14/03/2018 Victoria Derbyshire


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


14/03/2018

Victoria looks at the struggle of getting men to work with kids in nurseries, and tributes are paid to Professor Stephen Hawking, who has died at the age of 76.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 14/03/2018. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

I don't have much positive things

to say about Motor Neurone disease

0:00:100:00:13

but it taught me not to pity myself

and to get on with

0:00:130:00:16

what I still could do.

0:00:160:00:18

I'm happier now than before

0:00:180:00:19

I developed the condition.

0:00:190:00:25

'A brilliant and extraordinary

mind - one of the great

0:00:250:00:28

scientists of his generation' -

one of thousands of tributes to

0:00:280:00:32

Professor Stephen Hawking,

world-famous for his ground-breaking

0:00:320:00:35

work on black holes

and for re-defining perceptions

0:00:350:00:37

of people with disabilities,

has died at the age of 76.

0:00:370:00:41

We will be looking back at the life

and legacy of the most talked-about

0:00:410:00:44

scientist since Einstein.

0:00:440:00:49

Also - if your children go

to a nursery, chances that they're

0:00:490:00:52

taught by a man are incredibly slim.

0:00:520:00:54

Why?

0:00:540:00:55

There was a lot of stigma based

on negative stories out

0:00:550:01:01

there about men in childcare and,

you know, just children

0:01:010:01:06

being at harm and at risk and men

not being able to be nurturing

0:01:060:01:11

and men not being able to work

with children so small.

0:01:110:01:17

We've been exploring

why men are so unlikely

0:01:170:01:21

to join the profession -

why that's bad for our children

0:01:210:01:24

and we have exclusive details

on what is being recommended

0:01:240:01:26

to reverse the trend.

0:01:260:01:27

And Mr Twinkle Toes,

ballroom star Len Goodman,

0:01:270:01:29

is with us this morning.

0:01:290:01:31

We will be talking about Strictly

and the campaign he's spearheading

0:01:310:01:33

to try to stop over 60s falling

victim to bank scams.

0:01:330:01:41

Good morning, welcome

to our programme.

0:01:470:01:53

If you have a disability we want to

hear from you this morning, how

0:01:530:01:57

Professor Steven Hawking inspired

you. So significant how he

0:01:570:02:01

approached his motor neurone

disease, did his attitude towards

0:02:010:02:04

his disability affecting a positive

way the way that you approached

0:02:040:02:08

yours? We would love to talk to you

on the programme in the second hour

0:02:080:02:12

of the programme today. Send me an

e-mail, message as on Facebook or

0:02:120:02:16

use WhatsApp. Of course, that's our

top story today.

0:02:160:02:25

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

0:02:250:02:27

has died at the age of 76.

0:02:270:02:28

Hawking's fame came largely

from his best-selling book,

0:02:280:02:30

"A Brief History of Time"

which outlined his theories

0:02:300:02:32

about the universe.

0:02:320:02:40

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

0:02:410:02:43

neurone disease in 1964

and being told he had just

0:02:430:02:46

a few years to live.

0:02:460:02:47

Within the past few minutes,

Theresa May has described him

0:02:470:02:49

as "one of the great scientists

of his generation, whose courage,

0:02:490:02:52

humour and determination

to get the most from life

0:02:520:02:54

was an inspiration".

0:02:540:02:55

Nick Higham reports.

0:02:550:02:59

He was instantly recognisable

and utterly remarkable.

0:02:590:03:04

The visionary scientist,

helpless in his high-tech

0:03:040:03:07

wheelchair, who nonetheless

transformed our view

0:03:070:03:08

of the universe.

0:03:080:03:11

While a student, he developed

the first signs of motor neurone

0:03:110:03:14

disease.

0:03:140:03:16

Gradually his body shut down

until he could communicate only

0:03:160:03:21

using a computerised voice

synthesiser, controlled,

0:03:210:03:22

to start with, by hand.

0:03:220:03:24

It didn't hold him back.

0:03:240:03:29

I was never actually told that I had

only two years to live,

0:03:290:03:32

but I could see the doctors didn't

think my prospects were good.

0:03:320:03:40

His fame sprang from his book,

A Brief History of Time.

0:03:410:03:43

It sold 10 million copies.

0:03:430:03:44

But though many bought it,

rather fewer actually read it.

0:03:440:03:47

His theories about time,

space and black holes

0:03:470:03:49

were stupendously difficult

for non-specialists to grasp,

0:03:490:03:50

but he turned out to

have a genius for communication.

