01/03/2018 Victoria Derbyshire


01/03/2018

Victoria talks to those stranded in the snow as a second red warning is issued for severe weather.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello.

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It's Thursday.

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It's 9 o'clock.

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I'm Victoria Derbyshire.

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Welcome to the programme.

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Our top story today: Hundreds

of drivers have spent

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the night stranded in snow

on the M80 in central Scotland

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with more snow expected right

across the UK today.

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We are in the car and we are warm.

There is nothing to look at. It is

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like a car park. Everybody is trying

to sleep, I think. There aren't many

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lights on.

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We'll be looking at extra

payments people living

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in fuel poverty can claim

during the cold weather.

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Also this morning: It's one

of the most pressing

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issues of our time.

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Dementia.

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This morning

we reveal new figures showing

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1.3 million people will be living

with it in the UK by 2036.

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I now prefer to email or text. When

I type it is as though dementia has

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never entered my life.

This morning

we will be joined by this group of

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people who all live with dementia or

are professionals working in the

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field. If you have this condition,

we definitely want to hear from you

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this morning. Please get in touch in

the usual ways.

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And the Home Office says

it is considering allowing a medical

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cannabis trial to treat

a six-year-old boy with

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a rare form of epilepsy.

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We'll speak to Alfie

Dingley's parents before

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the end of the programme.

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Hello and

welcome to the programme.

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We're live until 11am.

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Really keen to hear

from you about your experience

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of living with dementia this morning

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or if you care for someone who does.

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Please do get in touch

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and if you're happy to speak on air

we'll try and get you on before

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the end of the programme.

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Use the hashtag VictoriaLIVE.

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You can message us on Facebook.

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Our top story today:

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The Met Office has issued

a second red alert for snow,

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this time for South Wales

and South West England.

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This red warning means the extreme

weather poses a real risk to life.

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In Scotland, hundreds of drivers

have spent the night stranded

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on snowbound motorways.

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Some were stuck for

more than 15 hours.

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Others have been stranded overnight

near Skegness in Lincolnshire

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where police say even snowploughs

can't get through and military

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vehicles have been deployed.

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Let's get the latest

from our correspondents.

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Catriona Renton is in Glasgow.

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Good morning. It is really cold

here. You can probably see the

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powdery snow floating by behind us

but it is really cold and it is very

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quiet. Because of the snow, of

course. People have heeded the

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warning this morning and there is

very little traffic on the roads.

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The people stranded overnight,

people are doing their best to sort

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out that situation. People were

stranded at Glasgow airport

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overnight and the airport is hoping

to open at three o'clock this

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afternoon. Two thirds of schools in

Scotland are closed today, I

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understand. Again that is tens of

thousands of children that will have

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the day off school. More to tell you

about the red warning that we are in

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the middle of hearing Glasgow. --

here in Glasgow. It is in central

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and southern Scotland at the moment

and it is due to be called off at

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ten o'clock this morning but there

is still an amber weather warning

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for much of the day until six

o'clock tonight. We are told not to

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get too hopeful than either because

the forecast until the weekend is

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for pretty bad weather, if not as

bad as it is now. People are bracing

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themselves and hunkering down.

Really it is a day to stay in the

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house and keep warm if you possibly

can. My colleague John Kay is in

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Truro.

I feel your pain. Good

morning from Cornwall. A lot of

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people woke up in the south of

England in Southland midway of this

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morning and looked out of the window

and thought it wasn't too bad.

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Powdery snow falling but what is all

the fuss about? Maybe we shouldn't

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have closed all the shops and

businesses and schools and doctors

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surgeries. But in the last few

minutes the latest warning has come

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from the Met Office to say that they

still believe this will be a very

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bad storm in this part of the

country. They have issued this red

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alert, the most severe warning, for

a sliver that goes from South Wales

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through Cardiff across the Bristol

channel and into northern Somerset,

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Weston-Super-Mare, into Somerset

itself, across Exmoor and Dartmoor

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and into Devon. That bright red zone

that you will see on the maps that

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we have already seen in Scotland.

Not just heavy snowfall but also

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high winds. Emma Storm is coming

from the Bay of this gate across the

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south. -- survey of Biscay. It means

high winds and drifting conditions,

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blizzards. The question is working

out where that will happen. In this

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part of the country there are remote

rural communities and keeping roads

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open in those areas will basically

be impossible. They are having to

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prioritise to work out which routes

they can keep running. In most

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places it is a little bit of dusty

snow right now but it will get much

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heavier as the day goes on and into

the evening and then again tomorrow

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and potentially into tomorrow night

as well. That is what they are

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worried about, not just the instant

snowfall, but the accumulation over

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hours and hours. It is the first red

warning for snow that I can remember

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in Devon and parts of Somerset over

the last few years. We have had read

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warnings for flooding, notoriously

four years ago, but it is the first

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one that level for snow, I think.

That is the situation in the

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south-west of England. Let's go to

Phil Bodmer in Yarm in north

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Yorkshire. Good morning. The snow in

the North East is falling thick and

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fast. You can see just how much

there is on this car. That shows you

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the level of snow that we have had.

Police in north Yorkshire are

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warning drivers not to travel if at

all possible. Driving conditions on

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many routes are abysmal. The A66

Scotch corner is closed currently.

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Lincolnshire Police say drivers are

being warned not to travel if they

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don't have to. Pretty much every

road throughout the county is

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impassable and gritters and snow

ploughs have been out all morning.

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In Yarm itself the main centre is

clear and perhaps you can see on

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that shot that the road is clear.

Snow ploughs and gritters have been

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through all morning. Leeds Bradford

Airport has cancellations this

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morning and there are problems on

the railways as elsewhere in the

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country. If you are setting out

today, the advice is to take time,

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make sure you are prepared, take

extra clothing and a blanket if you

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can and be prepared for a longer

journey than normal. Thank you. We

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will keep you updated with the

latest situation throughout the

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morning and a full weather forecast

for you just before ten o'clock. Now

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the rest of the news with Annita

McVeigh. Good morning.

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Theresa May will meet Donald Tusk

for a working lunch this morning.

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Tomorrow she is expected to release

more detail of her vision for

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Britain's future relationship with

the EU. Independent inquiry into

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child sexual abuse will publish its

first completed report this morning.

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The findings will focus on the

forced migration and abuse of

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thousands of children, many of whom

were in care, who was sent to

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Australia, New Zealand, Canada and

Africa following the Second World

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War. The British and Australian

governments have apologised but

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today's report is likely to condemn

the programme and highlights the

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failure to detect and prevent the

abuse.

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The Home Office says

it is considering allowing a medical

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cannabis trial to treat

a six-year-old boy with

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a rare form of epilepsy.

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It previously turned down requests

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by the family of Alfie Dingley,

from Warwickshire,

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to legally take the drug.

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But now ministers say

they are exploring every option,

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following a meeting with the family.

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An option could be a three-month

trial, led by Alfie's doctors

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and based on sufficient

and rigorous evidence.

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For the first time acid

is described as a highly

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dangerous weapon --

in new sentencing guidelines.

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The advice for judges

and magistrates

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in England and Wales has

been updated in the wake

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of a surge in attacks

using corrosive substances.

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Offenders are now likely

to face stiffer penalties.

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The American retail

giant Walmart says it

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will tighten its policy on firearms

sales as Donald Trump tells

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Congress it's time to act.

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The President stunned

some politicians

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in his own Republican party

by telling them on live TV not to be

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so afraid of the pro-gun lobby.

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He said he wanted what he called

a strong reform bill

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but stuck by his suggestion

of arming some teachers.

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Spotify,

the world's largest music streaming

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service has filed paperwork to start

trading its shares

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on the New York Stock Exchange.

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The Swedish company

which has a database

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of 30 million songs will

undertake what's known

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as a direct listing letting

investors and employees sell

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shares without needing

an intermediary.

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Spotify - which launched in 2008 -

now has over seventy

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one million paying subscribers,

with even more using their free

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advertisement supported service.

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Shoppers have until

midnight tonight to spend

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paper ten-pound notes featuring

Charles Dickens before

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they cease to be legal tender.

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The Bank of England says

there are still 200 million

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of them in circulation.

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They have been phased out

since last September

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and replaced by polymer notes

depicting Jane Austen.

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And finally there were 11 wins

for the BBC's journalism at

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the Royal Television Society Awards

last night including not one

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but two awards for this programme.

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Victoria Derbyshire was named

Network Presenter of the Year

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and she also picked up the gong

for best interview of the year,

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for football abuse.

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Congratulations, Victoria. Thank

you. I want to thank you for

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following coverage of our stories on

Facebook and the BBC News website.

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We really appreciate your support.

Thank you. We really want you to get

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in touch with us this morning if you

have experience of living with

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dementia, whether it is yourself or

you care for somebody in your family

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or placement with this condition. It

is one of the most pressing issues

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of our time. We are talking about it

a lot this morning and we would love

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to hear your experience. We want to

talk to you if you are happy to come

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on air.

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Use the hashtag VictoriaLIVE

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and if you text, you will be charged

at the standard network rate.

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(ANI OFF)

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Let's get the sport. Eddie Jones has

been talking about the physical and

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verbal abuse he experienced. Yes,

England lost to Murrayfield in the

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Six Nations championship on

Saturday. He was returning south

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from Edinburgh, got an early train

on Sunday morning. He was heading to

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Manchester because he was a guest of

Sir Alex Ferguson at the Manchester

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United match when they beat Chelsea.

It was on that train, travelling by

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himself in standard class, he got a

bit of verbal abuse and he said it

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was physical as well. This footage

is when he got off the train and

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Manchester Oxford Road, surrounded

by Scotland fans, who harangued him

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on the way to the taxi. We have

taken out some of the swearing.

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SHOUTING AND CHEERING. He says that

is it. He said he always liked

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taking selfies and engaging with

fans but he will never take public

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transport again after that incident.

He also pointed to the comments

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before the match from former

international Gavin Hastings, one of

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the Scotland prop is, talking about

hating the English. He says that

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incites certain behaviour and that

ties in. The Scottish rugby union I

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appalled by the verbal abuse

suffered by Eddie Jones and the

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disgusting behaviour of those

involved. They say it does not

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represent the values of the sport

and the fans. The dignity Eddie and

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the team showed on Saturday is in

stark contrast to this ugly

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incident. We hope not to see that

again. Of course Eddie Jones

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deciding he can't be seen like that

in public again. There were lots of

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goals at Wembley in the FA Cup last

night and people talking about the

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video assistant referee again. Yes,

Spurs manager Mauricio Pochettino

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called it embarrassing. This was the

fifth round replay against League

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One Rochdale. Spurs comfortable

winners in the end but the first

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half was one VAR decision after

another. The referee, Paul Tierney,

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the boys in his head Graham stopped,

the VAR for the night. The match was

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so stop and start. There was a

penalty awarded with VAR and then

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ruled out and VAR used again for

that. Five minutes added on at the

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end of the first half for all those

delays. Is that really good for the

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game? Here is the Spurs manager.

I

think we have the best referees in

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Europe or in the world and the

referees are so good. But I don't

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know if this system will help them

or create more confusion.

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or create more confusion. If you

watched this half, more confusion

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than help. Football is the context

of emotion and if we are going to

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kill this emotion I think we are

going to change the game.

Mauricio

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Pochettino was quite measured there.

He would have been angrier if they

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had lost because it was 1-1 at

half-time. Then the snow fell and

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Spurs raced away with it. Fernando

Llorente scored a hat-trick in 12

0:14:410:14:46

minutes. The perfect hat-trick,

right foot, left foot, head. Spurs

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won 6-1 and they are into the

quarterfinals and they will play

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Swansea. And at the world cycling,

we have another medal from the

0:14:560:15:05

Kennys. We were looking forward to

seeing them in action in the

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Netherlands. Six months after having

a baby, Laura Kenny helped the women

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qualify second greatest for the team

pursuit. There could be a medal

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later. Jason Kenny got the silver in

the team spirit. He had an 18 month

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lay-off after the Olympics and he

thought about retiring. That was

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back in 2016. But they came second

to the Netherlands. Another medal

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round his neck. I will be back with

the headlines in the next half an

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hour.

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hour. We are talking about one of

the most pressing issues of our

0:15:440:15:48

time, dementia.

Dementia is caused when the brain is

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affected by diseases and can include

symptoms like memory loss,

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difficulty speaking of thinking. By

the middle of this century, 1.3

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million people will be living at

home with dementia in this country.

0:16:010:16:06

According to new figures seen by

this programme. Alzheimer's is a

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form of dementia and the Alzheimer's

Society expects the number to double

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by 2036 and to keep on rising as the

population gets older and treatments

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improve.

Later this year, the Government will

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set out how to pay for social care

in our old age.

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Three years ago, we gave video

cameras to three people with

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dementia. We have gone back to them

and asked them to do the same again.

