09/03/2018 Victoria Derbyshire


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09/03/2018

The BBC's daily news and current affairs programme. Chloe Tilley talks to a victim of an acid attack to find out how life has changed.


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Transcript


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Hello.

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It's Friday, it's nine o'clock.

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I'm Chloe Tilley.

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Welcome to the programme

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Only months after Donald Trump

threatened North Korea with "fire

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and fury" and described Kim Jong-un

as "little rocket man" -

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the US President has

agreed to an offer to meet

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the country's leader.

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It's a move described by South Korea

as a "milestone for peace".

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He expressed his eagerness to meet

President Trump as soon as possible.

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President Trump officiated at a

briefing and said he would meet Kim

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Jong-un by May, to achieve

prominent denuclearisation.

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It's the first time ever a sitting

US President will have met

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a North Korean leader.

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We'll ask what the historic

meeting might achieve.

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A teenager who attacked six moped

riders with acid in a 90-minute

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rampage across London

is being sentenced today.

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We'll meet one of his

victims

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and find out how his

life has changed.

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And the last print edition of iconic

music magazine NME is out today.

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Bosses say it's no longer

financially viable.

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We'll look back at its history -

with a former editor and the lead

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singer of The Vaccines.

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Hello.

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Welcome to the programme.

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We're live until 11 this morning.

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Today we're talking

about the so-called latte levy.

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Ministers have failed to back

a recommendation to put a 25p charge

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on takeaway coffee cups.

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Instead, they praised coffee

shops who give discounts

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to customers who bring

in their own reusable cups.

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So what is more likely to encourage

you to think about the environment

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and use less plastic?

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The carrot or the stick approach?

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We're keen to hear your views.

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Use the hashtag #VictoriaLive.

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If you text,

you will be charged

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at the standard network rate.

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Our top story today.

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President Trump has accepted

an offer from North Korea to meet

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Kim Jong-un for talks.

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The meeting will happen by May.

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No serving US president has ever met

a North Korean leader.

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The surprise announcement was made

by senior South Korean

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officials in Washington,

who passed on a letter

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from the North Korean leader.

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Our Washington correspondent

Chris Buckler has this report.

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With missiles and displays

of military might,

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North Korea has at times seemed

nothing short of defiant

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in the face of sanctions

and international condemnation

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of its nuclear programme but,

despite appearances,

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it seems Kim Jong-un wants to talk.

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South Korean officials,

who met the North Korean leader,

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say he has committed

himself to denuclearisation

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and they have now delivered

a message from Kim Jong-un that

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caught many in the White House

completely off guard.

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Kim pledged that North Korea

will refrain from any further

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nuclear or missile tests.

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He understands that the routine

joint military exercises

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between the Republic of Korea

and the United States must continue.

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And he expressed his eagerness

to meet President Trump

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as soon as possible.

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The idea of a face-to-face meeting

between President Trump

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and Kim Jong-un, by May,

seems remarkable,

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given the months of insults

and threats hurled between them.

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They will be met with fire and fury.

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Rocket Man is on a suicide

mission for himself.

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But the tone has now changed.

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On Twitter, Donald Trump said that

great progress was being made

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but that sanctions will remain

until an agreement is reached.

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However, that meeting

is being planned.

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Some in the White House

will urge cautious

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and there will be no suspension

of the joint military exercises

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involving the United States

and South Korea.

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This may be a move away

from fire and fury,

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perhaps even towards friendship but,

in the long-term, that will depend

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on whether that message

coming from Pyongyang

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proves to be one of

propaganda or progress.

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Chris Buckler, BBc News, Washington.

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Our correspondent

Robin Brant is in Seoul.

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We can't underestimate the

significance of this meeting.

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It looks like it will be before the

end of May. This is huge, no sitting

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US president has met with a North

Korean leader before. It is

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completely unprecedented, we don't

know when it exactly where.

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know when it exactly where. It may

be in the demilitarised zone, on the

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border between the North. President

Trump wanted to get their in the

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past. On the campaign trail

President Trump said he wanted to

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meet with Kim Jong-un. He has been

talking about that for some while.

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This is hugely unconventional,

usually we have talks and process

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over several years ending in a

symbolic summit and possibly an

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agreement. This is the opposite,

only a few months ago they were

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calling each other names,

annihilating the US. We have the

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prospect within weeks of a

face-to-face meeting. At the centre

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will be the prospect of

denuclearisation which is what the

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south wants. It is pretty much what

everyone wants for this peninsular.

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Sorry, Cleary the line is not clear.

We will talk about this more after

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10am.

The

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Annita McVeigh is in

the BBC Newsroom

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The Newsroom

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with a summary of the rest

of the days news.

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Pressure is growing

on counter-terror officers

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to identify the source of a nerve

agent used in the attempted murder

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of a former Russian spy

and his daughter in Salisbury.

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The Home Secretary

Amber Rudd has visited

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Salisbury this morning,

where she's been speaking

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to police about the case.

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State media in Russia has

reacted angrily to any

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suggestion that the Kremlin

could be responsible.

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Andy Moore reports.

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In a sign of how extensive

this inquiry has become,

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police cordoned off and set a guard

over the grave of Sergei Skripal's

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wife, in Salisbury.

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And nearby, in the same cemetery,

a similar police presence

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at the spot where his son's

ashes are interned.

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Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey

was one of the first to help

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the Skripals, as they

fought for their lives.

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He is said to be in a serious

condition but recovering.

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He is a great character,

he is a huge presence in Wiltshire

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Police, well liked, well loved,

massively dedicated officer.

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He is clearly receiving high

specialist treatment

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so he is well set up.

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He's not the Nick that

I know but, of course,

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he's been receiving a high

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level of treatment.

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Boris Johnson...

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In Russia, state dominated media

made fun of Boris Johnson and joked

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about what happened

to former Kremlin spies.

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"If you are a professional traitor,"

he says, "my advice -

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don't move to England.

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Something is not right there,

the climate perhaps,

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but too many bad

things go on there."

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Sergei Skripal and his daughter,

Yulia, are still critically ill.

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The BBC has been told the nerve

agent used against them was not

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sarin or VX but

something much rarer.

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The British Government says it knows

what that substance was but is not

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naming it at the moment.

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Andy Moore, BBC News.

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With us now is our

correspondent Leila Nathoo.

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did Amber Rudd make any comment when

she visited this morning?

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She is expected to speak later, she

is still in Salisbury this morning.

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She came to the scene to see the

police cordoned, at the bench still

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covered by a police tent. She met

with some local business owners and

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talked about how the community had

been affected. And with the local MP

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and the Wiltshire Police Chief

Constable.

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I believe she is talking to some of

the first responders over there, in

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Salisbury city centre. We are

expecting to hear from the Home

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Secretary later.

The focus now for police is trying

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to piece together the movements,

ascertain exactly how this nerve

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agent was delivered, administered,

when it happened and how. There was

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a flurry of activity at the home of

Sergei Skripal yesterday, police

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have set up tents, the cordoned was

widened, that seems to be by police

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activity is going on.

Thank you.

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NHS employers and health unions

are understood to be close

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to agreeing a three-year pay deal

for hundreds of thousands

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of staff in England.

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The Government has already said it

will abolish the 1%

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pay cap on public sector pay

and the Chancellor has indicated

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he will provide extra funding

to meet the higher costs.

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The United States will

impose tariffs on imports

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of aluminium and steel.

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President Trump signed

off on the move

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at the White House late yesterday.

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It's sparked fears

of a global trade war.

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The European Union is

considering retaliating

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with charges on US made jeans,

motorbikes, bourbon and oranges.

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BBC News has uncovered

allegations of bullying

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and harassment in the House

of Commons affecting

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dozens of female staff.

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Workers known as "clerks" have

told Newsnight they have

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experienced aggressive

and threatening behaviour by some

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MPs and a lack of proper redress.

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The Speaker of the House John Bercow

has strongly denied

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a claim that he bullied

a former private secretary.

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A man, who became known as the M25

rapist for carrying out

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a series of sex attacks

in the Home Counties, has died

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at Wakefield Prison in Yorkshire.

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Antoni Imiela was 63 and had

had a heart condition.

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He'd been convicted of raping eight

women and girls in 2001 and 2002.

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A teenager who attacked six moped

riders with acid in a 90-minute

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rampage across London

is being sentenced later.

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17-year-old Derryck John

from Croydon admitted targeting

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the riders in north and east London

in July last year.

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He sprayed them in the face

with a noxious liquid and stole two

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mopeds before trying

to take another four.

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Police said one attack

had left a rider with

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"life-changing injuries".

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A proposal to impose a so-called

latte levy on throwaway

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coffee cups has been rejected

by the government.

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MPs on the Environmental Audit

Committee had suggested a charge

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of 25p for disposable coffee cups

to reduce their use.

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But ministers say it is better

for shops to offer voluntary

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discounts to customers

bringing their own cups.

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Roger Harrabin reports.

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What do you do with your used cup?

Should you throw it in the rubbish

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or recycle it? MPs on the

environmental audit can it eats

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steak coffee shops should be charged

25p for every cup they sell that

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cannot be fully recycled. The

Government does not like the idea.

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Ministers say they are not convinced

the recycling industry can handle

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supposedly recyclable cups that are

covered in cold cappuccino froth.

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They said it is better for shops to

offer discounts to people bringing

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their own monks.

We need a variety of solutions. It

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is great to see retailers starting

to take action but that should not

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be at the expense of the Government

also showing leadership.

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The MPs say this suggests the

Government is not serious about

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tackling the problem of waste.

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That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

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More at 9.30.

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Do get in touch with us

throughout the morning.

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Lots of you on the latte levy. One

saying, I use plastic cups because

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they are more hygienic.

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they are more hygienic. Pat says,

not taxing cups shows the Government

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is not only playing its service to

environmental issues, more people

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bring their own if they had to pick

extra, like bags. Lots of you

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getting in touch.

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Use the hashtag #VictoriaLive.

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If you text, you will be charged

at the standard network rate.

0:13:340:13:37

Let's get some sport.

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Good morning. I cannot believe the

Winter Paralympics Opening Ceremony

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is today.

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The largest ever Winter Paralympics

will officially kick off today

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with the opening

ceremony in Pyeongchang.

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A record 567 athletes from 48

countries, plus of course

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the Neutral Paralympic Athlete

delegation which includes around

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30 Russian athletes

will be taking part.

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There will be

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80 medals awarded in six sports,

alpine skiing, snowboarding,

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para-ice hockey, wheelchair curling,

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cross-country skiing.

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And biathlon where

Scott Meenagh will be

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the first British athlete to compete

in a nordic skiing event

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at a Paralympics for 20 years.

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So a small slice of history for him.

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The ceremony starts at 11 o'clock

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this morning.

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With snowboarder Owen Pick selected

as flagbearer at his first Games,

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eight years after losing a leg

in a Taliban blast while serving for

0:14:330:14:36

the British Army in Afghanistan.

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He says it's an honour to represent

the flag he served under

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while in the military but actually

thought he was getting

0:14:460:14:48

in trouble just before he was told.

0:14:480:14:53

A moment for his parents to be proud

of.

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Now, the action gets underway

in the early hours of tomorrow

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morning.

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But when it does begin

we're hoping for more

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scenes like this.

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When Kelly Gallgher won super-G gold

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with guide Charlotte Evans

in Sochi four years ago.

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She's got a new guide this time

around but will still hope

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to contribute to a rather ambitious

medal target for Paralympics GB.

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They want to win between six

and 12 medals, with a goal

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of at least seven.

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If they can do that, it would be

their second-highest medal haul

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and best showing since

Innsbruck, back in 1984.

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Everything about the team excites

me, whether it be returning para

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Olympians looking to recreate their

medal success or create it, the

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youngsters, Milly and James, who are

teenagers in Sochi. I'm sure they

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are looking to improve on those. But

the fact we are represented in five

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sports for the first time and the

Alpine skiing and curling, the

0:15:530:15:59

mainstays, but snowboard and Nordic

as well.

0:15:590:16:02

Briscoe went on to say that

increased investment is linked

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to performance and so extra funding

should mean the medals do

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flow - fingers crossed.

0:16:070:16:14

Really inspiring staff and another

inspirational woman, as if she

0:16:140:16:17

hasn't done enough in is credible

stuff in her career, she gets back

0:16:170:16:20

on the court six months after a

baby.

0:16:200:16:27

Good argument she is greatest

sportsperson of all time.

0:16:280:16:30

Serena Williams won her first

singles match on the WTA Tour

0:16:300:16:33

for nearly 14 months as she returned

after the birth of her child.

0:16:330:16:36

She's back at the age of 36,

clearly showing that

0:16:360:16:40

number is irrelevant,

as -he's reached the second

0:16:400:16:42

round at Indian Wells

with a straight sets victory over

0:16:420:16:45

Kazakhstan's Zarina Diyas.

0:16:450:16:49

It was her first singles

match on the Tour

0:16:490:16:51

since she winning the 2017

Australian Open while pregnant.

