23/02/2018 Victoria Derbyshire


23/02/2018

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Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello it's Friday, it's

9am, I'm Tina Daheley,

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welcome to the programme.

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When you get a prescription

and you pick up the treatment

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you expect it's the right drug,

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but too often it isn't

and it's costing lives.

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New research suggests mistakes

could be linked to up

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to 22,000 deaths in England.

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We are seeing four to five deaths

every single day because of errors

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in prescription or dispensing or the

monitoring of medications.

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And I'll be talking to the Health

Secretary Jeremy Hunt at 9.15am.

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From fighting fit, to fighting

for his life,

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a mystery virus left former England

footballer Andy Cole

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in need of a kidney transplant.

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His nephew Alexander stepped

in and saved his life

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by donating one of his.

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We'll hear their story here

on the programme in the next hour.

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The number of people being attacked

by acid is three times higher than

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in 2013, we will hear from two

survivors who tell us what impact

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the attacks have had on them. And a

care home for the elderly has been

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holding pole dancing displays for

its residents. And despite criticism

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from some, it has said it will

consider holding more. And so we

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shall be speaking with a couple of

pole dancers.

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Hello, welcome to the programme,

we're live until 11am this morning.

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In a few minutes' time,

we're going to be talking

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about organ donation with the former

England footballer Andy Cole.

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Andy's life was saved

when his nephew gave him his kidney.

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Today, MPs are debating a new Bill

which would introduce an opt-out

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organ donor system in England,

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where people are registered

as a potential donor

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unless they state otherwise.

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So what do you think?

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We'd like to hear from you if you've

benefited from an organ donation,

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or maybe you're a donor or on the

organ transplant waiting list.

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Do get in touch on this

all the stories we're talking

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about this morning, use

the hashtag #VictoriaLIVE.

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If you text, you will be charged

at the standard network rate.

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Our top story today,

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mistakes in giving medicine out,

the wrong pills or the wrong dose,

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are costing lives in England.

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GPs, pharmacists, hospitals and care

homes may be making millions

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of errors a year according

to a new study

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and could be a factor

in more than 22,000 deaths.

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The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt

says this level of harm is appalling

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and he's going to act.

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The report covers mistakes

made in the prescribing,

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dispensing and administering

of medication in England.

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These could involve

GPs, pharmacists, care

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homes and hospitals.

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The research is one of the first

exercises of its kind.

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It found that medication errors

could cause around 1,700 deaths

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per year and perhaps contribute

to up to 22,000 deaths.

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The cost to the NHS could be around

£1.6 billion a year.

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It does note that the vast majority

of prescriptions dispensed

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on the NHS are safe and mistakes do

occur in all health care systems.

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The Health and Social Care Secretary

Jeremy Hunt said it was a far bigger

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problem globally than has so far

been recognised, causing appalling

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levels of harm and death.

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Plans to tackle the problem include

introducing electronic prescribing

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systems in hospitals designed

to cut mistakes.

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The National Pharmacy Association

said it welcomed the focus

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on reducing medication errors,

but that a culture of learning,

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rather than blame, was needed.

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Hugh Pym, BBC News.

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A short while ago we spoke with

Jeremy Hunt, near is what he has had

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to say.

Twin four and five people

die every single day because of

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these errors, so what are we doing?

We know that if we move to

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electronic prescribing systems

rather than paper-based systems that

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we still have, then you can

eliminate around half of errors.

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My full interview with him

is after the news headlines.

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Get in touch, have you or somebody

in your family been wrongly

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prescribed medication, what impact

has it had?

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Unarmed officer who was at a Florida

school when 17 people were killed

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has failed to intervene in the

incident and has resigned

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subsequently. He remained outside of

the building and did not confront

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the gunmen, it is not yet known if

criminal charges will be brought. --

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An armed officer who was at the

Florida school, where 17 people were

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killed, has resigned after it

emerged he failed to intervene. .

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Scot Peterson was facing suspension

after an investigation revealed he

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remained outside the building and

did not confront the gunman. It's

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not yet known whether criminal

charges will be brought.

I saw a

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deputy arrived at the west side of

building 12 and take up a position

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and he never went in.

Was he there

when the shooter was still inside

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the building?

Yes he was, he did not

go in, what he should have done was

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going, address the killer, kill the

killer.

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Detectives investigating two murders

in Camden earlier this week have

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arrested an 18-year-old man.

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He was arrested in Camden

on suspicion of two counts

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of murder and one count

of grievous bodily harm.

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The police say both murders

are being treated as linked,

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and are appealing for information

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Two people are still being

questioned after a suspected

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hit-and-run in Coventry, which

killed two young brothers. A man in

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his 50s, and a woman in her 40s,

were arrested on suspicion of

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causing death by dangerous driving

and drink-driving. A two-year-old

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boy was pronounced dead shortly

after the incident - the death of

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his six-year-old brother was

confirmed a couple of hours later.

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A fourth British tourist has died

of injuries he suffered

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in a helicopter crash

in the Grand Canyon

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nearly a fortnight ago.

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Jonathan Udall, who was in his

30s and from Brighton,

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was on honeymoon with his wife,

Ellie Milward when

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the accident happened.

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His family has been

told of his death.

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Adina Campbell reports.

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Jon Udall and Ellie Milward

were on their honeymoon.

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She has now been left

with critical injuries,

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while her friends' online post,

announcing Mr Udall's death,

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described him as strong and brave.

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The Eurocopter EC130 crashed as it

came into land in Arizona's remote

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Quartermaster Canyon.

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Witnesses say it spun around twice

before hitting the ground and then

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bursting into flames.

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Police say bad weather meant

it was more than eight hours before

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the survivors could be

flown to hospital.

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Stuart Hill, on the left,

is pictured here along

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with his brother Jason,

who also died at the scene.

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Their parents say the brothers

shared an incredible bond

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and would be deeply missed.

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Jennifer Barham remains

in a critical condition

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in hospital in Las Vegas,

as does the pilot, Scott Booth.

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Experts say possible causes

of the crash include a faulty tail

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rotor and gusty winds.

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But it may take many

months to determine why

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the helicopter came down

with such terrible consequences.

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Adina Campbell, BBC News.

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Theresa May is understood to have

agreed with senior ministers,

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a position on Britain's future

relationship with the EU

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during talks at Chequers yesterday.

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Downing Street has given few details

but some of those present have

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suggested that everyone was happy

with the outcome.

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One told the BBC that "there has

been an outbreak of unity for now".

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Number Ten says the Prime Minister

will set out "the way forward" next

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week after a discussion by the full

Cabinet.

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EU leaders are meeting today to

discuss life after Brexit, reporter

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Adam Fleming is in Brussels. What

can you tell us about the away day

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and what is happening?

So this is a

meeting of the 27 remaining EU

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leaders here in Brussels, Brexit is

not the theme chin but it is the

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background music, they will be

talking about life after Brexit, as

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you said, lots of technical things,

what do you do with the seats that

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members of the European Parliament

have that they will no longer need,

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some will be spread around other

countries, some left in reserve,

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what do you do about hiring a

replacement for the president of the

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European Commission, Jean-Claude

Juncker, whose term of office ends

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just after Brexit happens next year,

coincidentally. The real big one,

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how do you fill the Brexit sized

hole that will appear in the

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multi-annual budget of the EU from

2021 onwards, they reckon it is £13

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billion and there will be months and

months of arguments about that, do

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you raise new money? Find new ways?

Ask countries that pay into the

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budget to pay more? They are not

happy about that. Ask countries who

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receive money from the budget to

receive less, they are not happy

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about that. There will be a brief

update from the president of the

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European Council, Donald Tusk, who

chairs these meetings, about the

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next thinking about the next phase,

which will be about trade and the

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future relationship, which will not

really get started until the next

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time these guys meet, which will be

the end of next month.

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MPs will debate a bill later

which would introduce a national

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"opt-out" system for organ

donation in England.

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A private member's bill presented

by Labour MP Geoffrey Robinson

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would mean people who did not

want to donate their organs

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would have to opt out.

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The Bill would need cross

party support to have any

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chance of progressing.

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The way we eat and drink is almost

as much of a factor in tooth

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erosion as what we consume,

according to new research.

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Scientists at King's College London

found acidic food and drink

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can wear teeth down,

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especially if people

snack continually.

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Our health correspondent,

Catherine Burns reports.

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Sipping, swilling, and nibbling,

researchers think one in six of us

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have habits like this,

and they are bad

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news for your teeth.

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When it comes to dentist visits,

the main worries tend to be

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fillings or gum disease,

but this report says

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we should also be thinking

about erosive tooth wear.

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It is when acid eats away

at the teeth, making them

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chip or get shorter.

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If you tend to play with things

in your mouth, or you if you tend

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to chop pieces of fruit up slowly

and nibble on them over a few

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minutes as opposed to just eating

them as a whole fruit,

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if you're doing these behaviours

on a daily basis for years

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and years and years,

you can cause serious

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damage to your teeth,

and that serious damage can mean

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that your whole mouth

needs to be rebuilt.

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Treatment takes an average

of more than 20 months

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at a cost of £4500 on the NHS

and almost £14,000 privately.

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Prevention is key.

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One part of that is cutting back

on acidic food and drinks.

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Some of the healthy choices we make

might be good for us overall,

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but they can erode your teeth.

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This report mentions adding a slice

of lemon or lime to your water,

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sugar-free soft drinks,

drinking fruit teas,

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and snacking on fruit.

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Take these grapes, for example.

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If you were to eat ten or 20

of them in one sitting,

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that would be one acid attack

on your teeth.

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If you were to eat the same amount

over a longer period of time,

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that would be a sustained attack.

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The advice is to be aware of overall

eating patterns and to consider

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snacks that are less acidic

and higher in calcium.

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Catherine Burns, BBC News.

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More and 9:30am. Do get in touch

with us throughout the morning - use

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the hashtag Victoria LIVE and If you

text, you will be charged at the

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standard network rate.

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Big day for men's curling, will you

be watching?

Hopefully everyone will

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be watching on BBC Two, Big Mac

shone horizon for the women's

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curlers, that is after the men went

out, British Vogue is carried into

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the business end of the competition,

taking on Sweden in a couple of

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hours' time, in the semifinals,

victory would guarantee themselves

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or gold. Eve Muirhead and her team

should be confident after knocking

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out the defending champions, Canada,

in the last match. Things will not

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be easy against the Swedish, they

have already beaten Great Britain

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earlier in the around robin phase.

If the British do win, that will be

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one better than the bronze medal

they won in the Sochi games four

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years ago. Fingers crossed.

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I will try to catch it, 11, that is

just when I finish. How significant

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is this first gold medal for an

athlete from Russia?

Extremist

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significant, piece of history.

Yesterday we were talking about one

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of their athletes handing back a

medal after being found guilty of

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doping and today, it's the complete

opposite, a stunning gold in the

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women's singles figure skating for

the 15-year-old Alina Zagitova, who

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had a world record score in her

short programme before an impeccable

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routine in the free dance here. Her

training partner, the Two-time

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reigning world champion Yevgenia

Medvedeva clearly upset with her

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silver medal, she was the favourite

going into it, but a fantastic

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moment for the 15-year-old, and

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as I say, slice of Olympic history

for her. And so you'd expect her to

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lead out the Olympic Athletes from

Russia in the closing ceremony at

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the weekend but what flag would she

be carrying? Well there is

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speculation that a meeting between

the International Olympic Committee

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president Thomas Bach and an aide of

the Russian President Vladimir

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Putin, involved discussions over

lifting the Olympic ban on the

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country in time for the ceremony. T

may also, be of no coincidence that

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the Russians have now paid a fine of

nearly 11 million pounds, as part of

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their punishment. That would upset

many of the sporting bodies at the

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games though with the question being

why not wait until Monday? -- £11

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million.

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Celtic are out of Europe, what went

wrong?

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Celtic boss Brendan Rodgers

claimed his team needed

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to have more courage.

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But his young side will learn

from the experience.

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They crashed out of the Europa

League after a 3-1 aggregate defeat

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against Zenit St Petersburg.

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Celtic had led 1-0

from the first leg,

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but conceded three goals

in a disappointing performance.

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They had 67% of possession

but clearly lacked a cutting edge,

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with Rodgers saying his team needed

to show more bravery to play more

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positively going forward.

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The Arsenal survived a scare in the

last 32 tie, it is now six years in

0:14:440:14:50

a row they have lost the home leg of

their European tie, they went 2-0

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down to their Swedish opponents,

Ostersunds, banks to a 3-0 first leg

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lead and this goal from Sayed

Kolasinac, they went through, 4-2,

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and Arsene Wenger hoping to avoid a

difficult draw for the last 16, that

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will be taking place at midday.

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Too many mistakes and too many lives

lost, and it's got to stop.

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That's what the Health

Secretary, Jeremy Hunt,

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has told this programme.

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He's concerned about the findings

of new research showing that GPs,

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pharmacists, hospitals and care

homes in England may be making

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millions of errors a year,

and could be a factor in more

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than 22,000 deaths.

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Mr Hunt told me this level

of harm is appalling,

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and he's going to act.

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We are doing a lot of things but it

is

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We are doing a lot of things but it

is important to reassure your view

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is that this report shows that error

rates are not higher in the UK then

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the US and other countries...

One in

five when it comes to prescriptions

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is too high?

Far too high and

between four and five people die

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every day because of these errors.

So what are we doing to sort this

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out? We know that if you move to

electronic prescribing systems

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rather than paper-based systems that

we still have in many hospitals, you

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can eliminate around half of errors.

How far are you with that?

Today we

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are announcing around an extra £75

million to help hospitals, but they

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create projects, so for example if

you try to give a drug to a pregnant

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woman that could damage the foetus,

then you will get a contraindication

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when you try to do that.

That means

75% of hospitals at the moment do

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not have an electronic process in

place?

That is right and that is

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what we want to put in place and

over the next five years we want all

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hospitals to move to

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that. He Bube talk to doctors,

pharmacists, nurses on the front

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line, they have another wobbly, and

that is that the culture is wrong,

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that if they make a mistake when

prescribing medicine, if they forget

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to bring down someone's dosage and

they admitted, they could get fired

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all suffer criminal prosecution or

something like that so the other

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thing we need to do is get the

culture right to recognise that

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there are going to be ordinary human

errors and we need to support

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people...

But they are just words,

in a way, in a sense, having this

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conversation today, the focus being

on how many mistakes are being made

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by GPs, in care homes, in hospitals,

could only serve to increase blame

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culture?

Not at all, what we are

doing today is not just words, we

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are decriminalising dispensing

errors by pharmacists, which I think

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is something pharmacists have long

thought creates the wrong culture.

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So you are changing the law so if a

pharmacist says, I made a mistake,

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they will not be prosecuted?

Provided it is a sensible mistake,

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no room for gross negligence, but

the kinds of human errors we

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typically see in the situation so we

are changing the law and we want to

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look at more generally how we move

in the NHS from a blame culture to a

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learning culture.