0:16:350:16:42

They are here with us this morning

along with others living with

0:16:420:16:46

dementia, some of their relatives

and those who care for people with

0:16:460:16:50

the disease. We will talk about what

it is like to live with dementia and

0:16:500:16:54

how we as a country can best pay the

care and those living with this

0:16:540:17:00

challenging disease.

First, here is a film they have made

0:17:000:17:03

for you.

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To my mind, my way of thinking...

You happen to take any positive you

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can to having such a cruel disease.

In 2040 quack -- In 2014, we gave

0:17:220:17:30

video cameras to three people

recently diagnosed with dementia.

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What are we looking at? It is the

moon, isn't it?

0:17:330:17:42

Three years later, we asked them to

look back at what has changed in

0:17:420:17:46

that time.

That is you talking. Yes.

0:17:460:17:53

This is the story of what it is like

to live with Alzheimer's disease,

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from the minds of the people most

affected.

0:18:000:18:06

Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with

Alzheimer's at just 57, in 2013.

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In her first set of video diaries

three years ago, she was still

0:18:190:18:25

working as an NHS administrator.

This is where I had my first

0:18:250:18:28

experience of what dementia can do

to your brain. I came out of my

0:18:280:18:34

office and I didn't have a clue

where I was. I decided to walk away

0:18:340:18:39

and down the corridor, hoping that

no one would come out and notice

0:18:390:18:46

there was something wrong. And so I

went through the end door and into

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the wash room. Because that was the

only door that was a locked door.

0:18:520:19:03

It showed someone at an earlier

stage, someone left -- less hesitant

0:19:030:19:12

than I am now, and simply talking

normally.

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normally. Whereas now I have to

think more about the words that are

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coming out of my mouth.

Wendy had to give up work earlier

0:19:230:19:35

than she really wanted, she moved

from a town house in York to a small

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village near one of her daughters.

When I moved, all the houses looked

0:19:390:19:44

the same, and I would get confused

as to which one I lived at. I would

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constantly walk up my neighbour's

path.

0:19:520:19:56

So, to make it clear which house was

my house, I simply put the -- Put

0:19:560:20:05

forget-me-not tiles each side of my

door, to show me which one was mine.

0:20:050:20:11

I always like it to untangling a

fine necklace. If you are having a

0:20:110:20:21

good day, you can sit and untangle

the Notts won by one. If you are

0:20:210:20:27

having a bad day, it is like when

you are feeling impatient, and you

0:20:270:20:34

simply cannot untangle it and the

more you try, the worse it becomes.

0:20:340:20:39

I always tell myself it is not me,

it is the disease. And I simply sit

0:20:390:20:48

quietly and wait for the fog to

left.

0:20:480:20:54

-- lift.

Yes, I stopped answering the phone,

0:20:540:20:59

I don't know, properly a year or

more.

0:20:590:21:03

When I answered it, people can't see

me, so they can't see me thinking. I

0:21:030:21:13

now prefer to e-mail or text. When I

type, it is as though dementia has

0:21:130:21:23

never entered my life because that

part of me isn't broken yet.

0:21:230:21:29

If you are going to give one piece

of advice to someone who has just

0:21:290:21:32

been diagnosed with dementia, what

would it be?

0:21:320:21:37

I always think of it as, yes, it is

definitely a bad diagnosis to get

0:21:370:21:47

but if you can think of it as a

different life, a life of adapting

0:21:470:21:53

to the challenges that dementia

throws at you, then it can still be

0:21:530:22:00

filled with laughter and adventures

and almost a new way of living.

0:22:000:22:10

It was the most amazing experience

because I have no fear anymore. I

0:22:130:22:17

always think I face my biggest fear

by facing dementia.

0:22:170:22:26

Keith Oliver was diagnosed with

Alzheimer's in 2010. In the first

0:22:320:22:38

set of video diaries he filmed for

us he had just retired as a head

0:22:380:22:42

teacher in Canterbury.

For some time I have struggled to a

0:22:420:22:45

member by that I have cleaned my

teeth, shade, combed my head in the

0:22:450:22:49

morning when I get up. So what I now

do is I put everything out of the

0:22:490:22:54

box, use it and as I have used it

plays it back in the box again.

0:22:540:23:00

I have changed in some ways and some

of those changes have been brought

0:23:000:23:03

on by dementia. I see the same

person who physically looks like me,

0:23:030:23:11

who is saying the things I was

saying at the time, and I still

0:23:110:23:15

believe in. But now I feel less able

to express myself as well as I did

0:23:150:23:22

then.

It is a lovely walk, this, along the

0:23:220:23:32

beach, and then around the harbour.

I get such a lot from it. It gives

0:23:320:23:38

me time to think, to contemplate, to

try to sort something out in my mind

0:23:380:23:44

that are bothering me. Watching

these boats rocking in the water

0:23:440:23:50

reminds me of how some days it is

for me walking and standing and

0:23:500:23:56

trying to keep my balance.

Any experience of dementia I have

0:23:560:24:03

sometimes brought on by being

depressed, by being isolated, being

0:24:030:24:09

lonely, frustrated. They are the

best friends of each other. Dementia

0:24:090:24:14

and depression are big allies and

the only way dealing with that is

0:24:140:24:19

through support, people coming into

my world to help me.

0:24:190:24:31

Books have always been important in

my life, for relaxation, learning. I

0:24:310:24:37

am a hoarder of books.

0:24:370:24:44

am a hoarder of books. Here is one

that I read a couple of years ago

0:24:440:24:48

about something very close to my

heart which is Nottingham Forest.

0:24:480:24:52

Reading the books 30 years later

brings back those memories that I

0:24:520:24:59

have of those happy days.

It is getting harder. I read a lot

0:24:590:25:12

but remember very little. I even

don't remember what books I bought,

0:25:120:25:17

there are occasions I go into a book

shop and I have bought the book home

0:25:170:25:22

and realised at home I have read it

before.

0:25:220:25:31

Some days I will use the metaphor of

the weather, some days are faulty

0:25:310:25:35

and even within those foggy days it

is like driving in fog, the fog

0:25:350:25:40

comes down and it lifts, it is

patchy. That is what dementia is

0:25:400:25:45

often like. Even today, I am

experiencing that talking to you.

0:25:450:25:50

Some of my charity of thinking is

coming and going as I am sitting

0:25:500:25:55

here now, talking and thinking about

today.

0:25:550:26:02

today. I have lost my train of

thought, you will have to ask me

0:26:040:26:07

that again.

Last time around I finished the

0:26:070:26:12

interview asking if you would

remember our conversation, will you

0:26:120:26:17

remember this conversation?

Again, the same answer, I will

0:26:170:26:21

remember how this conversation made

me feel. The actual subject matter,

0:26:210:26:26

no, I won't.

Christopher has been living with

0:26:260:26:34

Alzheimer's for more than a decade

now.

0:26:340:26:41

now. His wife Veronica filmed this

first set of video diaries outside

0:26:410:26:45

their home in Dorset three years

ago.

At some point, it hit you over

0:26:450:26:52

there, that is when you have to

decide what to do.

Yes, you had to

0:26:520:26:56

cope.

There is ask, do you recognise us?

0:26:560:27:01

You are looking rather severe, like

a magistrate! That is you talking.

0:27:010:27:13

Yes, I mean, everything has changed.

It is so sad. But you mustn't dwell

0:27:180:27:28

on that because otherwise you would

be sad all the time and I mustn't be

0:27:280:27:32

sad to you because you are positive.

What has changed, do you feel

0:27:320:27:37

different?

Yes.

And you know you still have

0:27:370:27:46

lots of feelings although you may

not be able to put it into words

0:27:460:27:50

like you used to.

0:27:500:27:57

We are on the quay Paul harbour,

sitting in the sunshine -- Poole.

0:27:570:28:06

And Christopher is having fish and

chips.

0:28:060:28:10

It is not the easiest thing to eat.

We are now in the car. The seat belt

0:28:100:28:17

is always a bit of a mystery, put

your belt on, darling. Can you put

0:28:170:28:23

your belt on? Put your belt on.

Your belt.

0:28:230:28:34

Your belt. Here, that is right. That

is right. Like everything, this gets

0:28:340:28:40

forgotten every single time.

Well done, you have done it.

0:28:400:28:47

Without that disabled badge?

Life would be a lot more stressful,

0:28:470:28:50

yes. When we first got the blue

badge, I was a little bit feeling,

0:28:500:28:57

it says disabled on it, and

Christopher doesn't look disabled,

0:28:570:29:02

so I was sort of half thinking

somebody might one day a cost us,

0:29:020:29:08

which happened. You are not

disabled, this man said, as we were

0:29:080:29:13

parking. So I left Christopher on

the pavement and I trotted down the

0:29:130:29:16

pavement and I said to that, repeat

that. And I said it louder, very

0:29:160:29:22

slowly he mumbled, you are not

disabled. You change places with me

0:29:220:29:28

24 hours Hutcheon for 24 hours --

you change places with me for 24

0:29:280:29:36

hours.

Don't take it, darling, drink it,

0:29:360:29:46

careful.

It is hot.

That is your tea.

0:29:460:29:55

That is right.

Are you a caper that? Are you happy,

0:29:550:29:59

darling, I am asking if you are

happy? I don't think you frustrated.

0:29:590:30:07

Sometimes I think he is frustrated,

yes. Sometimes you get cross. Not

0:30:070:30:13

often.

All you basically happy?

Yes. Yes, I think you are.

0:30:130:30:20

This is one of the things I am

deeply sad because I don't have a

0:30:200:30:27

name. What I called? And he laughs,

and he says, what did you say? What

0:30:270:30:38

am I called? Are you going to have

another go? What am I called?

I

0:30:380:30:48

can't remember.

0:30:480:30:49

The fact that Christopher's speech

is clearly not what it was, I mean,

0:30:570:31:02

speech and communication...

It is

lonely, yes. It is quite lonely. But

0:31:020:31:09

then he doesn't realise that. So

it's not as though you are living

0:31:090:31:16

with somebody who is doing something

to make you feel like that. It's not

0:31:160:31:20

like that at all. You see, there is

definitely interaction and feeling.

0:31:200:31:26

That hasn't gone. If I say I love

you. Do you love me? Do you love me?

0:31:260:31:36

Am I getting too close? Go on, kiss

me. Yes.

0:31:360:31:45

me. Yes.

Wow. Gosh. With us now is

an audience including some of the

0:31:460:31:51

people that you saw in that film and

there is a mixture of emotion in

0:31:510:31:54

this room, I think. There are some

people wiping their eyes because

0:31:540:31:57

they had tears in their eyes.

Veronica, you have tears in your

0:31:570:32:01

eyes but you also smiling, as is

Christopher. Hello, Christopher.

0:32:010:32:06

Thank you so much for coming on the

programme again. How do you react to

0:32:060:32:11

what you have seen? I don't mind who

speaks first.

I rally watch myself

0:32:110:32:18

on the television now. -- I've

rarely watched myself recently. It

0:32:180:32:30

is always a shock what I see. We

don't have this image of ourselves

0:32:300:32:33

in our head which is what I see on

the television.

Were you shocked?

0:32:330:32:42

Yes. I never watch myself normally.

And you always tend to think back to

0:32:420:32:53

how you were, especially when there

was the comparison with the earlier

0:32:530:32:56

film and now. It just brings it home

a little bit more, the changes.

What

0:32:560:33:04

is it like for you and Christopher

to watch yourselves then and now?

I

0:33:040:33:08

think

0:33:080:33:13

think we've filmed some jollier

bits. Those bits are rather

0:33:140:33:17

tear-jerking. It isn't as bad as

that, is it question that -- it

0:33:170:33:23

isn't as bad as that, is it? We have

a lot of fun. That is where we used

0:33:230:33:29

to sail. We get about. We went to

Mexico this summer. Why not?

The

0:33:290:33:35

other thing to say as well is that

the film illustrates how different

0:33:350:33:42

we all are but how similar we all

are as well. There are certain

0:33:420:33:46

things that we said and we have

experienced that are common to all

0:33:460:33:49

of us in that film but also the way

we deal with it is an element of

0:33:490:33:53

similarity but also different as

well.

Over the course of the

0:33:530:33:58

programme we are going to talk about

living with dementia. How we pay for

0:33:580:34:02

such care and its impact on the

health service and society in

0:34:020:34:05

general. You get in touch through

the programme if you or a family

0:34:050:34:09

member has dementia.

0:34:090:34:13

Still to come:

0:34:130:34:15

How is the cold snap

affecting people that

0:34:150:34:17

struggle with their bills?

0:34:170:34:19

We'll hear from people affected

by fuel poverty and discuss

0:34:190:34:24

what help is on offer.

0:34:240:34:29

Our final visit to Hawkswood Primary

0:34:290:34:31

Pupil Referral Unit,

as I talk to some of the children

0:34:310:34:33

about life at the school

and their hopes for the future.

0:34:330:34:37

Time for the latest news.