0:16:510:16:55

Afterwards the 23-time Grand Slam

singles champion said,

0:16:550:17:00

"I'm a little rusty

but it doesn't matter".

0:17:000:17:02

I'd imagine

0:17:020:17:04

she will have a big year ahead

despite her time off.

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A teenager is to be sentenced this

morning after pleading guilty

0:17:070:17:10

to carrying out acid attacks

on six moped riders.

0:17:100:17:12

Derryck John had been trying

to steal his victims' bikes

0:17:120:17:14

in the 90-minute rampage

across London in July of last year.

0:17:140:17:17

The 17-year-old from Croydon,

was convicted of throwing

0:17:170:17:22

a corrosive liquid with intent

to disable, burn, maim, disfigure

0:17:220:17:25

or cause grievous bodily harm -

a crime which, for an adult,

0:17:250:17:28

can lead to life imprisonment.

0:17:280:17:35

Let's talk now to Jabed Hussain.

0:17:350:17:36

He was one of Derryck

John's victims.

0:17:360:17:39

Thank you for coming in and talking

to us. I can't imagine how difficult

0:17:390:17:43

it is to relive this and a difficult

day, clearly. Tell me what you

0:17:430:17:49

remember of the night of the attack.

Thank you for having me here.

0:17:490:17:58

Basically I do remember most of it.

When he threw acid on me.

Where were

0:17:580:18:07

you?

I was on the Hackney Road.

You

were a delivery driver on your

0:18:070:18:14

scooter?

I was finishing my work.

Were you stopped at the time?

I was

0:18:140:18:19

at a traffic light.

What happened?

I

was looking for the easiest way to

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go home and I stopped at a traffic

light and I heard the sound of water

0:18:250:18:30

on my left hand side. Then I

realised something was wrong, very

0:18:300:18:35

wrong. I looked to the left and I

saw two boys on the motorbike,

0:18:350:18:41

literally next to me and I never

realised they were next to me. They

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were trying to do it again and were

trying to get me off my bike.

You

0:18:490:18:55

had your helmet on, luckily, and I

presume that helped save you from a

0:18:550:19:00

lot of the potential burns.

That's

right. I had a helmet on and it

0:19:000:19:05

saved my face.

What did the acid due

to the helmet?

It was melted.

0:19:050:19:09

Melted?

Yes.

What point did you

realise what was happening because

0:19:090:19:15

it clearly happened very fast.

I was

not prepared for that. I never

0:19:150:19:22

thought I would be the victim of an

acid attack or somebody would throw

0:19:220:19:25

acid on me or into my face. I never

thought I would be targeted, so I

0:19:250:19:32

was not prepared and I didn't know

what to do. I was asking for water

0:19:320:19:40

because it was getting dry and

worse. I was going to the doors and

0:19:400:19:47

asking for water.

Did anybody stop

to help you?

One of the ladies was

0:19:470:19:54

walking past, she was getting the

water from the shops.

Could you feel

0:19:540:19:58

the acid on your skin at this point?

Not at that moment, but I knew it

0:19:580:20:03

was something and then they were

doing further checks and going to

0:20:030:20:08

the hospital as well.

So, lasting

damage from swallowing some of it?

0:20:080:20:15

What has that meant for you

health-wise, the impact of

0:20:150:20:18

swallowing acid?

Severe chest pain

which has never happened to me

0:20:180:20:22

before. And a breathing problem

sometime, it's not normal, it's

0:20:220:20:31

totally different than before after

the incident.

So where did you

0:20:310:20:35

suffer burns?

On my left hand side.

I have recovered now there, anyway.

0:20:350:20:45

Did you find it difficult to look in

the mirror the first time after the

0:20:450:20:50

attack? Was it something that

troubled you?

I've thought I had

0:20:500:20:56

lost my face unless I saw it in the

mirror, I never thought I would get

0:20:560:21:00

my face back. Everybody is saying

that you are OK, and I thought that

0:21:000:21:07

they were trying to make me happy,

but when I saw my face, then I

0:21:070:21:13

realised, and I saw the other guy in

hospital, with the same issues I was

0:21:130:21:18

better than him.

Someone else who

had also been attacked was at the

0:21:180:21:23

same hospital question might yes, on

the same night.

0:21:230:21:25

So what effect does it have on you

now, moving on? Less than one year

0:21:270:21:32

after the attack. Do you feel able

to go out by yourself?

When I tried

0:21:320:21:43

to go myself, I always look right

and left when I go to the car. I

0:21:430:21:48

always look right and left and I

locked the doors and windows inside

0:21:480:21:52

the car. If anybody comes to my

house without giving me a call.

0:21:520:22:04

house without giving me a call. That

has never happened to me before. My

0:22:040:22:08

wife was telling me not to speak out

because I might be targeted what she

0:22:080:22:16

worried that you could be targeted

again? This is what she thinks, I

0:22:160:22:20

might be targeted because I am

speaking up. And I am doing a

0:22:200:22:24

campaign against it and doing to go

to every college and speak to the

0:22:240:22:31

use and invite them to talk to us

for a flexible job and also trying

0:22:310:22:35

to keep them free training and

equipment to start the flexible job

0:22:350:22:42

after school.

So do you think it's

because young people don't have

0:22:420:22:48

opportunities that they are getting

sucked into this kind of world?

0:22:480:22:53

Exactly. The government should look

after the use and provide them with

0:22:530:22:56

another youth clubs. And instead of

sending them to jail we should and

0:22:560:23:05

provide them with a youth club. I am

going to the

0:23:050:23:12

going to the colleges and I am

trying to help them make some money

0:23:130:23:17

as well.

Have you been able to work

and go out on your mobile again?

0:23:170:23:22

After the incident I have not been

back to work again.

Do you feel able

0:23:220:23:27

to work?

I would love to go back to

work. I would love to get back to

0:23:270:23:34

work but I need to see it's really

good money and a flexible job and I

0:23:340:23:43

am my own boss and I can start work

whenever I want. And I can finish

0:23:430:23:50

and I can drop my daughter at

school, so I love that job anyway.

0:23:500:23:58

So, today, the teenager, the

17-year-old who threw acid at you

0:23:580:24:03

and other people, five other people,

he is going to be sentenced today.

0:24:030:24:09

For you, what sentence do you want

to see? As we said in the

0:24:090:24:12

introduction this could be life

imprisonment if he was an adult, but

0:24:120:24:16

he is 17 years old.

0:24:160:24:22

he is 17 years old.

When you cannot

get some experience from the country

0:24:220:24:30

-- when you look at the experience

and the country I was born, that was

0:24:300:24:33

the highest level of acid attack in

the world, and the ex-prime

0:24:330:24:39

Minister, she made an act in 2002,

which was buying and selling

0:24:390:24:46

restriction, a life sentence for

acid attackers, and if anybody buys

0:24:460:24:50

without any ID or any body without

ID, they would be in jail for a long

0:24:500:24:56

time. And even a life sentence. She

handled it like that.

So you think

0:24:560:25:04

there should be life sentences for

anyone, irrespective of age, if they

0:25:040:25:08

carry out an acid attack?

If it's

not a life sentence it should be

0:25:080:25:12

similar. Something similar to that.

I would like to know that if I did

0:25:120:25:19

this kind of crime might be in jail

for a long time.

I really didn't

0:25:190:25:25

appreciate the damage that would be

done, said Derryck John, and I'm

0:25:250:25:30

terrified of the sentence and I'm

very sorry for what I did and I

0:25:300:25:34

realised I will receive a

significant sentence of

0:25:340:25:36

imprisonment. Does it help to know

he is remorseful?

I think he

0:25:360:25:40

realises that now. And like I said,

I respect his age but he did this to

0:25:400:25:54

five of them, not just me. If he

would have come to me and said he

0:25:540:25:58

would sort this himself I would say,

I'm sorry, if you say sorry, I would

0:25:580:26:03

have let him go and he's like that

now but he was young and he did not

0:26:030:26:10

know what he had done, but five of

them so if five of them, if you come

0:26:100:26:19

and work with us or you go back to

normal do something good, then we

0:26:190:26:22

would forgive you, but I don't think

everybody would forgive him because

0:26:220:26:28

he tried to damage five lives, five

faces. So if we just let him go,

0:26:280:26:34

others might do that kind of crime

against.

One final point. The

0:26:340:26:40

government is proposing stricter

controls on the sales of acid. Do

0:26:400:26:42

you think it goes far enough to

protect people from further attacks.

0:26:420:26:48

The 1972 act, that gives a chance to

criminals to carry acid for a second

0:26:480:26:57

time, and they would go to prison

for carrying acid, so they are

0:26:570:27:03

carrying it for a reason. He is a

criminal carrying a weapon is, so it

0:27:030:27:09

should be prison for more than that.

You need a stronger deterrent.

Yes.

0:27:090:27:16

I know the government are trying to

do they best they can do, to try and

0:27:160:27:24

do the tougher sentences for

carrying

0:27:240:27:30

carrying acid, like the former Prime

Minister who was in prison, because

0:27:310:27:34

they want to keep her away from the

election. I am doing a campaign for

0:27:340:27:38

her release. She was the first lady

to make that act in the word.

Jabed,

0:27:380:27:42

thank you for coming in and I'm very

grateful to you.

0:27:420:27:46

A Home Office

spokesperson said this.

0:27:460:27:47

Perpetrators of corrosive

0:27:470:27:48

attacks can already face up to life

imprisonment on conviction

0:27:480:27:51

and the Sentencing Council has

published a new guideline

0:27:510:27:53

on possession of bladed articles

and offensive weapons that

0:27:530:27:55

recognises these substances

as serious and highly

0:27:550:27:57

dangerous weapons.

0:27:570:28:01

The Home Secretary announced

in July 2017 an action plan

0:28:010:28:05

to tackle the use of corrosive

substances in violent attacks

0:28:050:28:08

and we are making good progress

on implementing this.

0:28:080:28:12

We

have put in place a set of voluntary

0:28:120:28:14

commitments with retailers

0:28:140:28:15

to restrict access to the most

harmful corrosive products.

0:28:150:28:21

More than a million NHS

staff, including nurses

0:28:210:28:23

could be in line for a pay rise.

0:28:230:28:25

NHS chiefs and health unions

in England are understood

0:28:250:28:27

to be close to agreeing

a three-year pay deal.

0:28:270:28:34

The Government has already said it

would scrap the 1% cap

0:28:340:28:36

on public sector pay.

0:28:360:28:38

Anisa Kadri has been looking

at this in more detail.

0:28:380:28:40

What more can you tell us

about this pay deal?

0:28:400:28:47

This is an update on the talks that

have been going on between NHS

0:28:470:28:52

chiefs and health unions. You will

have seen the headlines about nurses

0:28:520:28:55

leaving the NHS and the Department

of Health is said to be very

0:28:550:28:59

concerned about recruitment problems

so it is hoped that any pay deal

0:28:590:29:04

struck will retain staff. What the

unions want is a pay deal so their

0:29:040:29:08

pay rises above the 1% public sector

pay cap put in place by the

0:29:080:29:12

government. The government says it

will get rid of the cap and what we

0:29:120:29:16

know is that a deal for staff, not

including doctors and dentists, that

0:29:160:29:22

deal is not far off.

Any idea of the

specifics?

Reports of a 6.5 pay

0:29:220:29:28

increase over three years in return

for NHS staff losing a day of

0:29:280:29:34

holiday, they are said to be

premature, but we do know that back

0:29:340:29:39

in September unions wrote to the

government to demand a pay rise of

0:29:390:29:44

nearly 4% and they said, when you

take into account the speed at which

0:29:440:29:48

prizes -- prices are rising, they

had suffered a pay cut. And any

0:29:480:29:53

agreement struck on this will lead

the final approval from ministers.

0:29:530:29:57

Thank you for coming to explain

that.

0:29:570:29:58

Still to come.

0:30:010:30:01

We've the latest from

the Syrian enclave

0:30:010:30:04

of Eastern Ghouta and with

the situation getting ever

0:30:040:30:07

more desperate there we'll hear

from those on the ground

0:30:070:30:09

caught up in the conflict.

0:30:090:30:10

And it's farewell to

what was once Britain's

0:30:100:30:12

biggest music magazine.

0:30:120:30:15

The NME will now only

be available online.

0:30:150:30:17

We'll be talking about this

0:30:170:30:21

with lead singer of

The Vaccines Justin Young.

0:30:210:30:23

They first appeared on the NME's

famous front cover back in 2011.

0:30:230:30:31

Time for the latest news.

0:30:310:30:33

Here's Annita McVeigh

0:30:330:30:34

The BBC News headlines this morning.

0:30:340:30:35

President Trump has

accepted an offer

0:30:350:30:37

to meet North Korean leader

Kim Jong-un for talks.

0:30:370:30:40

The first ever meeting

between a serving American president

0:30:400:30:42

and a North Korean leader

will happen by May.

0:30:420:30:47

The shock announcement was made

by senior South Korean officials

0:30:470:30:50

in Washington after months

of heightened diplomatic tensions

0:30:500:30:52

between the two countries.