Let me bring it

one of our viewers' questions, this

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is from Louise, my Nan was overdosed

on heard usual medication when

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admitted into hospital last week due

to an ever by a pharmacist, what can

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you do to ensure this does not

happen in future and hold people

0:18:170:18:20

accountable for these very serious

actions?

Two things come first...

0:18:200:18:25

Not prosecute them?

We need to make

sure we learn from those mistakes

0:18:250:18:31

because they happen far too often

and at the moment very often we are

0:18:310:18:34

not because people are worried about

the consequences if they are open

0:18:340:18:37

about them so that is the first

thing we are doing. The second thing

0:18:370:18:42

is we are employing 2000 pharmacists

to work in GP surgeries because I

0:18:420:18:46

don't know if it was the case in

that particular story but very often

0:18:460:18:49

these problems happen with older

people with dementia who are on a

0:18:490:18:54

cocktail of drugs which sometimes

0:18:540:19:05

don't work well together, and what

you need to do is get an experienced

0:19:080:19:10

pharmacist to look at these

combinations of drugs and say, we

0:19:100:19:13

need to take you off those two drugs

because we think they could conflict

0:19:130:19:15

with some of the others you are

taking.

What would you say in

0:19:150:19:18

Louise's Ks?

You are right, it is a

terrible problem, much more

0:19:180:19:20

widespread than we thought, but the

World Health Organization said today

0:19:200:19:23

that the NHS is taking the lead in

trying to tackle these problems, and

0:19:230:19:25

we certainly want to halve the

number of medication errors over the

0:19:250:19:30

next five years and hopefully avoid

a repeat of the stories.

Changing

0:19:300:19:33

the culture is one thing, that is

progressive, but isn't the real

0:19:330:19:37

issue fundamentally about the NHS

being understaffed and under

0:19:370:19:41

resourced?

There are

0:19:410:19:52

real staffing pressures in the NHS,

for sure, because of the pressure of

0:19:550:19:58

an ageing population, but today's

report is clear that levels of

0:19:580:20:00

medication are no higher in the NHS

and other European countries, so it

0:20:000:20:02

is about...

Saying, it is not just

us, this is other countries as well,

0:20:020:20:05

it is not reassuring to people in

this country.

But it answers the

0:20:050:20:08

question of whether it is about NHS

staffing levels. I don't for a

0:20:080:20:11

second suggest there are not

staffing issues and we are

0:20:110:20:13

increasing the number of doctors and

nurses and training places and so

0:20:130:20:16

on, but I think it is also having

systems in place that when people

0:20:160:20:20

are busy you have got checks and

balances that can stop those

0:20:200:20:24

mistakes being made.

This programme

has been exposing the problem with

0:20:240:20:34

joiner or mesh implant over the last

year, you announced a review into

0:20:340:20:37

them, would you like to see them

banned completely?

No, I have taken

0:20:370:20:39

independent advice from the Chief

Medical Officer who has looked at

0:20:390:20:42

all of the evidence and no European

country has banned mesh because

0:20:420:20:46

there are women for whom it is a

lifeline, incredibly important...

0:20:460:20:51

But there are also women crippled by

its use, unable to walk and to have

0:20:510:20:56

sex?

That is why we have to have

processes in place to use it

0:20:560:21:02

inappropriate situations and that is

what this review is going to look

0:21:020:21:06

at, but we don't want to ban it

altogether because we know there are

0:21:060:21:11

other women who benefited hugely

from mesh and not just women but

0:21:110:21:14

also something that men can benefit

from in certain situations as well.

0:21:140:21:17

And a quick word on Brexit, were you

at the away day and how did it go?

I

0:21:170:21:22

was not there but the findings will

be brought back to the Cabinet on

0:21:220:21:26

Tuesday when we will have a

discussion.

What was your sense of

0:21:260:21:29

it, didn't go well?

My senses would

it -- my sense is it was a good

0:21:290:21:40

discussion and there are industries

and supply chain across continents

0:21:400:21:44

but it must always be on a voluntary

basis and we must have control of

0:21:440:21:48

our own laws.

After ten o'clock this

morning we will speak to the

0:21:480:21:52

grandmother I mentioned to Jeremy

Hunt, Health Secretary, who say she

0:21:520:21:56

was overdosed on her usual

medication when she was admitted

0:21:560:21:58

into hospital last week.

0:21:580:22:04

Former England footballer Andy Cole

had an illustrious career

0:22:040:22:06

playing for top teams such

as Manchester United

0:22:060:22:08

and Newcastle United and he remains

the Premier League's third

0:22:080:22:10

all-time top scorer.

0:22:110:22:12

But in 2015, at the age of 43,

Andy fell ill with a mystery virus

0:22:120:22:15

that attacked his kidneys

and left him needing a transplant.

0:22:150:22:19

His 29-year-old nephew

Alexander Palmer stepped

0:22:190:22:21

in and saved Andy's life

by donating his kidney.

0:22:210:22:25

The two have now recovered

but are raising awareness

0:22:250:22:27

of the importance of organ donation.

0:22:270:22:31

A private members bill today

will consider whether England should

0:22:310:22:36

adopt the opt-out organ donation

system that's already

0:22:360:22:38

in place in Wales.

0:22:380:22:39

I'm pleased to say Andy and his

nephew Alexander are with me now.

0:22:390:22:44

Good to see you both, thank you for

coming in. My first question is, how

0:22:440:22:49

are you?

A lot better than I was a

year ago, two years ago.

Take me

0:22:490:22:55

back to that time, ex-footballer,

fit, healthy, on holiday in Vietnam

0:22:550:22:59

in 2015, what happened?

I was having

a very nice time, got back to

0:22:590:23:05

Manchester, didn't feel particularly

well. Over three or four days, I

0:23:050:23:11

finally decided to go into hospital

with quite a bit of persuasion.

What

0:23:110:23:15

were your symptoms?

I was getting a

lot of water retention, a bit of

0:23:150:23:21

weight, growing and growing every

single day, so with a bit of

0:23:210:23:27

persuasion in the end I went into

the hospital and my consultant at

0:23:270:23:30

the time, still my consultant now,

basically explained to me what the

0:23:300:23:35

situation was and how bad it was at

the time.

What was the situation? As

0:23:350:23:39

they explained it to you at that

time? Because this is a pretty rare

0:23:390:23:44

condition?

He asked me quite a few

questions, I just remember saying to

0:23:440:23:51

him, I've not really got time, I

need to get home, and he was saying,

0:23:510:23:54

well, you won't be going home. Took

a sample of my kidney, a biopsy, and

0:23:540:24:02

started to explain what he thought

it was and if I had had other

0:24:020:24:07

symptoms which could be a kidney

problem and as soon as he said that,

0:24:070:24:11

every single symptom there was, and

he explained, that is one of the

0:24:110:24:15

reasons you will not be going home

for a little bit.

You have already

0:24:150:24:18

mentioned the bloating, putting on

weight, what with the other

0:24:180:24:21

symptoms?

Uncontrollable pick-ups,

things like that, itching, I was

0:24:210:24:27

itching like I had fleas, that was

basically the toxins in my body --

0:24:270:24:36

uncontrollable hiccups. When you're

kidney does not work, the toxins

0:24:360:24:39

cannot be flushed out.

You say you

had to be persuaded to see somebody,

0:24:390:24:46

why? They sound like a pretty bad

symptoms to me!

I am a man, and I

0:24:460:24:52

think as a man we feel like we don't

need to go to hospital, doctors,

0:24:520:24:58

whatever. When you become ill, if

you believe you become vulnerable,

0:24:580:25:03

and you don't want to...

Admit there

is anything wrong?

People say, man

0:25:030:25:10

of, get wrong with it, that is

exactly what I did. Would I do it

0:25:100:25:14

differently now? Yes. But at that

time it was like, no, I'm not going

0:25:140:25:18

to do it, I will take a couple of

paracetamol and in the morning I

0:25:180:25:22

will be good to go.

And, Alex, your

nephew, it is fair to say he is the

0:25:220:25:27

reason you are sitting here now?

Yes, he is. I am forever indebted to

0:25:270:25:34

him, he knows that. I appreciate

everything he has done for me and

0:25:340:25:37

what he has gone through, the pain

he has gone through, to see me

0:25:370:25:42

recover than Alex did at the time

because I remember when I left

0:25:420:25:45

hospital I left him in the hospital.

I remember saying, if I could change

0:25:450:25:51

it, I would do, because I did not

want to see him in that pain, first

0:25:510:25:55

and foremost. Fortunately he came

round and that is why we are sitting

0:25:550:25:58

in front of you now.

Alex, can you

tell me about the journey, Andy's

0:25:580:26:03

journey from the moment he was

diagnosed to the point where you

0:26:030:26:07

decided to donate your own kidney?

For me it was a straightaway thing,

0:26:070:26:11

as soon as they told be about the

situation I said, help, I am more

0:26:110:26:15

than happy to help stop a no-brainer

for me.

And what was the process

0:26:150:26:21

like, how do you go about donating

your kidney, would you have decided

0:26:210:26:25

you wanted to help, what happens

next?

A lot of blood tests, I had

0:26:250:26:32

the test and once the test came in

and it is positive, then it is the

0:26:320:26:36

next stage, not a simple process but

a process that is worthwhile.

Was it

0:26:360:26:43

an instant decision, did you think

about it and discuss it with

0:26:430:26:47

anybody?

For me it was an instant

decision, I knew within my heart of

0:26:470:26:50

hearts that if I could help then I

would come straightaway.

How did the

0:26:500:26:54

conversation go when you told Andy,

your uncle, that you wanted to do

0:26:540:26:57

this?

He was like, no, I don't want

it, I will be OK! But after

0:26:570:27:03

persuasion he came round to the

idea.

What was the operation like,

0:27:030:27:08

for both of you?

It was hard.

For

me, it was one of those ones, you

0:27:080:27:15

know, even the day I went down for

the transplant, I was still trying

0:27:150:27:20

to convince myself I didn't need it.

I sat down with the surgeons the day

0:27:200:27:24

before and said, are you sure that I

could not have a couple more weeks?

0:27:240:27:29

They said, you have gone as far as

you can go now. Acceptance in the

0:27:290:27:35

whole situation has been very, very

tough. It is coming up to a year

0:27:350:27:40

from the transplant, I have finally

accepted that it is what it is and I

0:27:400:27:43

need to try and move on with things

as quick as possible.

Before that,

0:27:430:27:47

you were having dialysis? You sound

like you have a strong support

0:27:470:27:52

network around you, your nephew, you

have said that your wife was

0:27:520:27:58

overboard in what you were going to,

getting a donor in the first place

0:27:580:28:02

was down to your wife? I have got to

be honest, if she did not nag me so

0:28:020:28:07

much I would not have gone into

hospital, a couple of paracetamol is

0:28:070:28:11

and I am good to go, I was doing

that every day, so the constant

0:28:110:28:15

nagging finally got me to say, OK,

my old club doctor came to see me,

0:28:150:28:22

sent before a scam, ended up going

into the hospital to find out what

0:28:220:28:26

the situation was. Before you fell

ill and donated your kidney, were

0:28:260:28:30

you on the organ donor list, was it

something you cared about?

I will be

0:28:300:28:35

brutally honest, I knew nothing

about it. When you talk about

0:28:350:28:40

organs, it is not something I

actually thought about until me

0:28:400:28:44

going through what I went through,

going into the hospital and seeing

0:28:440:28:48

different people having whatever

problems they have, it started to

0:28:480:28:51

change my perspective as well.

Knowing that you can change

0:28:510:28:56

someone's life if you do pass away

and leave your organs to someone

0:28:560:28:59

else to continue their life, that

has been a big thing for me,

0:28:590:29:03

definitely.

This is being debated

today in Parliament, what do you

0:29:030:29:07

think about the opt out scheme? It

is already in place in Wales.

It is

0:29:070:29:12

an option, life is all about

options. Would I do it? Of course I

0:29:120:29:18

would do it, 100%. When my time

comes and I pass away, I would love

0:29:180:29:21

to do it, for sure.

Alex, what do

you think?

I would, for sure,

0:29:210:29:28

because it is something you don't

think about until someone falls ill

0:29:280:29:31

and then you do your research and

think about the big changes you can

0:29:310:29:34

make when you donate your organs.

A comment from Twitter, I know

0:29:340:29:39

people looking for receiving

transplants, I moved over to Wales

0:29:390:29:42

from England for university web I

have the opt-out law and I signed up

0:29:420:29:46

to be a donor, should someone needs

my help on bed then I am more than

0:29:460:29:49

happy to give life.

What would you say to people who

0:29:490:29:54

don't support changing the system we

have two and opt-out where consent

0:29:540:29:57

is given unless you opt out of it?

Naturally it is entirely up to them

0:29:570:30:05

that if you look at the grand scheme

of things, why not? I am not trying

0:30:050:30:10

to be morbid but once you pass away,

if you can help someone else

0:30:100:30:17

continue with their life, it could

be a young person, middle-aged

0:30:170:30:20

person, old person, why not? Life is

about enjoying it, if you can give

0:30:200:30:24

someone that opportunity,

definitely, for me.

And, Alex, a

0:30:240:30:29

message to people watching at home?

I would say considerate, think about

0:30:290:30:34

it, because you are doing a good

thing in giving somebody the

0:30:340:30:37

opportunity to live longer, just

give it a good thought.

Alex, Andy,

0:30:370:30:42

thank you so much for coming in and

sharing your experiences with us.

0:30:420:30:46

Still to come.

0:30:460:30:47

The number of people being attacked

by acid is three times

0:30:470:30:50

higher than in 2013.

0:30:500:30:51

We'll hear from two survivors

who tell us what impact

0:30:510:30:53

the attacks have had on them.

0:30:540:31:03

Our poll dancing displays in a care

home an appropriate way to entertain

0:31:030:31:07

elderly residents? -- are pole

dancing.

0:31:070:31:24

mistakes in giving medicine out,

the wrong pills or the wrong dose,

0:31:320:31:35

are costing lives in England.

0:31:350:31:36

GPs, pharmacists, hospitals and care

homes may be making millions

0:31:360:31:39

of errors a year according

to a new study

0:31:390:31:41

and could be a factor

in more than 22,000 deaths.

0:31:410:31:43

Jeremy Hunt says that the government

is investing in police systems which

0:31:430:31:46

could help event mistakes. -- A

study has found that mistakes made

0:31:460:31:50

in the medication given to patients

in England could be the cause of

0:31:500:31:53

seventeen-hundred deaths a year, and

could contribute to thousands more.