0:03:500:03:58

He gave lectures and interviews,

and became an unlikely celebrity.

0:03:580:04:00

His private life was complicated.

0:04:000:04:05

With his first wife, Jane,

he had three children and she looked

0:04:050:04:07

after him until, in 1990,

he left her for his nurse,

0:04:070:04:10

Elaine.

0:04:100:04:11

They eventually married, only

for claims to emerge that Hawking

0:04:110:04:13

had been physically abused.

0:04:130:04:15

Police investigated,

but the case was dropped

0:04:150:04:17

for lack of evidence.

0:04:170:04:18

The couple later divorced.

0:04:180:04:23

Too often we are told that these

are stupid questions to ask,

0:04:230:04:26

but this is said by grown-ups

who don't know the answers...

0:04:260:04:29

He never lost his sense of humour.

0:04:290:04:32

Though by the end, he could only

speak by twitching his cheek to move

0:04:320:04:35

an infrared beam.

0:04:350:04:37

I don't have much positive to say

about motor neurone disease,

0:04:370:04:41

but it taught me not

to pity myself and to get

0:04:410:04:44

on with what I still could do.

0:04:440:04:47

I'm happier now than before

I developed the condition.

0:04:470:04:52

In 2014, his life was dramatised

in The Theory of Everything,

0:04:520:04:55

with Eddie Redmayne playing Hawking.

0:04:550:04:56

..To see what happened

at the beginning of time itself.

0:04:560:04:59

Stephen, here you are.

0:04:590:05:03

At Cambridge, they unveiled a statue

of him, a rare honour

0:05:030:05:06

for someone still living.

0:05:060:05:09

But few did more to transform our

understanding of the universe

0:05:090:05:12

and to overcome personal challenges.

0:05:120:05:19

We will talk much more about Steven

Hawking through the programme this

0:05:190:05:22

morning.

0:05:220:05:23

Joanna Gosling is in the BBC

Newsroom with a summary

0:05:230:05:26

of the rest of the days news.

0:05:260:05:27

Theresa May is expected to announce

sanctions against Russia

0:05:270:05:30

after the Kremlin failed

to explain their role in a chemical

0:05:300:05:32

attack in Salisbury.

0:05:320:05:35

Last night, the Russian Embassy

hinted that the expulsion

0:05:350:05:37

of its diplomats from London

would have an impact on their

0:05:370:05:39

British counterparts in Moscow.

0:05:390:05:40

Jane-Frances Kelly reports.

0:05:400:05:43

It began as an attack

on the streets of Salisbury.

0:05:430:05:45

The poisoning of a former Russian

intelligence officer

0:05:450:05:47

and his daughter.

0:05:470:05:50

But there is now diplomatic deadlock

between Britain and Moscow.

0:05:500:05:55

I'm standing outside the Russian

embassy here in London

0:05:550:05:58

and the midnight deadline

has just passed.

0:05:580:06:02

The only reaction the British

government has got from the Russians

0:06:020:06:05

so far are angry denials

and the threat of retaliatory action

0:06:050:06:07

if they take measures

against Moscow.

0:06:070:06:13

They've also helpfully got

a screen outside here that

0:06:130:06:15

shows their Twitter feed,

and on it they say:

0:06:150:06:21

The Russian Foreign Minister,

Sergey Lavrov, has objected to only

0:06:280:06:30

being given 24 hours to respond

to the claim Russia used

0:06:300:06:33

a chemical weapon.

0:06:330:06:35

Russia should get ten days, he said,

accusing Britain of flouncing

0:06:350:06:38

the chemical weapons convention.

0:06:380:06:42

Meanwhile, in Salisbury,

painstaking work continues.

0:06:420:06:45

Police are appealing for witnesses

who might have seen Sergei

0:06:450:06:48

and Yulia Skripal in their red BMW

car on the day they were poisoned.

0:06:480:06:53

Separately a number of deaths

are also being reinvestigated

0:06:530:06:56

by police and MI5 after claims

of Russian involvement.

0:06:560:07:01

They include a man in his 60s found

dead in New Maldon on Monday,

0:07:010:07:05

who is believed to be Russian

businessman Nikolai Glushkov,

0:07:050:07:10

a friend of Boris Berezovsky,

who was found hanged

0:07:100:07:12

in his home in 2013.

0:07:120:07:14

This morning Theresa May will be

briefed by her national security

0:07:140:07:17

council before going to Parliament,

where she's expected to announce

0:07:170:07:19

a series of measures against Russia.