0:30:520:30:57

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un

said he is committed

0:30:570:30:59

to denuclearisation.

0:30:590:31:02

Kim pledged that North Korea

will refrain from any further

0:31:020:31:04

nuclear or missile tests.

0:31:040:31:12

He understands that the routine

joint military exercises

0:31:130:31:17

between the Republic of Korea

and the United States must continue.

0:31:170:31:21

And he expressed his eagerness

to meet President Trump

0:31:210:31:23

as soon as possible.

0:31:230:31:29

Pressure is growing

on counter-terror officers

0:31:290:31:32

to identify the source of a nerve

agent used in the attempted

0:31:320:31:35

murder of a former Russian

spy and his daughter.

0:31:350:31:37

The Home Secretary

Amber Rudd has visited

0:31:370:31:39

Salisbury this morning,

where she's been speaking

0:31:390:31:41

to police about the case.

0:31:410:31:42

State media in Russia has

reacted angrily to any

0:31:420:31:44

suggestion that the Kremlin

could be responsible.

0:31:440:31:52

Aid agencies say a convoy has

arrived in eastern scooter. Carrying

0:31:520:31:57

aid they were prevented from

delivering in the week. -- Ghouta.

0:31:570:32:06

NHS employers and health unions

are understood to be close

0:32:060:32:12

to agreeing a three-year pay deal

for hundreds of thousands

0:32:120:32:17

of staff in England.

0:32:170:32:18

The Government has already said it

will abolish the 1%

0:32:180:32:20

pay cap on public sector pay

and the Chancellor has indicated

0:32:200:32:23

he will provide extra funding

to meet the higher costs.

0:32:230:32:31

The US will impose tariffs on

imports of aluminium and steel. The

0:32:340:32:40

EU is considering retaliating.

0:32:400:32:44

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

0:32:440:32:48

Here's some sport now.

0:32:480:32:52

We're only around an hour and a half

away from opening ceremony

0:32:520:32:55

at the Winter Paralympics.

0:32:550:32:57

Snowboarder Owen Pick

will be Great Britain's

0:32:570:33:00

flag-bearer in Pyeongchang

where a record 567 athletes,

0:33:000:33:04

from 48 countries, will take

part in 80 medal events.

0:33:040:33:09

Arsenal put their recent

problems to one side,

0:33:090:33:12

with a 2-0 victory over AC Milan

in the last 16 of the Europa League.

0:33:120:33:18

Goals from Henrik Mkhitaryan

and Aaron Ramsey put

0:33:180:33:20

Arsene Wenger's side in control

of the tie, with

0:33:200:33:22

the home leg to come.

0:33:220:33:23

Serena Williams had a winning

comeback on the WTA Tour just six

0:33:230:33:26

months after giving birth

to her first child.

0:33:260:33:28

She's into the second

round at Indian Wells thanks

0:33:280:33:30

to a straight sets victory over

Zarina Diyas.

0:33:300:33:34

It's a critical weekend

in the Six Nations, with Ireland

0:33:340:33:39

unbeaten and at

the top of the table.

0:33:390:33:41

They take on Scotland in Dublin.

0:33:410:33:42

A bonus point victory could give

them the title and deny

0:33:420:33:45

England their third Championship

in a row.

0:33:450:33:51

There are reports of air strikes

have hit eastern booster just as an

0:33:530:34:01

aid convoy finally got into the

area. Aid agencies have been

0:34:010:34:04

struggling to get supplies in. A

convoy which had to turn back this

0:34:040:34:08

week this morning crossed the front

line. Medecins Sans Frontieres says

0:34:080:34:13

more than 1000 have been killed

since an escalation in violence

0:34:130:34:20

started three weeks ago. The area

had previously been held by force as

0:34:200:34:24

opposed to the Government of

President Assad.

0:34:240:34:29

Let's talk to Joelle Bassoul

from Care International

0:34:290:34:30

which is working with Syrian aid

organisations in Eastern Ghouta.

0:34:300:34:37

Dr Rim Turkmani from

the London School of Economics,

0:34:370:34:39

who is Syrian and has

friends in Eastern Ghouta.

0:34:390:34:43

And Ahmad Khansour who is

living in Eastern Ghouta.

0:34:430:34:46

His house was destroyed

in a bomb attack.

0:34:460:34:52

Thank you all the talking to us. I

want to get a sense of the scale of

0:34:520:34:58

what is happening. For UK viewers it

is difficult to comprehend what is

0:34:580:35:04

happening in eastern scooter, give

us a sense of what life is like that

0:35:040:35:07

now?

It is a pleasure to spend Friday

0:35:070:35:14

morning addressing this situation.

But not under the bombardment around

0:35:140:35:20

me.

0:35:200:35:24

me. Almost 1000 people have died and

over 3000 are injured. The situation

0:35:240:35:30

here is deteriorating rapidly.

Yesterday, 35 cases of

0:35:300:35:45

sophistication -- suffocation after

we were targeted with toxic gases.

0:35:450:35:55

People are terrified.

It is a confusing situation because

0:36:000:36:11

so many civilians are dying. You are

telling us what you have witnessed

0:36:110:36:16

but there are unconfirmed reports

about chlorine gas. Tell me about

0:36:160:36:23

your home, I know it was bombed last

week. Tell us what happened and how

0:36:230:36:27

you managed to get yourself and your

family out?

0:36:270:36:31

Myself, my family, more than 50,000

people are displaced internally

0:36:310:36:39

inside eastern Gutha.

0:36:390:36:44

inside eastern Gutha. We have been

targeted by bombardment, artillery,

0:36:460:36:48

weapons.

0:36:480:36:53

weapons. Right now, I am living with

a relative in their house. My family

0:36:590:37:10

are in their basement. It is a

nightmare. Including everything that

0:37:100:37:17

has happened, the moment of being

targeted, and our journey from that

0:37:170:37:24

place to this safer place.

You were in your home when it was

0:37:240:37:31

bombed?

Yes, me, my wife, two kids were at

0:37:310:37:35

my home.

0:37:350:37:41

my home. A regime helicopter made a

bombardment. Everything was

0:37:410:37:48

destroyed. We could not see for over

three minutes, we could not hear

0:37:480:37:55

anything for maybe five minutes.

Things became clearer and it was a

0:37:550:38:04

nightmare.

You have very small children, three

0:38:040:38:08

years old and one-year-old, are they

OK?

0:38:080:38:12

Luckily they are OK. The other 200

children in Eastern Ghouta are not

0:38:120:38:19

because they are dead. 1000 people

have died in Eastern Ghouta, more

0:38:190:38:25

than 200 of them are children, many

are women, they are not OK.

0:38:250:38:30

As I speak I can hear noises, is

that a bombardment, bombs falling

0:38:300:38:36

right now?

Exactly, bombardments, air strikes.

0:38:360:38:41

That is an air strike. They never

stop since the morning. In fact they

0:38:410:38:46

never stop even at night, for the

last 18 days.

0:38:460:38:52

Stay safe. If you have to go at any

point, your safety is far more

0:38:520:38:56

important.

I want to bring in our other guests.

0:38:560:39:01

You have friends in Eastern Ghouta,

are they telling you similar

0:39:010:39:05

stories?

Very similar. They talk about what

0:39:050:39:10

we don't see in the media, 400,000

people, roughly the size of

0:39:100:39:15

Leicester or Coventry, who don't

want to spend their lives in

0:39:150:39:22

basements, they want to send their

children to school, have an ordinary

0:39:220:39:28

life. But they don't want to be

arrested or killed because they are

0:39:280:39:31

voicing an opposition point of view.

Let us talk about the significance

0:39:310:39:35

of this aid getting through and

bombardments as aid goes in. A lot

0:39:350:39:42

of aid is not getting in. Do we know

where this aid goes to?

0:39:420:39:51

What are you hearing? There was a

convoy of 46 trucks if you days ago

0:39:510:39:56

and nine were not able to unload

because of the security situation.

0:39:560:40:03

They had to put out. They were not

allowed yesterday. Today there was a

0:40:030:40:08

window where they went in. They are

distributed wherever they can, there

0:40:080:40:14

is a distribution point in Duma, and

where there is a big enough storage

0:40:140:40:19

space. I have to say, this is not

enough. This is extremely important.

0:40:190:40:29

We do not need just one or two

convoys, we need to open

0:40:290:40:35

humanitarian corridors, this

population is living under extremely

0:40:350:40:39

harsh conditions. It should be

normal food is delivered and medical

0:40:390:40:48

equipment, not the exception.

Humanitarian corridors are opening

0:40:480:40:50

but no one is using them.

What are you hearing about the aid

0:40:500:40:56

getting into Eastern Ghouta today?

We need to put things into

0:40:560:41:01

perspective about aid. There are

400,000 people living in Eastern

0:41:010:41:07

Ghouta. The convoy on Monday was

enough for 20 7000. Even this number

0:41:070:41:16

was not reached completely because

not everything was delivered. The

0:41:160:41:20

rest of the convoy getting into day,

the people on the ground, delivery

0:41:200:41:24

is difficult. They go towards mass

population movements. The aid is

0:41:240:41:33

being targeted by air strikes.

Humanitarian workers on the ground

0:41:330:41:38

are how to distribute the aid

without putting civilians at risk.

0:41:380:41:42

Do people trust the Syrian

Government when it says there are

0:41:420:41:49

humanitarian corridors the people to

leave Eastern Ghouta, or we will

0:41:490:41:53

allow aid to get in and it is safe

view to get that, do people trust

0:41:530:41:57

the Syrian Government?

It is exactly the opposite. You can

0:41:570:42:02

see the result of what is happening

by watching that nobody has ever

0:42:020:42:09

left. People are left with two

choices, either being dead under

0:42:090:42:15

bombardment, locked in their

shelter, or go out through this

0:42:150:42:20

so-called humanitarian corridor.

There aren't other two corridors,

0:42:200:42:27

and if we can trust the regime, you

would see thousands of people try to

0:42:270:42:32

get out. In fact, only 500 people to

be honest have got a lot of

0:42:320:42:38

Easterner Gunter. Ever since they

have left, no one has heard anything

0:42:380:42:45

about them.

0:42:450:42:50

about them.

Do you believe the

Syrian regime wants people to leave

0:42:540:43:00

eastern hooter? -- eastern hooter?

-- Ghouta.

0:43:000:43:10

People should not be forced out of

their land, why should they be asked

0:43:100:43:14

to leave? Why evacuate an entire

city? It is their right to stay.

0:43:140:43:21

Those leaving because they have no

choice, they don't want their

0:43:210:43:25

children to be killed, it is a

forced displacement. We don't talk

0:43:250:43:31

about geopolitics. These people want

a normal life. Not just the Syrian

0:43:310:43:37

regime but there is Russia and other

countries involved. There is a clear

0:43:370:43:42

bargain here between Turkey and

Russia are where there are huge

0:43:420:43:49

operations going on where Turkey is

taking a blind eye. They are going

0:43:490:43:56

hand in hand. You have so many

actors in Syria, a multiplicity of

0:43:560:44:03

actors, and everyone is allowing the

other to do what it wants so they

0:44:030:44:07

turn a blind eye so they turn a

blind eye in another corner in

0:44:070:44:11

Syria.

0:44:110:44:20

Syria. This is the disgraceful Bagan

going on. This is teaching the

0:44:200:44:26

entire world global security doesn't

work. The Security Council is unable

0:44:260:44:33

to provide security, once two

countries are inside Syria, there is

0:44:330:44:37

no way we can get the country secure

again.

0:44:370:44:40

Give us a sense of what is available

for people inside of Easterner

0:44:400:44:48

Gunter when we talk about hospitals,

medical supplies,. -- Ghouta.

0:44:480:44:56

The people on the ground paint a

humane picture. There is very little

0:44:560:45:04

food left. The few shops that had

stops before the latest offensive

0:45:040:45:09

started selling at a very high price

when it is available.

0:45:090:45:17

To have something to eat, small

children are relying on plants mixed

0:45:200:45:29

with grains because there is no

wheat flour available. We have to

0:45:290:45:33

think of this as being on the

outskirts of Damascus, the price of

0:45:330:45:39

sugar is ten times higher. People

are going without food. Just one

0:45:390:45:48

meal a day where it is available.

Things like meat are a luxury now.

0:45:480:45:59

Ahmed, have you ever contemplated

leaving the city?

0:46:010:46:07

leaving the city?

There is some

misconception about leaving the city

0:46:080:46:12

when the regime offer it to the

civilians. You would think anybody

0:46:120:46:15

would think that it is safe and you

could leave the city and come back

0:46:150:46:19

to it whenever I want. First of all,

if I leave the city I know I will

0:46:190:46:26

never come back. We have seen what

happened in the other city who have

0:46:260:46:31

been displaced maybe a couple of

years ago, and nobody has ever come

0:46:310:46:38

back yet. And it seems nobody will

come back from now on. In many

0:46:380:46:50

cities all around Syria this is

happening. As my friend said, it is

0:46:500:46:54

systematic displacement, enforced

displacement against the UN

0:46:540:47:01

constitution. It is against the

humanity values. It is just wrong.