0:34:370:34:40

The BBC News headlines this morning:

0:34:400:34:42

The Met Office has issued

a red weather warning

0:34:420:34:47

for Devon, Somerset and the southern

half of Wales, meaning imminent

0:34:470:34:50

loss of life is possible.

0:34:500:34:51

A separate red weather

warning is in place

0:34:510:34:53

for Scotland's central belt.

0:34:530:34:54

The snow continues to cause

problems across the UK.

0:34:540:34:56

Hundreds of schools are closed

in south Wales, southern

0:34:560:34:58

England and Scotland.

0:34:580:34:59

Our reporter John Kay

sent us this from Truro.

0:34:590:35:05

The latest warning has come from the

Met Office saying that they still

0:35:050:35:09

believe this is going to be a very

bad storm in this part of the

0:35:090:35:12

country. They have issued this red

alert, severe, the most severe

0:35:120:35:16

warning, a red warning for a sliver

that goes from south Wales to

0:35:160:35:22

Cardiff, across the Bristol channel,

through North Somerset,

0:35:220:35:25

Weston-Super-Mare, down through some

assert itself, across Exmoor and

0:35:250:35:29

Dartmoor and into Devon. That bright

red zone that you will see on the

0:35:290:35:32

maps all day.

0:35:320:35:37

maps all day.

In Scotland hundreds

of people have been trapped in their

0:35:380:35:40

cars on the M18 a Glasgow. Some

attract for 15 hours. Others have

0:35:400:35:47

been stranded in Lincolnshire and

forecasters are warning of snow to

0:35:470:35:51

come across the UK. Where the red

alerts remain in force, people are

0:35:510:35:55

advised not to venture out. In other

news: The President of the EU

0:35:550:36:01

Council Donald Tusk has warned UK

can't have trade with the EU if it

0:36:010:36:07

is outside the single market and

customs union. The warning comes

0:36:070:36:11

following the publication of the

EU's draft withdrawal treaty. The

0:36:110:36:16

independent inquiry into child

sexual abuse will publish its first

0:36:160:36:21

completed report this morning. The

findings will focus on the forced

0:36:210:36:24

migration and abuse of thousands of

children, many of whom were in care,

0:36:240:36:29

who were sent to Australia, New

Zealand, Canada and Africa following

0:36:290:36:33

the Second World War. The British

and Australian governments have

0:36:330:36:36

apologised but today's report is

likely to condemn the programme and

0:36:360:36:39

highlights the failure to protect

and prevent the abuse.

0:36:390:36:47

and prevent the abuse. This

programme has discovered new figures

0:36:470:36:51

which underscores the scale of

suffering of those living with

0:36:510:37:00

dementia.

0:37:000:37:06

The Home Office says

it is considering allowing a medical

0:37:060:37:09

cannabis trial to treat

a six-year-old boy with

0:37:090:37:11

a rare form of epilepsy.

0:37:110:37:12

It previously turned down requests

0:37:120:37:13

by the family of Alfie Dingley,

from Warwickshire,

0:37:130:37:15

to legally take the drug.

0:37:150:37:16

But now ministers say

they are exploring every option,

0:37:160:37:19

following a meeting with the family.

0:37:190:37:20

An option could be a three-month

trial, led by Alfie's doctors

0:37:200:37:23

and based on sufficient

and rigorous evidence.

0:37:230:37:26

The American retail

giant Walmart says it

0:37:260:37:29

will tighten its policy on firearms

sales as Donald Trump tells

0:37:290:37:31

Congress it's time to act.

0:37:310:37:32

The President stunned

some politicians

0:37:320:37:37

in his own Republican Party

by telling them on live TV not to be

0:37:370:37:41

so afraid of the pro-gun lobby.

0:37:410:37:43

He said he wanted what he called

a strong reform bill

0:37:430:37:46

but stuck by his suggestion

of arming some teachers.

0:37:460:37:49

There were 11 wins for

the BBC's journalism at

0:37:490:37:54

the Royal Television Society Awards

last night including two

0:37:540:37:56

awards for this programme.

0:37:560:37:58

Victoria Derbyshire

was named Network Presenter

0:37:580:38:00

of the Year and she also picked up

the gong for best interview

0:38:000:38:03

of the year for football abuse.

0:38:030:38:05

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

0:38:050:38:12

Thank you for your messages about

dementia. This email from Mark: I

0:38:120:38:16

look after my mum who was diagnosed

with outsiders several years ago.

0:38:160:38:20

The council have been a huge help

but I have experienced the whole

0:38:200:38:23

calyx of life in the modern world in

the UK which breaks down when it

0:38:230:38:28

comes to dementia. I have difficulty

proving my mother's identity,

0:38:280:38:32

visiting her, connecting different

care services together. I keep

0:38:320:38:35

getting referred to online help and

even after expelling to people that

0:38:350:38:40

my mother has Alzheimer's, they

still try and ask her memory

0:38:400:38:43

questions. I care for my mum because

it is a pleasure but it hurts that

0:38:430:38:47

there is little recognition in even

things like tax codes that

0:38:470:38:51

recognises that in fact looking

after a person with advanced

0:38:510:38:54

dementia is a far more stressful and

training thing than looking after

0:38:540:38:57

children. Catherine says: I am one

of the lucky ones. As I am

0:38:570:39:04

self-employed and my dad has a

reasonable pension, while we

0:39:040:39:08

struggle financially, I am able to

care for my dad myself. Both my

0:39:080:39:12

parents had dementia and I care for

them both, starting in 2012, until

0:39:120:39:16

my darling man passed away in 2015.

I am 54 and single. -- my darling

0:39:160:39:22

mother passed away in 2015. I love

them more than I can say. We now

0:39:220:39:27

live with my dad. The problem is

unless you have the money, it is a

0:39:270:39:31

lottery and the social care system

is broken. My heart breaks for those

0:39:310:39:34

without family for whom life with

dementia must be unbearable. We are

0:39:340:39:39

going to talk about some of those

specific issues, the fractured

0:39:390:39:42

health and social care system, and

the difficulty in getting outside

0:39:420:39:46

help after ten o'clock this morning.

Please continue to send your own

0:39:460:39:51

experiences. Sent us an email. You

can message us on Facebook and

0:39:510:39:55

Whatsapp as well. Now we have more

sport. Hello. The headlines: The

0:39:550:40:02

England rugby union head coach Eddie

Jones said he was physically and

0:40:020:40:04

verbally abused returning by train

from the Kolkata defeat to Scotland

0:40:040:40:11

at the weekend. This is footage of

him being harangued at Manchester

0:40:110:40:16

Oxford road train station. --

Calcutta Cup defeat. The Scottish

0:40:160:40:23

union said it is disgusted and

appalled. Eddie Jones said he will

0:40:230:40:29

not take public transport again.

Manchester United beat Rochdale 6-1

0:40:290:40:36

-- Tottenham Hotspur beat Rochdale

6-1 and will now play Swansea in the

0:40:360:40:41

quarterfinals. Andy Murray could be

back in the practice court that the

0:40:410:40:47

end of this month. As since is time

Olympic champion Jason Kenny won

0:40:470:40:51

silver in the team sprint at the

track cycling World Championships in

0:40:510:40:55

the Netherlands. His wife Laura will

be bidding for a medal in the team

0:40:550:40:59

pursuit later today. I will be back

after ten o'clock. Thank you.

0:40:590:41:07

Hundreds of drivers have spent

the night stranded in snow

0:41:070:41:10

on the M80 and adjoining motorways

in central Scotland.

0:41:100:41:12

Some have been stuck

for more than 15 hours.

0:41:120:41:14

Others have

been stranded overnight

0:41:140:41:15

near Skegness in Lincolnshire

and forecasters are warning of more

0:41:150:41:18

snow to come across many parts

0:41:180:41:19

of the UK.

0:41:190:41:23

Yesterday, we invited Bryan,

a homeless man living

0:41:230:41:31

on the streets of central London

for 18 years, into our studio.

0:41:320:41:35

This was him yesterday

afternoon as snow continued

0:41:350:41:37

to fall in the capital.

0:41:370:41:38

He told us he'd worken up yesterday

morning with one inch

0:41:380:41:41

of snow all over him.

0:41:410:41:42

He was also incredibly grateful

for all your messages

0:41:420:41:44

of support you sent him.

0:41:440:41:47

We will keep in touch with him.

0:41:470:41:49

Many people living

at home struggle too.

0:41:490:41:50

One in ten people in England

live in fuel poverty.

0:41:500:41:55

That's where the amount a household

pays for fuel leaves them

0:41:550:41:57

below the poverty line.

0:41:570:42:00

When weather drops below a certain

level it triggers extra payments

0:42:000:42:02

for people claiming some benefits.

0:42:020:42:04

But many don't know about it

and therefore don't claim.

0:42:040:42:10

Who is entitled?

0:42:210:42:24

You have to be over 65

and also qualify for pension

0:42:240:42:27

credit.

0:42:270:42:29

How much?

0:42:290:42:32

You get up to £300,

depending on age.

0:42:320:42:37

How to claim.

0:42:370:42:39

Most get it automatically.

0:42:390:42:40

Some have to claim.

0:42:400:42:45

For details, see gov.uk/

WinterFuelPayment.

0:42:450:42:51

Cold weather payments.

0:42:510:42:59

Let's talk to Jodie Hullah,

a mum of a 19-month-old,

0:44:030:44:05

who sometimes can't afford

to heat her home.

0:44:050:44:09

Andria Efthimiou has asthma

and ended up being hospitalised

0:44:090:44:11

when her home got too cold.

0:44:110:44:13

And Ruth London from the charity

Fuel Poverty Action.

0:44:130:44:16

Thank you for coming on the

programme. How often do you go

0:44:160:44:22

without hot water and heating?

Sometimes it can be two or three

0:44:220:44:29

days. Other times it can be longer

and other times shorter. It all

0:44:290:44:33

depends what the weather is like and

when I get paid.

Explain why you

0:44:330:44:39

have to make the decision to keep

heating and hot water off in certain

0:44:390:44:43

periods.

Just because we can't

afford it. I put as much money as I

0:44:430:44:47

can onto my meter and sometimes it

is not enough. We ran out of gas and

0:44:470:44:54

then we have no hot water is heating

or I have to make the decision

0:44:540:44:57

whether Will we be cold during the

day or in the evening.

How does that

0:44:570:45:08

affect your 19-month-old?

She gets

body quite a bit. At the moment he

0:45:080:45:15

has a cough and cold and it is hard

but there is nothing you can do

0:45:150:45:18

about it.

You had to give up work

when you are pregnant because of

0:45:180:45:22

various pregnancy issues. You are in

a privately rented flat and

0:45:220:45:26

Universal Credit is paid to you and

after rent you are left with £100 a

0:45:260:45:30

week for food, gas, electricity,

clothes, anything else your child

0:45:300:45:37

needs.

Yes, probably less than that.

0:45:370:45:43

The cold weather payment means an

extra £25 for you, what difference

0:45:430:45:49

will that make?

I think it means we will get an

0:45:490:45:57

extra two days of heating and hot

water.

0:45:570:46:00

How do you feel about that?

I don't

know. The situation is there isn't

0:46:000:46:08

much do -- much I can do to change

it. It is one of those things you

0:46:080:46:14

get on with. You don't have a

choice.

0:46:140:46:22

Jodi, I am going to bring in Andria

in the studio. Is your attitude the

0:46:220:46:28

same, it is what it is?

Absolutely. You don't even notice

0:46:280:46:34

what is happening. For example, my

daughter started coming home from

0:46:340:46:39

school and going straight to bed. I

thought she was hiding from me. She

0:46:390:46:44

said she was cold. I was really

shocked. Because the me it is called

0:46:440:46:50

but you get into a trooper load. I

have had asthma the over 50 years.

0:46:500:47:00

-- trooper mode. Even though I have

had to go to casualties because of

0:47:000:47:06

my respiratory system, it becomes a

way of life. But this is dangerous.

0:47:060:47:14

They wanted to take me in, I was

worried about my daughter.

0:47:140:47:22

worried about my daughter. If you're

respiratory rate is at 48, people

0:47:220:47:25

have heart attacks. They gave me

some diazepam.

Is that directly

0:47:250:47:30

linked to you not putting the

heating on?

0:47:300:47:33

Absolutely.

0:47:330:47:37

Absolutely. It is tough. But it is

difficult to notice. And knowing

0:47:380:47:44

other people are in a more difficult

situation because of money. It is

0:47:440:47:50

tragic. Thousands of people are

dying from fuel poverty every year.

0:47:500:47:54

Then something is really wrong.

In terms of deaths from cold

0:47:540:48:02

weather, we have the latest figures

from 2017, sorry, 2016, over that

0:48:020:48:11

winter period.

It was 11,000 last winter. It is

0:48:110:48:16

outrageous, it should not be our way

of life that people are dying

0:48:160:48:21

because they cannot afford to keep

their homes warm. Some of the Chief

0:48:210:48:27

Executive is earn more in their

bonus and most people spend all year

0:48:270:48:32

on their energy. It is not

sustainable. There are natural

0:48:320:48:39

disasters and unnatural disasters.