0:31:530:31:55

-- 1700 deaths a year. The report,

commissioned by the government said

0:31:550:31:58

the number of drug errors totals 237

million cases a year. The Health and

0:31:580:32:01

Social Care Secretary, Jeremy Hunt,

said the government is investing in

0:32:010:32:03

computer systems that would help

prevent mistakes. An armed officer

0:32:030:32:05

who was at the Florida school, where

17 people were killed, has resigned

0:32:050:32:08

after it emerged he failed to

intervene. Scot Peterson was facing

0:32:080:32:10

suspension after an investigation

revealed he remained outside the

0:32:100:32:12

building and did not confront the

gunman. It's not yet known whether

0:32:120:32:14

criminal charges will be brought.

0:32:140:32:25

A fourth British tourist has died of

injuries he suffered in a helicopter

0:32:300:32:33

crash in the Grand Canyon nearly a

fortnight ago. Jonathan Udall, who

0:32:330:32:35

was in his 30s and from Brighton,

was on honeymoon with his wife,

0:32:350:32:37

Ellie Milward. She and another

British woman, as well as the

0:32:370:32:39

helicopter's pilot, remain in a

critical condition in hospital.

0:32:390:32:41

Detectives investigating two murders

in Camden earlier this week have

0:32:410:32:43

arrested an 18-year-old man. He was

arrested in Camden on suspicion of

0:32:430:32:46

two counts of murder and one count

of grievous bodily harm. The police

0:32:460:32:48

say both murders are being treated

as linked, and are appealing for

0:32:480:32:51

information. Theresa May is

understood to have agreed with

0:32:510:32:52

senior ministers, a position on

Britain's future relationship with

0:32:520:32:55

the EU during talks at Chequers

yesterday. Downing Street has given

0:32:550:32:56

few details but some of those

present have suggested that everyone

0:32:560:32:59

was happy with the outcome. The

Environment Secretary, Michael Gove,

0:32:590:33:01

said there was a "very, very good

atmosphere". Number Ten says the

0:33:010:33:03

Prime Minister will set out "the way

forward" next week after a

0:33:030:33:05

discussion by the full Cabinet.

0:33:050:33:06

Sipping acidic drinks such as fruit

teas and flavoured water can wear

0:33:070:33:09

away teeth and damage the enamel. A

team at King's College London found

0:33:090:33:11

that drinking them between meals and

savouring them for too long

0:33:110:33:14

increased the risk of tooth erosion

from acid. The research found the

0:33:140:33:16

problem was increasing as people

snacked more.

0:33:160:33:27

Team GB's women face Sweden in the

semifinals of the curling at the

0:33:310:33:36

Olympics, after beating the

defending champions Canada, in their

0:33:360:33:40

last match, Britain will be

confident, but face a team that has

0:33:400:33:44

beaten them once already in

Pyeongchang. The winner will take

0:33:440:33:46

home at least a silver medal. There

was an historic moment in the

0:33:460:33:51

Women's singles figure skating as

15-year-old Alina Zagitova won the

0:33:510:33:53

first gold for the Olympic Athlete

from Russia. Celtic went out of

0:33:530:33:59

Europe after losing 3-1 on aggregate

to Zenit St Petersburg. But Arsenal

0:33:590:34:03

are in the draw later today despite

losing at home to Ostersund FC of

0:34:030:34:06

Sweden - a 2-1 defeat but a 4-2

aggregate win.

0:34:060:34:18

A growing number of people

are being attacked by acid.

0:34:200:34:22

New figures - obtained by 5 live

investigates show there were 646

0:34:220:34:25

acid attacks in England and Wales

last year, over three times

0:34:250:34:27

higher than in 2013.

0:34:270:34:29

The majority of these attacks

were in London, followed

0:34:290:34:31

by Greater Manchester and Essex.

0:34:310:34:32

Along with 5 live Investigates,

we brought together two

0:34:320:34:34

acid attack survivors -

with very different stories -

0:34:340:34:36

to talk about the impact

the attacks have had -

0:34:360:34:39

and are still having -

on their lives...

0:34:390:34:49

In 2014, my ex paid someone to chuck

acid over me.

I was a victim of acid

0:34:570:35:10

attack last year. Someone threw acid

at my face on the street while I was

0:35:100:35:16

riding my mopeds.

I was attacked

three and a half years ago, almost

0:35:160:35:26

four, August, 2014, my ex-partner

paid someone to chuck acid on me

0:35:260:35:32

while I was on the way to work,

8:30am. This guy came towards me,

0:35:320:35:38

shaking a bottle. He looked me in

the eyes and gave me this look and

0:35:380:35:43

that is when he threw the acid. Half

a head of hair, my right ear, all my

0:35:430:35:51

right side. My first thing was, my

God, he has chuck water over me, and

0:35:510:35:58

seconds later, it was burning, and

it felt like I was melting.

0:35:580:36:03

I was delivering food, I was a food

delivery man, I was finishing my

0:36:060:36:13

work, trying to go home, I stopped

at the traffic light. I felt water

0:36:130:36:19

on the helmet, I saw two boys with

masks on. I left my bike on the

0:36:190:36:26

street. I felt burning on my face.

One of the ladies passing by, she

0:36:260:36:33

asked me what happened. When she saw

me lying down on the pavement. I was

0:36:330:36:41

crying like a baby. I have never

cried like that. The police arrived

0:36:410:36:46

and put water on me.

Where is it

hurting? Are you all right? Where is

0:36:460:36:57

it hurting, mate? Keep your eyes

open.

Yeah, I kept crying for water

0:36:570:37:04

as well, that was the initial thing,

feeling burning. Someone running out

0:37:040:37:10

of the house with a bucket of water,

and I remember smoking, and for me,

0:37:100:37:16

that started the reaction again, it

was all over me. Looked down... It

0:37:160:37:22

was all burned, it was everywhere, I

can still smell that smell now, it

0:37:220:37:26

is a smell that I cannot describe.

If I did not have that water over

0:37:260:37:32

me, I would have been blind, that

water was a blessing.

It was burning

0:37:320:37:37

on my chest. There was a pain all

over my body. I had to sleep all day

0:37:370:37:46

as well.

I was in hospital for six

weeks. I had skin grafts, they took

0:37:460:37:52

it from my thigh, all the

operations. My right hand, my right

0:37:520:37:58

arm, right side of my head, this

hair is fake. I lost my ear and

0:37:580:38:03

minor. And then my chest. -- I lost

my ear and my neck. I realised it

0:38:030:38:12

was my ex, the key person that

planned it, I vowed that he would

0:38:120:38:21

never win, and that was the fight

that I wanted to fight back at full

0:38:210:38:26

I remember the first time I ever

cried... Everyone was crying around

0:38:260:38:32

me, but I thought, this is how

Anthony wants me, so from that

0:38:320:38:36

point, why was like, I'm not going

to do what he wants. He wanted me

0:38:360:38:40

not to go out so I went out, I am a

tacky how I was before, I did not

0:38:400:38:47

want what he had done to affect my

life. He had affected it enough

0:38:470:38:51

already.

Your one is different

issues, my scarring is, I'm not

0:38:510:39:01

able... I am not able to go

anywhere, I am scared, it is

0:39:010:39:08

psychological. Weekends, I would

spend time with my friends, chill

0:39:080:39:10

out. I don't know why I cannot meet

them now, but I do not feel safe. If

0:39:100:39:16

anyone comes to my house, I am

happy, but I do not feel like it is

0:39:160:39:24

safe for me to go back to work.

For

me, it is the effects of my family,

0:39:240:39:29

my dad is a broken man, he is the

person I can see has changed the

0:39:290:39:33

most, I am his little girl, he was

away at the time, it was so hard

0:39:330:39:40

because my family were struggling.

And I did not know how to deal with

0:39:400:39:44

that, for me, it was like, why are

you crying, are you... What have you

0:39:440:39:49

got to cry about. Took me a while to

think about how they must be

0:39:490:39:53

feeling.

0:39:530:40:04

I did not go back to work until last

April, it has had three years, it

0:40:040:40:09

took me that long to feel that I was

ready to go back into society. I

0:40:090:40:14

needed to get back to work, it made

me feel so much better getting

0:40:140:40:18

bacteria allergy. My ex-partner got

life, minimum 13 years, he had seven

0:40:180:40:27

convictions. -- it made me feel so

much better getting back to life. My

0:40:270:40:32

attacker got seven years, he was out

last May, I don't think that is

0:40:320:40:36

justice, he is the one who scarred

me for life, I think he should have

0:40:360:40:41

got a lot longer than two years. I

am still here, no ear, half a head

0:40:410:40:45

of hair, whereas he is starting his

new life.

Exactly. My attacker is

0:40:450:40:51

15. I have a sympathy for his age,

but I think he is responsible for

0:40:510:41:00

what he done. I want him to be in

jail... He should get a long

0:41:000:41:08

sentence for that. A tougher

sentence.

He is probably oblivious

0:41:080:41:12

to the effects and how severe acid

is. There is no education... Robbie

0:41:120:41:19

was not educated enough to know the

severity of it.

Why do they have to

0:41:190:41:25

do acid, they have got a lot of

options, why do they have to do

0:41:250:41:28

this?

I think it is so easy, rather

than with a knife, with a gun, with

0:41:280:41:35

any weapon, you have got to hide it.

Liquid in a bottle... A bit of acid

0:41:350:41:41

goes on your face, you are scarred,

that second. It is severe. I have my

0:41:410:41:48

scars, I have lost my ear, the side

of my head, but I feel like it could

0:41:480:41:53

have been worse, I could have been

blind. You cannot live your life

0:41:530:41:57

based on what they have done. I

could spend all my time hating the

0:41:570:42:02

fact that he got for but where would

it get me, that sentence will be

0:42:020:42:06

what he done anyway. For yourself,

obviously, when you have the

0:42:060:42:11

sentence coming up, if it is not

something you are not happy with,

0:42:110:42:16

don't let it affect you more than it

should, it has already affected you

0:42:160:42:20

enough.

Obviously, we can go to the

camera, we can speak out, but there

0:42:200:42:27

is a lot of victims that cannot show

their face now. As a community, as a

0:42:270:42:34

society, we will have the

responsibility. We should speak out

0:42:340:42:39

about it.

0:42:390:42:41

And you can hear much more on that

story on the BBC Radio 5 live

0:42:410:42:44

Investigates programme

at 11 on Sunday

0:42:440:42:47

We will also be discussing further

what should be done to tackle acid

0:42:480:42:52

attacks after 10am this morning. A

couple of your comments before we

0:42:520:42:56

move on, on prescriptions, this

e-mail, two weeks ago we had a

0:42:560:43:01

letter from the local GP surgery

advising they were no longer issuing

0:43:010:43:05

electronic prescription, now we have

to take a trip every two weeks to

0:43:050:43:09

the surgery because prescriptions

now take seven days with a GP and

0:43:090:43:12

four days with a chemist. Call this

progress? And John has said, even

0:43:120:43:18

correct or electronic prescribing

will not sort out basic errors in

0:43:180:43:23

actually giving medication to

patients, my wife was recently in

0:43:230:43:26

hospital and my daughter and I, both

medically trained, had to check drug

0:43:260:43:30

charts every day, to make sure

medication had been administered.

0:43:300:43:36

One important medication was omitted

for an entire day because they had

0:43:360:43:41

run out and needed to order more.

Keep your messages coming in.

0:43:410:43:48

It's a crisis that began six months

ago and is now regarded

0:43:480:43:51

as the fastest growing humanitarian

disaster in the world.

0:43:510:43:53

Hundreds of thousands

of Rohingya Muslims -

0:43:530:43:55

most of them children -

have been forced from their homes

0:43:550:43:57

fleeing violence at the hands

of the Myanmar military.

0:43:570:43:59

According to aid organisation

Unicef, there are now an estimated

0:43:590:44:02

720,000 children in the camps

of southern Bangladesh

0:44:020:44:04

and Myanmar's Rakhine state.

0:44:040:44:05

With the cyclone season approaching,

the potential for yet more suffering

0:44:050:44:07

is great and Unicef are warning

the fragile camps on which the

0:44:070:44:10

children depend could be swept away.

0:44:100:44:12

In a moment we'll hear from two

people working with refugees

0:44:120:44:14

on the ground in those camps,

but first here's a look at the story

0:44:140:44:18

of Mohammed Faisal -

a Bangladeshi boy who fled his home

0:44:180:44:20

when his village was

burned to the ground.

0:44:200:44:26

This video was filmed

and given to us by Unicef,

0:44:260:44:28

and just a warning you might find

some of the details upsetting.

0:44:280:44:35

Let's talk now to Tun Khin,

who fled Myanmar when he was 17

0:45:540:45:59

and now campaigns on behalf

of his fellow Rohingyas.

0:45:590:46:04

Thank you for coming in. Why did you

have to leave?

I left when my age

0:46:040:46:12

was 17 and I have suffered these

things, even though my grandfather

0:46:120:46:18

was a member of Parliament, I was

not recognised as a citizen of

0:46:180:46:23

Burma. For me, I have faced

restriction of movement and I have

0:46:230:46:28

seen my friends who are not allowed

to go to university myself in Burma,

0:46:280:46:38

and Rohingyas, if we want to get

married we need to get a pass and

0:46:380:46:41

many of my friends...

This is

because you are Muslim?

It is

0:46:410:46:46

ethnic, religious and political

prosecution, quite a big issue, they

0:46:460:46:50

do not want to see Rangers in Burma.

They are systematically destroying

0:46:500:46:54

the Rohingya community as a

genocide, it has been a long-time

0:46:540:46:59

planned, so we have seen only six

months ago mass exodus and mass

0:46:590:47:06

killings, but going on since 1978,

so 40 years right now, this is going

0:47:060:47:15

on a long-term, we have seen

refugees 1991, 1992, 1978 we have

0:47:150:47:23

seen the 2016...

So why do you

think, you are telling me that you

0:47:230:47:28

have experienced what people are

going through now, the same sort of

0:47:280:47:32

persecution. What do you think about

what is happening now, the fact that

0:47:320:47:36

the world is talking about what is

happening, things have escalated in

0:47:360:47:39

the last six months and we have

hundreds of thousands of children in

0:47:390:47:42

these camps?

This is long-time

planned but first they strip our

0:47:420:47:49

ethnic breads, then our citizenship

rights, they impose restriction of

0:47:490:47:53

movement and then when the

government came to power there was

0:47:530:48:00

more anti-Rohingya campaign in cited

in Burma and military getting an

0:48:000:48:08

opportunity to eliminate and wipe

out the population. They are trying

0:48:080:48:18

to get mass killings and finally we

had only one thing, they were taking

0:48:180:48:23

away our land, they burned our

villages, massive atrocities taking

0:48:230:48:27

place there and military committed

in the Rohingya community but...

We

0:48:270:48:34

can speak to somebody who is there.

0:48:340:48:37

Benjamin Steinlechner

from Unicef, who's joining us

0:48:370:48:38

from his hotel half-an-hour

from a huge refugee camp.

0:48:380:48:43

Thank you for joining us this

morning. Can you give us a sense of

0:48:430:48:47

what it is like there at the moment?