0:47:010:47:06

For myself, I know that if I tried

to leave eastern Ghouta, I will be

0:47:060:47:14

detained, the same as 400,000

civilians here. The regime may not

0:47:140:47:19

arrest 400,000 people, but while we

are speaking the regime has

0:47:190:47:25

detainees of something between

250,000 and 400,000 people, in the

0:47:250:47:35

prisons, which are called

slaughterhouses by many reports,

0:47:350:47:39

including international reports. So

the regime right now is trying to

0:47:390:47:45

take revenge on anybody who has ever

said anything about the dictator who

0:47:450:47:50

should step down from his position.

Clearly, Ahmed, you do not trust

0:47:500:48:00

President Assad. Thank you so much,

all of you, for speaking to us, but

0:48:000:48:05

particularly you, Ahmed, keep your

family safe and thank you so much.

0:48:050:48:09

You could hear bombardments in the

background in eastern Ghouta, just

0:48:090:48:13

behind Ahmed speaking to us.

0:48:130:48:16

Coming up.

0:48:160:48:19

It could hardly be

thought possible given

0:48:190:48:21

all the rhetoric but there are to be

high level talks between

0:48:210:48:23

President Trump and Kim Jong-un,

the North Korean leader.

0:48:230:48:25

But how significant is this

and what could be achieved?

0:48:250:48:28

Amy Winehouse.

0:48:280:48:29

David Bowie.

0:48:290:48:30

The Arctic Monkeys.

0:48:300:48:31

The Clash.

0:48:310:48:32

Rihanna.

0:48:320:48:34

These are just some of the many

stars who've appeared on the front

0:48:340:48:37

cover of the NME magazine

during its 66-year reign.

0:48:370:48:39

Its final edition has

been published today.

0:48:390:48:43

Jamaican rapper and singer

Stefflon says she's honoured

0:48:430:48:45

to be its last cover star.

0:48:450:48:50

There's no reference that

it's the final issue

0:48:500:48:52

because it went to press on Tuesday

and staff were only told

0:48:520:48:55

the news on Wednesday.

0:48:550:48:56

Bosses say the reason the magazine's

come to an end is because it's "no

0:48:560:48:59

longer financially viable"

and its team will now focus

0:48:590:49:02

on the brand's digital platforms.

0:49:020:49:04

Well, joining us now is lead singer

of The Vaccines, Justin Young.

0:49:040:49:08

The Vaccines have

appeared on the front

0:49:080:49:11

cover of NME many times.

0:49:110:49:15

Also here, former editor

of NME.com, Greg Cochrane.

0:49:150:49:17

And music journalist Laura Snapes.

0:49:170:49:21

Thank you all for coming in this

morning.

0:49:210:49:27

Before you were in a band,

what were your thoughts of NME?

0:49:270:49:30

Did you get hold of it I get excited

by it?

When I could. I grew up in

0:49:300:49:36

the mill of nowhere with a corner

shop 20 minutes walk away. And I

0:49:360:49:40

would walk down and there would be

maybe Q magazine, and then once a

0:49:400:49:46

month may be a NME. And then when I

got it it became my Bible. It

0:49:460:49:51

informed me and educated me not just

in music, but culture and import --

0:49:510:49:56

politics.

Incredibly important to

me. I use add that it is going? It

0:49:560:50:00

is just going digital. -- are you

sad that it is going?

It is not

0:50:000:50:06

being the same since it went three

and was less focused on music. It is

0:50:060:50:11

sad. I am a nostalgic person, but

that is what most print press faces

0:50:110:50:16

now. I think streaming culture is a

big thing to mention. Music is so

0:50:160:50:23

accessible instantly that the public

have become the critical voice in a

0:50:230:50:28

way that may be NME was 30 years

ago.

Would you agree with that?

It's

0:50:280:50:36

still important to have that middle

person, that voice to rate that

0:50:360:50:42

space. Justin is right that there is

an enormous amount of music out

0:50:420:50:44

there and it's more accessible than

ever. But I still think having a

0:50:440:50:49

critical voice and pointing people

in the direction of new music is

0:50:490:50:52

important which is why there has

been huge success on the digital

0:50:520:50:57

side for NME and they are reaching a

greater number of people than ever.

0:50:570:51:01

So just because the magazine is

going it doesn't mean they don't

0:51:010:51:04

still have an important place in

that arena.

They can do it digitally

0:51:040:51:10

rather than a magazine?

I'm not sure

if they can. The brilliant thing

0:51:100:51:14

about a magazine which online has

failed to replicate, not just NME,

0:51:140:51:20

in the great dales of the NME, it

felt like a clubhouse, there were a

0:51:200:51:27

recurring jokes on the artist felt

like a revolving cards -- type of

0:51:270:51:30

people. The kind of content that the

website publishes is not

0:51:300:51:35

commensurate with the era defining

stuff of the past, so I'm not sure

0:51:350:51:40

if they can carry it over.

But isn't

it just the way we are going now?

0:51:400:51:45

Everybody expects to see things on

their phones and tablets and we

0:51:450:51:48

don't even read books as much any

more.

Well, I do.

I do as well. I

0:51:480:51:54

love a book. But the many people

it's having it there and being

0:51:540:51:58

accessible.

To the credit of the

NME, the final edition is being

0:51:580:52:03

printed today but the brand

survives. They have put themselves

0:52:030:52:07

in a position where despite the

print product not being part of

0:52:070:52:11

their offering any more, the office

is still open and it has not

0:52:110:52:15

disappeared and people are still

working there and that's because

0:52:150:52:19

they have transitioned to the point

where they've made a successful

0:52:190:52:21

digital business and that is to

their credit. There are other

0:52:210:52:24

well-known titles that if they were

to shock to the print offering

0:52:240:52:30

tomorrow, that would be the end, so

to their credit they have managed to

0:52:300:52:36

travel through those changing times,

if you like.

Justin, your band has

0:52:360:52:41

been in the NME and on the front

cover. What does it mean as a band

0:52:410:52:45

to be in the club that Laura talked

about, that revolving door of

0:52:450:52:50

artists?

Growing up it was a

tangible mark of success. I remember

0:52:500:52:55

being on the cover in January 2011

and it was an incredible moment in

0:52:550:53:01

any band's Korea and we were lucky

enough to be on it several times. We

0:53:010:53:05

were supposed to be on it next week.

No!

It's true. They couldn't have

0:53:050:53:14

kept it going for one week longer.

But it is an amazing thing. To me,

0:53:140:53:19

anyone on the front of the NME was a

rock star and maybe I was able to

0:53:190:53:26

say the same about myself.

It's an

amazing thing. To your family and

0:53:260:53:30

friends and people who have

supported you, they see it as a

0:53:300:53:32

milestone. It's not a pipe dream.

You have made it when you are on the

0:53:320:53:36

cover.

People can sit in their local

corner shop once a month, so yes.

0:53:360:53:43

Why do you think it lasted so long?

You are looking at five or six

0:53:430:53:47

generations that were with the NME.

What was the staying power?

There is

0:53:470:53:57

the age-old story that every

generation of reader thinks their

0:53:570:54:01

generation of bands and writers was

the best era. But I think, for every

0:54:010:54:09

generation, it is true that

generation. Admittedly for a

0:54:090:54:12

shrinking amount of people it

remained a Bastian of taste and a

0:54:120:54:18

Bible and it was incredibly

informative and entertaining.

I

0:54:180:54:22

think because music is such an

important part of peoples make up

0:54:220:54:28

and they were identified by the

music they like and I still believe

0:54:280:54:32

that, NME has been there as a best

mate everyone has taken that to

0:54:320:54:40

heart. You have to be 70 years old

to remember a time before it existed

0:54:400:54:47

in print, now. That is why people

felt very sentimental about this

0:54:470:54:51

news today because it is something

that feels very dear to people.

I

0:54:510:54:57

think there's always been a reason

for it to exist. People have wanted

0:54:570:55:01

that kind of relationship with it

and the coverage they provided there

0:55:010:55:05

are so many headlines about albums

dying and people not caring about

0:55:050:55:10

music any more but I don't think

that's true to any extent. The

0:55:100:55:14

survival is there because people do

still care.

One of your colleagues

0:55:140:55:17

at the Guardian wrote this.

Regardless of whether you thought

0:55:170:55:25

the best days involved punk, Pete

Dougherty, in the end became

0:55:250:55:29

clueless as to what it was supposed

to be doing or who it was supposed

0:55:290:55:32

before -- Pete Doherty.

I have to

agree with that. Although the free

0:55:320:55:37

publication in the last two and a

half years has been a triumph in

0:55:370:55:41

terms of publishing because they

make this advertising funded model

0:55:410:55:46

when the sales figures were about

13,000 by the end, which is pretty

0:55:460:55:49

drastic. It has been a publishing

success but I don't think it has had

0:55:490:55:54

a clue who was meant before. It was

great when they came back and they

0:55:540:56:00

had Rihanna on the cover and we

fought hard to get women and people

0:56:000:56:03

of colour on the front but we were

told they did not sell. So the

0:56:030:56:06

revival of the magazine was a chance

to right the wrongs of history and

0:56:060:56:10

people were excited but the second

cover was Chris Moyle 's, who had no

0:56:100:56:14

relevance to the audience, the

mission and was not even covered in

0:56:140:56:17

an interesting way. They asked

questions about feminism and he got

0:56:170:56:20

off the hook very quickly. And very

quickly you could see the mission

0:56:200:56:25

they had being squandered.

Justin,

do you think it lost direction?

I

0:56:250:56:30

think so and I think you got a

conference of answer there.

Why is

0:56:300:56:36

there a review in publishing

generally that women and people of

0:56:360:56:39

colour don't sell on the front of

things.

I don't understand. I wish I

0:56:390:56:43

knew. I remember when Madonna was on

the cover of a music magazine

0:56:430:56:48

monthly, their worst selling issue

ever. There might be some truth in

0:56:480:56:51

the fact that magazines are still

bought by men and it might tip

0:56:510:56:54

slightly in that favour, but I wish

I did know and I wish it wasn't that

0:56:540:56:58

way.

Thank you for coming in and it

was lovely to speak to you today.

0:56:580:57:03

Let's get the latest weather update.

0:57:030:57:04

Sarah Keith Lucas is here.

0:57:040:57:08

Hopefully the snow has gone and we

might have a warm weekend. You never

0:57:080:57:11

know. How are we looking?

0:57:110:57:13

I wouldn't describe it as warm, but

it's less cold than it has been.

0:57:160:57:20

Reasonably mild weather on the cards

in the next couple of days and it's

0:57:200:57:23

quite a chilly start to the

day-to-day but we have got blue

0:57:230:57:26

skies and sunshine and this is how

things are looking in Northumberland

0:57:260:57:31

at the moment. Not sunny everywhere

with some mist and fog patches

0:57:310:57:35

around and here is a picture sent

round by a weather watcher in

0:57:350:57:39

Warwickshire. Pretty misty and murky

and foggy. But the mist and fog is

0:57:390:57:43

lifting and clearing away. Through

today, staying largely dry, bright

0:57:430:57:48

and sunny in northern parts of the

country whereas further south we

0:57:480:57:52

have more cloud which brings further

outbreaks of rain which is pushing

0:57:520:57:56

into the south-west of England,

clouding across southern England but

0:57:560:58:00

further north a lot of sunshine for

much of the Midlands, northern

0:58:000:58:03

England, Northern Ireland and

southern Scotland. For central and

0:58:030:58:07

northern Scotland, snow showers that

should peter out over the next few

0:58:070:58:10

hours. The sunshine should reappear

across Scotland and temperatures

0:58:100:58:15

between eight up to 11 degrees. As

we head into the evening hours, the

0:58:150:58:20

patchy rain in the South will head

further north, into the Midlands,

0:58:200:58:25

Wales and into Northern Ireland as

well. Scotland overnight stays with

0:58:250:58:29

a clear and dry condition with the

northern half of Scotland so

0:58:290:58:35

temperatures below freezing and we

will see a widespread frost, but

0:58:350:58:39

further south we have further cloud,

outbreaks of rain and it's I'll

0:58:390:58:44

start to the day. Double figures to

the south-west. How is the weekend

0:58:440:58:49

shaping up? We will see outbreaks of

rain at times as things turn milder.

0:58:490:58:55

There should be some sunshine on

offer as well. We still have the

0:58:550:59:01

cold air holding across Scotland

with the blue colours on the map,

0:59:010:59:06

but that is moving in from the

south, so it's milder air spilling

0:59:060:59:10

in and it will have worked

northwards across all of the UK. For

0:59:100:59:14

Saturday, heavy rain for a time

through central England towards

0:59:140:59:18

Northern Ireland and as the rain

pushes north and bumps into the cold

0:59:180:59:21

air are likely to see a bit of hill

snow. A couple of centimetres

0:59:210:59:27

possible in the Grampians, but low

levels, falling as rain. For England

0:59:270:59:32

and Wales return to sunny spells,

still a few showers but look at the

0:59:320:59:35

temperatures. We could see 15

degrees or so on Saturday and

0:59:350:59:39

potentially the warmest day of the

year so far. Sunday should start

0:59:390:59:42

misty and foggy but a lot of dry

weather on the cards.