0:07:190:07:23

Jane-Frances Kelly, BBC News.

0:07:230:07:29

Let's talk to our assistant

political editor Norman Smith...

0:07:290:07:32

Is it clear what those measures are

likely to be?

We know the range that

0:07:320:07:36

Theresa May is thought to be looking

out, they include expelling Russian

0:07:360:07:42

diplomats based in London after the

murder of Alexander Litvinenko four

0:07:420:07:48

diplomats were expelled, so I think

we can expect considerably more to

0:07:480:07:51

be booted out this time. There are

also likely to be acid freezes,

0:07:510:07:56

travel bans on those closely

associated with President Putin. And

0:07:560:08:01

some suggestions that perhaps the

broadcasting licence for RTE may be

0:08:010:08:11

revoked, I think that is less

likely, it would be a gift for

0:08:110:08:14

President Putin in propaganda terms

of he was able to say that the West

0:08:140:08:19

was shutting down Russian

broadcasters and he has threatened

0:08:190:08:23

to retaliate against British media

in Russia but the key is a more

0:08:230:08:26

long-term range of measures which

will require international backing

0:08:260:08:32

from organisations like the EU, also

looking to America. Or at an further

0:08:320:08:37

sanctions. That may take an awful

lot longer to put in place. Although

0:08:370:08:42

following phone calls would Boris

Johnson and Theresa May and a number

0:08:420:08:45

of international leaders, they have

expressed support and there have

0:08:450:08:50

been expressions of solidarity

mailing them down to specific

0:08:500:08:55

commitments, that may be harder and

more time-consuming to put in place

0:08:550:09:00

-- mailing them down.

0:09:000:09:03

The government is to spend £50

million on trying to raise racial

0:09:030:09:06

and religious tensions.

0:09:060:09:09

It is one of a number of proposals

in the government's integrated

0:09:090:09:12

communities strategy,

which is to be published more

0:09:120:09:14

than a year after an independent

review found the country had become

0:09:140:09:17

more divided as it

had become diverse.

0:09:170:09:18

Here's our Home Editor,

Mark Easton.

0:09:180:09:20

17 years after race riots

in Bradford, an official report

0:09:200:09:25

warned of highly segregated

communities where people led

0:09:250:09:27

parallel lives, the city will now be

named among five places in England

0:09:270:09:30

that must adopt an integration plan.

0:09:300:09:37

The others Waltham Forest in London,

Peterborough, Walsall and Blackburn,

0:09:370:09:39

all areas with a history of racial

and ethnic tensions.

0:09:390:09:45

12 years ago, Blackburn

was highlighted as suffering

0:09:450:09:47

from deep segregation between white

and Asian communities.

0:09:470:09:50

To reduce tensions, teenagers

were bussed in from other

0:09:500:09:52

schools to integrate.

0:09:520:09:55

Pupils from a 99% white

secondary school made to meet

0:09:550:09:58

pupils from a 95% nonwhite

secondary across town.

0:09:580:10:02

Today's strategy suggests

more schemes like this.

0:10:020:10:06

It also proposes some extra support

for English-language classes,

0:10:060:10:08

state provision has halved

in the last few years,

0:10:080:10:11

new targeted help to improve

economic opportunities for people

0:10:110:10:17

in segregated communities,

particularly women,

0:10:170:10:19

and the promotion of pluralistic

British values by teachers.

0:10:190:10:25

The strategy is the latest in a long

line of government initiatives

0:10:250:10:27

to try and deal with one

of Britain's most sensitive

0:10:270:10:29

and enduring social challenges.

0:10:290:10:30

Mark Easton, BBC News.

0:10:300:10:33

Around a third of NHS clinics

and a quarter of private ones

0:10:330:10:37

offering breast implant surgery

in England have not sent any patient

0:10:370:10:39

data to a national safety registry.

0:10:390:10:46

NHS Digital set up the service

in 2016 to safeguard

0:10:460:10:48

patients after the PIP scandal,

when thousands of women

0:10:480:10:50

received faulty implants.

0:10:500:10:52

Women who have had surgery

are now being urged to make

0:10:520:10:54

sure their details are added

to the register.

0:10:540:10:59

The creators of The Crown have

admitted Claire Foy who portrays

0:10:590:11:02

the Queen was paid less

than her male counterpart.