It somewhat feels like the calm

0:48:470:48:51

before the storm in the camp now.

Lots of our response efforts work

0:48:510:48:57

very well, we have installed

latrines, we are able to help the

0:48:570:49:02

refugees with medical supplies,

medical services, and nutrition

0:49:020:49:07

services for the babies, basic

education and child protection

0:49:070:49:11

services. However, there is the

cyclone monsoon season looming and

0:49:110:49:16

the camp, which is terribly fast, is

built on the grounds of a former

0:49:160:49:20

Forest which is now absolutely

deprived of the forest and without

0:49:200:49:25

any routes because people have used

them for firewood. With the rain

0:49:250:49:30

coming in there are huge risks of

floods and people getting flooded,

0:49:300:49:35

and of diseases spreading in the

camps.

Can you mitigate for any of

0:49:350:49:40

those things, knowing that cyclone

season is approaching, what can you

0:49:400:49:43

do?

So, we have already started

implementing the wells, finding out

0:49:430:49:53

where we could move some people who

are at very high risk of getting

0:49:530:49:56

flooded and we make sure some of the

major facilities that are important

0:49:560:50:00

life-saving facilities are moved to

higher places that people have easy

0:50:000:50:04

access to them.

Can you tell me

about some of the children you are

0:50:040:50:08

helping and working with? What is

the sense in the camp, do people

0:50:080:50:12

feel like things are getting worse,

that things are improving?

Things

0:50:120:50:16

have definitely improved for the

children. When they first came

0:50:160:50:21

during the biggest influx in August,

you could see them draw images of

0:50:210:50:26

horrific scenes, soldiers shooting

people, men hanging from trees,

0:50:260:50:30

blood everywhere. Now you see

children are drawing peaceful scenes

0:50:300:50:37

of flowers and peaceful landscapes,

so you can definitely see a change

0:50:370:50:41

there.

What are the diseases that

you are dealing with, what are

0:50:410:50:45

people most vulnerable to? Teams

from the UK were sent out before

0:50:450:50:49

Christmas to deal with an outbreak

of diphtheria in the camps.

That is

0:50:490:50:53

very true and luckily that has been

pretty much contained because of the

0:50:530:50:58

effort of the combined effort of aid

agencies there. We are still

0:50:580:51:03

fighting malnutrition in the camps,

many children are still malnourished

0:51:030:51:07

but we are helping them through our

malnutrition centres giving them

0:51:070:51:11

highly nutritious peanut paste to

get them back to a healthy state.

0:51:110:51:15

You have been there for three months

working on the ground with people

0:51:150:51:19

trying to help them. In terms of the

international effort, what more

0:51:190:51:23

could the global community be doing

to help?

Our efforts need to be

0:51:230:51:30

stepped up. As I mentioned, with the

monsoon coming in, it does feel like

0:51:300:51:34

the calm before the storm and this

is an underfunded crisis and we need

0:51:340:51:38

more help from around the world to

respond to the imminent needs of the

0:51:380:51:43

Rohingya people here.

OK, then, for

now, thank you. Tun, I want to come

0:51:430:51:48

back to you, do you have family

living there at the moment, do you

0:51:480:51:52

speak to people?

I have some

relatives in Northern Rakhine state

0:51:520:51:59

facing starvation, threatened by

military and security forces and

0:51:590:52:03

even yesterday some houses burned

down, some of my friends messaged

0:52:030:52:10

me. The military and Burmese

government is trying to get all

0:52:100:52:15

Rohingya out from Burma, that is

their plan, another 500 to 600,000

0:52:150:52:19

left only so every day they cannot

access the race though, cannot

0:52:190:52:25

access the fishing, they have no

right to move through markets, and

0:52:250:52:29

the situation is getting much, much

worse. Six months, no government has

0:52:290:52:34

taken any action to stop this

genocide. It is very disappointing.

0:52:340:52:40

What do you think the government

should be doing here, you are from

0:52:400:52:43

Myanmar but live in the UK, what

should the Government be doing?

The

0:52:430:52:48

Government must bring this

responsible who committed genocide,

0:52:480:52:54

military and other murderers, must

be brought to the International

0:52:540:52:57

criminal Court, those who are

complicit in this genocide. Also it

0:52:570:53:01

is important that we need to look

for a prominent solution, we also

0:53:010:53:07

need to call for a global arms

embargo for Burma and also the UN, a

0:53:070:53:21

lot of people talking about

repatriations, I was there a few

0:53:210:53:25

days ago in Bangladesh, I have met

recently people who fled from Burma.

0:53:250:53:30

The situation is still the same, so

how can you return back these

0:53:300:53:35

refugees when people are still

fleeing? So in Burma, Rohingyas

0:53:350:53:40

cannot go back without any

protection of international level,

0:53:400:53:46

that is UN protection, which is much

needed to save the lives of

0:53:460:53:51

Rohingya.

Tun, thank you for coming

in to talk to us, I am sure we will

0:53:510:53:55

revisit this subject again in the

future.

0:53:550:53:57

Let's return out into the inquiry

into lasting's Florida school

0:53:570:54:02

shooting, which ranks as the second

deadliest ever

0:54:020:54:03

at a US public school.

0:54:030:54:08

Now it's emerged that an armed guard

was on duty at the school

0:54:080:54:11

in Parkland where 17 people

were shot dead,

0:54:110:54:13

and did not intervene.

0:54:130:54:14

Scot Peterson, who has now resigned,

remained outside the building

0:54:140:54:16

and failed to confront the gunman.

0:54:160:54:22

Scot Petersen was absolutely

on-campus through this entire event.

0:54:220:54:25

He was armed, he was in uniform. But

what I saw was a deputy arrive at

0:54:250:54:35

the west side of building 12, take

up a position, and he never went in.

0:54:350:54:46

A care home in Dorset is facing

critism after it emerged staff hired

0:54:460:54:49

pole dancers as entertainment

for its elderly residents.

0:54:490:54:53

Pictures from the performance

show elderly residents -

0:54:530:55:03

both male and female,

and their families -

0:55:030:55:05

watching the dancers acrobatically

spin around a metal pole

0:55:050:55:07

in sports bras and knickers.

0:55:070:55:08

It's been branded 'inappropriate'

by local councillors,

0:55:080:55:10

who said they were 'staggered'

by the choice of entertainment.

0:55:100:55:12

But bosses at the home in

Christchurch defended its decision.

0:55:120:55:16

Let's speak now to Eleanor Spry,

who owns Pole Crazy -

0:55:160:55:18

some of her students took part.

0:55:180:55:24

With me in the studio is Sam Cane

from Pole Fit London, he's one of

0:55:240:55:33

the UK's top poll instructors.

Eleanor, first of all, how did this

0:55:330:55:36

come about?

It was a bit of fun.

Someone from the care home said to

0:55:360:55:43

one of my instructors, the residents

are looking for something a bit more

0:55:430:55:46

interesting and diverse, would you

like to come and do a performance,

0:55:460:55:49

and that was it, that is what we

did. It was a Sunday afternoon, just

0:55:490:55:54

some light-hearted entertainment.

Were you surprised they had come to

0:55:540:55:57

you with this request? Have you had

anything like it before?

We have

0:55:570:56:02

done public performances, so we have

done community fates in the area,

0:56:020:56:09

not specifically a care home. So I

wasn't overly surprised, sometimes

0:56:090:56:15

it is difficult with the logistics

of getting the poll there but there

0:56:150:56:19

was no, oh my goodness, what are we

doing.

What was the response from

0:56:190:56:23

the residents?

Loved it, four rounds

of applause. The girls love

0:56:230:56:28

performing and I think the residents

saw that, they saw how much they

0:56:280:56:31

enjoyed putting on a show for them

and they have asked us to go back,

0:56:310:56:36

so I can only assume that they

enjoyed it that much.

Did you get

0:56:360:56:40

any negativity? I know this was an

optional activity for the residents

0:56:400:56:44

to attend, they did not will have to

watch it, they could come along if

0:56:440:56:47

they wanted to.

Negativity from the

residents? From the care home beyond

0:56:470:56:55

that?

We will come to the outside

criticism, but no one from there?

0:56:550:57:00

But what do you make of criticism

from local councillors? Dorset

0:57:000:57:04

County Council told the Bournemouth

Echo, it is not really the sort of

0:57:040:57:09

entertainment would have thought

that the residents wanted all would

0:57:090:57:11

have encouraged.

That is more a

critic of the residents, isn't it,

0:57:110:57:17

that is trying to think for them.

They requested it, we performed,

0:57:170:57:21

that is the end of the story for me.

They have covered it with this

0:57:210:57:25

notion of what pole dancing is, we

have proved time and time again that

0:57:250:57:29

pole dancing is far more diverse and

here we are, with people who you

0:57:290:57:34

would assume would maybe frown upon

it or have connotations of it and

0:57:340:57:37

they are not, they are so

open-minded and we can learn from

0:57:370:57:41

those burdens.

Some, there has been

criticism of it being too sexual, do

0:57:410:57:44

you take that on board?

When it

comes down to it, it is very much a

0:57:440:57:49

fitness thing, you can do it in

different styles but this kind of

0:57:490:57:53

performance was fitness -based, very

acrobatic spaced, so in that respect

0:57:530:57:56

it is not so much sexualised, it is

more of a sport, a performance. What

0:57:560:58:03

do you make of the creditors and? I

can always understand where the

0:58:030:58:06

criticism comes from but I think it

is now reminded. People don't take

0:58:060:58:10

into account the progression of

where we have come with the sport

0:58:100:58:13

and the different level that is

taken.

We can show our viewers some

0:58:130:58:17

pictures of you. Do you think part

of the criticism is down to the fact

0:58:170:58:23

that this is an elderly audience and

that is where people, some people

0:58:230:58:30

are saying it is inappropriate? Do

you think they would have responded

0:58:300:58:34

the same if it was a group of

younger people?

They probably would

0:58:340:58:37

not have responded the same way, no,

but in the same way elderly people

0:58:370:58:43

are people as well and they can have

their own fun.

You look like you are

0:58:430:58:49

having fun, very agile! How common

are male pole dancers?

Very common,

0:58:490:58:55

lots of competitions around the

world have male categories. In my

0:58:550:59:00

school, Pole Fit London, male

students take up 30 to 40% of the

0:59:000:59:03

overall student so it is quite

common to have men.

Do you get a

0:59:030:59:07

range of ages?

Absolutely, a range

of ages and body types, we get

0:59:070:59:12

everyone coming through our doors,

so we have kids classes, classes for

0:59:120:59:16

people that are as old as want to

take part, there is no limit in that

0:59:160:59:21

respect.

Eleanor, if we can get you

back again, is Alan is still there?

0:59:210:59:27

Yes, I near!

Are you planning to put

on any more events like this? Could

0:59:270:59:34

this be a new line of work for you,

performing at care homes across the

0:59:340:59:39

country?!

Absolutely! Why not?!

Let's liven them up!

Moving art and

0:59:390:59:46

craft and gardening to one side,

pole dancing seems to be the way

0:59:460:59:49

forward!

Thank you both for coming to talk to

0:59:490:59:52

us. If the Nichols, operations

manager from the care home, told us

0:59:520:59:56

in a statement, our residents

requested through regular meetings

0:59:560:59:59

with them that we include more

modern entertainment and activities.

0:59:591:00:03

Dementia residents and non-dementia

residents are really enjoyed the

1:00:031:00:07

artistic display of musicality and

gymnastic ability, and the Showcase

1:00:071:00:12

received overwhelming positive

feedback from relatives. Time to get

1:00:121:00:16

the latest weather.

1:00:161:00:22

As temperatures take a significant

dip through the weekend, any

1:00:221:00:27

physical activity would be a good

idea!

LAUGHTER

1:00:271:00:30

You may have heard about the beast

from the east, it means very cold

1:00:311:00:35

weather is on the way next week, in

fact, bitterly cold, when you factor

1:00:351:00:39

in the wind, daytime temperatures

for a time next week barely above

1:00:391:00:43

freezing, may feel like it is minus

and double figures with the wind

1:00:431:00:47

chill, and snow in the forecast for

eastern areas. That is next week.

1:00:471:00:53

This weekend, it is all quiet

compared with that, and lots of

1:00:531:00:58

sunshine this weekend, but protect

yourself against the cold wind, very

1:00:581:01:01

much part of the weather. Is breezy

out there, southern and western

1:01:011:01:07

parts in particular, some areas of

cloud particularly through the

1:01:071:01:09

eastern side of England, one or two

light showers. Rather cloudy. Many

1:01:091:01:17

places will have good breaks, cloud

allowing some of the sunshine to

1:01:171:01:21

come through, temperatures around

three to six Celsius, factoring in

1:01:211:01:23

the breeze, and feeling colder than

that. Coming through tonight, large

1:01:231:01:28

holes in the cloud will allow the

temperature to get away for a

1:01:281:01:31

widespread frost, this morning

starting at -7, rural Oxfordshire.

1:01:311:01:37

Tomorrow morning, some spots will be

as low as that, Northern Ireland may

1:01:371:01:40

stay above that, cloud and breeze

here. For many of us, cold, frosty

1:01:401:01:46

start to the weekend. Saturday,

sunshine to come, some cloud around,

1:01:461:01:51

maybe Northern Ireland, far

south-west of England, for most

1:01:511:01:55

places, there will be a lot of

sunshine to come, not doing anything

1:01:551:01:59

for the temperature, getting cold on

Sunday and into next week.

1:01:591:02:02

Hello it's Friday, it's 10

o'clock, I'm Tina Daheley.

1:02:061:02:08

Mistakes made in the medication

given to patients in England

1:02:081:02:10

could be the cause of 17-hundred

deaths a year.

1:02:101:02:12

The Health Secretary says

the government is investing

1:02:121:02:14

in online e-prescriptions

to prevent mistakes.

1:02:141:02:16

We'll be speaking to a patient

who ended up overdosing

1:02:161:02:18

after being given the wrong amount

of her medication.

1:02:181:02:22

Today we are investing money to help

hospitals progress, around only one

1:02:241:02:28

quarter have those systems in place

at the moment.

1:02:281:02:33

We'll be speaking to a patient

who ended up overdosing

1:02:331:02:36

after being given the wrong amount

of her medication.

1:02:361:02:38

From fighting fit,

to fighting for his life,

1:02:381:02:40

a mystery virus left former England

footballer Andy Cole in need

1:02:401:02:42

of a kidney transplant.

1:02:421:02:43

His nephew Alexander stepped

in and saved his life

1:02:431:02:45

by donating one of his.

1:02:451:02:48

Going into the hospital and seeing

all the different people having

1:02:481:02:52

whatever problems they had, that's

changed my perspective. Knowing you

1:02:521:02:55

can change someone's life, if you do

pass away, and leave organs to

1:02:551:03:00

someone else, I think that has been

a big thing for me, definitely.