0:59:420:59:47

Hello, it's Friday, it's ten

o'clock, I'm Chloe Tilley.

0:59:530:59:55

Our top story.

0:59:550:59:57

Donald Trump and North

Korea's Kim Jong-un say

0:59:570:59:59

they're going to meet each other.

0:59:591:00:00

South Korea described it

as a "milestone for peace".

1:00:001:00:04

He expressed his eagerness to meet

President Trump as soon as possible.

1:00:041:00:09

President Trump appreciated this and

said he would meet Kim Jong-un by

1:00:091:00:18

May two achieve denuclearisation.

1:00:181:00:23

Not surprisingly President Trump has

taken to social media,

1:00:231:00:26

he's said that great progress had

been made but sanctions will remain

1:00:261:00:28

until an agreement is reached.

1:00:281:00:33

Ahead of Mother's Day this

Sunday we'll hear stories

1:00:331:00:35

of childbirth around the world.

1:00:351:00:42

It was always one day in the future.

I went through the two micrograms of

1:00:421:00:48

IVF and suffered very early

miscarriages.

1:00:481:00:55

We'll hear from that mum

Ellen Shepherd and her daughter

1:00:551:00:58

Alice who is now three months

old later in this hour.

1:00:581:01:00

And we'll talk to Save the Children

who are calling for action to be

1:01:001:01:03

And MPs reject calls to impose

a so-called latte levy

1:01:061:01:09

on throwaway coffee cups.

1:01:091:01:10

They say it's better for shops

1:01:101:01:11

to offer voluntary discounts

to customers bringing

1:01:111:01:13

their own cups.

1:01:131:01:14

But what do you think?

1:01:141:01:15

Get in touch in the usual ways.

1:01:151:01:17

Good morning.

1:01:231:01:24

It's ten o'clock.

1:01:241:01:26

Here's Annita McVeigh

in the BBC Newsroom

1:01:261:01:28

with a summary of today's news.

1:01:281:01:29

President Trump has

accepted an offer

1:01:291:01:32

to meet North Korean leader

Kim Jong-un for talks.

1:01:321:01:36

The first ever meeting

between a serving American president

1:01:361:01:38

and a North Korean leader

will happen by May.

1:01:381:01:41

The shock announcement was made

by senior South Korean officials

1:01:411:01:43

in Washington after months

of heightened diplomatic tensions

1:01:431:01:45

between the two countries.

1:01:451:01:46

Our Beijing correspondent

Steven McDonnell has more.

1:01:461:01:54

The response they have had at the

Chinese foreign ministry in Beijing

1:01:561:02:01

has been perhaps what you might have

expected. Beijing has after all been

1:02:011:02:06

urging Pyongyang and Washington to

sit down and talk for some time and

1:02:061:02:10

the news there might now be a

meeting between Kim Jong-un and

1:02:101:02:15

Donald Trump was naturally welcomed.

China Public argued it has done more

1:02:151:02:20

than any other country to bring

North Korea to the negotiating

1:02:201:02:24

table. Apart from voting for

sessions at the UN, as North Korea's

1:02:241:02:29

keek trading partner of the blocking

of North Korean textile, seafood,

1:02:291:02:37

coal exports, has hit that country's

impoverished economy hard. Behind

1:02:371:02:43

closed doors some Chinese diplomats

will be urging caution. Remember

1:02:431:02:48

this country hosted the failed six

party talks. At the last minute when

1:02:481:02:53

it seemed a deal had been done the

full North Korea to give up its

1:02:531:02:59

weapons in exchange for fuel aid,

and American diplomatic recognition,

1:02:591:03:04

north Korea pulled out and it

collapsed.

1:03:041:03:06

We also asked if China might be

happy to post a meeting between Kim

1:03:061:03:13

Jong-un and Donald Trump. The answer

we got was China is doing all it can

1:03:131:03:18

to help. The Chinese Government is

saying it feels vindicated today.

1:03:181:03:23

Because it sees the Winter Olympics

as a breakthrough and according to

1:03:231:03:28

the Chinese Government that

breakthrough was achieved because

1:03:281:03:30

there was a suspension of drills and

a suspension of missile tests.

1:03:301:03:37

Vindication Beijing says it

suspension or the pension plan. So

1:03:371:03:43

China can say it believes, we told

you so, it worked.

1:03:431:03:51

Pressure is growing

on counter-terror officers

1:03:531:03:55

to identify the source of a nerve

agent used in the attempted

1:03:551:03:58

murder of a former Russian

spy and his daughter.

1:03:581:04:00

The Home Secretary

Amber Rudd has visited

1:04:001:04:02

Salisbury this morning,

where she's been speaking

1:04:021:04:03

to police about the case.

1:04:031:04:04

Russia's Foreign Minister has

dismissed allegations

1:04:041:04:06

that his Government has any link

to the nerve agent attack.

1:04:061:04:08

A short while ago, Amber Rudd

was asked about the condition

1:04:081:04:11

of Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

1:04:111:04:15

Still very serious for the two

people who were the subject of this

1:04:151:04:19

outrageous attack. And for the

police officer, I understand it is

1:04:191:04:23

still serious although he is

conversing and engaging.

1:04:231:04:27

A teenager who attacked six moped

riders with acid in a 90-minute

1:04:271:04:30

rampage across London

is being sentenced later.

1:04:301:04:32

17-year-old Derryck John

from Croydon admitted targeting

1:04:321:04:34

the riders in north and east London

in July last year.

1:04:341:04:37

He sprayed them in the face

with a noxious liquid and stole two

1:04:371:04:40

mopeds before trying

to take another four.

1:04:401:04:42

Police said one attack

had left a rider with

1:04:421:04:44

"life-changing injuries".

1:04:441:04:49

Earlier on the programme,

we spoke to one of Derryck John's

1:04:491:04:52

victims Jabed Hussain

who described his injuries.

1:04:521:04:54

I thought I had lost my face anyway.

1:05:001:05:04

The less I saw of my

face in the mirror.

1:05:041:05:06

I thought I had lost my face.

1:05:061:05:08

I thought I would never

get my face back.

1:05:081:05:10

Everyone was saying, you are OK.

1:05:101:05:12

I thought they were

trying to make me happy.

1:05:121:05:20

But when I saw my face,

then I realised, and I saw the other

1:05:211:05:24

guy was in hospital,

with the same issues,

1:05:241:05:26

and I am better than him.

1:05:261:05:34

A convoy has now arrived in Eastern

Ghouta delivering aid.

1:05:361:05:44

NHS employers and health unions

are understood to be close

1:05:441:05:47

to agreeing a three year pay deal

for hundreds of thousands

1:05:471:05:49

of staff in England.

1:05:491:05:50

The government has already said it

will abolish the one

1:05:501:05:53

per cent pay cap on public sector

pay and the Chancellor has indicated

1:05:531:05:56

he will provide extra funding

to meet the higher costs.

1:05:561:05:59

The United States will

impose tariffs on imports

1:05:591:06:01

of aluminium and steel.

1:06:011:06:02

President Trump signed

off on the move

1:06:021:06:03

at the White House late yesterday.

1:06:031:06:05

It's sparked fears

of a global trade war.

1:06:051:06:08

The European Union is

considering retaliating

1:06:081:06:13

with charges on US-made jeans,

motorbikes, bourbon and oranges.

1:06:131:06:18

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

1:06:181:06:20

More at 10.30.

1:06:201:06:26

We were talking about the end of

NME, going into digital format.

1:06:261:06:31

Doris says she remembers the NME and

radio Luxembourg as being access to

1:06:311:06:40

so much music. The annual concerts

were brilliant and saw the

1:06:401:06:44

introduction of new stars and

established groups. I understand we

1:06:441:06:48

use different methods but what a

shame.

1:06:481:06:53

And another, sad but inevitable, and

any will live in digital form. The

1:06:531:07:00

magazine is a business and had to

follow business rules.

1:07:001:07:04

Your thoughts are welcome on that

and any story we are talking about.

1:07:041:07:07

Do get in touch with us

1:07:071:07:08

throughout the morning.

1:07:081:07:09

Use the hashtag #VictoriaLive.

1:07:091:07:11

If you text, you will be charged

at the standard network rate.

1:07:111:07:13

Here's some sport now.

1:07:131:07:15

From 11 o'clock this morning

the opening ceremony

1:07:151:07:17

of the Winter Paralympics will mark

1:07:171:07:18

the start of the biggest Games yet

with well over 500 athletes

1:07:181:07:21

competing in six disciplines

from 48 countries.

1:07:211:07:26

Owen Pick will lead Paralympics

GB out as flagbearer.

1:07:261:07:29

He's at his first Games having

lost a leg while serving

1:07:291:07:32

for the British Army

in Afghanistan eight years ago.

1:07:321:07:38

Arsenal's victory in

the Europa League last night

1:07:381:07:44

helped end their worst run

since 2002 and ease the pressure

1:07:441:07:47

on manager Arsene Wenger.

1:07:471:07:48

His side went to Italy

and they came back

1:07:481:07:50

with a 2-0 victory.

1:07:501:07:51

Henrik Mkhitaryan scored his first

1:07:511:07:52

goal for the club and Aaron

Ramsey added another

1:07:521:07:55

at the San Siro.

1:07:551:07:56

The second leg is at

the Emirates next Thursday.

1:07:561:08:04

Look, we have won a game, we are not

qualified,

1:08:071:08:17

qualified, so we have raised belief

in the team. When you lose three in

1:08:171:08:21

six days it is always very

difficult.

1:08:211:08:25

We want to keep our focus and finish

the job next week, that is the

1:08:251:08:29

target.

1:08:291:08:30

It's a huge weekend

in the Six Nations

1:08:301:08:34

with plenty of permutations,

but Ireland could be

1:08:341:08:36

crowned champions.

1:08:361:08:38

They go into their match

with Scotland in Dublin

1:08:381:08:42

top of the table and with three wins

from three victory would keep them

1:08:421:08:45

on course for a first

Grand Slam in nine years.

1:08:451:08:48

But remember,

Scotland showed against England that

1:08:481:08:49

they're no pushovers.

1:08:491:08:53

It is a superb rugby star that they

play which makes them very potent on

1:08:531:08:58

the counter attack, attacking from

loose ball, very I supposed

1:08:581:09:04

dangerous in those wider channels.

1:09:041:09:07

England are away in France

and they need to match Ireland's

1:09:071:09:09

result to keep alive their hopes

of a third straight title.

1:09:091:09:12

Head coach Eddie Jones

has named Owen Farrell

1:09:121:09:14

as captain for the first time,

with Dylan Hartley out injured.

1:09:141:09:18

I think these weeks when you're

coming back from a loss of the week

1:09:181:09:24

you live for, they really test your

metal, the metal of the coaches,

1:09:241:09:31

players, to keep focus and generate

that energy and zest and brutality

1:09:311:09:37

that you need for the next game.

1:09:371:09:39

One of the greatest

sports people of all time

1:09:391:09:41

Serena Williams won her first

singles match on the WTA Tour

1:09:411:09:43

for nearly 14 months as she returned

after the birth of her child.

1:09:431:09:49

At 36, and having suffered

what she called "near fatal" health

1:09:491:09:52

complications after giving birth

last September she reached

1:09:521:09:54

the second round at Indian Wells

with a straight sets victory over

1:09:541:09:57

Kazakhstan's Zarina Diyas.

1:09:571:09:58

Afterwards, Williams said

she was "a little rusty".

1:09:581:10:06

I almost wanted to cry because I

missed my daughter I was like, oh,

1:10:061:10:12

but I pulled myself together,

Serena, you have got to do this. It

1:10:121:10:16

was good, I was really happy to be

out there and just to be able to

1:10:161:10:21

play tennis again.

1:10:211:10:22

But Britain's Heather Watson

1:10:221:10:23

is out at Indian Wells.

1:10:231:10:24

She just can't beat

Victoria Azarenka.

1:10:241:10:25

this is the sixth time they've met

and the six time Watson has lost.

1:10:251:10:33

That is all the sport for now.

1:10:351:10:38

President Trump once described

North Korea as "the last

1:10:381:10:40

place on Earth" he would want to go.

1:10:401:10:42

And only months ago

he called the leader

1:10:421:10:45

of the country "rocket man"

because of his nuclear missile tests

1:10:451:10:48

and threatened to unleash

"fire and fury" on him.

1:10:481:10:50

But now, in a surprise move,

Donald Trump has agreed

1:10:501:10:53

to an invitation to meet Kim

Jong-un.

1:10:531:10:55

It will be the first time a US

President has ever met

1:10:551:10:58

a North Korean leader

and is being described as one

1:10:581:11:01

of the biggest gambles

of Donald Trump's presidency.

