41:421:41:49

And, you know, I don't think

it's a criminal record.

1:41:491:41:55

To me, it's a catalogue of abuse.

1:41:551:41:56

Right.

1:41:561:41:58

It's eight-page,

double sided, you know?

1:41:581:42:02

And every time I have to present

that to potential employers,

1:42:021:42:09

or when my son was at school,

to the parents and teachers,

1:42:111:42:14

to the headteacher, it brings back,

it triggers a lot of trauma

1:42:141:42:17

and doesn't help me to move on.

1:42:171:42:20

And interestingly, I don't believe

any of the men who ever bought

1:42:201:42:23

and sold me as a child have

ever been criminalised.

1:42:231:42:26

That's where I think we should be

focusing our attention.

1:42:261:42:31

And the point is, when you apply

for a job - whoever it's with,

1:42:311:42:34

but particularly if it's working

with children - you have to talk

1:42:341:42:37

about these multiple convictions

from three decades ago.

1:42:371:42:40

That's right, yeah.

1:42:401:42:41

What is the reaction

when that happens?

1:42:411:42:44

It's mixed.

1:42:441:42:45

Some people find me inspirational

and are quite supportive.

1:42:451:42:49

But recently, I had to sit

and explain my criminal record

1:42:491:42:52

for over an hour to two senior

people in an area that

1:42:521:42:56

I was commissioned to do some work,

and I literally had to go

1:42:561:42:59

through my story,

my history of abuse.

1:42:591:43:07

That's really humiliating.

1:43:131:43:16

I'm nearly 50 years

old and I want to be able to live

1:43:161:43:19

a life free of that abuse.

1:43:191:43:23

It's OK people suggesting that

I move on, but it's very difficult

1:43:231:43:26

when you've got that

around your neck, sort of thing.

1:43:261:43:28

You know?

1:43:281:43:31

And part of your legal argument...

1:43:311:43:32

The hearing begins today.

1:43:321:43:35

We'll find out whether there'll be

a judicial review of this.

1:43:351:43:38

The legal argument is that

you believe this requirement

1:43:381:43:41

to disclose these kind

of convictions is

1:43:411:43:43

discriminatory against women.

1:43:431:43:44

Yes, it is.

1:43:441:43:46

It is actually a full judicial

review hearing today.

1:43:461:43:52

We're arguing that it is

discriminatory against women

1:43:521:43:56

because 98% of people who have

convictions for soliciting

1:43:561:43:59

are women, and because over two

thirds of jobs, types of positions

1:43:591:44:07

that you might apply for, are ones

performed by women, so it has

1:44:101:44:15

a sort of double-whammy effect.

1:44:151:44:19

We're also arguing that it's

contrary to our human rights

1:44:191:44:21

obligations in respect

of trafficking, because so many

1:44:211:44:24

women like Fiona has

described who have these,

1:44:241:44:26

who were in street prostitution,

were subject to coercion

1:44:261:44:29

or control, or moved around

the country, exploited.

1:44:291:44:35

And that's key because there will be

people watching who say,

1:44:351:44:37

well, why is this past conviction

any different from a past conviction

1:44:371:44:40

for theft or any other crime?

1:44:401:44:42

And what you're arguing is,

you were not an offender,

1:44:421:44:45

you were a victim.

1:44:451:44:46

Exactly.

1:44:461:44:47

Exactly, precisely.

1:44:471:44:50

And now, we've moved

forward a long way.

1:44:501:44:53

There is a greater understanding

about the process of grooming

1:44:531:44:56

and about the way in which young

women are kind of controlled

1:44:561:44:59

and brought into prostitution.

1:44:591:45:03

And we don't now see that

as criminal activity.

1:45:031:45:07

We see those women

as victims of crime.

1:45:071:45:13

And those from the past

who are still being penalised,

1:45:131:45:17

effectively, for something that

happened so long ago, you know,

1:45:171:45:20

it's a gross human-rights violation

and it's one that we think has

1:45:201:45:23

to come to an end.

1:45:231:45:26

And we believe there

is wide support for that.

1:45:261:45:29

So there is a debate

about prostitution and whether it

1:45:291:45:32

should be legalised,

criminalised or what should happen,

1:45:321:45:38

but across the board,

there is almost total unity

1:45:381:45:45

that this is no longer

necessary to penalise.