1:03:001:03:07

Today, MPs will debate changing the

law so that presumed consent on

1:03:071:03:11

organ transplant can be made legal.

650 acid attacks last year, we will

1:03:111:03:19

be finding out why this crime is on

the rise. Snapchat loses £1 billion

1:03:191:03:26

from stock market value as one of

its most influential users, Kylie

1:03:261:03:29

Jenner, tweets that she no longer

uses the social media site.

1:03:291:03:39

A study has found that mistakes made

in the medication for patients in

1:03:481:03:52

England could be the cause of 1700

deaths every year and contribute to

1:03:521:03:57

thousands more, the report

commissioned by the government says

1:03:571:03:59

the number of drugs errors totalled

237 million cases every year, the

1:03:591:04:03

health and social care secretary

Jeremy Hunt says the government is

1:04:031:04:09

investing in computer system that

would help to prevent mistakes.

1:04:091:04:18

An armed officer who

was at a Florida school

1:04:181:04:20

when 17 people were killed

1:04:201:04:21

has failed to intervene

in the incident and has

1:04:211:04:23

resigned subsequently.

1:04:231:04:25

Scot Peterson was facing suspension

after an investigation revealed

1:04:251:04:27

he remained outside the building

and did not confront the gunman.

1:04:271:04:29

It's not yet known whether criminal

charges will be brought.

1:04:291:04:33

A fourth British tourist has died

of injuries he suffered

1:04:331:04:36

in a helicopter crash

in the Grand Canyon

1:04:361:04:37

nearly a fortnight ago.

1:04:371:04:38

Jonathan Udall, who was in his

30s and from Brighton,

1:04:381:04:41

was on honeymoon with his wife,

Ellie Milward when

1:04:411:04:43

the accident happened.

1:04:431:04:44

His family has been

told of his death.

1:04:441:04:51

Detectives investigating two murders

in Camden earlier this week have

1:04:571:04:59

arrested an 18-year-old man.

1:04:591:05:00

He was arrested in Camden

on suspicion of two counts

1:05:001:05:02

of murder and one count

of grievous bodily harm.

1:05:021:05:05

The police say both murders

are being treated as linked,

1:05:051:05:07

and are appealing for information

1:05:071:05:11

Theresa May is understood to have

agreed with senior ministers,

1:05:111:05:14

a position on Britain's future

relationship with the EU

1:05:141:05:16

during talks at Chequers yesterday.

1:05:161:05:17

Downing Street has given few

details but some of those

1:05:171:05:19

present have suggested that everyone

was happy with the outcome.

1:05:191:05:22

The Environment Secretary,

Michael Gove, said there

1:05:221:05:23

was a "very, very good atmosphere".

1:05:241:05:25

Number Ten says the Prime Minister

will set out "the way forward" next

1:05:251:05:28

week after a discussion by the full

Cabinet.

1:05:281:05:35

MPs will debate a bill which will

introduce a national opt out system

1:05:351:05:39

for organ donation in England, a

private members bill presented by

1:05:391:05:44

Labour MP Geoffrey Robinson will

mean that those who do not want to

1:05:441:05:46

donate organs will have do opt out,

the bill will need cross-party

1:05:461:05:50

support to have any chance of

progressing.

1:05:501:05:56

Sipping acidic drinks such as fruit

teas and flavoured water can wear

1:05:561:05:59

away teeth and damage the enamel.

1:05:591:06:00

A team at King's College London

found that drinking them

1:06:001:06:02

between meals and savouring them

for too long increased the risk

1:06:021:06:05

of tooth erosion from acid.

1:06:051:06:06

The research found the problem was

increasing as people snacked more.

1:06:061:06:13

Get in touch with us throughout the

morning, use the hashtag, Victoria

1:06:161:06:22

live, if you text us, you will be

charged at the standard network

1:06:221:06:25

rate.

1:06:251:06:27

Less than one hour away from the

crucial match for Team GB's women's

1:06:271:06:32

curlers at the Winter Olympics. BBC

One or online, we will see Great

1:06:321:06:36

Britain taking on Sweden for a place

in the gold-medal match. Skipper Eve

1:06:361:06:41

Muirhead and the team should be

confident, knocking out the

1:06:411:06:44

defending champions Canada in the

last match. Things will not be easy

1:06:441:06:47

for them, beaten by the Swedish ones

already during the round robin

1:06:471:06:51

phase. If the British win, it will

be one better than the bronze they

1:06:511:06:55

won in the Saatchi games four years

ago. And Switzerland have already

1:06:551:07:00

beaten Canada to take the bronze in

the men's medal match. Canada were

1:07:001:07:03

the defending champions and like

their women's team miss out on any

1:07:031:07:05

medal at all. Another athlete

representing the Olympic Athletes

1:07:051:07:09

from Russia has tested positive for

a banned substance at Pyeongchang.

1:07:091:07:11

The Russian Bobsleigh Federation has

confirmed Nadezhda Sergeeva, who

1:07:111:07:13

finished 12th in the two-woman bob,

is under investigation.

1:07:131:07:24

But, an extremely significant

gold medal overnight,

1:07:291:07:33

a first for an Olympic Athlete

from Russia, a stunning gold

1:07:331:07:39

in the Women's singles figure

skating for the 15-year-old

1:07:391:07:42

Alina Zagitova, who had a world

record score in her short programme

1:07:421:07:45

before an impeccable routine

in the free dance here.

1:07:451:07:47

Her training partner,

the Two-time reigning world champion

1:07:471:07:49

YEvgenia Medvedeva though,

clearly upset with her silver medal

1:07:491:07:51

as she was the favourite

going into it but a fanstic moment

1:07:511:07:54

for young Zagitova

and of course a slice

1:07:541:07:56

of Olymnpic history for her.

1:07:561:08:03

In the women's ski cross overnight,

Britain's Emily Sarsfield got

1:08:031:08:06

through her first heat on final's

day. That was thanks in part to a

1:08:061:08:10

big crash for one of her opponents.

But sadly, she was knocked out in

1:08:101:08:13

the next race. Still, a great

achievement from Emily given she's

1:08:131:08:15

had no funding and worked three jobs

just to compete at an Olympics.

To

1:08:151:08:26

eventually get here after upsets of

multiple knee surgeries and whatever

1:08:261:08:29

else it might be, and working three

jobs in the summer and staff, it is

1:08:291:08:34

huge to be stood on the line and the

big thing is to have fun. Ski cross

1:08:341:08:40

is such a good sport, I hope I have

put it on the map, that is what I

1:08:401:08:45

wanted to do.

Emily did not make it

but there was a brilliant final, in

1:08:451:08:52

the ski cross as Canada continued

their dominance of the event. First

1:08:521:08:55

and second place for them - Kelsey

Serwa and Brittany Phelan with gold

1:08:551:08:57

and silver.

1:08:571:09:05

Away from South Korea, Celtic boss

Brendan Rodgers claimed his team

1:09:051:09:07

needed to have more courage but they

will learn from the experience as

1:09:071:09:13

they crashed out of the Europa

League after a 3-1 aggregate defeat

1:09:131:09:16

against Zenit St Petersburg. Celtic

had led 1-0 from the first leg, but

1:09:161:09:21

conceded three goals in a

disappointing performance. Despite

1:09:211:09:23

67% of possession on the night, they

lacked a cutting edge. With Rodgers

1:09:231:09:28

saying his team needed to show more

bravery to play more positively

1:09:281:09:31

going forward. Arsenal survived a

scare in their last 32 type, now six

1:09:311:09:35

years in a row they have lost the

home leg of their European tie,

1:09:351:09:46

going 2-0 down at home against

Swedish opposition Ostersunds.

1:09:461:09:53

Thanks to their 3-0 first leg lead

and that goal from Cor Kolasinac,

1:09:531:09:57

they went through, 4-2, on

aggregate. -- Sead

1:09:571:10:05

Kolasinac.

Bravo to the pole dancer

that was just on, says one viewer,

1:10:051:10:10

if I was in a care home I would much

rather see that then listened to an

1:10:101:10:14

inept musician or boring speaker who

would think that because we are old,

1:10:141:10:19

we must be prepared to put up with

mediocrity chosen for us.

1:10:191:10:22

Descriptions as well, Jeremy Hunt

has been in charge of the NHS for

1:10:221:10:27

almost eight years, all failings are

as a direct result of his inaction

1:10:271:10:31

or action, says one viewer. It fits

in with his agenda of privatisation

1:10:311:10:38

through the back door, suddenly the

idea will come an outside private

1:10:381:10:41

company to come in and address these

issues. Keep your messages come in.

1:10:411:10:55

Too many mistakes and

too many lives lost.

1:10:571:10:59

And it's got to stop.

1:10:591:11:00

That's what the Health

Secretary, Jeremy Hunt,

1:11:001:11:01

has told this programme.

1:11:021:11:03

He's concerned about the findings

of new research showing that GPs,

1:11:031:11:05

pharmacists, hospitals and care

homes in England may be making

1:11:051:11:08

millions of errors a year

and could be a factor in more

1:11:081:11:10

than 22,000 deaths.

1:11:111:11:12

Mr Hunt told me this level of harm

is appalling and he's going to act.

1:11:121:11:15

Louise Fenner-Jiggins

got in touch with us

1:11:151:11:17

because she says her,

Nan Shirley Wardell, was overdosed

1:11:171:11:19

by mistake when in hospital.

1:11:191:11:20

We are doing a lot of things but it

is important to reassure our

1:11:201:11:24

viewers, that this report is clear

that the NHS error rates are not

1:11:241:11:31

higher than elsewhere, than in the

US or other EU countries.

One in

1:11:311:11:35

five when it comes to prescriptions

is high.

Far too high, between four

1:11:351:11:40

and five people die every single day

because of these errors. So what are

1:11:401:11:47

we doing? We know that if we move to

electronic systems rather than

1:11:471:11:50

paper-based that we still have in

many hospitals, you can eliminate

1:11:501:11:54

around half of errors.

How far are

you with that?

Today we announce the

1:11:541:11:59

next £75 million to help hospitals

progress, at the moment it is around

1:11:591:12:03

a quarter of hospitals that have

those systems in place. But they

1:12:031:12:08

create the Czechs, for example, if

you try to give a drug to a pregnant

1:12:081:12:13

woman that could damage the foetus,

then you will get a contrary

1:12:131:12:17

indication when you get that. --

checks. That means 75% of hospitals

1:12:171:12:21

at the moment do not have electronic

processing in place? Yes, and that

1:12:211:12:25

is what we want to put right, we

want all hospitals to move to that,

1:12:251:12:29

but if you talk to doctors,

pharmacists, nurses on the front

1:12:291:12:33

line, they have another worry, and

that is that the culture is wrong,

1:12:331:12:37

that if they make a mistake where

they are prescribing medicine,

1:12:371:12:41

bringing down someone's dosage, and

they admit it, they could get fired.

1:12:411:12:45

Or they could suffer a criminal

prosecution, and so the other thing

1:12:451:12:52

we need to do is get the culture

right, to recognise that there is

1:12:521:12:56

going to be ordinarily human errors.

Those are just words, in a way, in a

1:12:561:13:03

sense, having this conversation

right now today, the focus being on

1:13:031:13:05

how many mistakes are being made by

GPs in care homes and hospitals,

1:13:051:13:09

could only serve to increase blame

culture?

Not at all, what we are

1:13:091:13:15

doing today is not just words, we

are decriminalising, dispensing

1:13:151:13:20

errors by pharmacists, which is

something pharmacists have long

1:13:201:13:24

thought creates the wrong culture.

Pharmacists says, I made a mistake,

1:13:241:13:30

you say there will not be

prosecuted?

As long as it is a

1:13:301:13:37

reasonable mistake, human errors,

yes, as long as it is not gross

1:13:371:13:41

negligence. We want to look at more

generally how we move in the NHS

1:13:411:13:45

from a blame culture to a learning

culture.

1:13:451:13:51

This just in, in my past life I was

a pharmacy tech in a well-known

1:13:511:13:56

London hospital, the pressure put on

technicians and pharmacists is

1:13:561:14:00

awful, waiting times, patients not

being patient, waiting for proper

1:14:001:14:04

checks, patients,

1:14:041:14:05

nurses and doctors need to be more

patient and then there would be

1:14:051:14:10

fewer errors. We can speak now with

Louise and her grandmother, she says

1:14:101:14:15

she was overdosed by mistake while

in hospital.

1:14:151:14:27

Tell us what happened?

Last Tuesday

my grandmother was admitted to

1:14:301:14:34

Kingston Hospital with pneumonia,

while she was in the care of

1:14:341:14:37

Kingston Hospital, from Tuesday, she

received four doses, of double her

1:14:371:14:42

usual epilepsy tablet she has been

taking four years, the issue came to

1:14:421:14:49

attention when my grandfather

noticed that the nurse who was

1:14:491:14:52

dispensing medication had two

tablets instead of one, and so we

1:14:521:14:57

were very concerned at the fact this

had not even been picked up on by

1:14:571:15:00

the hospital until my grandfather

noticed himself.

What was the

1:15:001:15:04

response from the hospital when you

told them?

1:15:041:15:06

First of all they said my grandad

was wrong, that they had the correct

1:15:111:15:15

dosage. She did then go to

investigate and the doctor came back

1:15:151:15:18

very quickly and said, I'm sorry but

there has been a terrible error, to

1:15:181:15:22

which then the prescription was

changed, but by which point my Nan

1:15:221:15:26

had received four times what she

should have done and had some really

1:15:261:15:29

nasty, severe side effects from it

which could have got a lot worse had

1:15:291:15:32

the time gone on even longer.

Surely, it sounds awful, what

1:15:321:15:39

happened. Can you tell us about last

Tuesday from your perspective?

I

1:15:391:15:42

don't remember a lot about it,

actually, because I wasn't well

1:15:421:15:46

anyway, so I only know that they

overdosed me.

My Nan cannot remember

1:15:461:15:52

a lot, that was part of the problem,

she was hallucinating, she did not

1:15:521:15:56

know where she was, she had a lot of

side-effects and that was part of

1:15:561:15:59

it, she cannot remember what

happened.

How do you feel about what

1:15:591:16:05

we are hearing today, this report,

the data that has been released,

1:16:051:16:09

telling us there are potentially

millions of mistakes being made

1:16:091:16:11

every year?

Personally I think it is

disgusting. At the end of the day,

1:16:111:16:18

these people have other people's

lives in their hands. I am a

1:16:181:16:23

secondary school teacher myself,

duty empathetically those working in

1:16:231:16:26

the NHS, I know what it is like to

work in a stressful environment and

1:16:261:16:30

under pressure and I understand

everybody has a hard job to do, but

1:16:301:16:33

at the same time these mistakes

should not be made. Somebody needs

1:16:331:16:37

to be held accountable for what they

are doing and luckily in our

1:16:371:16:42

instance the consequences were not

as dire as they could before

1:16:421:16:45

somebody else. But it is scary that

this is still happening in today's

1:16:451:16:48

H.