1:11:011:11:04

The announcement about the meeting

was made by Chung Eiu-Yong

1:11:041:11:06

the head of a South Korean

delegation that met both leaders.

1:11:061:11:12

I told President Trump that in our

meeting the North Korean leader said

1:11:121:11:20

he is committed to denuclearisation,

pledging that North Korea would

1:11:201:11:30

refrain from any further nuclear

missile tests. He understands that

1:11:301:11:35

the routine joint military exercises

against the Republic of Korea and

1:11:351:11:41

the United States must continue, and

he expressed his eagerness to meet

1:11:411:11:47

President Trump as soon as possible.

President Trump appreciated the

1:11:471:11:55

briefing and said he would meet Kim

Jong-un by May to achieve prominent

1:11:551:12:02

denuclearisation. The Republic of

Korea along with the United States,

1:12:021:12:07

Japan and our many partners around

the world remain fully and

1:12:071:12:13

resolutely committed to the complete

denuclearisation of the Korean

1:12:131:12:18

peninsular, along with President

Trump, we are optimistic about

1:12:181:12:23

continuing a diplomatic process to

test the possibility of a peaceful

1:12:231:12:28

resolution.

1:12:281:12:30

Well, it's an extraordinary overture

after months of trading

1:12:301:12:33

insults but can the two leaders

change from enemies to frenemies?

1:12:331:12:40

They will be met with Fire And Fury,

like the world has never seen.

1:12:401:12:52

Rocket man is on a suicide mission

for himself, and for his regime.

1:12:591:13:12

He is a sick puppy.

1:13:221:13:29

President Trump said he would meet

Kim Jong-un by May to achieve

1:14:231:14:28

prominent denuclearisation.

1:14:281:14:31

With me are Dr Brian Klaas,

a fellow at the London School

1:14:401:14:43

of Economics who has worked

on US political campaigns.

1:14:431:14:45

Charlie Wolf, he's a political

commentator and former

1:14:451:14:47

communications director

of Republicans Abroad UK.

1:14:471:14:53

Thank you for coming in. This is so

significant and historic and yet we

1:14:541:15:00

don't really know much about it?

We know they will properly meet

1:15:001:15:05

sometime before Bay. One of the

worries I have, it is a historic

1:15:051:15:12

opportunity, but how the

coordination has not been coming

1:15:121:15:16

between the Trump administration and

State Department. Rex Tillerson a

1:15:161:15:21

few hours downplayed the possibility

of any negotiations. If you hours

1:15:211:15:27

later the announcement they would

meet head-to-head.

1:15:271:15:32

Isn't that just the way he runs the

White House?

This is why the rubber

1:15:321:15:38

hits the road, it is a major gamble.

We are banking on someone who is not

1:15:381:15:43

a details person. He has mistaken in

the past the past three leaders of

1:15:431:15:52

North Korea as the same

1:15:521:15:53

It is a problem that

1:15:591:16:00

It is a problem that needs to get

solved, but North Korea has a

1:16:001:16:03

history of using negotiations to buy

time and we hope that the US has

1:16:031:16:08

ample time to prepare and

coordinating come to a peaceful

1:16:081:16:11

solution that ends up resolving the

crisis.

We have been played several

1:16:111:16:16

times under George Bush and Clinton

and even back to Carter. The Kim

1:16:161:16:22

family are good falling, but this

time you have a man in the White

1:16:221:16:29

House who is a deal-maker and part

of being a deal-maker is knowing not

1:16:291:16:32

to take one when it is not right. So

Barack Obama, his problem was that

1:16:321:16:37

there had to be a deal and he would

give away the farm just to get the

1:16:371:16:41

deal and get nothing in return. I

think Donald Trump will take a bit

1:16:411:16:45

more of a different approach. He is

a hard guy. The whole theory of

1:16:451:16:50

calling him rocket man and this fire

and Furyk, that is projecting power

1:16:501:16:54

and that is what I think brought

into the table. He understands that

1:16:541:16:58

need to carry a big stick. Walk

softly and carry a big stick.

So

1:16:581:17:04

President Trump has played a

blinder, and that is what has forced

1:17:041:17:08

him to the table.

It's played a

major part.

Do you believe that?

I

1:17:081:17:13

don't, because in the process, we

have alienated several allies. South

1:17:131:17:18

Korea and Japan are on different

pages to the US and we need to

1:17:181:17:23

coordinate with them. So there is a

risk by going into bilateral talks

1:17:231:17:27

we have Donald Trump in a room

making a deal that South Korea and

1:17:271:17:31

Japan cannot live will and that is a

real risk. Thereon many countries --

1:17:311:17:38

there are many countries at stake,

it's not just North Korea, it is the

1:17:381:17:42

key allies in the region, and China

needs to be on board with the

1:17:421:17:45

decision, so you have the risk that

the bilateral talks are a concession

1:17:451:17:50

to the regime of Kim and there might

be a positive result, but they are

1:17:501:17:56

extremely risky. I hope the State

Department works closely with Trump

1:17:561:17:59

to evolve a clear plan and not just

wing it. What Trump did yesterday

1:17:591:18:04

was to show that he could make

things up as he goes along is and

1:18:041:18:07

I'm extremely worried about that.

That is the way he's run the

1:18:071:18:11

presidency so far.

It doesn't seem

to work them. It's not the norm --

1:18:111:18:16

it does seem to work for him.

Academics are driven crazy and we

1:18:161:18:24

might not understand it but it does

seem to work.

We just got this from

1:18:241:18:30

the International atomic agency

saying that they are closely

1:18:301:18:34

following developments related to

the nuclear programme of North Korea

1:18:341:18:37

and we hope these development will

lead to concrete progress regarding

1:18:371:18:41

the nuclear issue. We continue to

monitor the North Korea nuclear

1:18:411:18:46

programme, including the use of

satellite imagery. We stand ready to

1:18:461:18:50

contribute to its peaceful

resolution by resuming our

1:18:501:18:53

verification activities in the

country once the political agreement

1:18:531:18:56

is reached amongst the countries

concerned. I want to just break down

1:18:561:19:04

the elements of the deal and it

appears that North Korea has agreed

1:19:041:19:08

to this in order to have talks. One

of the significant things it is. Kim

1:19:081:19:14

Jong-un says a commitment to

denuclearisation which is clearly

1:19:141:19:17

important but he also says he

understands that the US and South

1:19:171:19:21

Korean military drills must

continue, the drills that happen

1:19:211:19:24

once a year. It is a huge show of

strength. Very close to North Korea

1:19:241:19:28

and for so long they have been very

angry at this and think it is

1:19:281:19:34

provocation. That is a pretty

significant step.

Brian will notice

1:19:341:19:41

that the US has not dropped

sanctions and the other punishments

1:19:411:19:46

they have had going on the regime.

He is not just giving in. He still

1:19:461:19:50

has to learn of this.

The

denuclearisation is the goal and

1:19:501:19:55

it's the goal that is broadly

fantasy because the odds that he

1:19:551:19:58

will give up nuclear weapons is

virtually zero. Putting the talks as

1:19:581:20:05

a gambit to denuclearisation is an

ambitious goal but it is one that

1:20:051:20:09

could do it if that is the only

goal, so I don't think the freezing

1:20:091:20:13

of the testing is a massive

concession because the dynasty has

1:20:131:20:17

done this multiple times on what

they've done during this freeze

1:20:171:20:20

period is do research, further the

programme and come at the talks with

1:20:201:20:24

nothing changing, but the nuclear

development is advanced. The real

1:20:241:20:30

risk is that the US is played

without getting concessions. All of

1:20:301:20:34

us hope this time is different and

it is the first time a US president

1:20:341:20:38

is involving 121 talks and we have

our fingers crossed but it's a

1:20:381:20:42

question of whether this ends up

coming to fruition in a positive

1:20:421:20:45

way.

What will North Korea want in

return? They won't give everything

1:20:451:20:50

up.

We have no idea. Generally in

the past it has been wheat, food,

1:20:501:20:55

hard cash but they separated dealing

with North Korea and Iran, because

1:20:551:21:03

Iran never knew what they wanted. It

is a Marxist government with people

1:21:031:21:08

starving so he's holding a nuclear

pistol to our heads.

Interesting to

1:21:081:21:15

know if they will shake hands and I

think people will expect that. Thank

1:21:151:21:19

you both for coming in. Still to

come, the government has failed to

1:21:191:21:28

back a latte levy on coffee cups.

Get in touch in the usual way.

1:21:281:21:37

The Home Secretary,

Amber Rudd has just visited

1:21:371:21:39

the scene of the attack on a former

Russian spy in Salisbury and praised

1:21:391:21:42

the police for their response.

1:21:421:21:43

Sergei Skripal and his daughter,

Yulia, have been in hospital

1:21:431:21:46

since they were found unconscious

on a bench on Sunday.

1:21:461:21:48

Officials say they were

poisoned by a nerve agent.

1:21:481:21:50

Amber Rudd gave this update

in the last half an hour.

1:21:501:21:53

I understand people's curiosity

about all those questions and

1:21:531:21:56

wanting to have answers and there

will be a time to have those

1:21:561:22:00

answers. But the best way to get to

them is to make sure we give the

1:22:001:22:04

police the space that they need to

really go through the area carefully

1:22:041:22:09

to do their investigation and to

make sure they have all the support

1:22:091:22:13

they need in order to get that.

The

reason many people have those

1:22:131:22:18

questions as they will be concerned

about safety. This is somebody

1:22:181:22:21

potentially walking around Britain

with a chemical weapon. It's not

1:22:211:22:25

just curiosity, it's a concern over

safety.

It is exactly that concern

1:22:251:22:29

about safety which is why we need

all the information we can from this

1:22:291:22:33

incident in order to make everybody

say and we have to give the police

1:22:331:22:40

all the space they need in order to

collect all the information to be

1:22:401:22:48

absolutely clear that there is no

further risk. We need to make sure

1:22:481:22:51

they can do the investigation and

collected so it can be confirmed.

1:22:511:22:57

What is the current range of options

once it has the facts here?

At the

1:22:571:23:03

moment the priority will be the

incident, which is why I'm in

1:23:031:23:06

Salisbury today to make sure that

everybody is protected around here

1:23:061:23:11

and making sure the emergency

services have had the support that

1:23:111:23:14

they need and will continue to get

and it is great to hear that that is

1:23:141:23:18

the case. In terms of further

options, that will have to wait

1:23:181:23:22

until we are absolutely clear what

the consequences could be and what

1:23:221:23:27

the actual source of this nerve

agent has been.

1:23:271:23:31

So how have people living

in Salisbury reacted to this attack

1:23:311:23:34

in the middle of their city?

1:23:341:23:35

Let's speak now to John Glen,

the Conservative MP for Salisbury.

1:23:351:23:42

We hope in a minute to speak to a

former member of Greater Manchester

1:23:421:23:46

Police but we're struggling to

connect right now.

And we are

1:23:461:23:49

speaking to Pat

1:23:491:23:55

speaking to Pat Sessions --

1:23:551:23:55

Also joining us is Pat

Sissons, a radio station

1:23:551:23:57

journalist who has been covering

the updates in story.

1:23:571:23:59

And Anthony Davies

who owns a coffee shop

1:23:591:24:01

near to where the incident happened.

1:24:011:24:05

John, you have been out speaking to

the constituents. Is there a sense

1:24:051:24:08

of worry, maybe panic in Salisbury

about what has happened and the

1:24:081:24:14

continued police activity there?

I

think people have seen what has

1:24:141:24:21

happened and as the week has

progressed people have been

1:24:211:24:25

reassured by the statement from the

Chief Medical Officer and the words

1:24:251:24:29

of the Home Secretary. She was able

to visit the crime scene, Amber

1:24:291:24:37

Rudd, and go to the hospital. People

understand it's an exceptional event

1:24:371:24:44

and were trying to work out what

happened and why and how, but I

1:24:441:24:48

think people are reassured by what

they have heard and I don't see on

1:24:481:24:53

the streets of Salisbury any

widespread panic, but they do want

1:24:531:24:56

to know what happened.

I know your

copy shop is very close to where

1:24:561:25:03

this happened. You are open now,

presumably, so what are people

1:25:031:25:07

saying as they come in and get

copied and have a chat.

Everyone is

1:25:071:25:12

generally interested in what is

going on and they want answers, but

1:25:121:25:18

as John correctly said, there is no

major panic, it's more interest and

1:25:181:25:22

intrigue and more concerned for the

well-being of the victims and

1:25:221:25:28

obviously the policeman. But also to

try and understand what is going on

1:25:281:25:33

and to let the police get on and do

the job and let them understand what

1:25:331:25:38

has happened so we can get this

result. There is certainly no panic

1:25:381:25:42

or major concern will stop its more

intrigue and interest and concern

1:25:421:25:49

regarding the people who are being

targeted very badly by this.

1:25:491:25:57

Anthony, I could see you nodding

away. Is that the sense you are

1:25:571:26:03

getting as you speak to people and

follow the story.