Fuel poverty is an unnatural

0:48:390:48:44

disaster. People having the cladding

removed, put on their buildings,

0:48:440:48:49

because it was not safe, like

Grenfell Tower. Now they are

0:48:490:48:55

freezing because they are in tower

blocks with no protection from the

0:48:550:49:00

elements.

That was installation.

Cladding and

0:49:000:49:07

installation are vital to keeping

homes warm -- insulation. If you

0:49:070:49:15

look at the weather now, climate

change is also an unnatural

0:49:150:49:20

disaster. If we are going to keep

warm, the other extreme is heat

0:49:200:49:27

waves, if we are to survive we need

to address that and the prices

0:49:270:49:31

people are paying and the terribly

low levels of income, the fact

0:49:310:49:37

people cannot afford to keep their

home one, people on benefits, then

0:49:370:49:44

they get sanctioned and had nothing

at all to put in the meter. And you

0:49:440:49:53

lose your heat, the food in your

fridge and freezer, your ability to

0:49:530:49:57

charge your phone, the things our

daily lives depend on, these are not

0:49:570:50:04

things we should say, that is life,

I have to get on with it.

0:50:040:50:09

We have to change that.

The

Government would say they are

0:50:090:50:14

bringing in environmental measures.

And they would say they will cap

0:50:140:50:21

fuel bills which will help.

It has taken a couple of years since

0:50:210:50:25

they started talking about it. It

depends how much the cap on energy

0:50:250:50:32

bills is. They say energy prices are

about to go up again which could

0:50:320:50:37

wipe out the difference. We do want

a cap but it is not a solution.

0:50:370:50:45

Energy is much too important to be

left to the fans ripping us off as

0:50:450:50:49

the Government has said.

One comment, the Winter Fuel Payment

0:50:490:50:57

is positive but not enough, those of

us who are low paid and in work

0:50:570:51:02

simply take the hit driving us

further into poverty. It is heat or

0:51:020:51:07

eat. For anyone watching now

struggling to keep warm, what is

0:51:070:51:13

your advice?

It is hard to give personal advice.

0:51:130:51:22

Everyone has thought of the

immediate solution, hot water

0:51:220:51:28

bottles, insulating foil behind the

radiators, draught proofing is

0:51:280:51:34

important. Make sure you are on the

best tariff you can find. If you are

0:51:340:51:39

in debt and struggling to repay,

sometimes you can adjust the rate of

0:51:390:51:45

repayment so you are paying a bit

more in summer but less now. There

0:51:450:51:49

are little things. But the bigger

things that the individual can't do,

0:51:490:51:56

is to deal with the energy crisis,

the benefits sanctions, the low

0:51:560:52:02

income, the fundamental cause, lack

of insulation in our homes, bad

0:52:020:52:11

boilers, and ultimately climate

change.

0:52:110:52:14

Thank you.

0:52:140:52:23

Coming up.

0:52:230:52:28

How to deal with an ageing

population many of whom have

0:52:280:52:32

dementia, a huge rise in people

expected to be living with dementia

0:52:320:52:36

in the next years, we will hear from

people living with it.

0:52:360:52:43

All this week, we've

brought you an insight

0:52:430:52:45

into the work of Hawkswood Primary

pupil referral unit

0:52:450:52:47

in north-east London.

0:52:470:52:49

It's a place where children

as young as four are taught

0:52:490:52:51

when they are in danger

of being permanently excluded

0:52:510:52:54

from their mainstream schools.

0:52:540:52:57

For our last film this week,

I caught up with some

0:52:570:53:00

of the children at lunchtime to talk

about life at the school

0:53:000:53:03

and their hopes for the future.

0:53:030:53:07

I met seven-year-olds

Logan and Kyan, along

0:53:070:53:09

with Andrew who's nine.

0:53:090:53:12

So where do we go first?

0:53:150:53:16

So we go here.

0:53:160:53:17

Come on.

0:53:170:53:20

Do you know my favourite fish?

0:53:220:53:24

What's your favourite fish.

0:53:240:53:25

Tuna, definitely.

0:53:250:53:27

Oh!

0:53:270:53:29

Hi, guys.

0:53:290:53:32

How's it going?

0:53:370:53:39

How do you find it

here at the school?

0:53:390:53:42

It's a good place.

0:53:420:53:44

It helps you to behave.

0:53:440:53:48

You get guidance, and Miss Mannakee

is a very good teacher.

0:53:480:53:51

Is she?

0:53:510:53:52

Yeah.

0:53:520:53:53

And she shows tough love.

0:53:530:53:54

Tough love.

0:53:540:53:56

What does that mean for you,

what does that mean?

0:53:560:54:00

Well, tough love means,

um, it's pretty tough,

0:54:000:54:02

it's discipline.

0:54:020:54:03

If you're being unsafe,

they restrain you.

0:54:030:54:05

They restrain you.

0:54:050:54:06

Has that ever happened to you?

0:54:060:54:08

It has happened a lot of times.

0:54:080:54:10

It isn't very nice.

0:54:100:54:12

It's not comfortable.

0:54:120:54:15

Andrew, are you going back

to mainstream school soon, is

0:54:150:54:17

that right?

0:54:170:54:18

How do you feel about that.

0:54:180:54:23

Well, I feel good, happy that I've

come a long way, and now I'm

0:54:230:54:28

going back to mainstream,

because Miss Mannakee has helped me

0:54:280:54:31

since I was in year three.

0:54:310:54:33

Ah.

0:54:330:54:35

Can you remember what

you used to be like?

0:54:350:54:43

I used to think I was just bad,

if anyone does a little thing,

0:54:430:54:46

sticks their tongue out

of me, I used to flip.

0:54:460:54:48

But now I just ignore.

0:54:480:54:49

Now I just ignore

and tell the teacher.

0:54:490:54:51

I don't fight any more.

0:54:510:54:53

And what about you?

0:54:530:54:56

Why do you think you used

to get cross or angry, or

0:54:560:54:59

anxious?

0:54:590:55:03

Every time it was a different

reason, but now I just

0:55:030:55:06

feel I made the choice to do it now.

0:55:060:55:08

So you make good choices now.

0:55:080:55:09

Yeah.

0:55:090:55:13

But sometimes I do it a little bit.

0:55:130:55:15

Only like a tiny bit.

0:55:150:55:17

I don't do a big big reaction.

0:55:170:55:18

Logan, what about you?

0:55:180:55:23

I used to get restrained so much.

0:55:230:55:29

And Andrew, can you remember why

you used to get cross and angry

0:55:290:55:32

when you were in your old school?

0:55:320:55:37

What do you think was going on?

0:55:370:55:38

Um I wanted my own way.

0:55:380:55:41

I knew I had anger issues but any

little thing I used to get angry

0:55:410:55:45

at.

0:55:450:55:46

I didn't know why.

0:55:460:55:47

But since I've come

here my behaviour has

0:55:470:55:49

improved a lot.

0:55:490:55:50

When I mean a lot, I mean a lot.

0:55:500:55:52

Yeah?

0:55:520:55:53

Brilliant.

0:55:530:55:54

If it wasn't for Miss

Mannakee I'd probably

0:55:540:55:56

be the same...

0:55:560:55:57

Do you feel proud of yourself?

0:55:570:56:00

Yeah, but I mostly feel proud

of Miss Mannakee for helping

0:56:000:56:03

me.

0:56:030:56:04

Ah.

0:56:040:56:05

That's a very, very

lovely thing to say.

0:56:050:56:07

Very lovely.

0:56:070:56:08

How does your mum think

you've got on here?

0:56:080:56:13

She's very proud

of me, I've improved.

0:56:130:56:14

Wow.

0:56:140:56:19

Do you feel calmer as well

now, would you say?

0:56:190:56:22

Not with...

0:56:220:56:23

You still don't like that...

0:56:230:56:26

Do you?

0:56:260:56:32

When Miss Mannakee told me

to actually try dinner I actually

0:56:320:56:35

liked it.

0:56:350:56:36

So that's another thing that

Miss Mannakee helped me with.

0:56:360:56:38

Is that Miss Mannakee?

0:56:380:56:39

That's Miss Mannakee there.

0:56:390:56:40

OK.

0:56:400:56:42

Miss Mannakee.

0:56:420:56:43

I'm hearing a lot about you.

0:56:430:56:44

Yeah.

0:56:440:56:45

They are, they are loving

you, I have to say.

0:56:450:56:51

Yesterday when I went home,

I heard Mum say, I don't know

0:56:510:56:56

how you've dealt with me,

like she doesn't know how

0:56:560:56:58

I learned this quick.

0:56:580:57:02

Did you explain to Mum how

you managed to learn quickly?

0:57:020:57:04

You need to tell me why

you learned quickly.

0:57:040:57:06

Because of your tough love.

0:57:060:57:09

Because I gave tough

love, and what else?

0:57:090:57:12

What did you need to do?

0:57:120:57:15

Give up and start crying?

0:57:150:57:18

What did you do.

0:57:180:57:19

Never give up.

0:57:190:57:20

Oh, I love that.

0:57:200:57:22

I say that to my kids,

never give up.

0:57:220:57:25

So listen.

0:57:250:57:26

I'm done.

0:57:260:57:28

Look at you eating

your apple, good boy.

0:57:280:57:31

Thank you so much for

inviting me for lunch.

0:57:310:57:33

It's OK.

0:57:330:57:34

Thank you.

0:57:340:57:35

It's been really, really

lovely to meet you.

0:57:350:57:38

I'm just going to get

some pudding now, would

0:57:380:57:40

that be all right?

0:57:400:57:41

Miss, please may I go up?

0:57:410:57:43

Thank you.

0:57:430:57:51

And thank you so much

to the staff and pupils

0:57:510:57:55

at Hawkswood Primary School

who opened up their doors to us.

0:57:550:58:01

Let's get the latest

weather update with Carole.

0:58:010:58:07

It has the potential to be the

coldest day in March in the UK ever?

0:58:080:58:14

That is right. As well as that, we

have also got a few weather

0:58:140:58:19

warnings.

One which is about to expire across

0:58:190:58:25

central Scotland, Tayside and Fife,

but anyone for heavy snow and

0:58:250:58:31

blizzards across Devon, Somerset and

South Wales.

0:58:310:58:36

We are about to lose the one across

Central Scotland but we still have

0:58:360:58:41

amber be prepared in all these areas

including Northern Ireland, for snow

0:58:410:58:47

which will be blowing and feeling

bitterly cold.

0:58:470:58:50

An amber warning across the

south-west, Hampshire and the south

0:58:500:58:55

Coast, for snow and wind but this is

the red one, the top level of

0:58:550:59:02

warning the Met Office ever issues.

If you are out, bear that in mind,

0:59:020:59:06

there will be some atrocious

conditions with blizzards, blowing

0:59:060:59:10

snow, because the wind is gale-force

winds.

0:59:100:59:15

Through the morning, we will

continue with the snow, across

0:59:150:59:20

southern England, through Wales and

the potential for significant

0:59:200:59:24

snowfall across areas in that red

morning, up to 20 centimetres, about

0:59:240:59:31

eight inches, plus more than double

that in some areas. Moving

0:59:310:59:38

northwards, the risk of another

dangerous element, freezing rain.

0:59:380:59:43

We have strong winds, these

temperatures may be what you see on

0:59:430:59:50

your thermometer but wait for the

wind chill, it will feel more like

0:59:500:59:59

-13 in Birmingham. Wrap up warmly is

the message if you are stepping out

0:59:591:00:05

today.

Heading into the evening, we still

1:00:051:00:09

have snow across the south-west,

Wales, snow showers across the North

1:00:091:00:15

and east, a keen wind, some drier

conditions, the risk of freezing

1:00:151:00:21

rain, and a cold night, temperatures

well below freezing.

1:00:211:00:26

Tomorrow, a little bit of let up in

amounts of snow but it will still be

1:00:261:00:31

snowing, with showers across the

north and east. Through the day,

1:00:311:00:37

this snow will drift slowly north

eastwards. Later in the afternoon,

1:00:371:00:44

we think the snow will be in a line

from London up to Liverpool Bay and

1:00:441:00:50

all points south, with a lot of snow

across central areas. If you are

1:00:501:00:55

out, bear that in mind. It will feel

better. For the weekend, it will

1:00:551:01:02

still be cold but less in the south.

Nonetheless we are still looking at

1:01:021:01:09

the risk of snow, perhaps not as

heavy.

1:01:091:01:16

Hello.

1:01:181:01:19

It's Thursday.

1:01:191:01:20

It's 10 o'clock.

1:01:201:01:21

I'm Victoria Derbyshire.

1:01:211:01:23

Our top story today -

a second red weather warning has

1:01:231:01:25

been issued for heavy snow,

this time for South Wales

1:01:251:01:28

and South West England

with more snow expected

1:01:281:01:29

across the UK.