Shirley, how do you feel about

what we are hearing today in the

1:16:481:17:01

news that lots of errors are being

made, one in five prescriptions

1:17:011:17:04

could be a mistake?

When you are in

hospital and see some of them

1:17:041:17:10

walking and they don't know what

they are doing with the tablets and

1:17:101:17:13

that, you know...

We asked the

Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, to

1:17:131:17:20

comment on your situation, we put

your question to him on your behalf.

1:17:201:17:23

Here is what he said.

We need to

make sure we learn from those kinds

1:17:231:17:28

of mistakes because, as you said at

the start, they happened far too

1:17:281:17:31

often and at the moment very often

we are not because people are

1:17:311:17:35

worried if they are open about them

there will be consequences, so that

1:17:351:17:38

is the first thing we are doing. The

second thing is we are employing

1:17:381:17:43

2000 pharmacists to work in GP

surgeries because I don't know if it

1:17:431:17:47

was the case in that particular

story but very often these problems

1:17:471:17:50

happen with older people with

dementia who are on a cocktail of

1:17:501:17:56

drugs which sometimes don't work

well together and what you need to

1:17:561:17:59

do is get an experienced pharmacist

to look at the combinations of drugs

1:17:591:18:03

to say, actually, we need to take

two of those two drugs because they

1:18:031:18:06

could conflict with some of the

other drugs you are taking.

In

1:18:061:18:10

Louise's case, what would you say?

You are right, this is a terrible

1:18:101:18:15

problem, much more widespread than

we thought. But the World Health

1:18:151:18:20

Organization said today that the NHS

is taking the lead in trying to

1:18:201:18:24

tackle these problems and we

certainly want to halve the number

1:18:241:18:27

of medication errors over the next

five years.

Shirley, are you

1:18:271:18:33

convinced by Jeremy Hunt's response?

I don't know, really. I really don't

1:18:331:18:38

know.

That they are tackling the

problem, the NHS is trying to change

1:18:381:18:45

the culture and they are dealing

with this.

They say that, then

1:18:451:18:51

nothing happens, does it?

I think

the issue is that people do need to

1:18:511:18:56

be held accountable for their

actions. It is not enough to say, we

1:18:561:19:00

are spending this money, that money,

it is down to what you do and how

1:19:001:19:04

you change it, and halving the

incidence is not good enough, they

1:19:041:19:07

should not happen at all. I accept

human errors happen, we are all

1:19:071:19:13

human, but when you are dealing with

something as important as this,

1:19:131:19:16

people must be held accountable for

what they are doing.

There will be

1:19:161:19:21

people watching who work in care

homes, hospitals, they may be

1:19:211:19:26

pharmacists, doctors, they may feel

frustrated that, again, they are the

1:19:261:19:29

focus of blame when they are working

on the front line, working in an

1:19:291:19:34

environment which is under

resourced, understaffed, lacking

1:19:341:19:38

money, and yet again the finger of

blame is being pointed towards them?

1:19:381:19:43

As I say, I empathise with them, it

is very hard, but, as I say, I am

1:19:431:19:49

accountable as a teacher for the

outcomes and results of my students,

1:19:491:19:52

they have to be held accountable for

what their job is and ultimately

1:19:521:19:56

their job is dealing with medication

for these people and they must be

1:19:561:19:59

held accountable for what they are

doing.

What do you think about the

1:19:591:20:03

point Jeremy Hunt made, the Health

Secretary, about blame culture,

1:20:031:20:07

getting away from that where people

are able to admit they made mistakes

1:20:071:20:11

which they can then go on to learn

from, instead of hiding them or

1:20:111:20:19

covering them up?

I think it is much

better than hiding them, obviously,

1:20:191:20:22

but we have to make sure that

ultimately they can learn from it

1:20:221:20:24

and that the mistakes don't continue

to happen. We should not be hiding

1:20:241:20:29

it but, as I keep saying it and I

will always say, there has to be

1:20:291:20:33

accountability, so whilst they

should not necessarily lose their

1:20:331:20:36

jobs, we are all human, mistakes do

happen, they have to be picked up on

1:20:361:20:40

and they have to learn from it,

there has to be some sort of outcome

1:20:401:20:43

to it, that is what we are seeking

for my Nan, we know what has

1:20:431:20:47

happened based on her experience,

something is happening and it is not

1:20:471:20:50

allowed to be brushed under the

carpet and forgotten about.

Louise,

1:20:501:20:55

Shirley, thank you for coming onto

the programme to talk about what

1:20:551:20:58

happened with you.

A couple of you have sent in

1:20:581:21:01

messages.

I got my first Ypres description a

1:21:011:21:05

few weeks ago, the consultant

prescribed mild steroid and an error

1:21:051:21:09

in transcription meant the drug I

received was different, not the drug

1:21:091:21:12

I was supposed to be given, not a

good idea for someone waiting for a

1:21:121:21:17

new hip having mobility issues.

Alan has e-mailed, my wife and I get

1:21:171:21:22

several repeat prescriptions every

month and each month the boxes

1:21:221:21:25

change and are different colours and

shapes, the tablets themselves can

1:21:251:21:36

be different colours, sizes and

shapes, it can be very confusing. I

1:21:361:21:39

assume the pharmacy just supplies

whatever they can get cheapest.

1:21:391:21:41

Being attacked with acid

is a difficult thing

1:21:411:21:42

to imagine for most of us,

but a growing number

1:21:421:21:45

of people are being affected.

1:21:451:21:46

New figures obtained by 5Live

Investigates show there were 646

1:21:461:21:48

acid attacks in England and Wales

last year, over three times

1:21:481:21:51

higher than in 2013.

1:21:511:21:52

The BBC sent Freedom of Information

requests to 46 police

1:21:521:21:55

forces across the country,

asking for the number of acid

1:21:551:21:57

attacks in recent years.

1:21:571:21:59

25 forces responded

to that request in full.

1:21:591:22:02

Along with 5Live Investigates,

we brought together two acid attack

1:22:021:22:06

survivors with very different

stories to talk about the impact

1:22:061:22:09

the attacks have had,

and are still having,

1:22:091:22:11

on their lives.

1:22:111:22:16

My name is Adele, and in 2014 my ex

paid someone to chuck acid over me.

1:22:161:22:31

My name is Gibaud Hussein and I was

a victim of an acid attack last

1:22:311:22:37

year. Someone threw acid on my face

on the street while I was riding my

1:22:371:22:42

method.

I was attacked three and a half

1:22:421:22:50

years ago, almost four, August 2000

and 14. My ex-partner paid someone

1:22:501:22:54

to chuck acid over me. I was on my

way to work, 8:30am when this guy

1:22:541:23:02

came towards me, shaking a bottle. I

remember feeling wary as he walked

1:23:021:23:06

past me because he looked me in the

eye and gave me a look, that is when

1:23:061:23:09

he chucked the acid. Half the head

of hair, my right ear, all my right

1:23:091:23:18

side. My first thing was, oh, my

God, he has chucked water over me.

1:23:181:23:23

Seconds later it was burning and it

felt like I was melting.

I was

1:23:231:23:31

working for number at the time, food

delivery -- working flat Uber. I had

1:23:311:23:38

just finished my work and was going

home will stop I heard the sound of

1:23:381:23:42

water on my helmet on the left-hand

side. I looked to the left and

1:23:421:23:47

soared two boys with the mask on and

I jumped on my bike, left my bike on

1:23:471:23:51

the street. It was burning on my

face. One of the ladies who was

1:23:511:23:57

passing by, she just asked me what

happened. When she saw me, I was

1:23:571:24:03

just lying down on the pavement and

I started crying like a baby, I have

1:24:031:24:07

never cried like that. They started

putting water on me.

Where is it

1:24:071:24:16

hurting, in your eyes? We need to

try and get water in your eyes. Eyes

1:24:161:24:23

open, OK?

Yeah, I kept crying for

water as well, just the initial

1:24:231:24:32

thing, I would feel it burning,

someone came running out of their

1:24:321:24:36

house with a bucket of water, then I

just remember smoking, for me that

1:24:361:24:40

kind of started a reaction again and

it was all over me, I looked down,

1:24:401:24:44

didn't have a bra, it was all

burned, everywhere, I can still

1:24:441:24:49

smell that smell now, it is a smell

that I cannot describe. If I did not

1:24:491:24:54

have the water over me, I would have

been blind. That water was a

1:24:541:24:58

blessing.

It was burning on my

chest, there was pain all over my

1:24:581:25:07

body, so I had to sleep.

I was in

hospital for six weeks, I had skin

1:25:071:25:19

grafts, they took it from my side.

My right hand, my right arm, the

1:25:191:25:23

right side of my head, this hair is

fake. I lost my ear and my neck, and

1:25:231:25:29

then my chest.

1:25:291:25:33

We can speak now to Simon Harding,

a criminologist who's currently

1:25:331:25:36

researching acid attacks

at Middlesex University.

1:25:361:25:37

Janette Collins, who runs The Crib,

a youth project in Hackney.

1:25:371:25:42

And Ayesha Nayyar, a lawyer

who represents acid attack victims.

1:25:421:25:46

Thank you for joining us on the

programme. Simon, what do you think

1:25:461:25:51

is behind the rise?

It is

interesting, acid attacks that we

1:25:511:25:56

experience in the UK is really quite

different from other areas around

1:25:561:26:00

the world. If you look at India,

Pakistan, Jamaica, Colombia,

1:26:001:26:07

Indonesia, you tend to find acid

attacks are men throwing acid over

1:26:071:26:13

women, usually because the women

have exercised their decision-making

1:26:131:26:16

power.

They are to do with honour?

To do with honour and domestic

1:26:161:26:23

violence. Here, less so. We have

seen a shift in how acid attacks are

1:26:231:26:28

presenting in this country. They

have traditionally been used as a

1:26:281:26:34

kind of last resort, perhaps a

revenge attack, that type of thing,

1:26:341:26:37

but we now find it is much more

casual, and certainly people will be

1:26:371:26:43

aware of the incidents in London

over the past year that grabbed the

1:26:431:26:47

headlines over the summer, young

boys sometimes gang affiliated

1:26:471:26:51

casually using and throwing acid,

sometimes to incapacitate people so

1:26:511:26:58

they can then go on to rob them of

their wallet, the phone, even their

1:26:581:27:04

mopeds. So it is a change in the

type of victim and also a change in

1:27:041:27:10

the age of the offender, so much

younger than ever before.

Janet, is

1:27:101:27:16

this about also, as well as using

acid in attacks, is is also about

1:27:161:27:21

people carrying acid in the way they

might have carried a knife before?

I

1:27:211:27:27

understand what my friend is saying

here, but I have not seen that

1:27:271:27:32

rising acid attacks when it comes to

the young people we have been

1:27:321:27:36

working with, and we work with some

hard to reach young people as well.

1:27:361:27:40

When we are doing our knife -based

workshop, we introduce acid attacks

1:27:401:27:46

in there but a lot of the young

people I have spoken do have not

1:27:461:27:49

really seen it as a big issue is how

we, the adults, are seeing it. I

1:27:491:27:56

think sometimes, I do understand

they were doing it on the mopeds,

1:27:561:28:00

but sometimes when we start pushing

things over to young people it can

1:28:001:28:03

create a problem with young people.

If I think you are carrying acid and

1:28:031:28:08

I am going to go into a certain

area, I am going to have to carry

1:28:081:28:12

acid myself. Sometimes I think we

fuel the fire.

Who is fuelling the

1:28:121:28:17

fire, because some people have made

this argument that the more the

1:28:171:28:19

media talks about it, we see it in

the papers and on TV, it in a way

1:28:191:28:24

encourages it, but also if we are

hearing that the number of attacks

1:28:241:28:27

have tripled, what do you put that

down to?

Has it tripled in the sense

1:28:271:28:32

of young people using acid as a new

form of violence towards another

1:28:321:28:38

young person?

Your area of

expertise?

It can lead to what we

1:28:381:28:44

call a bird expert -- escalation.

Approximately half of the incident

1:28:441:28:49

in London occurred in the east of

London so there is some significant

1:28:491:28:52

event taking place there and it is

possible that young people who have

1:28:521:28:58

adopted this or learned it through

social media, it is effectively

1:28:581:29:04

leading to escalation within that

neighbourhood, so one gang start

1:29:041:29:07

using it, another rival gang

starts...

I totally agree with that,

1:29:071:29:12

I understand that.

Let's bring in

Ayesha. What kind of sentence can

1:29:121:29:16

you expect for carrying out an acid

attack or even carrying acid?

It

1:29:161:29:20

depends what you are doing with the

acid. If you are carrying acid you

1:29:201:29:24

can be charged with the offence of

possession of a weapon which carries

1:29:241:29:28

a maximum four-year prison sentence.

The same as carrying a knife?

It is,

1:29:281:29:33

yes. If you throw acid, if you miss

your victim you can be charged with

1:29:331:29:38

throwing a corrosive liquid with

intent to maim, disfigure or cause

1:29:381:29:44

grievous bodily harm. That does

carry a maximum life sentence in

1:29:441:29:48

prison. If you throw acid and you

hit your victim, you can be charged,

1:29:481:29:52

likely to be charged with grievous

bodily harm which, again, carries a

1:29:521:29:56

maximum life sentence in prison. If

you compare that with knife crime,

1:29:561:30:00

if you use a knife you are likely to

be charged with attempted murder. If

1:30:001:30:04

you use acid and throw it, you are

likely to be charged, cases we have

1:30:041:30:13

had in the past, you are likely to

be charged with grievous bodily

1:30:131:30:16

harm.

So are you saying the law

needs to be tougher?

I think the

1:30:161:30:19

framework is there, even if you are

charged with grievous bodily harm

1:30:191:30:21

the framework is there to receive a

maximum life sentence in prison but

1:30:211:30:26

that has not happened to date. The

Arthur Collins case in 2017 was the

1:30:261:30:31

largest acid attack in the country,

he was charged with five counts of

1:30:311:30:35

grievous bodily harm, nine counts of

assault, 14 counts, he got a 20 year

1:30:351:30:40

prison sentence. He did not get life

in prison. I know the case that is

1:30:401:30:45

going to trial, sorry, being

sentenced next week where -- next

1:30:451:30:48

month whether young mopeds driver

threw acid on six victims, the

1:30:481:30:54

victims are pushing for life

sentencing to be passed.

Sentencing

1:30:541:30:57

is one thing but also the charge,

grievous bodily harm as opposed to

1:30:571:31:01

attempted murder in the case of a

knife attack, toughening up the law,

1:31:011:31:06

do you think that would act as a

deterrent and see the numbers come

1:31:061:31:10

down?