0:11:020:11:07

Matt Smith's portrayal of a young

Duke of Edinburgh earned him more

0:11:070:11:10

than Foy's Golden Globe-winning

performance as Queen Elizabeth

0:11:100:11:12

in the Netflix drama.

0:11:120:11:16

The show's producers said Smith's

previous starring role

0:11:160:11:18

in Doctor Who meant he was paid more

than his co-star.

0:11:180:11:22

The University of Mosul, in Iraq -

which was left in ruins

0:11:220:11:25

by Islamic State militants -

is to begin re-stocking its library,

0:11:250:11:28

with new books donated from the UK.

0:11:280:11:30

It's believed that well over 100,000

manuscripts were destroyed

0:11:300:11:36

or looted during the IS occupation.

0:11:360:11:37

A lecturer told the BBC

he was so happy when the books

0:11:370:11:41

arrived from Britain, he danced.

0:11:410:11:45

That's a summary of the latest BBC

News, more at 9:30am.

0:11:450:11:50

Thank you. Thank you for your

messages about Professor Steven

0:11:500:11:53

Hawking.

We will focus on all areas of his

0:11:530:11:56

life today, his brilliant scientific

mind, the theoretical physics

0:11:560:12:01

breakthroughs and how he approached

his disability. Luke says that how

0:12:010:12:06

he inspired him was to never give up

and not focus on what you cannot do

0:12:060:12:10

but what you can.

Another says that Steven Hawking was

0:12:100:12:15

a great advocate for the NHS and

will be sorely missed, and another

0:12:150:12:19

says that he is an inspirational

role model as to what can be

0:12:190:12:23

achieved with someone with a

disability. His determination and

0:12:230:12:25

focus to keep going and keep

achieving professionally. Respect

0:12:250:12:31

and RIP. Thank you for those.

0:12:310:12:36

Time for a look at the sport. A

disappointing night for Manchester

0:12:360:12:44

United?

0:12:440:12:46

More than disappointing -

their opposition last night Sevilla

0:12:460:12:48

had more shots on goal than any team

to visit Old Trafford

0:12:480:12:51

since the great Real Madrid

a full five years ago...

0:12:510:12:58

And the manner of defeat has really

hurt the Manchester United fans -

0:12:580:13:01

a tradition of arrogant,

effective attacking football has

0:13:010:13:03

diminished in the past four or five

years but this performance may well

0:13:030:13:06

be worse than anything

they saw under David Moyes

0:13:060:13:08

or Louis Van Gaal -

there was a severe lack of urgency

0:13:080:13:11

and watching Jose Mourinho's team,

you really wouldn't have known

0:13:110:13:14

a place in the Champions

League was at stake...

0:13:140:13:18

The tie was poised at 0-0

after the first leg in Spain,

0:13:180:13:22

but with away goals counting double,

United looked like they

0:13:220:13:24

really hadn't realised.

0:13:240:13:26

Sevilla took control by scoring

a crucial away goal with less

0:13:260:13:29

than 20 minutes left.

0:13:290:13:33

The Spanish side put the tie to bed

with a second soon afterwards,

0:13:330:13:36

with Wissam Ben Yedder's second.

0:13:360:13:38

If they weren't angry enough,

Manchester United fans won't be

0:13:380:13:40

overly happy with Jose Mourinho's

comments after the match...

0:13:400:13:42

I sit in this chair twice in the

Champions League. And I walk out

0:13:420:13:51

with Manchester United at home at

Old Trafford. I sit in this chair

0:13:510:13:55

with Real Madrid, Manchester United

out... So I do not think it is

0:13:550:14:01

something new for the club. Of

course, being Manchester United

0:14:010:14:07

manager, and losing the Champions

League tie at home, that is

0:14:070:14:13

devastating.

0:14:130:14:18

The Chelsea game tonight is poised

at 1-1. They have not been beaten on

0:14:230:14:27

their last four fizzes away to beat

Barcelona at the Nou Camp.

0:14:270:14:33

And at the Winter Paralympics there

has been another medal for Great

0:14:330:14:35

Britain?

0:14:350:14:39

Yes, things going very well

for ParalympicsGB out in Pyeongchang

0:14:390:14:41

and especially for skiiers

Menna Fitzpatrick

0:14:410:14:43

and guide Jen Kehoe.

0:14:430:14:44

They've won their third medal

at the Games after finishing second

0:14:440:14:47

in the women's visually

impaired giant slalom...

0:14:470:14:51

It wasn't the best day for GB's

other entrants, Kelly Gallagher and

0:14:510:14:59

her guide, Millie Knight and Brett

Wild incident. But the medal tally

0:14:590:15:04

is at five so far in South Korea.