1:01:291:01:31

It is a little bit of dusty snow

right now that it will get much

1:01:311:01:34

heavier as the day goes on and into

the evening and again tomorrow and

1:01:341:01:37

potentially into tomorrow night as

well. That is what they are worried

1:01:371:01:40

about. Not just the instant snowfall

but the accumulation of hours and

1:01:401:01:45

hours.

We will speak to some of you

affected by the weather. And also an

1:01:451:01:50

employment lawyer who will tell you

your rights if you can't get to work

1:01:501:01:53

because of bad weather. It is a

condition that will affect 1 million

1:01:531:01:57

people in the UK by 2036. We look at

the pressures of living at home with

1:01:571:02:02

dementia for the individuals and

their loved ones.

What am I called?

1:02:021:02:09

Oh. Are you going to have another

go? Tell me what I am called.

I

1:02:091:02:14

can't...

You can't remember. You

can't remember what I'm called,

1:02:141:02:20

darling.

We will be joined by this

group of people who all live with

1:02:201:02:25

dementia or are professionals

working in the field. If you care

1:02:251:02:28

for a relative with this condition

we definitely want to hear from you

1:02:281:02:31

this morning. Please get in touch in

the usual ways. The Home Office

1:02:311:02:36

considering allowing a medical

cannabis trial to treat a

1:02:361:02:39

six-year-old boy with a rare form of

epilepsy.

1:02:391:02:46

We'll speak to Alfie Dingley's

parents before the end of the show.

1:02:501:02:54

Here is the latest BBC News with

Annita McVeigh. Good morning.

1:02:541:03:00

The Met Office has issued

a red weather warning

1:03:001:03:02

for Devon, Somerset and the southern

half of Wales meaning imminent

1:03:021:03:05

loss of life is possible.

1:03:051:03:06

A separate red weather

warning is in place

1:03:061:03:08

for Scotland's central belt.

1:03:081:03:09

The snow continues to cause

problems across the UK.

1:03:091:03:11

Hundreds of schools are closed

in south Wales, southern

1:03:111:03:13

England and Scotland.

1:03:131:03:14

Phil Bodmer is in Yarm

in North Yorkshire.

1:03:141:03:20

The snow here in the North East is

falling thick and fast. You can see

1:03:201:03:25

how much there is on this car, and

that just shows you the level of

1:03:251:03:29

snow we have had. Police in north

Yorkshire are warning drivers not to

1:03:291:03:33

travel if at all possible. They say

driving conditions on many routes

1:03:331:03:37

are abysmal and the A66 that Scotch

Corner is closed currently.

1:03:371:03:42

Lincolnshire Police say once again

drivers are being warned not to

1:03:421:03:45

travel if they don't have to because

pretty much every road throughout

1:03:451:03:50

the county is impassable.

1:03:501:04:01

Gritters and snow ploughs have been

out all morning. In Yarm itself, the

1:04:011:04:04

main centre is clear. You can see on

the top shot now that the road is

1:04:041:04:07

clear. Snow ploughs and gritters

have been through all morning. Leeds

1:04:071:04:10

Bradford Airport has some

cancellations this morning and there

1:04:101:04:12

are problems on the railways as

elsewhere in the country. If you are

1:04:121:04:14

setting out today, the advisers to

take time. Make sure you are

1:04:141:04:16

prepared and take extra clothing a

blanket if you can and be prepared

1:04:161:04:23

for a longer journey than usual.

Thousands of people in Scotland have

1:04:231:04:26

been trapped in cars in Scotland

overnight on the M80 in Glasgow.

1:04:261:04:31

Some were trapped for 15 hours.

Others have been stranded near

1:04:311:04:36

Skegness in Lincolnshire and

forecasters are warning of more snow

1:04:361:04:38

to come across many parts of the UK.

Where the red alerts remain in

1:04:381:04:43

place, people are advised not to

venture out. In other news: The

1:04:431:04:47

President of the EU Council, Donald

Tusk, has warned UK can't have

1:04:471:04:52

frictionless trade with EU European

Union if it is outside the market

1:04:521:04:55

and single -- customs union and

single market. This programme has

1:04:551:05:06

uncovered exclusive new figures that

underscore the scale of the

1:05:061:05:09

challenge of people suffering from

dementia and their carers. By the

1:05:091:05:12

middle of the century, 1.3 million

people will be living at home with

1:05:121:05:16

dementia in the UK, a sharp rise

from the 540,000 currently living

1:05:161:05:21

with dementia at home.

1:05:211:05:26

For the first time acid

is described as a highly

1:05:261:05:29

dangerous weapon in new

sentencing guidelines.

1:05:291:05:32

The advice for judges

and magistrates

1:05:321:05:33

in England and Wales has

been updated in the wake

1:05:331:05:35

of a surge in attacks

using corrosive substances.

1:05:351:05:37

Offenders are now likely

to face stiffer penalties.

1:05:371:05:39

The American retail

giant Walmart says it

1:05:391:05:41

will tighten its policy on firearms

sales as Donald Trump tells

1:05:411:05:44

Congress it's time to act.

1:05:441:05:47

The President

stunned some politicians

1:05:471:05:49

in his own Republican Party

by telling them on live TV not to be

1:05:491:05:52

so afraid of the pro-gun lobby.

1:05:521:05:54

He said he wanted what he called

a strong reform bill

1:05:541:05:57

but stuck by his suggestion

of arming some teachers.

1:05:571:06:03

There were 11 wins for the BBC's

journalism at the royal television

1:06:031:06:07

society awards last night including

two for this programme. Victoria

1:06:071:06:12

Derbyshire was named network

presenter of the year and she also

1:06:121:06:14

picked up the gong for best

interview of the year for the

1:06:141:06:17

football abuse story. That is a

summary of the latest BBC News. More

1:06:171:06:23

at 10:30am. Thank you. It must have

been a good night last night because

1:06:231:06:27

I have no idea where my glasses are.

I have left them somewhere in the

1:06:271:06:32

capital city of this country. We

have so many messages from you about

1:06:321:06:35

dementia. Thank you very much. We

will talk more about it in the next

1:06:351:06:40

half an hour. This tweet says your

report on life with dementia is a

1:06:401:06:44

difficult but worthwhile watch. A

lot of people with experiences of

1:06:441:06:52

neurological conditions will

recognise aspects of how it affects

1:06:521:06:54

them. Gary says moving stories from

families in this living with

1:06:541:06:58

dementia special. Emotional in so

many ways. Rebecca had: So painful

1:06:581:07:03

watching the dementia diaries on

Victoria Derbyshire. I can't imagine

1:07:031:07:06

how it feels for the person and

their partner. Joe has emailed to

1:07:061:07:10

say I am watching your programme and

finding the focus on dementia very

1:07:101:07:13

informative. It is brilliant,

informative and also emotional. Both

1:07:131:07:17

my grandmother and mother-in-law had

the condition. I saw them slowly

1:07:171:07:21

lose their identity. It was soaked

that. Adam says: My mum had dementia

1:07:211:07:29

from 2009 at 2014. What a

destructive type of disease. It was

1:07:291:07:34

so sad to have the shell of a loved

one left over from a very loving

1:07:341:07:39

mother. We coped as well as we could

and so many restrictions. Sadly her

1:07:391:07:43

final week was made worse by

appalling end of life care. The

1:07:431:07:47

programme can only go to raise

awareness of such a debilitating

1:07:471:07:51

disease that affects more than just

the sufferer. Please tell as many

1:07:511:07:54

people as possible. That is what we

plan to do today. Your experience is

1:07:541:08:00

so valuable. We are going to hear

from experts of people caring for

1:08:001:08:09

dementia sufferers and we will talk

to experts who are looking at curing

1:08:091:08:11

the disease, which is the aim one

day but we are long way from that.

1:08:111:08:15

If you want to get in touch, you are

very welcome. Use the hashtag. If

1:08:151:08:20

you are texting, you will be charged

at the standard rate. Now the sport.

1:08:201:08:25

The England rugby union head coach

Eddie Jones said he was physically

1:08:251:08:28

and verbally abused by returning by

train from Scotland on Sunday.

1:08:281:08:32

England lost their Six Nations match

at Murrayfield the day before. He

1:08:321:08:37

suffered abuse on the train from

Edinburgh. This is footage of him at

1:08:371:08:41

Manchester Oxford Road Haitian being

harangued and sworn at by a group of

1:08:411:08:47

men. -- train station. He then

attended the Manchester United match

1:08:471:08:55

as a guest of Sir Alex Ferguson

before continuing his journey to

1:08:551:08:57

London by train when he was abused

again. Our rugby union reporter

1:08:571:09:02

Chris Jones is here. This is quite

shocking. Part of Eddie Jones's

1:09:021:09:07

modus operandi, he likes to engage

with the fans and he likes having

1:09:071:09:10

selfies. Clearly this happened on a

couple of legs of his journey south.

1:09:101:09:16

He also pointed out some pre-match

comments, from former players, a

1:09:161:09:24

Scottish prop, saying the England

hating message, he says that

1:09:241:09:27

insights certain behaviours.

Yes,

and he also spoke about an interview

1:09:271:09:33

that the great Gavin Hastings gave.

He said Scotland would love to win

1:09:331:09:40

to rob Eddie Jones's nose in the

dirt. Some would say that is pretty

1:09:401:09:45

freaked Calcutta Cup sparring but

Jones feels it created an atmosphere

1:09:451:09:47

of animosity. Jones was travelling

south from Edinburgh, away to the

1:09:471:09:56

game at Old Trafford between

Manchester United and Chelsea. We

1:09:561:10:00

had BBC footage about him being

accosted at Manchester Oxford Road,

1:10:001:10:05

and British Transport Police have

confirmed there was an incident

1:10:051:10:07

reported on the train down from

Manchester to London. Scottish rugby

1:10:071:10:12

union have sent out a very strong

statement saying they are appalled

1:10:121:10:15

and disgusted by the reactions in

the video. And the RFU, while

1:10:151:10:21

welcoming the Scottish statement,

and appreciating their support, they

1:10:211:10:25

will not make any further comment.

They said that Eddie Jones said all

1:10:251:10:29

he had to say yesterday when he

spoke to the British newspapers. But

1:10:291:10:33

they say he may not take public

transport in this way again and they

1:10:331:10:37

are going to make sure they can do

whatever they can to ensure his

1:10:371:10:42

security. They also point out that

Jones is keen to draw a line and the

1:10:421:10:46

absurd and move on.

Thank you. --

draw a line under the episode and

1:10:461:10:53

move on. Mauricio Pochettino says

the use of VAR in their FA Cup win

1:10:531:10:57

at Wembley against Rochdale was

embarrassing. Referee Paul Tierney

1:10:571:11:01

used the system which has been

trialled in the cup competitions

1:11:011:11:04

this season to allow a goal,

disallow a penalty and allow a

1:11:041:11:11

penalty. Five minutes of time added

on at the end of the first half to

1:11:111:11:14

allow for all the stoppages. The

Spurs boss feels the technology on

1:11:141:11:18

this occasion has been having a

negative affect on the game. It was

1:11:181:11:24

1-1 at half-time. A second-half

hat-trick in the space of 12 minutes

1:11:241:11:29

from Fernando Llorente so Spurs go

through 6-1 in the end. They will

1:11:291:11:33

now face Swansea in the

quarterfinals. I will be back with

1:11:331:11:38

the sport headlines a bit later.

1:11:381:11:44

Three years ago we gave video

cameras to three people living with

1:11:551:12:00

dementia to film their lives. They

did so and they are back with us

1:12:001:12:03

this morning along with others

living with dementia, some of their

1:12:031:12:06

relatives, those who care for people

with the disease as well. We will

1:12:061:12:10

talk about what it is like to live

with dementia and how we as a

1:12:101:12:13

country can best pay for that care

for this challenging disease. First,

1:12:131:12:18

this is Jim with some facts and

figures.

1:12:181:12:25

The number of people being cared for

with dementia in their own homes is

1:12:441:12:47

expected to rise by 1.3 million by

2051 according to new projections

1:12:471:12:53

showing by this programme. What

impact will that have on health

1:12:531:12:57

services and society in general?

Well, it is now thought one in every

1:12:571:13:01

three people born today in 2018 will

develop dementia in their lifetime.