1:45:451:45:47

You know, there is an understanding

that these women are

1:45:471:45:49

effectively victims.

1:45:491:45:51

OK.

1:45:511:45:53

What do you say, Fiona,

to a potential employer

1:45:531:45:57

who might say, actually,

I don't want somebody who used to be

1:45:571:46:00

involved in prostitution

working in my school,

1:46:001:46:02

organisation, working

at my charity now?

1:46:021:46:08

Well, I'd say that I've managed

to be a really good mum.

1:46:081:46:11

I've got a really lovely

20-year-old son, who's a really

1:46:111:46:13

decent member of society.

1:46:131:46:14

Respectful.

1:46:141:46:18

I actually work in a youth club

in the community that

1:46:181:46:21

I was brought up in.

1:46:211:46:23

I've set up an organisation

to prevent sexual violence

1:46:231:46:27

and abuse of girls and women.

1:46:271:46:29

And it's an empowerment programme.

1:46:291:46:33

And I have a fantastic

relationship with them young

1:46:331:46:35

people, and their parents.

1:46:351:46:38

And they're all behind

this campaign too.

1:46:381:46:41

So I think people need to be...

1:46:411:46:44

Before they start judging,

I think they need to really inform

1:46:441:46:47

themselves about the realities

of prostitution, what really goes

1:46:471:46:50

on, and maybe look at some

of the men in their organisations

1:46:501:46:53

and ask, do they buy sex?

1:46:531:46:57

Do they, you know,

support that life?

1:46:571:47:01

Because the men are hidden.

1:47:011:47:05

How old were you when

you are first arrested?

1:47:051:47:07

I was 16 and a half.

1:47:071:47:09

I'd been missing

from home 18 months.

1:47:091:47:12

Wow.

1:47:121:47:13

And you were arrested?

1:47:131:47:15

I was arrested.

1:47:151:47:18

I was bailed to my pimp's

parents' address.

1:47:181:47:20

And, erm...

1:47:201:47:23

Was the pimp there

when you were arrested?

1:47:231:47:25

Yes.

1:47:251:47:27

He was stood with me

and they used first-name terms

1:47:271:47:30

with him that night,

the Vice Squad.

1:47:301:47:31

So he was a very

well-known perpetrator.

1:47:311:47:33

He wasn't arrested?

1:47:331:47:34

No.

1:47:341:47:35

He's never been arrested.

1:47:351:47:38

And that's something that a lot

of the other women say,

1:47:381:47:42

that they're the ones that

were constantly being arrested.

1:47:421:47:44

And the pimps and the perpetrators

and those men who were abusing them,

1:47:441:47:50

you know, who beat them and raped

them, were not arrested.

1:47:501:47:56

So, I mean, it's

a completely skewed...

1:47:561:48:01

The system wasn't working then,

it's not working now.

1:48:011:48:04

And we need to recognise -

who are the real victims here?

1:48:041:48:07

And change the system.

1:48:071:48:10

This is a very important challenge.

1:48:101:48:14

It comes on the back of other

challenges about criminal records.

1:48:141:48:18

But this case raises some issues

particular to exploitation

1:48:181:48:20

and street prostitution.

1:48:201:48:25

Thank you, both.

1:48:251:48:26

Thank you very much

for talking to us.

1:48:261:48:28

Thank you.

1:48:281:48:29

Thank you.

1:48:291:48:35

That judicial review will ask for

one and a half days. It starts

1:48:351:48:39

today. We will of course bring you

its outcome. Now, this is really

1:48:391:48:44

interesting. A new study suggests

that women who are failing to

1:48:441:48:48

progress when in Labour could reduce

their chances of an emergency

1:48:481:48:57

Caesarean by drinking a simple

drink. Please tell us more.