They are nearly at the target of

0:15:040:15:12

seven set by UK Sport.

0:15:120:15:18

Well, the beast from the east has

left Cheltenham racecourse with some

0:15:180:15:21

very heavy ground underfoot -

it made for hard work for the horses

0:15:210:15:24

and jockey's on the opening day

at the Festival but there was no

0:15:240:15:28

dampening of spirits...

0:15:280:15:29

In fact, the sun was shining

as Buveur D'Air took

0:15:290:15:31

the big race on day one...

0:15:310:15:32

The Nicky Henderson trained horse

was the odds-on favourite

0:15:320:15:35

going into the Champion Hurdle,

but he and jockey Barry Geraghty

0:15:350:15:38

were pushed all the way

by the seven to one shot Melon,

0:15:380:15:41

winning by barely

a neck on the line.

0:15:410:15:43

It means Buveaur D'Air

retains his title and gives

0:15:430:15:45

Henderson his seventh winner

in the race.

0:15:450:15:50

The Queen Mother Champion Chase

is the feature race today -

0:15:500:15:53

Altior is the favourite -

another Nicky Henderson horse.

0:15:530:15:55

Coverage with John Inverdale

on the team 5live from 1pm.

0:15:550:16:03

Thank you very much, for the moment.

0:16:090:16:11

If your child is under 5 -

the chances of a man

0:16:110:16:14

teaching them are very slim.

0:16:140:16:15

The numbers of men working as early

years teachers has always been low.

0:16:150:16:18

In fact, for the last 20 years,

it's been around 2% of the total

0:16:180:16:21

workforce in the sector.

0:16:210:16:22

There are currently around 25,000

job vacancies and the Government has

0:16:220:16:25

recognised how important men

in early years can be

0:16:250:16:28

to the children they teach.

0:16:280:16:31

Efforts have been made by small

groups across the country

0:16:310:16:33

to increase those numbers,

and our reporter Chris Hemmings has

0:16:330:16:36

been given exclusive access

to proposals being drawn up

0:16:360:16:38

to advise the Government

on how they can help.

0:16:380:16:46

MUSIC

0:16:520:16:53

What one?

0:16:530:16:54

Where is your puppet one?

0:16:540:16:55

If you send your child to a nursery,

chances are the don't have

0:16:550:16:59

a male teacher.

0:16:590:17:06

A lot of men don't see it

as a man's job, you know?

0:17:060:17:09

And a lot of men are not aware

that the role actually exists.

0:17:090:17:12

There's about 400,000 early years

educators in the UK, and about 98%

0:17:120:17:15

of those are female.

0:17:150:17:16

Many people think they

will just be average

0:17:160:17:18

baby-sitting, kind of thing.

0:17:180:17:19

But what they actually

learn from the

0:17:190:17:24

early years really

sets them up for life.

0:17:240:17:26

Men are not being encouraged

into the profession.

0:17:260:17:28

And when they do take

jobs, they still face

0:17:280:17:30

prejudices.

0:17:300:17:31

Because I was a man,

it wouldn't be appropriate for me to

0:17:310:17:35

work in early years because of

safeguarding concerns, they were

0:17:350:17:37

worried particularly

what the parents might think.

0:17:370:17:40

The government said they need

help addressing the

0:17:400:17:42

problem and a task force

was set up to advise them.

0:17:420:17:50

We've been given exclusive

access to what the

0:17:520:17:54

government is being urged to do.

0:17:540:17:58

Well done, give yourselves a clap.

0:17:580:18:06

Jamal Campbell is a rarity.

0:18:080:18:10

He's a member of the

London early years

0:18:100:18:12

foundation, and part of the just 2%

of the teaching bid teachers under

0:18:120:18:15

five who are male.

0:18:150:18:16

He started teaching 16

years ago, and is still

0:18:160:18:18

frustrated by how little status

is given to his job.

0:18:180:18:21

We deserve more.

0:18:210:18:24

We deserve more because it is such

an important profession, you know,

0:18:240:18:32

people are entrusting their

precious, their babies to us to

0:18:350:18:38

care for them, and teach

them and nurture them.

0:18:380:18:40

You know, we spend more time

with their children than

0:18:400:18:42

they do.

0:18:420:18:43

And we're helping them so when they

go to primary school, when

0:18:430:18:46

they go to secondary school,

they've got the tools.