1:13:011:13:08

It is already the leading cause of

death for women in the UK and the

1:13:081:13:12

second leading cause of death for

men after heart disease. By 2040, it

1:13:121:13:17

is predicted more people will die of

dementia in this country than all

1:13:171:13:20

cancers combined. Then there is the

cost to society, currently put at

1:13:201:13:27

£26 billion a year in care and

treatment, which again is expected

1:13:271:13:31

to double by 2040. At the moment,

most of that cost is paid for by the

1:13:311:13:36

people with the disease. If you live

in England or Northern Ireland and

1:13:361:13:42

you have assets over £23,250, you

are currently expected to pay the

1:13:421:13:48

social care bill yourself. The rules

are slightly different in Wales and

1:13:481:13:53

Scotland, where the amount is Zeb

Taia. This summer the government

1:13:531:13:56

should start the process of

reforming the entire system in

1:13:561:14:03

England. As for the cost to the

health service, one in four hospital

1:14:031:14:07

beds is now used by someone with

dementia. 69% of people living in a

1:14:071:14:12

private care home have the

condition. It is not just about

1:14:121:14:16

those living with the disease. 25

million people in this country now

1:14:161:14:20

have a family member or close friend

with dementia. 700,000 directly care

1:14:201:14:25

for somebody affected. Both members

that are set to increase rising over

1:14:251:14:32

the next 50 years. Can I introduce

you again to Wendy Mitchell, Keith

1:14:321:14:37

Oliver and Christopher, who are all

living with dementia and have been

1:14:371:14:41

filming their lives for you?

Veronica is Christopher's wife.

1:14:411:14:46

Jennifer is also here. She is a GP

who has been diagnosed with

1:14:461:14:49

dementia. And we have got Brenda

over here. She was diagnosed three

1:14:491:14:54

years ago. She is with her husband

Stephen. We will introduce you to

1:14:541:15:00

some of our other guests in the

course of the next half an hour. I

1:15:001:15:07

want to talk to you about the

challenges of living with dementia.

1:15:071:15:12

One example is when you were

accosted after parking in a disabled

1:15:121:15:18

space?

It was rather embarrassing. Maybe

1:15:181:15:21

the gentleman who accused us, with

dementia, you don't look disabled,

1:15:211:15:27

you don't look ill. Christopher can

walk which used to be a criteria for

1:15:271:15:32

the blue badge. The stress of going

places, big car parks is taken away

1:15:321:15:41

by the blue badge, it is essential.

The Government is running something,

1:15:411:15:46

looking at it again.

Is there a stigma surrounding

1:15:461:15:50

dementia?

You are nodding?

I think there is a

1:15:501:15:56

great stigma, I am afraid. People do

not talk about dementia a lot of the

1:15:561:16:01

time.

Why is that? A lot of people are

1:16:011:16:07

very frightened of dementia. What

you have shown in these films is it

1:16:071:16:11

is not frightening, it is part of

life, and a lot of people are going

1:16:111:16:17

to have some form of dementia. We

must get used to it and accept it

1:16:171:16:22

and talk about it. If you avoid

talking about it, you avoid the

1:16:221:16:28

understanding of all the people

around you. We want everybody to

1:16:281:16:33

make this country dementia friendly

so we welcome people with dementia,

1:16:331:16:40

we talk about it, we change policies

to make sure people with dementia

1:16:401:16:45

and those who care for them, people

like Veronica, have an understanding

1:16:451:16:51

relationship with neighbours, with

police, with shop assistants, with

1:16:511:16:57

people we come across every day.

Wendy, you are an incredible

1:16:571:17:05

illustration of living with

dementia, and the adjustments you

1:17:051:17:09

have made, including moving house.

Did you want to move house?

1:17:091:17:15

Did you feel forced? No, I was

definitely forced. Dementia forced

1:17:151:17:20

me in one way because I used to live

in a busy centre of York. And I hope

1:17:201:17:28

everyone realises dementia isn't

just about memory, but lots of other

1:17:281:17:33

senses are affected as well. And

hearing was one of my first. It just

1:17:331:17:39

became too chaotic, it made me

anxious to be in that busy situation

1:17:391:17:46

which I used to love.

So, I had to move somewhere quiet.

1:17:461:17:50

But also financially, I still had a

mortgage when I was diagnosed.

1:17:501:17:57

People often forget, when you are

diagnosed, you still have a

1:17:571:18:07

mortgage, young children, I was

working. So no one would have given

1:18:071:18:12

me a mortgage under those

circumstances, with living alone. So

1:18:121:18:18

I had to move to a cheaper part of

the country to be able to still have

1:18:181:18:22

a house.

What about other experiences?

1:18:221:18:27

In a long-distance sense, you look

after your mum who has dementia, who

1:18:271:18:33

is 91.

She has been in care for over six

1:18:331:18:36

years. Before that she was living

alone at home. I would say with

1:18:361:18:42

symptoms of dementia for up to 20

years. People assume that dementia

1:18:421:18:49

is all about memory loss, getting

confused about names, dates, money.

1:18:491:18:54

That is part of it. In her case, she

has mixed Alzheimer's and vascular

1:18:541:19:00

dementia. Troubling symptoms were

along the paranoid spectrum, having

1:19:001:19:09

fears and delusions, irrational

emotional responses, the kind of

1:19:091:19:13

things that come and go. You can't

obviously point to them as a

1:19:131:19:18

disease. Sometimes it seems like an

irrational flare-up in your

1:19:181:19:23

relationship and then you move on.

Can I ask how you managed to get

1:19:231:19:28

your mother into a care home?

It was immensely difficult, too hard

1:19:281:19:33

to explain in a sound bite. It was a

long process and I wouldn't have

1:19:331:19:39

been able to do it if she had still

been able to be independent. It was

1:19:391:19:44

only when she got into crisis. She

wasn't safe to be left on her own.

1:19:441:19:53

And going out, driving, not being

visibly disabled, our life had

1:19:531:19:58

shrunk down. By that time, the only

places we could go well where I

1:19:581:20:03

could park right outside and go

straight in because I couldn't leave

1:20:031:20:07

her to park the car somewhere else.

Effectively you had to use

1:20:071:20:12

subterfuge to get your mum into

care?

1:20:121:20:15

Part of her symptoms are she hasn't

been able to recognise the symptoms

1:20:151:20:21

herself. She would be antagonistic

to anyone raising it. Understandably

1:20:211:20:26

because if you think someone is

raising an issue you are afraid of

1:20:261:20:30

but you don't think it is an issue

at all, of course you would be

1:20:301:20:35

angry. I could never plan things

with her. Everything I organised for

1:20:351:20:40

her, in the end I did behind her

back with social workers, clinical

1:20:401:20:46

psychiatrists, occupational

therapists, ultimately with the care

1:20:461:20:51

home. All of us employing a degree

of subterfuge to get her to accept

1:20:511:20:55

the things by that stage she needed.

Jennifer, was it you who found

1:20:551:21:05

yourself wandering along a bridge?

You are going to a tube station and

1:21:051:21:10

you found you weren't in the right

place and didn't know where you

1:21:101:21:13

work? -- know where you work?

I didn't know where the exit was on

1:21:131:21:21

the platform. I kept going up and

down the bridge because I didn't

1:21:211:21:25

know. So many people say we look all

right and don't understand how

1:21:251:21:32

difficult life can be.

And who helped you? Nobody, until

1:21:321:21:37

the person waiting to meet

eventually came to find me. By which

1:21:371:21:41

time the station was deserted and I

were still wandering up and down

1:21:411:21:44

over the bridge because I did not

know how get out.

Can I add, there

1:21:441:21:52

was an important word, rationality.

That is one of the things you

1:21:521:21:58

mention robs me of Sundays. I find

it very alien from what I used to be

1:21:581:22:05

like. An example is, the other day,

I felt nobody cared. It was a really

1:22:051:22:12

foggy day and I sensed nobody cared.

My consultant came to visit me at

1:22:121:22:17

home because I wasn't well. This is

my psychiatrist. And I gave him all

1:22:171:22:25

guns blazing about how I felt nobody

cared. I felt horrible because this

1:22:251:22:30

poor chap has come to see me at home

and he truly does care, and I spoke

1:22:301:22:36

about not caring. I did clarify, it

is the system that appears not to

1:22:361:22:42

care. The individuals within the

system are giving an enormous amount

1:22:421:22:46

of care.

We will talk about the

system in a moment. You talk

1:22:461:22:54

powerfully in the film about

depression and dementia being best

1:22:541:22:58

friends, give us an insight?

I have

never had depression in my life and

1:22:581:23:04

when I was first diagnosed, the

consultant, he didn't give me any

1:23:041:23:08

prescription for the uptime is but

an antidepressant.

1:23:081:23:15

an antidepressant. I took the

description but I never cashed it. I

1:23:161:23:19

have never taken an antidepressant.

When I did become depressed because

1:23:191:23:25

of the dementia I remember saying,

if I am going down I want my eyes

1:23:251:23:29

open. Because I don't want the cloud

to be made even more so by the

1:23:291:23:40

medication. I did come out of that.

Because of the people that surround

1:23:401:23:47

me, my wife, my family, and those

professionals who are doing their

1:23:471:23:54

best to help me.

I want to show you a little clip of

1:23:541:24:00

Wendy in a glider.

When was this,

last year?

1:24:001:24:04

Probably, yes. Stupid question on my

part!

1:24:041:24:10

Let us play you this.

1:24:101:24:13

How good was that?

That was amazing. Did you have some

1:24:171:24:22

of the people saying to your

daughter, are you sure she will be

1:24:221:24:24

all right?

I remember distinctly

because of the powerful emotion it

1:24:241:24:31

makes you feel. I was stood next to

them, and the pilot and technicians

1:24:311:24:41

spoke to my daughter and said, is

your mum really capable? Will she

1:24:411:24:48

take all the controls?

1:24:481:24:54

take all the controls?

Is that

because people sometimes think

1:24:541:24:56

dementia equals madness?

When people

think of dementia they often think

1:24:561:25:03

of the end stages and they forget

there is a beginning and a middle

1:25:031:25:07

and so much living to be done. All

the time. So they were just assuming

1:25:071:25:14

I had no control over myself.

Luckily, my daughter said, why don't

1:25:141:25:21

you ask her, she is stood here! Once

we had got over that initial

1:25:211:25:30

barrier, they started to relax a

little but it wasn't until we were

1:25:301:25:33

up in the sky and I was taking

photos and talking that I could see

1:25:331:25:41

the pilot behind me visibly relax

and start talking to me, instead of

1:25:411:25:47

wondering how on earth much longer

it was before we got down again.

1:25:471:25:52

Fantastic. I want to ask Carol if

you could introduce your

1:25:521:25:58

organisation, about the current

state of research into dementia,

1:25:581:26:03

treatments and cures, before we talk

about care for people with dementia

1:26:031:26:07

in this country.

I am the Director

of Alzheimer's research UK, funding

1:26:071:26:17

research from really early

scientific research all the way to

1:26:171:26:19

the clinic. We are making

significant progress. We don't have

1:26:191:26:25

a cure but we are making progress.

We understand a lot more about the

1:26:251:26:30

pathology behind these diseases,

about the genetics, we understand a

1:26:301:26:35

lot more about the processes which

provides targets to develop drugs.

1:26:351:26:41

There are many drugs in development.

We all hope they will show

1:26:411:26:47

effectiveness and benefit in

patients.

Is there anything on the

1:26:471:26:50

market now to help people manage

their dementia?

There are

1:26:501:26:55

symptomatic treatments on the market

now. These treatments are effective

1:26:551:27:01

in a proportion of people but not

everybody.

1:27:011:27:06

What do they do? They slowed down

the decline in memory loss and the

1:27:061:27:13

appearance of behaviours. They don't

have any effect on disease

1:27:131:27:16

modification. They don't slow the

disease process or stop it. But they

1:27:161:27:22

really help with the symptoms. They

don't work in everybody but in some

1:27:221:27:27

they work for a significant period.

Brenda hello. Thank you for being so

1:27:271:27:36

patient. Diagnosed three years ago

and involved in medical trials. If

1:27:361:27:43

you say so, yes. Can you tell us a

little bit?

1:27:431:27:48

It gets me out of the house and I go

to various places, with Stephen, of

1:27:481:27:55

course. And sometimes I am looked

from head to toe, other times they

1:27:551:28:00

ask me questions, but I don't really

remember what has happened will stop

1:28:001:28:08

I just go with the flow.

Can you

tell us a little bit? To go back,

1:28:081:28:14

Brenda says she goes with the flow.

When she was first diagnosed, she

1:28:141:28:19

was very angry. After a few months

she had an epiphany where she said

1:28:191:28:24

to me one day, I am coming out,

literally. And when she came out,

1:28:241:28:32

she was completely different, all of

the anger had gone, she didn't mind

1:28:321:28:35

talking about it to people.

Yesterday we have to fill in lots of

1:28:351:28:41

questionnaires for the research, we

did one yesterday, asked on a scale

1:28:411:28:47

of one to ten where do you consider

yourself in happiness, where did you

1:28:471:28:50

put yourself, do you remember?

Nearly ten. She decided on eight

1:28:501:28:57

because she said there is room for

improvement. But she always feels

1:28:571:29:01

very happy. When she was first

diagnosed, it seemed to be automatic

1:29:011:29:14

the patient is put on an

antidepressant. Brenda was angry,

1:29:141:29:21

she wasn't depressed. It took a few

months. We persuaded the memory

1:29:211:29:26

clinic and doctor to take her off

the antidepressants, there was no

1:29:261:29:30

need for it. And she doesn't need it

now. As far as the tiles are

1:29:301:29:37

concerned, Brenda does willingly

volunteer for quite a few trials,

1:29:371:29:41

some of which are sponsored by

Alzheimer's research UK. She is

1:29:411:29:47

subjected to all sorts of

indignities she is happy with, being

1:29:471:29:52

hung up in answers, involved in

balance studies, constant brain

1:29:521:29:56

scans.