OK, good

1:48:571:49:04

morning, Victoria. Yes, so, our

scientific research carried out at

1:49:041:49:09

the University of Liverpool showed

that women who were having failure

1:49:091:49:13

to progress labours, and these are

the ones that then end up with the

1:49:131:49:17

only way to deliver the baby is to

have emergency surgery, the

1:49:171:49:24

emergency C-section, and what we

found that was in that group of

1:49:241:49:27

women, and only that group of women,

the blood that was surrounding the

1:49:271:49:33

uterus, the womb, was significantly

more acid than in any of the other

1:49:331:49:36

groups. Now, we knew from our lab

studies that acid is not helpful to

1:49:361:49:45

contractions and of course, in

Labour, you need a lot of really

1:49:451:49:48

good strong contractions to deliver

the baby. So, that was the

1:49:481:49:57

background, Victoria, so then, if

you like, we hypothesised, well, if

1:49:571:50:02

it is acid that is causing the

problems and failure to progress,

1:50:021:50:07

then can we not do anything to

overcome the acid in the uterus? And

1:50:071:50:12

that's when we, and I should say the

Wii is a couple of clinical

1:50:121:50:17

colleagues in Sweden, came up with

the idea of neutralising the acid by

1:50:171:50:24

giving a bicarbonate drink, so that

was the background to it.

Which is

1:50:241:50:32

fascinating and it seems so simple.

It worked, did it? It did, yes.

1:50:321:50:37

Again, I need to stress this is a

small trial. It's been randomised

1:50:371:50:43

and done in a blinded fashion. So,

we had 100 women in each group. The

1:50:431:50:52

control group had the normal

treatment, which is the one drug,

1:50:521:50:56

oxytocin, which may help. The second

group were given a second -- a

1:50:561:51:02

couple of sachets of the got

bicarbonate drink, which is

1:51:021:51:07

available at Street shops, available

anywhere, not a drug, popped it in

1:51:071:51:14

water fizzed up, drank it, then they

would proceed after an hour to

1:51:141:51:18

normal treatment. When we looked at

the data, it was really fascinating,

1:51:181:51:22

really exciting, because even when

we rolled out any differences in the

1:51:221:51:27

size of the babies or the size of

the women, we got a significant

1:51:271:51:32

increase in the number of women who

were able to have a successful but

1:51:321:51:37

delivery. To put that another way,

we really reduced the number of

1:51:371:51:43

women having to have surgery, and

that's what's so exciting.

So what

1:51:431:51:47

happens next then with what you've

discovered so far? I know it's a

1:51:471:51:52

smallish sample, but what do you do

next?

What we do next is struggled

1:51:521:51:57

to get funding, we will get funding,

to do a multi-centre trial, though

1:51:571:52:02

it's not just one hospital in

Sweden, but several, hopefully one

1:52:021:52:06

here in Liverpool. Also, to have a

centre in a developing nation such

1:52:061:52:12

as Uganda or Malawi which are

university has links with and the,

1:52:121:52:18

do these results hold out? Because

the excitement for us is this is

1:52:181:52:23

cheap, you don't need refrigeration

to save the sachets for use, you

1:52:231:52:31

don't have to be skilled in great

clinical obstetrics or anything. You

1:52:311:52:37

can just open the sashay, put it in

water and ask the lady to drink it.

1:52:371:52:43

And if this goes large scale and the

results are upheld, that this will

1:52:431:52:49

have a really good impact on

reducing maternal death, which is

1:52:491:52:55

what can happen in sub Saharan

Africa if you have failure to

1:52:551:53:00

progress, but also all the healthy

women in this country who didn't

1:53:001:53:03

want to have surgery but it was the

only way to get their baby out.

1:53:031:53:08

Wouldn't it be great to not have to

have surgery if you don't want it?

1:53:081:53:13

It sounds amazing. I just want to

ask you finally, Professor Ray, how

1:53:131:53:19

quick was the reaction once the

woman drank the bicarbonate?

Right,

1:53:191:53:25

so in terms of changes in her blood

acid, we took a blood sample after

1:53:251:53:29

one hour and already, there were

changes. And then we let the labour

1:53:291:53:34

take its course, so the women who

were entered into the trial, they

1:53:341:53:41

may have had a cervix that was only

four centimetres dilated. You need

1:53:411:53:48

it ten centimetres to deliver the

Beadle had and the baby. So that

1:53:481:53:51

takes time. -- to deliver the head

and the baby. We don't expect Labour

1:53:511:54:00

to be instant. But we may have been

talking about six hours, rather than

1:54:001:54:05

12, 18.

Never. Yes. Good work,

Professor Susan Rae. Thank you so

1:54:051:54:11

much were telling our audience about

it.

Thank you, Victoria.