When it was

1:26:031:26:10

revealed one of the policeman had

been hospitalised, that is where the

1:26:101:26:15

focus came. There hasn't been panic

but when you see people in full

1:26:151:26:22

asthmatics walking through an area

you know

1:26:221:26:28

you know where all, that happens so

suddenly and everybody was so

1:26:301:26:33

bewildered that once it was known,

and Salisbury is a small city, and I

1:26:331:26:39

would say everybody knows everyone

but friends of friends will know

1:26:391:26:41

someone involved, and for a serving

police officer to be involved, that

1:26:411:26:46

is the focus of concern a lot of the

time.

Do people feel that they are

1:26:461:26:54

getting enough information? We are

told that the government knows what

1:26:541:26:56

the nerve agent is but they are not

releasing that right now. Our people

1:26:561:27:01

satisfied that this is being handled

in a correct way?

I certainly am. I

1:27:011:27:07

think it comes back to the fact that

the police are doing everything they

1:27:071:27:11

can. We know they are trying to do

it in the right way and there is a

1:27:111:27:17

right way and wrong way to do it.

There's no point in everybody

1:27:171:27:21

jumping to conclusions. The worst

thing anybody can do is jump to

1:27:211:27:25

conclusions and start pointing

fingers, has already happened. The

1:27:251:27:28

only thing from my point of view is

that the police do what they do best

1:27:281:27:33

and that's the only thing we can ask

for.

I know, John Glenn, you are on

1:27:331:27:39

the Home Secretary earlier this

morning -- you were with the Home

1:27:391:27:45

Secretary on the visit. Is it right

that the information is not being

1:27:451:27:48

released to the public to know what

the nerve agent was?

I cannot see

1:27:481:27:54

the useful mass of knowing what the

agent is at the moment. The Home

1:27:541:27:59

Secretary is well placed to

understand the implications of

1:27:591:28:02

telling everyone that -- I cannot

see what the usefulness. She is

1:28:021:28:08

being advised by special officers

from the Met police working with

1:28:081:28:11

Wiltshire officers to undertake the

investigation and we should rely on

1:28:111:28:16

their judgment as they advise us on

what is appropriate to know. But we

1:28:161:28:20

do know it's a serious incident.

It's essentially a silent

1:28:201:28:25

assassination on the attempt -- an

attempt on the streets of Salisbury,

1:28:251:28:32

and police officers have been

injured in the course of doing their

1:28:321:28:34

duty. We know the basic outline of

what has happened and the details

1:28:341:28:39

will emerge when it's appropriate

and we need to know.

Do you worry

1:28:391:28:44

that trade might be affected? People

see Salisbury on the news and lots

1:28:441:28:48

of tourists go there.

Is that a

concern? Yes, in the long term it

1:28:481:28:53

is. Salisbury is a small city which

relies heavily on tourism and it has

1:28:531:28:59

been noticeably quieter but that is

just a symptom of what has been

1:28:591:29:05

going on as everyone has been

keeping out of the way of letting

1:29:051:29:08

the police do what they do.

Ultimately there are businesses that

1:29:081:29:12

are still close in the immediate

vicinity of where this took place

1:29:121:29:15

and they will need to be looked

after and make sure they are OK.

1:29:151:29:22

Long-term, hopefully this won't have

a negative effect on the city and

1:29:221:29:25

the businesses. I don't think it

will long-term. These things happen

1:29:251:29:30

all around the world but life goes

on. There will always be people who

1:29:301:29:37

do certain things like this and we

just get on with it and deal with it

1:29:371:29:41

and we can only do what we can do

best.

You say quieter, but Pat, the

1:29:411:29:47

world media has descended on

Salisbury, and I wonder if you're

1:29:471:29:51

getting a sense that they are

getting fed up with that attention

1:29:511:29:54

as it goes on and the sheer number

of people reporting?

Understandably

1:29:541:29:59

there was a lot of excitement at

first when you see famous faces from

1:29:591:30:03

the TV camped out on traffic islands

in the market in Salisbury with

1:30:031:30:07

people trying to put it on

Instagram, but as time goes on, you

1:30:071:30:11

might see that because the city is

trying to get on with day to day

1:30:111:30:15

life unlike Anthony says, it will

spring back, but there is concern

1:30:151:30:18

that the message is going out that

the shops are shot and we got a

1:30:181:30:23

message from one of the other

businesses in the shopping centre

1:30:231:30:26

that is part of the police called in

-- police called in, saying they

1:30:261:30:30

were three-day shot because of the

end of the last week with the snow,

1:30:301:30:36

so the continued media focus might

be fuelling that a bit. Salisbury

1:30:361:30:39

businesses want people to know they

are open.

1:30:391:30:41

do you get a sense people are

getting annoyed with the media

1:30:451:30:50

traipsing around?

A little bit. There are a lot of

1:30:501:30:55

people taking photos. Again,

unfortunately, that is a symptom of

1:30:551:31:01

the situation. It is not too bad at

the moment. If it carries on, the

1:31:011:31:08

wrong message gets out, then the

annoyance factor will go up and we

1:31:081:31:16

will get frustrated about dozens of

photographers standing around

1:31:161:31:20

everywhere.

I am pleased to say we can bring in

1:31:201:31:28

Martin, a former greater Manchester

Superintendent, a friend of Nick

1:31:281:31:32

Bailey, the police officer who was

injured.

1:31:321:31:38

injured. First of all, when you

heard yesterday Nick Bailey was the

1:31:381:31:42

police Sergeant being treated in

hospital, did it surprise you

1:31:421:31:46

knowing the man that he rushed to

help out straightaway?

1:31:461:31:50

It didn't surprise me at all,

knowing Nick, and I have known him

1:31:501:31:57

for the last three years in

Wiltshire Police, I found him

1:31:571:32:04

absolutely a leader, someone who

will take the lead and put the

1:32:041:32:08

public first. In evidence we have

done, work with Nick, it has been

1:32:081:32:13

about putting the public first. It

came as no surprise to find he was

1:32:131:32:18

involved in this.

As a police officer confronted with

1:32:181:32:22

a situation where you cannot clearly

know all of the facts as you appear

1:32:221:32:27

on scene, what goes through your

mind? Do you worry, get concerned,

1:32:271:32:32

or is it professional charge into

help?

1:32:321:32:35

It is a mixture of both. You do

worry. Quite often you will get a

1:32:351:32:42

phrase through your head saying,

this will hurt. By the same token,

1:32:421:32:46

you move forward and rush into

danger. If you look at London

1:32:461:32:53

bridge, Borough market, Westminster,

officers attending burglaries, there

1:32:531:33:00

is always a risk, always fear, but

you always go forward and put the

1:33:001:33:04

risk at the back of your mind

because your job, first of all, is

1:33:041:33:09

to keep yourself safe but to look

after members of the public.

1:33:091:33:13

The BBC is getting reports Sergei

Skripal may have been poisoned at

1:33:131:33:19

his home, is that something you have

heard?

1:33:191:33:23

I have only heard it on media

outlets this morning, I am hearing

1:33:231:33:28

exactly the same as everyone else, I

have no access to any other

1:33:281:33:33

information at this moment.

Thank you all so much for speaking

1:33:331:33:36

to us this morning, I am grateful

for your time.

1:33:361:33:39

Still to come.

1:33:391:33:40

Ahead of Mother's Day this Sunday,

we will be taking a closer look

1:33:401:33:43

at stories of childbirth

across the globe.

1:33:431:33:46

Calls to impose a so-called

latte levy on throwaway

1:33:461:33:48

coffee cups have been rejected.

1:33:481:33:51

Do you think it is better

for customers to bring their own

1:33:511:33:54

coffee cups along with them?

1:33:541:33:55

We'll be discussing this soon.

1:33:551:33:58

It's Mother's Day on Sunday.

1:34:101:34:15

have followed five different mums

from Kenya, Romania, Guatemala,

1:34:151:34:21

Nepal and the UK and captured key

moments of childbirth.

1:34:211:34:24

Each of the mothers gave birth

successfully but their stories

1:34:241:34:29

are a moving reminder of how

different things can be when mothers

1:34:291:34:32

are forced to give birth alone.

1:34:321:34:33

The charity is calling

on all governments across the world

1:34:331:34:37

to ensure that by 2030 everyone has

universal access to

1:34:371:34:38

essential health services.

1:34:381:34:43

Ellen Shepherd is a mother

from the UK, and was captured

1:34:431:34:46

on film giving birth to baby Alice.

1:34:461:34:50

We'll speak to Ellen in a moment.

1:34:501:34:53

First, let's watch the journey

of those five mothers,

1:34:531:34:57

and as a warning, these images given

to us by Save the Children

1:34:571:35:00

do show childbirth.

1:35:001:35:06

I'd always kind of imagined

I would be a mum one day

1:35:171:35:21

but I didn't get that real

broodiness, so it was always,

1:35:211:35:24

"One day in the future."

1:35:241:35:25

I ended up going through

two rounds of IVF that

1:35:251:35:27

didn't work and separately had two

very early miscarriages.

1:35:271:35:30

It is a real shift

in how you see things.

1:35:301:35:32

Yeah, it was difficult to deal with.

1:35:321:35:35

He really wanted a family

and a child, and he was crazy

1:36:061:36:08

about children.

1:36:081:36:10

I was actually quite afraid

when I found out that I

1:36:101:36:13

was pregnant.

1:36:131:36:16

He was such a calm person

and he just looked at me,

1:36:161:36:19

smiled said to me, "Come on,

1:36:191:36:20

baby, it's never, you know,

the perfect time."

1:36:201:36:24

I was absolutely sure that things

would be OK, you know.

1:36:241:36:30

When I was four months' pregnant,

he had a stroke and,

1:36:301:36:33

after three weeks, he died.

1:36:331:36:37

Everything that we

expected just changed.

1:36:371:36:45

I had no idea how

intense the contractions

1:37:071:37:09

would be and how difficult

they would be to get through.

1:37:091:37:12

Well done.

1:37:121:37:16

She came out purple

and not breathing.

1:37:161:37:19

I didn't really register that

in the way they were rubbing her.

1:37:191:37:25

I know you wanted to delay but give

her minute and, if she isn't,

1:37:251:37:28

I'm going to cut the cord.

1:37:281:37:30

Come on.

1:37:301:37:31

OK.

1:37:311:37:32

Come on, little lady.

1:37:321:37:35

Can we get an extra pair of hands?

1:37:351:37:38

It's not rising.

1:37:421:37:43

Temperature's not rising.

1:37:431:37:46

And again.

1:37:471:37:48

No.

1:37:481:37:50

Can you keep an eye on mum?

1:37:501:37:56

The longer it took,

the more you think, "Well,

1:37:571:37:59

is she going to start breathing?"

1:37:591:38:01

I think I was crying at that point.

1:38:011:38:07

Andy was in a bit

of a state behind me.

1:38:071:38:12

After that, we heard her cry so

the ventilation had got her going.

1:38:121:38:15

Tried.

1:38:461:38:48

You saw, they told me, "Push."

1:38:481:38:52

But she was just blocked

there so I couldn't make it.

1:38:521:38:59

There is a small part

of the C section

1:38:591:39:01

I don't remember.

1:39:011:39:02

The part in the middle.

1:39:021:39:03

It is a blank.

1:39:031:39:06

I just remember

when they came in and

1:39:101:39:12

brought her to me.

1:39:121:39:13

Vamos.

1:39:171:39:18

Vamos.

1:39:181:39:21

She's wonderful.

1:40:401:40:42

She's like a little

treasure, you know.

1:40:421:40:43

She's wonderful.

1:40:431:40:45

I think she's the best

thing in my life.

1:40:451:40:53

Let's speak to Ellen Shepherd

the UK mum featured

1:40:561:40:59

in the Save The Children film.

1:40:591:41:02

Ellen is with her daughter Alice

who is now three and a half months

1:41:021:41:05

old.

1:41:051:41:08

And Simon Wright,

director of international

1:41:081:41:10

development at Save the Children UK.

1:41:101:41:18

Alice, you are staring at me

beautifully, probably full of milk!

1:41:181:41:26

Alice is safe now. We saw it was a

traumatic birth. You had a dramatic

1:41:261:41:31

journey even conceiving.

Most of my delivery was reasonably

1:41:311:41:37

calm but at the end she was very

sloppy and it took them three

1:41:371:41:41

minutes to resuscitate her which was

terrifying. It had been a long

1:41:411:41:48

journey, we spent 20 months knowing

we might find it difficult to

1:41:481:41:52

conceive. We had two unsuccessful

rounds of IVF. And another two

1:41:521:41:59

miscarriages. We were told we should

think about using an egg donor. The

1:41:591:42:06

month after Alice was conceived.

To have gone through that and to

1:42:061:42:10

have Alice born in that state, did

you understand what was happening?

1:42:101:42:16

You are in a haze when you are

giving birth.

1:42:161:42:19

I didn't remember her being like

that until I saw that footage. For

1:42:191:42:28

the first few minutes I had so much

faith in the midwives who stayed so

1:42:281:42:31

calm, the doctors came in, I thought

this happens a lot, they know what

1:42:311:42:37

they are doing. Then I was starting

to panic. Thinking what if she

1:42:371:42:46

doesn't start breathing.