It gets me out of the house.

Thank

1:29:561:30:01

you so much.

1:30:011:30:09

you so much. I want to talk about

the current state of care for people

1:30:091:30:12

with dementia in the UK. One in four

people in a hospital bed is someone

1:30:121:30:18

with dementia.

Is that the right place for them?

My

1:30:181:30:24

dad died last year, in hospital for

the last six months of his life. He

1:30:241:30:30

was in a care home prior to that.

The experience chimes with the

1:30:301:30:38

subterfuge and going against his

will, he would have rather stay at

1:30:381:30:43

home, but my mum had cancer and

could not care for him. Once he went

1:30:431:30:47

into hospital, the care home said

they would not have him back because

1:30:471:30:53

his level of need had increased to

the point where they could not

1:30:531:30:57

manage, which

1:30:571:30:57

My mother died last February, so it

was down to me to look at care homes

1:31:091:31:12

and pick one. I was quite surprised

to find that wasn't the case.

1:31:121:31:17

Actually the care homes would come

and assess him.

So they pick you or

1:31:171:31:21

not as the case may be?

Exactly.

Each time it was the same thing.

1:31:211:31:28

They couldn't manage his night-time

wondering. He was in a hospital

1:31:281:31:32

environment which was not

necessarily... It was an alien

1:31:321:31:36

environment. It probably wasn't

showing him how he would have been

1:31:361:31:41

if he had been settled and familiar.

He would be awake a lot of the night

1:31:411:31:46

and sleeping during the day and he

would get very agitated and he would

1:31:461:31:49

want to walk up and down the

corridor but because he was so

1:31:491:31:53

confused and disorientated, somebody

had to be with him all the time. The

1:31:531:31:56

ward he was on was appropriate for

people with dementia but in a risk

1:31:561:32:03

averse way.

But in an ideal world,

are you saying as experts, because

1:32:031:32:08

of your personal experiences and

because you are caring for someone

1:32:081:32:11

or the organisation you work for,

that being a hospital just because

1:32:111:32:16

you have dementia is not the right

place?

Absolutely. I work for the

1:32:161:32:22

Alzheimer's Society and we know who

people who stay in hospital with

1:32:221:32:26

dementia can stay there from twice

to seven times as long because the

1:32:261:32:29

community support is not there. Some

of the numbers we have talked about,

1:32:291:32:34

there are 500,000 people living in

their own homes with dementia, and

1:32:341:32:38

they have told the Alzheimer's

Society that 85% would like to stay

1:32:381:32:41

in their own homes for as long as

possible. By 2050 we will have 1.3

1:32:411:32:46

million people living with dementia

in their homes. Their individual

1:32:461:32:50

support needs need to be there.

Either we address them sensibly,

1:32:501:32:55

more affordably in the community or

we are going to have the greater

1:32:551:32:59

crisis on the NHS which is

avoidable.

Ago. People with dementia

1:32:591:33:05

can live in their own homes

independently, individually, as you

1:33:051:33:09

have illustrated and you are

illustrating, but we have got to pay

1:33:091:33:13

for professionals to go in and help

them do what, for example?

It can be

1:33:131:33:19

a whole range of support. As Keith

said, there is support for living

1:33:191:33:23

with dementia and reducing

isolation. You can have group

1:33:231:33:26

activities and one-to-one support

and as dementia progresses, it can

1:33:261:33:30

move into the health needs, the

health support. What we can but hope

1:33:301:33:34

is now we have, with Jeremy Hunt,

the Health Secretary, and he is

1:33:341:33:41

responsible for health care and

social care, and this is the first

1:33:411:33:43

time the two have been put together

and we need the resources properly

1:33:431:33:47

but this is not just this government

but successive governments for 20

1:33:471:33:50

years.

That is the challenge. Mike,

you run a care home. What is your

1:33:501:33:55

view?

I had something about care in

the community? It is a challenge as

1:33:551:34:00

well because it is about having

enough staff to look after people in

1:34:001:34:04

their own home. There was a report

last week which showed we cannot

1:34:041:34:09

recruit enough people. It is not

just care homes which has its own

1:34:091:34:13

challenges but it is the community

as well, making sure people have

1:34:131:34:17

better care. You are a politician,

crossbench peer, former director of

1:34:171:34:24

Age Concern. How should we pay for

this in the future?

I think Jeremy

1:34:241:34:30

Hunt has got to bring together

health and social care funding. I

1:34:301:34:34

think we have got to start using the

taxation system to help us with

1:34:341:34:38

that. Very importantly.

Income tax?

Yes.

National Insurance? Everybody?

1:34:381:34:47

Everybody who can. And we have got

to encourage people to stay at home

1:34:471:34:52

but that doesn't mean you're care

workforce, those people, have got to

1:34:521:34:54

be properly paid, recognised as

being indispensable in this sort of

1:34:541:35:00

case.

Dave?

It is not just about

staff and professional carers. A lot

1:35:001:35:07

of people living with dementia are

supported by family members.

1:35:071:35:11

Particularly for people in black and

ethnic minorities, they are being

1:35:111:35:15

supported on a voluntary basis,

either by family members or by

1:35:151:35:20

neighbours or members of the

community. The challenges they face,

1:35:201:35:25

they don't really understand how

dementia works. They are very

1:35:251:35:29

worried about it. They often feel it

is not something that they can talk

1:35:291:35:36

about in their communities at all. I

think that is an area that is really

1:35:361:35:41

left out of a lot of the

conversation when people talk about

1:35:411:35:45

the cost of dementia, because they

are bearing the cost of dementia out

1:35:451:35:48

of their pockets every day.

I want

to bring in Doctor Eileen Burns, a

1:35:481:35:55

hospital doctor

1:35:551:36:00

hospital doctor and President of The

Geriatrics Society. Where is the

1:36:011:36:04

best place for people to be treated,

helped and supported, and how do we

1:36:041:36:09

pay for it?

We really need to start

planning in a much more sensible and

1:36:091:36:14

structured way than we have done

today for the future population. We

1:36:141:36:18

know that the population is ageing

and we know in particular the very

1:36:181:36:22

elderly group, the group in whom

dementia is most prevalent, are

1:36:221:36:26

increasing the fastest, and if we

don't start planning now, we really

1:36:261:36:30

are going to be in the soup, as my

colleague said. We need to think

1:36:301:36:34

about different models of care.

Currently many people with dementia

1:36:341:36:37

end up in a hospital setting because

something happens. Perhaps they have

1:36:371:36:41

a fall, they develop an infection,

it may or may not be the best place

1:36:411:36:46

for them at that time. Sometimes

people with dementia will need acute

1:36:461:36:51

hospital care, just like any of us

might do. If they don't need

1:36:511:36:54

hospital care but there is a crisis,

we need more alternatives rather

1:36:541:36:59

than just 909, ambulance, A&E,

hospital

1:36:591:37:07

ward. In many parts of the country

that is the only pathway we have. We

1:37:191:37:22

need alternatives to help people not

going to hospital if that is

1:37:221:37:24

appropriate and alternatives to help

people get back out of hospital in a

1:37:241:37:27

timely way. As has been mentioned,

when people get stuck in hospital,

1:37:271:37:29

they become less well, despite

everything we try and do an hospital

1:37:291:37:32

to avoid unwanted effects.

We know

this, politicians know this, the

1:37:321:37:34

population knows this. It is

grabbing at by the scruff of the

1:37:341:37:38

neck and sorting it. Those things

you pointed out, we know, don't we?

1:37:381:37:43

I am frustrated in a way because I

have been involved for 30 years and

1:37:431:37:47

we have done a lot of talking. My

fear is that there will be another

1:37:471:37:52

delay when the green paper comes up.

We have got to get on with it

1:37:521:37:56

quickly.

We are very good at talking

in this country and not very good at

1:37:561:38:01

action quick enough. The talking

takes up far too much time.

The

1:38:011:38:08

public is saying enough is enough.

We are expecting a green paper,

1:38:081:38:12

government paper on social care in

the not too distant future. Ron

1:38:121:38:19

occur?

It is a long journey for a

lot of people. -- Veronica? The

1:38:191:38:29

train, as people call it. At first

the diagnosis is brilliant and there

1:38:291:38:32

is a lot of post diagnosis care, but

as you travel on the train, I mean,

1:38:321:38:38

Christopher was diagnosed ten years

ago and he had it two years before

1:38:381:38:40

that while we try to find out what

it was. We are getting to a stage

1:38:401:38:47

where we want specialist clinical

help. That is totally different from

1:38:471:38:49

anything we have met so far. That is

what we really need to stay at home.

1:38:491:38:56

As you say, we can go into hospital

for a short time but it is to be

1:38:561:39:00

avoided as possible. Everybody has

that experience. There are very few

1:39:001:39:06

Admiral nurses. The cinema, that is

what we need. The funding of that

1:39:061:39:14

end of it. There has been a lot of

stuff about the beginning, you must

1:39:141:39:18

get diagnosed and talk about it, it

has become a thing, and we now need

1:39:181:39:22

to grab the thing and sort it. For

our children and grandchildren.

1:39:221:39:30

Sorry, Keith. Very briefly?

It is

appalling that such a significant

1:39:301:39:37

disease as Alzheimer's, at point of

diagnosis you are then discharged!

1:39:371:39:41

That is criminal and crazy. There is

no care plan.

I don't think most

1:39:411:39:46

people know that.

It is true. There

is no care plan given for most

1:39:461:39:51

people until they hit a crisis and

then a care plan is developed. That

1:39:511:39:56

care plan, I know from my experience

of 35 years in education, if I had

1:39:561:40:01

children in my care, in my school,

who required additional support and

1:40:011:40:05

help, we would have a plan to give

them that. We would give them that

1:40:051:40:09

where it would make a difference.

One final thought. I am so sorry. I

1:40:091:40:16

will bring it back to the personal,

if I may? Jennifer, go ahead.

You

1:40:161:40:20

are so right. We have got to get in

at the beginning. Doctors, with

1:40:201:40:25

stroke, we didn't used to do very

much but nowadays we do and we put a

1:40:251:40:28

lot of effort into it and there is a

window of opportunity at the

1:40:281:40:31

beginning. It goes down as time goes

on and it is the same with dementia.

1:40:311:40:37

If we can get it right at the

beginning and do something rather

1:40:371:40:40

than just having a diagnosis, we can

make a tremendous difference. There

1:40:401:40:44

is so much that can still be done.

I

want to thank you all, very much.

1:40:441:40:53

Dave, Sally, Tim, Keith, Wendy,

Christopher, Veronica, Carol,

1:40:541:40:59

Stephen, Eileen, thank you for

coming on the programme. We could

1:40:591:41:02

have talked for longer, I know. I am

so grateful for your time and

1:41:021:41:06

patience this morning. Thank you

very much. And thank you for your

1:41:061:41:10

comments. This email from Jenny: I

have never got in touch with you

1:41:101:41:14

before but I wanted you to know

about my mother who was diagnosed

1:41:141:41:18

with dementia in 2010. It is a long

story but I had to sell her home and

1:41:181:41:21

she has been in a residential home

for two years and now a nursing home

1:41:211:41:26

for two more. The only thing she has

left is an ability to swallow baby

1:41:261:41:33

food and breathe. She does not know

me or anyone else. It has been a

1:41:331:41:37

battle all the way through. I really

worry for people who have no one to

1:41:371:41:41

fight their corner. When you contact

social services, they just tell you

1:41:411:41:45

there is no money at the end of the

conversation and you are left to

1:41:451:41:49

sort things out. Very scary for our

futures. Heartbreaking issue and so

1:41:491:41:53

well covered by you this morning.

Thank you. This email from Glenys.

1:41:531:41:58

My husband was diagnosed without

same as five years ago. It is so

1:41:581:42:02

true that every sufferer experiences

the disease in different ways. Some

1:42:021:42:10

people are very chatty when we go to

Alzheimer's Society events, but some

1:42:101:42:15

are very silent. I thought my

husband would watch with me and we

1:42:151:42:20

could discuss it but he says what he

always says when I suggest watching

1:42:201:42:24

TV, I have seen this programme

before and he is genuinely convinced

1:42:241:42:28

that he has. Unfortunately for me he

has returned to his jigsaw puzzle.