Definitely, remember at the

moment there is no crime of

1:31:101:31:13

possession for acid, if you are

caught in a knife you are charged

1:31:131:31:16

with the crime of possession. If the

police stop you with acid, they have

1:31:161:31:20

to prove you intended to use it and

criminals are aware of that, as a

1:31:201:31:25

statistic, they know if they stopped

carrying acid, the police have to

1:31:251:31:29

prove they intend to use it which

threshold, as opposed to knife

1:31:291:31:38

crime. So something needs to be done

about introducing a crime of

1:31:381:31:40

possession for acid, that would go

some way to stopping the carrying of

1:31:401:31:43

acid in the country at the moment.

And we know the Government is

1:31:431:31:46

reviewing legislation around

carrying corrosive substances. Thank

1:31:461:31:48

you all for joining us this morning.

1:31:481:31:50

In a statement,

the Home Office said...

1:31:501:31:52

"The perpetrators of these sickening

attacks can already face up to life

1:31:521:31:55

imprisonment on conviction.

1:31:551:31:56

An action plan was set up

by the Home Secretary last year

1:31:561:31:59

to tackle the use of corrosive

substances in violent attacks

1:31:591:32:01

and we are making good progress

on implementing this."

1:32:011:32:04

substances in violent attacks and we

are making good progress on

1:32:041:32:06

implement in this. Still to come on

the programme: after Lily Allen

1:32:061:32:12

draws attention to the three day

London music festival with a

1:32:121:32:15

distinctively Male line-up, a new

initiative pledges to have a 50/50

1:32:151:32:22

gender balance across all live music

events. And the power of celebrity,

1:32:221:32:28

Kylie Jenner says that she is no

longer using Snapchat and Snapchat

1:32:281:32:32

promptly loses £1 billion from its

stock market value!

1:32:321:32:38

Time for the latest news,

here's Joanna Gosling.

1:32:461:32:47

A study has found that mistakes made

in the medication given to patients

1:32:471:32:50

in England could be the cause

of seventeen-hundred deaths a year,

1:32:501:32:53

and could contribute

to thousands more.

1:32:531:32:54

-- 1700.

1:32:541:32:58

The report commissioned

by the government said the number

1:32:581:33:00

of drug errors totals

237 million cases a year.

1:33:001:33:02

The Health and Social Care

Secretary, Jeremy Hunt,

1:33:021:33:04

said the government is investing

in computer systems that

1:33:041:33:06

would help prevent mistakes.

1:33:061:33:07

A fourth British tourist has died

of injuries he suffered

1:33:071:33:10

in a helicopter crash

in the Grand Canyon

1:33:101:33:12

nearly a fortnight ago.

1:33:121:33:13

Jonathan Udall, who was in his

30s and from Brighton,

1:33:131:33:15

was on honeymoon with his wife,

Ellie Milward.

1:33:151:33:17

She and another British woman,

as well as the helicopter's pilot,

1:33:171:33:20

remain in a critical

condition in hospital.

1:33:201:33:25

An armed officer who was

at the Florida school,

1:33:251:33:27

where 17 people were killed,

has resigned after it emerged

1:33:271:33:30

he failed to intervene.

1:33:301:33:31

Scot Peterson was facing suspension

after an investigation

1:33:311:33:33

revealed he remained outside

the building and did not

1:33:331:33:35

confront the gunman.

1:33:351:33:36

It's not yet known whether criminal

charges will be brought

1:33:361:33:43

Detectives investigating two murders

in Camden earlier this week have

1:33:441:33:48

arrested an 18-year-old man.

1:33:481:33:52

He was arrested in Camden

on suspicion of two counts

1:33:521:33:54

of murder and one count

of grievous bodily harm.

1:33:541:33:56

The police say both murders

are being treated as linked,

1:33:561:33:59

and are appealing for information.

1:33:591:34:02

Sipping acidic drinks such as fruit

teas and flavoured water can wear

1:34:021:34:06

away teeth and damage the enamel.

1:34:061:34:07

A team at King's College London

found that drinking them

1:34:071:34:09

between meals and savouring them

for too long increased the risk

1:34:091:34:11

of tooth erosion from acid.

1:34:121:34:13

The research found the problem was

increasing as people snacked more.

1:34:131:34:21

Before we go to the sport, I want to

read you out a comment that has come

1:34:271:34:32

in from Stephen, 78, he has e-mailed

to ask, how can I book a place at

1:34:321:34:37

the care home(!) that is in response

to the story this morning about some

1:34:371:34:43

people criticising a care home which

showed pole dancing to its

1:34:431:34:48

residents. Slightly linked to sport,

apparently, pole dancing is on its

1:34:481:34:51

way to becoming a recognised sport,

potentially even an Olympic sport.

1:34:511:34:57

Potentially, I think it will be

quite a while before we see it at an

1:34:571:35:01

Olympic Games. Serious stuff out on

the ice to come. Team GB's women

1:35:011:35:07

face Sweden in the Semi final of the

Curling at the Winter Olympics in

1:35:071:35:09

around half an hour from now.

Britain will be confident, but face

1:35:091:35:18

a team that has beaten them once

already in Pyeongchang. The winner

1:35:181:35:20

will take home at least a silver

medal which would make it Britain's

1:35:201:35:23

most successful Winter Olympics.

Another Olympic Athlete from Russia

1:35:231:35:27

has tested positive for a banned

substance. Bobsleigh pilot Nadezhda

1:35:271:35:31

Sergeeva is one of 168 Russians

allowed to compete as neutrals,

1:35:311:35:33

despite the country being banned for

a state sponsored doping programme.

1:35:331:35:43

But there was a first gold of the

games for an Olympic Athlete from

1:35:451:35:47

Russia. It came in the Women's

singles figure skating as

1:35:471:35:49

15-year-old Alina Zagitova. She beat

her team-mate and favourite Yevgenia

1:35:491:35:52

Medvedeva. Arsenal are in the Europa

League last 32 draw later today,

1:35:521:35:54

despite losing at home to Ostersunds

of Sweden - a 2-1 defeat but a 4-2

1:35:541:35:57

aggregate win.

1:35:571:36:05

Wales already does it,

1:36:101:36:11

now organ donation could soon become

an opt-out system in England.

1:36:111:36:14

Today MPs are debating a bill

which wants the law to be changed

1:36:141:36:17

so medics would be able to assume

consent had been given

1:36:171:36:20

by a potential adult organ donor,

unless they've said otherwise.

1:36:201:36:22

The Former England footballer

Andy Cole is supporting the bill

1:36:221:36:24

after having a kidney transplant

in 2013 at the age of 43.

1:36:241:36:27

The kidney was donated by Andy's

nephew, Alexander Palmer.

1:36:271:36:29

I spoke to the pair earlier

in the programme about how

1:36:291:36:32

the transplant process

changed their lives.

1:36:321:36:38

I appreciate everything he has done

for me and what he has gone through,

1:36:521:36:55

the pain he has gone through,

to see me recover than Alex did

1:36:551:36:58

at the time because I remember

when I left hospital I left him

1:36:581:37:02

in the hospital.

1:37:021:37:03

I remember saying, if I could change

it, I would do, because I did not

1:37:031:37:06

want to see him in that pain,

first and foremost.

1:37:061:37:09

Fortunately he came

round and that is why we are sitting

1:37:091:37:11

in front of you now.

1:37:111:37:12

Alex, can you tell me

about the journey, Andy's journey

1:37:121:37:15

from the moment he was diagnosed

to the point where you decided

1:37:151:37:18

to donate your own kidney?

1:37:181:37:19

For me it was a straight away thing,

as soon as they told be

1:37:191:37:22

about the situation I said,

help, I am more than happy to help

1:37:221:37:25

stop a no-brainer for me.

1:37:251:37:35

And what was the process like,

how do you go about donating your

1:37:361:37:40

kidney, would you have decided

you wanted to help,

1:37:401:37:42

what happens next?

1:37:421:37:43

A lot of blood tests,

I had the test and once the test

1:37:431:37:46

came in and it is positive,

then it is the next stage,

1:37:461:37:50

not a simple process

but a process that is worthwhile.

1:37:501:37:51

Joining us now is 30-year-old

Jess Harris, who is waiting for both

1:37:551:37:58

a kidney and pancreas transplant.

1:37:581:37:59

Intensive care consultant

Dale Gardiner, who is also

1:37:591:38:01

the deputy clinical lead for organ

donation for the NHS

1:38:011:38:03

Blood and Transplant.

1:38:031:38:04

And Crispin Blunt, one of the MPs

who is debating the bill today.

1:38:041:38:07

How long have you been waiting?

I

have been active on the list since

1:38:071:38:12

September 15, 2017, five months on

the list.

Wide EU need a kidney and

1:38:121:38:17

pancreas transplant?

Type one

diabetic, since I was 12, 13 years

1:38:171:38:22

old. The impact of diabetes is...

There is a link between diabetes

1:38:221:38:29

type one and kidney disease, disease

kidney failure, if it develops.

That

1:38:291:38:34

is the point I am at. You are having

dialysis every day. I do PD dialysis

1:38:341:38:41

every night and every morning, from

my flat. What is it like for you,

1:38:411:38:47

day-to-day?

The dialysis was a

really big adjustment, I feel a lot

1:38:471:38:52

better than I did before I started

dialysis, but it is the last thing I

1:38:521:38:56

do before bed, first thing I do in

the morning before I wake up,

1:38:561:39:03

really.

How does it affect your

quality of life?

In terms of what

1:39:031:39:07

I'm able to do in between dialysis,

I feel generally better. I'm

1:39:071:39:13

grateful I have it. The kidney is

the only organ where you have

1:39:131:39:18

replacement therapy while you are

waiting for a kidney. But I don't

1:39:181:39:23

want to have to do it. All my

friends are travelling, if I have

1:39:231:39:28

been out with friends, I have to go

back and do it, if I do it before I

1:39:281:39:31

go out with friends, I am

uncomfortable the whole night. I

1:39:311:39:36

have not found a time when is the

optimal time.

Opting out, it is

1:39:361:39:43

being debated today, let's bring in

Crispin Blunt, dozens of MPs are

1:39:431:39:49

gathering, to debate the bill, why

are you taking part?

I'm one of the

1:39:491:39:54

supporters of the bill, 20 minutes

ago concluded his speech introducing

1:39:541:40:02

his speech to the house, he took a

lot of interventions, it is pretty

1:40:021:40:06

clear there is very strong support

for him, to get this bill onto the

1:40:061:40:10

statute book. Both from the

government front bench as well as

1:40:101:40:14

his own. Given that unanimity across

the house, I hope that we can get to

1:40:141:40:19

a place where we can start to

address the 500 people every year

1:40:191:40:26

unable to get a life-saving

transplant.

How much of an impact

1:40:261:40:29

will the opt out system have, for

bringing down the number of people

1:40:291:40:34

who are waiting for an organ

donation like Jess, waiting for a

1:40:341:40:38

kidney and a pancreas?

Exactly

right, wonderful opportunity here to

1:40:381:40:44

launch a conversation in the

country, as in intensive care

1:40:441:40:47

doctor, I have these really

difficult conversations with people.

1:40:471:40:51

People who are dying, with their

families, at the end of their life,

1:40:511:40:55

and what I know for a fact is the

family do not know what your wishes

1:40:551:41:00

are, they are just left in such

shock, and confusion. I am so

1:41:001:41:06

excited by these conversations, the

possibility of launching a

1:41:061:41:10

discussion through the country, so

that you can tell your family what

1:41:101:41:13

your wishes would be.

When you have

the difficult conversations with

1:41:131:41:18

people who have just lost a loved

one, it is that is when you need the

1:41:181:41:22

conversation to take place, in the

cases where people have said, no,

1:41:221:41:26

what do they say to you, how often

do they say that to you?

If you are

1:41:261:41:32

on the organ donor register, 38% of

the population, nine times out of

1:41:321:41:36

ten the families will support your

wish. If you are not on the

1:41:361:41:40

register, it is a 50/50 chance,

families are left uncertain because

1:41:401:41:45

they do not know what the wishes

would be. Through this discussion

1:41:451:41:48

and conversation and legislation,

there will be a chance that you will

1:41:481:41:53

be a donor unless you tell us you do

not want to be, and that will bring

1:41:531:41:57

a lot of comfort to families, that

they know their loved one would have

1:41:571:42:00

opted out if they wanted to.

Crispin

Blunt, this opt out system, 24

1:42:001:42:06

years, why has it taken the

government so long to be debating

1:42:061:42:09

this when other places have had it

longer?

I don't know why we have not

1:42:091:42:14

got round to this before, there was

some discussion with Jeffrey Benson

1:42:141:42:18

about the Chief Rabbi giving some

opposition to Gordon Brown when he

1:42:181:42:21

was Prime Minister, when he was

looking at bringing this measure in.

1:42:211:42:25

But there are, as I understand it,

only two religions, aroma and

1:42:251:42:29

Shintoism, who have fundamental

objection to this. There are

1:42:291:42:35

elements of Judaism who have

problems with it but all of this can

1:42:351:42:38

be addressed through an opt out

system. -- the Roma. This bill will

1:42:381:42:42

do a couple of important things, it

will put on the statute book that

1:42:421:42:46

you need to opt out in order to do

it but it will mean there is a

1:42:461:42:49

societal assumption that the right

thing to do is to make your organs

1:42:491:42:53

available to others, after your

death, and that then changes the

1:42:531:42:58

conversation with families as well.

It does...

I think that will make a

1:42:581:43:03

big difference.

It changes the

conversation but then there is added

1:43:031:43:07

pressure on families who have just

lost a loved one, to perhaps agree

1:43:071:43:11

to something they may not want.

They

will then be clear, if their

1:43:111:43:16

relative has opted out, then they

will no that there has been the

1:43:161:43:23

opportunity for their relative to

consider this when they were able to

1:43:231:43:26

do so and to opt out. That changes

the dynamic, a family suddenly faced

1:43:261:43:32

with this really difficult decision,

in that often, in circumstances of

1:43:321:43:38

sudden death, in a road traffic

accident, that kind of thing, when

1:43:381:43:42

those organs will be really useful

to a number of people, and it is an

1:43:421:43:48

agonising conversation for people to

have, if the whole national

1:43:481:43:50

conversation around it changes about

what the expectations are, and there

1:43:501:43:55

has been the opportunity for people

to opt out, that will make life

1:43:551:44:01

considerably easier for the doctor

we have just heard from, to have

1:44:011:44:04

those conversations and save lives.

Lots of people may be signed up,

1:44:041:44:10

decide whether they are willing to

donate their organs but in reality,

1:44:101:44:13

do you know what is the percentage,

how many organs can actually be

1:44:131:44:17

used?