I know,

1:54:111:54:17

much more work to be done, but

fascinating. Wright, thank you for

1:54:171:54:23

your messages about the worklife

balance. I have been quite a few

1:54:231:54:26

about these. Sophie says, the

question is how to buy both

1:54:261:54:30

companies and how to be confident

enough challenge those not offering

1:54:301:54:34

a better worklife balance. It

shouldn't be seen as a business or

1:54:341:54:39

individual issues to solve, helping

mums to regain confidence to go back

1:54:391:54:43

to work with business is key, I

believe, to test and try different

1:54:431:54:47

options that can be economically

viable. This e-mail from Simon, up

1:54:471:54:53

until MS effectively tucked me in my

flat, I worked in a variety of jobs.

1:54:531:55:00

I was kept in mind that I worked to

live, I didn't live to work. I knew

1:55:001:55:08

a number of people working excessive

hours who were filling the time,

1:55:081:55:12

rather than doing a job. Another man

says he worked insane hours at an

1:55:121:55:21

agency as well as three hours a day

of the meeting, starting my own

1:55:211:55:25

company a year ago if only to reduce

the commute.

1:55:251:55:32

While Britain prepares to leave

the EU, one French treasure

1:55:321:55:34

is apparently preparing to make

the reverse journey -

1:55:341:55:36

and it's the first time it'll be

leaving continental shores in nearly

1:55:361:55:39

a thousand years.

1:55:391:55:40

The 230ft long artwork tells

the story of William the Conqueror

1:55:401:55:43

and the Battle of Hastings.

1:55:431:55:44

Joining me in the studio

is Dr Michael Lewis.

1:55:441:55:46

He's from the Department

of Portable Antiquities and Treasure

1:55:461:55:49

at the British Museum.

1:55:491:55:50

Hello, how are you? Lovely to meet

you.

How excited are you about this?

1:55:501:55:56

It's going to be an amazing

exhibition. It is busily really

1:55:561:56:00

generous of the French to allow this

object, which is a medieval

1:56:001:56:08

masterpiece to come to the United

Kingdom and be displayed.

Where do

1:56:081:56:11

you think it was created?

Well, my

view, and scholars differ on this, I

1:56:111:56:18

believe it was made in Canterbury on

the orders of a bishop, and it's

1:56:181:56:28

probable that it was made for the

consecration of Bayeux Cathedral.

1:56:281:56:37

Most people probably remember the

Bayeux tapestry for the Battle of

1:56:371:56:41

Hastings, but that is the end, as he

would expect. It has a big build-up.

1:56:411:56:47

It starts in 1064 and it starts with

Edward the confessor directing

1:56:471:56:51

Harold to go on a mission. Somehow,

he gets captured in France and then

1:56:511:56:56

he gets handed over to William, Duke

of Normandy, and he accompanies

1:56:561:57:01

William, Duke of Normandy, on a

campaign against rebel Breton

1:57:011:57:04

leader. The ultimate thing, which is

significant really, is that he makes

1:57:041:57:08

a holy oath at the end that journey

and it's by this oath that William

1:57:081:57:12

then says that he's promising to

help me find or get the English

1:57:121:57:18

crown on the death of Edward the

confessor. The rest of the tapestry

1:57:181:57:22

then deals with that Harold becomes

king, he is chosen, then there was

1:57:221:57:27

the Battle of Hastings where William

defeats Harold and he is shown being

1:57:271:57:33

killed. Some people think with an

arrow in the eye but hopefully this

1:57:331:57:37

exhibition will show their summits

in this story.

How excited do you

1:57:371:57:43

think British people will be in

terms of going to see this? Quite a

1:57:431:57:47

lot will have seen it when you get

on the ferry and you go over there.

1:57:471:57:52

Yes, you are right. A lot of people

who visit Bayeux Museum at the

1:57:521:57:56

moment are from England or the

English-speaking world. Obviously

1:57:561:58:00

1066 is the date that we all know.

Everyone who goes to a state school

1:58:001:58:05

is taught about 1066 and the Bayeux

tapestry. It will be amazing, I

1:58:051:58:10

think, a lot of schoolchildren not

just do hear about it but to go and

1:58:101:58:13

see this thing as well. For the

wider public, I think people will be

1:58:131:58:17

amazed about how long it is. It

definitely has a real impact when

1:58:171:58:20

you see this work of art. It looks

so new and lively.

Thank you. We

1:58:201:58:26

will look forward to seeing it.

Thank you for watching.

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