1:42:281:42:34

And from Sally: My dad was diagnosed

without thymus in 2013. I liken it

1:42:341:42:39

to having a child. As time moves on

you move into a different phase and

1:42:391:42:43

you can hardly remember the days

before and it becomes normal. It is

1:42:431:42:47

heartbreaking. What I find most

hardest try to keep my mother in

1:42:471:42:50

good spirits because she is his main

carer. My dad is living in his own

1:42:501:42:55

world really and seems fairly

content. My mother is so upset all

1:42:551:42:59

the time and depressed. My siblings

and I find that difficult. We just

1:42:591:43:10

feel helpless as there is only so

much we can do with young children

1:43:101:43:13

of our own. There has also been a

real reluctance from her to seek

1:43:131:43:16

help which we find so frustrating.

It has really changed my perspective

1:43:161:43:18

on life and to live each day with

positivity. Take that trip, spend

1:43:181:43:22

that money, have those experiences,

as you never know what life will

1:43:221:43:25

bring. Absolutely. It is not a dress

rehearsal. I have some breaking news

1:43:251:43:32

to bring you. The first is to do

with Prince William, the Duke of

1:43:321:43:37

Cambridge. Kensington Palace has

announced that he will visit Israel,

1:43:371:43:41

Jordan and the occupied Palestinian

territories this summer. The visit

1:43:411:43:45

is at the request of Her Majesty's

government and has been welcomed by

1:43:451:43:50

the Israeli, Jordanian and

Palestinian authorities. Further

1:43:501:43:52

details will be announced in due

course. And MI5 has reduced the

1:43:521:43:58

threat level to Great Britain from

Northern Ireland related terrorism

1:43:581:44:01

from substantial to moderate, which

means that a terrorist attack is

1:44:011:44:08

possible but not likely. MI5 has

reduced the threat level to the UK

1:44:081:44:12

from Northern Ireland related

terrorism from substantial to

1:44:121:44:14

moderate, which means an attack is

possible but not likely.

1:44:141:44:20

The Home Office says it's

considering allowing a medical

1:44:201:44:23

cannabis trial to treat

a six-year-old boy with

1:44:231:44:25

a rare form of epilepsy.

1:44:251:44:26

Alfie Dingley, from

Kenilworth in Warwickshire

1:44:261:44:27

suffers up to 30 violent

seizures a day.

1:44:271:44:33

His mother took him

to the Netherlands to take

1:44:331:44:37

a cannabis-based medication

in September and says while there

1:44:371:44:39

his seizures reduced in number,

duration and severity.

1:44:391:44:44

The Home Office had so far

denied six-year-old Alfie Dingley

1:44:441:44:47

access to the drug due to it

being a banned substance.

1:44:471:44:50

Alfie's mum Hannah Deacon

joins me on the programme.

1:44:501:44:58

thank you for talking to us.

Why have they changed their mind?

1:45:011:45:10

Well, we had a very good meeting on

Monday with the Home Office Minister

1:45:111:45:19

and his advisers, and also our MP

who has been extremely helpful with

1:45:191:45:23

organising everything for us.

We were presented with this option

1:45:231:45:28

about the fact we could use the

medication that three months under

1:45:281:45:32

the clinician in the UK, to show its

effectiveness, and after that point,

1:45:321:45:40

apply for a Home Office license so

Alfie could use it in the country.

1:45:401:45:45

We have done five months of the

trial in Holland where we had a

1:45:451:45:49

report done by our paediatric

urologist, but they feel they want a

1:45:491:45:54

UK clinician to do a trial as well.

We are very positive they have given

1:45:541:46:00

us this lifeline. I think they see

what a serious issue we have here.

1:46:001:46:07

How important it is Alfie does not

go back into being severely ill as

1:46:071:46:11

he was before we went to Holland. I

hope we get this action plan into

1:46:111:46:17

place quickly. We have been told it

will be within a month so we hope

1:46:171:46:21

that will happen.

Could you describe for our audience

1:46:211:46:26

what it is like you as Alfie's mum

when he has a seizure?

1:46:261:46:35

Well, just to clarify, Alfie has a

condition which is genetic which

1:46:351:46:39

causes cluster seizures, he was

having a cluster of severe seizures

1:46:391:46:46

every four to ten days. Not every

day but when he does they are very

1:46:461:46:52

aggressive, he doesn't breed and

they don't stop without intravenous

1:46:521:46:57

steroids. -- breathe. We can't

manage it at home, we go to A&E. By

1:46:571:47:09

the time we get to our local

hospital 15 minutes away he could

1:47:091:47:13

have had five seizures. It is a very

aggressive presentation and be

1:47:131:47:18

anything that stops it is

intravenous steroids. The worst

1:47:181:47:22

thing I have experienced. I did it

for two years come every week,

1:47:221:47:28

watching my child suffer. It is not

something any parent should have to

1:47:281:47:33

go through, or child. He is a very

brave, strong little boy. But his

1:47:331:47:41

body won't last forever if UK -- if

he is injected with steroids every

1:47:411:47:46

week.

The Home Office says the Government

1:47:461:47:51

has huge sympathy, the policing

minister wants to explore every

1:47:511:47:57

option and has met with you to

discuss treatments but no decisions

1:47:571:48:01

have been made and any proposal

would need to be led by senior

1:48:011:48:06

clinicians using sufficient and

rigorous evidence. No decisions have

1:48:061:48:11

been made after the child is what

that means, isn't it?

1:48:111:48:18

Yes, they are still on the fence a

little bit, which is upsetting. We

1:48:181:48:23

have been given this option. I want

a commitment from them they are

1:48:231:48:28

going to help Alfie. As a mother,

that is all I am, his mum, I am not

1:48:281:48:35

a politician, I am not an activist,

I am just a mother who is tired of

1:48:351:48:42

seeing my son suffer, and I have

found something that helps him. And

1:48:421:48:46

I want everyone to get together and

make this happen to him. It is his

1:48:461:48:50

human right to be well. This makes

him while. And I understand there

1:48:501:48:59

are legal sites, legislation, red

tape. But we need to act quickly and

1:48:591:49:03

I want some

1:49:031:49:09

I want some sincere help from the

Home Office, some commitment, sorry,

1:49:101:49:15

that they will make this happen. And

this is what they have offered us

1:49:151:49:20

and I want it to happen, quickly.

Thank you very much the talking to

1:49:201:49:26

us this morning.

Can I say one thing. Everyone

1:49:261:49:31

watching, please, if you support

what we are trying to do, please

1:49:311:49:35

follow us on Facebook, we have a

link where you can lobby your MP,

1:49:351:49:42

just fill your details in. We need

people power on this, we need our

1:49:421:49:48

MPs, and this will happen for him if

we come together and support him and

1:49:481:49:53

make it happen.

Thank you.

1:49:531:49:55

Thank you.

1:49:551:50:00

Thank you. The Government has

announced it will not press ahead

1:50:001:50:03

with the second part of the lettuce

and enquire into press standards and

1:50:031:50:08

regulations, the culture secretary

has told the House Of Commons there

1:50:081:50:11

will be no part two of the inquiry,

the inquiry set up into press

1:50:111:50:19

standards and regulations after

phone tapping claims around the News

1:50:191:50:23

Of The World which lets -- which led

to it closing.

1:50:231:50:31

So many of you have got in contact

with us about dementia.

1:50:311:50:40

Lewis is in Edinburgh.

1:50:431:50:51

Hilary is in Northern Ireland.

1:50:551:51:00

My sister, she would be six years

older than me but she helped me

1:51:001:51:08

whenever my care -- whenever my kids

were young and it is something for

1:51:081:51:13

me to help her back. Caring for her

is difficult, whenever I see my

1:51:131:51:20

nephew straggling. The bureaucracy

of social services, the office of

1:51:201:51:26

care and protection for the

management of her finances, the

1:51:261:51:28

Housing Executive in relation to

having her home adapted to meet her

1:51:281:51:33

needs. I was a care manager in

dementia care, and I currently work

1:51:331:51:41

in mental health. The difficulty I

understand is that when somebody's

1:51:411:51:48

environment isn't working for them,

then the care becomes more difficult

1:51:481:51:54

and that is when they are drawn to

nursing care.

1:51:541:52:01

She is a health professional says

she knows about these areas and she

1:52:011:52:05

finds it hard to bring the different

parts of the service together to

1:52:051:52:11

help her sister with dementia.

How will it be for the rest of us?

1:52:111:52:16

That was my experience, a total

minefield. Before my dad was

1:52:161:52:21

diagnosed, we didn't want to believe

this could be the case. We were told

1:52:211:52:28

to get on with it, so to speak. We

had a lot of help when I got in

1:52:281:52:34

touch with Alzheimer's Scotland.

They gave us the next steps to do.

1:52:341:52:41

In terms of banks, financial

institutions, they... Changing power

1:52:411:52:49

of attorney was good for us but it

was slow.

1:52:491:52:54

Thank you, both.

1:52:541:53:01

The Met Office has upgraded

its weather warning

1:53:011:53:03

for south Wales and south-west

England to red, as freezing

1:53:031:53:06

temperatures and snow

affect much of the UK.

1:53:061:53:08

It means lives are at risk.

1:53:081:53:11

Another red warning is already

in place in central

1:53:111:53:16

Scotland where hundreds of people

have been spending the night trapped

1:53:161:53:19

on the M80 in central Scotland

because of the snow.

1:53:191:53:21

Police are appealing to people

to stay put until help arrives.

1:53:211:53:24

Hundreds of schools are expected

to be closed for a second day,

1:53:241:53:27

across many parts of the UK.

1:53:271:53:29

Local authorities have been

struggling to keep roads clear

1:53:291:53:31

and many rail services

have been disrupted.

1:53:311:53:34

But the snow is, of course,

providing some beautiful images.

1:53:341:53:36

Have a look here at how the London

skyline was transformed by snow.

1:53:361:53:44

Leslie in Glasgow said she feared

she would die in chaos on the M80.

1:54:151:54:21

And Brian in North Lanarkshire said

he ignored red warning because he

1:54:211:54:27

couldn't not attend to his patients.

And Polly is an employment lawyer

1:54:271:54:33

who can tell you what rights you

have if you cannot make it into

1:54:331:54:36

work.

The weather was horrendous, it got

1:54:361:54:41

worse and worse. 18 hours.

Who helped you in the end?

The

1:54:411:54:51

emergency services arrived at 5am

this morning with a cereal bar and

1:54:511:54:57

some water. After that, I followed

the trucks so we could get through.

1:54:571:55:08

There were no snowploughs, nothing.

We are showing your video which you

1:55:081:55:15

took from your phone just outside

your car.

That was at 5am this

1:55:151:55:21

morning.

You are all right now? I am fine, a

1:55:211:55:27

bit tied.

-- tired. Why did you think you are

1:55:271:55:35

going to die?

The first few hours it was fine.

1:55:351:55:40

There was an amber warning, we are

used to this type of weather. Then

1:55:401:55:43

all of a sudden, the roads were

jammed. When I got past the

1:55:431:55:54

junction, there were two police

people, lorries had jackknifed, a

1:55:541:56:01

policewoman said, you need to pass

this card, if you can manage, you

1:56:011:56:04

need to go. The K, so I was turning.

Stupidly, I went. There were no road

1:56:041:56:15

markings. I was the only person I

could see for two hours. On the

1:56:151:56:25

other side, northbound, there were

people that, I was screaming for

1:56:251:56:28

someone to help. Nobody could stop.

Then the northbound traffic

1:56:281:56:36

disappeared, that was closed. It

took maybe three hours. Then the

1:56:361:56:43

trucks arrived, they overtook me and

I was able to go behind. Then we

1:56:431:56:49

were parked there for the night.

You

had to attend to your patients, tell

1:56:491:56:56

us why?

At the time I was leaving

1:56:561:57:04

At the time I was leaving for work,

but getting back was a nightmare. I

1:57:051:57:08

ended up getting trapped on the

motorway the eight or nine hours but

1:57:081:57:15

hats off to the people who came out

of their houses to help us. Making

1:57:151:57:22

sure people were OK. The van driver

behind me was asking if children

1:57:221:57:26

wanted to make use of his fan to

sleep.

Polly, please can you answer

1:57:261:57:38

this, can employers, can employees

legally refuse to come to work in

1:57:381:57:43

weather like this?

Technically, employees have a duty

1:57:431:57:49

to try to get to work and if they

don't attend, technically that is an

1:57:491:57:55

unauthorised absence. However,

common sense often prevails in this

1:57:551:58:03

situation, we are dealing with

serious circumstances. Employers

1:58:031:58:06

ultimately have a duty of care to

their employees's health and safety.

1:58:061:58:12

If you don't go, will you be played

-- will you be paid?

1:58:121:58:17

No. Thank you or your company today.

1:58:171:58:21

On the programme tomorrow.

1:58:211:58:22

We'll look ahead to Theresa May's

big speech on Brexit.

1:58:221:58:30

Victoria talks to those stranded in the snow as a second red warning is issued for severe weather.

How can dementia develop over a period of three years? The show visits Wendy, Keith and Christopher to see what has changed.

Plus the Home Office says it is considering allowing a medical cannabis trial to treat a six-year-old boy with a rare form of epilepsy.


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