One thing that is really

clear, only 1% of us will die in a

1:44:171:44:23

way where there is a possibility for

us to donate organs, that means you

1:44:231:44:27

have two die in an intensive care

unit, that is why you come across

1:44:271:44:30

doctors like myself, who after

trying to save your life will have

1:44:301:44:34

the terrible conversation with the

family. But if the family say yes,

1:44:341:44:39

and for me, this is the most

humbling moment of my intensive care

1:44:391:44:43

career, when you are with a grief

stricken family, and they look

1:44:431:44:46

beyond themselves to other people,

and they say that simple word, yes,

1:44:461:44:50

to help others, that is immensely

humbling. And when they do say yes,

1:44:501:44:56

and the donation does go ahead, they

can save and transform the lives of

1:44:561:45:00

up to eight or nine people, I have

heard stories like that over the

1:45:001:45:04

last few months, people helping to

save that many people, who saves

1:45:041:45:08

that many people in their whole

life?

Thank you.

1:45:081:45:12

Jess, how much difference would it

make to your life is someone donated

1:45:161:45:20

and you got the match?

It would

transform my life because I have

1:45:201:45:24

been on the list for five months but

even before I was activated on the

1:45:241:45:28

list, my life has been in limbo,

have not been able to work, to

1:45:281:45:31

travel, I get tired doing really

basic things, food shopping,

1:45:311:45:37

hospital appointments for me is

basically might activity for the

1:45:371:45:43

day, but it is important everyone

has that conversation or start

1:45:431:45:46

having that conversation so that

your wishes are known, so there is

1:45:461:45:51

no shock discovery at the end if

something were to happen. It is life

1:45:511:45:55

transforming and this vote... I have

got a few friends in similar

1:45:551:46:00

situations to myself, 6500 people

waiting for transplants, and it

1:46:001:46:04

would be an exciting day for people

like me if this vote goes through.

1:46:041:46:09

You are backing it?

100%, yes.

Thank

you for coming in and talking about

1:46:091:46:17

what happened to you.

1:46:171:46:18

Last month, Lily Allen

made a simple statement

1:46:181:46:20

with a tweet when the line-up

for London's Wireless

1:46:201:46:22

festival was announced.

1:46:221:46:23

It showed only three female

artists were set to perform

1:46:231:46:26

over the three days.

1:46:261:46:27

But a new initiative to be announced

next week is hoping to get gender

1:46:271:46:31

balance in the music industry.

1:46:311:46:33

30 music events have made

a pledge towards achieving

1:46:331:46:37

a 50/50 gender balance

across their festivals by 2022.

1:46:371:46:42

That includes live music line-ups,

conferences and commissions.

1:46:421:46:44

Before we get to the guests,

we thought we'd take a look at how

1:46:441:46:49

some of this summer's big festivals

are doing when it comes

1:46:491:46:51

to having female artists...

1:46:511:46:56

We looked at some of the big summer

festivals and removed all the male

1:46:561:47:05

artists and bands to see how many

female artists are on the line-up.

1:47:051:47:08

First up, Reading

and Leeds festival.

1:47:081:47:13

Headlined by Fall Out Boy, Kendrick

Lamar and Kings Of Leon.

1:47:131:47:16

We also did the same

with the Isle of Wight festival.

1:47:161:47:19

Again, taking out

all the male artists.

1:47:191:47:21

And we did the same

with Boardmasters,

1:47:211:47:22

which takes place in Cornwall.

1:47:221:47:25

In a statement, the organisers

of Boardmasters told us this

1:47:251:47:27

isn't the full line-up...

1:47:271:47:29

"But booking acts is a complex

process that needs to factor

1:47:291:47:33

in touring schedules,

the fast-paced and changing music

1:47:331:47:37

landscape and, of course, acts'

willingness to play the festival.

1:47:371:47:40

We don't see gender

as a defining factor."

1:47:401:47:48

We can speak now to Yaw Owusu,

who is the curator of

1:47:481:47:51

Liverpool International Music

Festival.

1:47:511:47:52

He also has a music label

and manages male and female artists.

1:47:521:47:55

Vanessa Reid, chief executive

of the PRS Foundation.

1:47:551:47:57

And rapper Little Simz.

1:47:571:48:03

Thank you all for joining us. Seems

to be the topic of the year, gender.

1:48:031:48:09

When it comes to booking artists for

the Festival, is gender something

1:48:091:48:14

you take into consideration or is

that a recent thing?

Not really, you

1:48:141:48:18

focus on the audience and the remit

of the Liverpool International Music

1:48:181:48:22

Festival is to reflect the music

people like and reflect the

1:48:221:48:25

ever-changing relationship Liverpool

has with music. So gender is not

1:48:251:48:29

really a factor, I don't lean

heavily to male or female, just what

1:48:291:48:34

people like. Our line-ups tend to be

very balanced in every single way

1:48:341:48:40

and that is just because I feel the

audience wants that and it is

1:48:401:48:43

important to do.

But you are leaving

it to fate, in a way, and if we are

1:48:431:48:48

seeing in the case of other

festivals, it is great that yours

1:48:481:48:51

ends up being balanced, but as we

have seen, so many are not and if we

1:48:511:48:55

take away the male artists from a

lot of the festival line-ups, you

1:48:551:48:58

only have a few female artists on

their?

That is why a product like

1:48:581:49:04

Key Change is so important, because

it forces the dialogue, forces the

1:49:041:49:10

conversation, so places where gender

balance is not so strong, hopefully

1:49:101:49:13

that changes.

Vanessa, your target,

as I understand it, is also 2020 to

1:49:131:49:19

achieve gender balance?

2022.

Why so

long?

I think that is a short amount

1:49:191:49:28

of time to achieve the change that

festivals have proposed was that

1:49:281:49:30

they want to achieve. We have been

working with festivals in Europe and

1:49:301:49:35

North America and supporting

emerging female artists and industry

1:49:351:49:39

professionals, but they said, let's

take this further, let's set up a

1:49:391:49:42

gender balanced pledge and because

last year I think on average women

1:49:421:49:48

made up 26% of the festival line-up

in the UK, so we are talking about

1:49:481:49:54

doubling the target in a five-year

time frame so I think that is quite

1:49:541:49:58

ambitious but also achievable, and

that is what we want to see, people

1:49:581:50:01

working together to achieve change

that I think everyone wants.

Is that

1:50:011:50:06

good enough, 2022 target?

I believe

so, yeah, for sure, and I believe it

1:50:061:50:11

is possible. Especially with my

festival and what I am trying to

1:50:111:50:18

achieve yearly, it seems to be

heading that way, so I think 2022

1:50:181:50:22

for sure.

Tell me about your

experience, being a female artist in

1:50:221:50:26

the industry, are you in a minority,

do you face bigger challenges, is it

1:50:261:50:30

the case, I don't know, that the

industry outside of artists, the

1:50:301:50:37

people making the big decisions, our

men, is that why women are not being

1:50:371:50:40

booked?

Yeah, but I also think it

boils down a lot to women are just

1:50:401:50:47

not being, I feel, played in terms

of the radio factor, all these

1:50:471:50:53

different factors that come into

play which it appears like...

Break

1:50:531:50:57

them down, what are they, radio the

first one?

For sure, myself, I am

1:50:571:51:03

unsigned, independent, so everything

is done in-house, there is not a

1:51:031:51:06

label or a big machine pushing me or

handing me these opportunities. I

1:51:061:51:12

played a bunch of festivals last

year which I actually found the

1:51:121:51:16

majority of them I was the only

woman on the line-up, or at least on

1:51:161:51:20

my stage, and with my festival, we

did the maths yesterday, it is 75%

1:51:201:51:28

women, which is insane to me. If I

am able to do that at my level, then

1:51:281:51:33

the big festivals are.

When you talk

about radio, you meal radio play,

1:51:331:51:37

female artists not being paid

enough?

Yeah, I think it is not as

1:51:371:51:41

much as it should be, in my opinion.

What is that down too, is it a

1:51:411:51:46

conscious or subconscious thing?

I

don't know, honestly, I have no

1:51:461:51:50

answer to that.

What about you as a

female artist making it in the

1:51:501:51:54

industry, what are the challenges?

Are any of them dictated by George

1:51:541:51:59

on the?

For sure, especially because

I wrap and rap is, some would say, a

1:51:591:52:04

male dominated sport. My gender has

come into play over the years, of

1:52:041:52:11

course, being the fact that I am

female, I am young, I am black, that

1:52:111:52:16

is the reality of the situation, and

I have found many challenges in

1:52:161:52:24

that, but I think over time as I

have grown and my family has grown,

1:52:241:52:27

people have taken to me.

He said a

female black artist in the industry,

1:52:271:52:33

being a rapper, what is your

response then when you see Stormzy

1:52:331:52:36

has made such a lot of progress,

picking up two big awards at the

1:52:361:52:40

Brits, his performance at the end

was being called iconic. Do you

1:52:401:52:45

think the next artist potentially

next year, the year after, will be a

1:52:451:52:49

female Stormzy, to achieve the same

amount of success?

Hopefully.

You,

1:52:491:52:55

possibly!

I hope so! Stormzy is a

good friend of mine, I have seen his

1:52:551:53:03

journey, so happy for his success at

the minute and it is what we need

1:53:031:53:07

and what young people need to see,

especially now, it is all these,

1:53:071:53:13

especially in my area, it is nice to

be able to see that real model and

1:53:131:53:18

be able to say, yeah, they have done

it and come from the same

1:53:181:53:23

environment as me, I am able to

achieve that, I am able to do good.

1:53:231:53:27

What, for you, would be a sign that

gender parity has been achieved in

1:53:271:53:32

the industry?

One thing about the

Key Change campaign, success is when

1:53:321:53:35

it is not needed any more so I hope

in five, ten years from now we will

1:53:351:53:40

be at a point when we don't need to

keep talking about this and the

1:53:401:53:43

stage is better reflect the

audiences they are serving, and I

1:53:431:53:50

think promoting a bowl models, as

Little Simz was saying, is

1:53:501:53:53

important. We saw Dua Lipa at the

Brits are accepting her reward and

1:53:531:53:57

talking about the people who

inspired her to take that step and

1:53:571:54:00

make such a success out of her

career so continuing to promote role

1:54:001:54:05

models on stage while investing in

talent is really important.

Thank

1:54:051:54:08

you for coming on to talk to us

today. A spokesperson from

1:54:081:54:12

Boardmasters told us...

We are always on the lookout for new

1:54:121:54:15

artists to perform at the festival

alongside the existing surf

1:54:151:54:19

competition featuring the world's

best male and female competitors.

1:54:191:54:24

This year's complete music line-up

1:54:241:54:34

is yet to play the festival. We

don't see gender as a defining

1:54:371:54:40

factor.

The MD of the company that runs the

1:54:401:54:46

Wireless festival said, 18 female

artists were approached to play but

1:54:461:54:49

only three were secured for the

first announcement, several were

1:54:491:54:52

unable to commit due to touring

schedules and other regions but in

1:54:521:54:56

an ideal world all 18 would be

confirmed and we would be having a

1:54:561:55:01

different conversation. I recognise

there is an imbalance in the music

1:55:011:55:04

industry and I am actively trying to

correct that with the Rebalance

1:55:041:55:09

programme I launched in August last

year.

1:55:091:55:13

Popular social media app Snapchat

lost one of it's most

1:55:131:55:15

influential users this week -

as well as £1 billion

1:55:151:55:17

from it's stock market value.

1:55:181:55:22

The reality TV star Kylie Jenner

tweeted to her 24 million followers

1:55:221:55:25

that she no longer uses Snapchat

after the new update.

1:55:251:55:30

She later professed her love for the

apps, calling at her first love.

1:55:301:55:36

The app's parent company Snap's

shares dropped by almost 8%.

1:55:361:55:38

One million people have signed

a petition demanding Snap change

1:55:381:55:41

the app back to how it was before

the update.

1:55:411:55:47

Let's speak to the technology

expert Tom Cheesewright.

1:55:471:55:52

Is the update really that bad, Tom?!

I think if you are used to a certain

1:55:521:55:57

way of doing things, and this is a

very tight community and particular

1:55:571:56:00

demographic, then any change is bad

change, just like when Facebook

1:56:001:56:04

changed its news feed a few years

ago, people react against it. Maybe

1:56:041:56:07

they will settle down, but not so

far.

For people who don't know about

1:56:071:56:12

Snapchat, what exactly was the

update and what was it that angered

1:56:121:56:17

people?

Two things, one is the move

towards bringing in more of the

1:56:171:56:22

brands, the publishers into the news

feed, and the second one is about

1:56:221:56:31

mixing those up with your friends'

stories, people found it harder to

1:56:311:56:33

see their friends' stories and

harder to navigate through that.

In

1:56:331:56:35

terms of generally the idea of

Snapchat in the first place was

1:56:351:56:38

people being able to post stories

that would then disappear after a

1:56:381:56:41

certain amount of time, how much of

Snapchat's success, or lack of,

1:56:411:56:47

depending on what you think, have

been influenced by Instagram

1:56:471:56:51

launching its own Insta stories?

There has been a constant battle

1:56:511:56:58

between them, Snapchat started to

claim more users recently and

1:56:581:57:02

forecast said that Facebook would

lose users to Snapchat but messages

1:57:021:57:07

that disappear don't create a great

model for generating revenue.

Again,

1:57:071:57:14

reading the papers today, the owner

has picked up something like a 450

1:57:141:57:18

million salary for last year?! That

is a lot of money! For a company who

1:57:181:57:23

shares have dropped.

It is very

stock related but the company also

1:57:231:57:29

posted record results, the share

price jumped 26% two weeks ago so an

1:57:291:57:33

8% fall is perhaps not so dramatic

in those terms.

What do you think

1:57:331:57:37

the future of Snapchat is?

I think

it has a hard slog against Facebook

1:57:371:57:42

which is rapid at copying its

beaches but if it can keep its core

1:57:421:57:47

of users and grow with people like

me, maybe Ed can succeed.

1:57:471:57:51

Thank you very much. I want to

finish on some comments, Abbey on

1:57:511:57:55

Facebook on organ donation says, why

would people donate organs? It is

1:57:551:57:59

selfish for families to say no

because, let's face it, they don't

1:57:591:58:02

need them any more. Families can

override donor card at the moment

1:58:021:58:07

which is wrong.

Graham tweeted to say the Government

1:58:071:58:10

is legalising body snatching. Let us

know the level of compensation if

1:58:101:58:16

organs are taken from dead patients

by mistake before they start this.

1:58:161:58:20

On Monday, Victoria will be

at a Pupil Referral Unit

1:58:201:58:22

for primary school pupils -

hearing from them, their parents

1:58:221:58:24

and teachers about how they're

trying to turn their lives around.

1:58:241:58:27

From me, though, thank

you for your company today.

1:58:271:58:29

Former England footballer Andy Cole talks to Tina about organ donation, after his nephew saved his life by giving him one of his kidneys. Health secretary Jeremy Hunt on why errors with drugs across the NHS could be linked to thousands of deaths. Plus the elderly care home which has been putting on pole dancing displays for its residents.


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