She is

clearly doing fine now. Simon, for

1:42:461:42:50

any woman who has given birth, they

will know every birth is different.

1:42:501:42:55

The care you receive in the UK is

pretty much the same but that can't

1:42:551:42:59

be sent for women around the world.

Access to health workers to support

1:42:591:43:06

birth is an unequal service. 30

million women in the world give

1:43:061:43:11

birth every year without any trained

health worker by their side. If

1:43:111:43:14

something goes wrong, there is no

one there who knows what to do. That

1:43:141:43:21

is why there are such high rates of

maternal mortality and newborn

1:43:211:43:27

mortality. That is why we and our

partners creating this film, we want

1:43:271:43:35

to draw attention to the fact it is

so unequal.

1:43:351:43:39

Not too mention terrifying and

incredibly painful, these women are

1:43:391:43:43

doing this without any pain relief.

Where are the places in the world

1:43:431:43:48

where women are most vulnerable?

Sub

Saharan Africa, South Asia, where

1:43:481:43:55

there is no investment in health

services, very few health workers or

1:43:551:43:59

not enough, and they are not fairly

distributed. Countries like India,

1:43:591:44:06

Kenny, Nigeria, the chances of

whether you get this skilled birth

1:44:061:44:10

attendant depends on your wealth. In

the richest part of the publisher

1:44:101:44:14

and you will get good care. In the

poorest, half the women are getting

1:44:141:44:19

no support.

Often women have to travel a long

1:44:191:44:25

way to access medical care. For you,

you were very brave to have your

1:44:251:44:30

birth documented, did you have to

think about whether you wanted to

1:44:301:44:34

take part?

We didn't fully anticipate quite how

1:44:341:44:41

intimate the footage would be

beforehand. But I do like capturing

1:44:411:44:46

things like that and I have been

very open about miscarriages and IVF

1:44:461:44:51

and it is a shame we don't talk more

about these things as a society. I

1:44:511:44:56

was keen to become part of the

conversation.

1:44:561:45:01

To see the different experiences of

the different women, was it an

1:45:011:45:06

eye-opener?

It was. I had to be flat on my back,

1:45:061:45:12

on a hard bed, I can imagine being

there.

1:45:121:45:20

The thought of giving birth on your

own, I cannot even begin to imagine,

1:45:211:45:24

the idea of no pain relief, or

whatever. Is this simply down to

1:45:241:45:30

money? Is -- if money gets thrown at

the problem will it be solved?

Not

1:45:301:45:37

simply. There are countries not

spending enough on their health

1:45:371:45:40

services that are organising it in

better ways but skilled birth

1:45:401:45:44

attendants, you need a health

service which is local, available 24

1:45:441:45:48

hours a day which women can get to

when they need that kind of support

1:45:481:45:51

and in the case of an obstructed

labour whether Caesarean is needed,

1:45:511:45:54

you need a higher quality of medical

expertise to react. It's not just

1:45:541:46:00

money, it's how it's organised and

whether it's organised fairly, and

1:46:001:46:03

the fact it's so unequal in this

country shows that countries could

1:46:031:46:06

be taking a different approach. This

commitment to universal health

1:46:061:46:11

coverage that governments have made

is about this. Everybody should get

1:46:111:46:14

the health service they need and it

shouldn't matter whether they have

1:46:141:46:17

cash to pay for it or.

What would

happen if a woman is is -- is in a

1:46:171:46:23

rural village in sub Saharan Africa,

a long way away from a medical

1:46:231:46:29

facility? How can you make sure

there will be a birth attendant with

1:46:291:46:32

her?

You need to invest in local

health services and referral

1:46:321:46:36

services. If there is a need for a

Caesarean, you need something where

1:46:361:46:41

women can get a facility to get it

and that involves transport, and in

1:46:411:46:47

Kenny one of the women who gave

birth there trouble by motorbike --

1:46:471:46:52

Kenya. -- travelled by motorbike.

You have to see who is paying for

1:46:521:46:59

the transport, and the roads, it's

all vitally important.

It's been

1:46:591:47:03

lovely to have you come in and it is

Mother's Day on Sunday, your first

1:47:031:47:06

Mother's Day. Any plans?

Sleep? We

are going on a plane to Ireland for

1:47:061:47:12

a wedding so it will be an amazing

one.

It's the best time to travel

1:47:121:47:15

when they are that small. They don't

cry as much.

1:47:151:47:23

Some breaking news on Syria, and the

Syria aid convoy shelling in Ghouta,

1:47:231:47:33

this is coming from a UN

representative in eastern Ghouta is

1:47:331:47:40

putting the UN, ICRC convoy at risk,

and despite assurances of safety

1:47:401:47:47

from parties including the Russian

Federation. Today's convoy entered

1:47:471:47:51

to deliver the remaining aid that

could not be off-loaded from

1:47:511:47:55

Monday's convoy which was due to

insecurity and the ongoing fighting.

1:47:551:47:59

The UN has called for a cessation of

hostilities in the area and for calm

1:47:591:48:04

throughout Syria so that aid can be

safely delivered to the people in

1:48:041:48:07

need. That update comes to us from

Syria about the risk to the aid

1:48:071:48:13

convoy as they are trying to get aid

into that desperate town of eastern

1:48:131:48:17

Ghouta.

1:48:171:48:20

Now are you one of the many people

who can't start their day

1:48:201:48:23

without a takeaway coffee?

1:48:231:48:24

Every day hundreds of thousands

of us throw our coffee cup

1:48:241:48:26

into a recycling bin.

1:48:261:48:28

But these cups are aren't easily

recyclable, and the UK throws away

1:48:281:48:30

2.5 billion of them a year.

1:48:301:48:33

Now the idea of putting a 25p charge

on the cups has been

1:48:331:48:36

rejected by the Government.

1:48:361:48:38

Ministers say it's better for cafes

to offer discounts to customers

1:48:381:48:40

who bring their own cups.

1:48:401:48:44

We'll talk about that

with one of the MPs

1:48:441:48:46

calling for this tax in a moment.

1:48:461:48:48

But it's not just

coffee cups that are adding

1:48:481:48:53

to the plastic mountain

and damaging the environment.

1:48:531:48:54

Here are some tips on reducing

our use of plastic.

1:48:541:49:02

Have you ever thought that every

single plastic toothbrush you have

1:49:101:49:14

used is sitting out there in

landfill?

1:49:141:49:16

And for more on the

Government's rejection

1:51:491:51:52

of a "latte levy", I'm joined

in the studio by Gavin Ellis from

1:51:521:51:55

the environmental charity Hubbub.

1:51:551:52:03

He provided evidence

to the committee of MPs

1:52:031:52:05

calling for this levy.

1:52:051:52:06

And from our Leeds Newsroom

we can hear from Labour

1:52:061:52:08

and Co-operative MP Alex Sobel

who is a member of that committee.

1:52:081:52:13

Gavin, explain why you think it is

so important that you go for the

1:52:131:52:18

stick approach rather than the

carrot?

I think we need both. I

1:52:181:52:21

don't think it's about one or the

other. The interesting thing about

1:52:211:52:26

what we found today is that the

government rejected a call for a

1:52:261:52:30

latte levy, and a lot of the

evidence shows that people are more

1:52:301:52:36

receptive to being charged for

something than being given a

1:52:361:52:40

discount.

Like carrier bags?

Exactly. We are involved in a trial

1:52:401:52:45

in 35 Starbucks store where they are

adding 5p levy on to every cup sold

1:52:451:52:51

in the stores. That is running for

three months and it's only just

1:52:511:52:55

started. We are disappointed that

the government hasn't waited to see

1:52:551:52:59

the results of the trial before

dismissing the levy.

What is the 5p

1:52:591:53:02

for? To help recycle? Or to get

people to think more?

We are the

1:53:021:53:10

recipients of the 5p and we work

with the charity to change other

1:53:101:53:14

people behaviours and shift them to

reusable cups.

Alex, why you think

1:53:141:53:19

it is better that there is an

incentive to use reusable cups

1:53:191:53:25

rather than this 25p levy?

In the

report we want to phase out these

1:53:251:53:33

types of disposable coffee cups and

we need to create a pathway and the

1:53:331:53:39

25p levy would create recycle

facilities for coffee chains,

1:53:391:53:48

manufacturers, to create properly

nonplastic cups to use. It would

1:53:481:53:50

create both those things.

But it

means we have five years of still

1:53:501:53:55

having these copy cups that we get

through at an alarming rate and

1:53:551:53:58

nothing is done about it.

To be

fair, five years is a reasonable

1:53:581:54:03

compromise between us on the

government. We thought we were

1:54:031:54:06

proposing something the government

might take on. The government gave

1:54:061:54:10

the impression a few weeks ago it

would introduce the levy and they

1:54:101:54:13

have rowed back. It's typical of

this government to go for voluntary

1:54:131:54:16

measures to go -- that don't work.

In 2023, what is the plan? What

1:54:161:54:22

would the copy cups look like?

They

would look different is, but

1:54:221:54:28

manufacturers would find bio

alternatives or paper alternative to

1:54:281:54:31

plastic -- coffee cups.

It is

realistic if the government apply

1:54:311:54:37

some pressure and at the moment it

is all voluntary and the onus is on

1:54:371:54:44

giving discounts on reusable cups

but the vast majority so it's only

1:54:441:54:52

about once up to 2% use the

reusables despite the incentives, so

1:54:521:54:58

we need to try the different

approach and we will be openly

1:54:581:55:03

sharing the results of this at the

end of it.

Shouldn't the copy shops

1:55:031:55:07

be sucking this up rather than the

consumers? -- coffee shops.

There is

1:55:071:55:13

a lot of money to be made through

disposable cups. The industry hasn't

1:55:131:55:17

done enough. We ran a campaign

backed by most of the industry that

1:55:171:55:24

recycled 4 million cups, in the

city, in nine months. But with a few

1:55:241:55:30

exceptions the industry has backed

away and not shown any appetite to

1:55:301:55:33

learn from it or extended to other

areas.

Would that not be a better

1:55:331:55:38

strategy that you penalised the copy

chains -- coffee chains rather than

1:55:381:55:44

the customers and create a new tax?

We need to look at the example of

1:55:441:55:47

the plastic bags. That 5p levy has

created an 85% reduction in the used

1:55:471:55:54

in shops and supermarkets and it's

the same principle. So we have got

1:55:541:55:59

proof that it works and we need to

apply to copy cups and potentially

1:55:591:56:03

look at other places to apply it in

terms of plastics.

I was saying

1:56:031:56:07

before, Gavin, when you go into a

copy cups, people on their phones

1:56:071:56:11

and doing other things -- coffee.

It's not obvious where a reusable

1:56:111:56:19

cup is to buy. Do the coffee firms

need to stick it on the counter in

1:56:191:56:23

front of our noses, or maybe we

should get it free?

That is

1:56:231:56:28

definitely true. Some are better

than others, but by and large it's

1:56:281:56:31

not that obvious and they are

inconspicuous. If it's obvious they

1:56:311:56:34

are on the till and they are there

and they are encouraged to use it,

1:56:341:56:39

they will be taken up more.

Do you

agree that they should be more

1:56:391:56:44

obvious?

Absolutely. Coffey

retailers are moving in that

1:56:441:56:51

direction but the 25p charge would

supercharge that and we would see it

1:56:511:56:54

straightaway that there would be

alternatives, just with plastic

1:56:541:56:59

bags, it became much more obvious

when the 5p charge was introduced.

1:56:591:57:07

View messages coming in with Wendy

saying we should adopt Italian style

1:57:071:57:10

copy shops where the copy is cheaper

and smaller but you drink it

1:57:101:57:15

standing at the counter.

It doesn't

necessarily go with the big cities

1:57:151:57:21

and that on the go culture but the

charging for disposable cups might

1:57:211:57:27

encourage people to drink it in

store as well.

Jack says I work for

1:57:271:57:31

a copy chain and we offer a discount

for reusable cups -- coffee chain.

1:57:311:57:38

We then collect ones and recycle

them. Irrespective of how

1:57:381:57:44

politicians vote, companies have a

responsibility for community

1:57:441:57:47

leadership and should be taking the

lead in being environmentally

1:57:471:57:50

responsible. Jade has tweeted saying

my university offers discounted hot

1:57:501:57:55

drinks to those who bring reusable

coffee cups and it is an incentive.

1:57:551:58:02

I am just being told that we need to

bring you this breaking news, just

1:58:021:58:08

getting to me here. 100 RAF

personnel are being deployed in

1:58:081:58:13

Salisbury to help police and assist

with the investigation. Thank you

1:58:131:58:16

for coming in. Newsroom Live coming

next, thanks for your company, have

1:58:161:58:21

a great day.

1:58:211:58:23

Chloe Tilley talks to a victim of an acid attack to find out how life has changed. Plus the show hears stories of childbirth around the world ahead of Mother's Day, and a look at whether there should be a latte levy on throwaway coffee cups.