0:18:460:18:54

So, what do you think it is that

puts men off coming into

0:18:570:19:01

the profession in the first place?

0:19:010:19:02

The thing about a lot of men

is a lot of them haven't tapped

0:19:020:19:06

into that side of their personality

yet, but I

0:19:060:19:08

think what will draw people

to the profession is if they had

0:19:080:19:11

more knowledge about the profession,

they will understand that...

0:19:110:19:17

They will get to see the benefits

they will have of having a balanced

0:19:170:19:20

workforce, you know?

0:19:200:19:21

Do you think there is

a stigma attached to it?

0:19:210:19:25

Yes, there is a lot of stigma based

on negative stories that are out

0:19:250:19:29

there about men in childcare,

you know, and just children

0:19:290:19:35

being at risk, men not

being able to be nurturing,

0:19:350:19:40

men not being able to work

with children so small.

0:19:400:19:43

Some children out there

may not have a male

0:19:430:19:47

in their home, there needs

to be balance, they need

0:19:470:19:49

to have that interaction.

0:19:490:19:52

It breaks down the whole, you have

to be macho to be a male thing.

0:19:520:19:56

You know?

0:19:560:19:58

It shows them that men can be silly,

men can play, men can make

0:19:580:20:02

jokes, men can give you a hug,

you know, if you've fallen down.

0:20:020:20:07

Basically we're positive role models

for them and we show them a whole

0:20:070:20:10

different side of this

being a male thing.

0:20:100:20:17

I'm going to see who's

going to choose one of our songs.

0:20:170:20:20

Me, me!

0:20:200:20:21

I'm looking to see who's listening.

0:20:210:20:24

Most nurseries in the UK

are privatised, but some councils do

0:20:240:20:27

still provide early years education.

0:20:270:20:29

We asked each of those councils how

many male nursery teachers they

0:20:290:20:32

employ.

0:20:320:20:36

And of the 38 who told us

they still have in-house nursery

0:20:360:20:40

services, 26 do not hire

a single male teacher.

0:20:400:20:42

So, what's putting men off?

0:20:420:20:48

James is just 23 years old,

and in January this year,

0:20:480:20:53

parents had him removed

from a class on the

0:20:530:20:56

first day of his very first job.

0:20:560:20:58

I had been there

maybe 20 minutes,

0:20:580:21:00

"I'm sorry, we need to move you.

0:21:000:21:02

I'll explain in the corridor."

0:21:020:21:05

And they explained that

because I was a man,

0:21:050:21:10

it wouldn't be appropriate for me

to work in early years, basically

0:21:100:21:16

because of safeguarding concerns,

they were worried particularly what

0:21:160:21:20

the parents might think

and stuff like that.

0:21:200:21:28

So I ended up being moved to Year 4.

0:21:290:21:31

I was obviously shocked as you might

expect, but also I had

0:21:310:21:35

heard stories and rumours that this

was the kind of thing you could kind

0:21:350:21:38

of expect if you are

a man in early years -

0:21:380:21:41

there would be kind of an air

of suspicion around you,

0:21:410:21:44

men can't be trusted.

0:21:440:21:48

It was more of a, yes,

this isn't right that

0:21:480:21:52

is happening to me, but it's kind

of to be expected.

0:21:520:21:55

That must have been

heartbreaking for you.

0:21:550:21:58

Yes, it was tough,

I couldn't believe that after

0:21:580:22:03

they had fed back to me at the end

of the day really positively,

0:22:030:22:08

they had then gone and said

to the agency, we don't want him

0:22:080:22:11

because we need to put

someone in reception,

0:22:110:22:14

and from what they had indicated

through the conversation I had had

0:22:140:22:21

at the school, it was more

because I am a man,

0:22:210:22:24

I couldn't have been there -

but if I had been a woman,

0:22:240:22:27

I would have been kept

for a second day.

0:22:270:22:29

Almost exactly a year ago,

a government report highlighted the

0:22:290:22:31

lack of gender diversity and clearly

stated they wanted more men to

0:22:310:22:34

choose to work in early years.

0:22:340:22:36

It highlighted that

more men would help

0:22:360:22:38

plug the near 25,000

early years job vacancies

0:22:380:22:41

and would increase the number

of male role models

0:22:410:22:44

for children, and also recognise

that children from lone parent

0:22:440:22:49

families spend very

little time with men, and

0:22:490:22:51

so, in their own words, male early

years workers are therefore vital

0:22:510:22:54

in making sure young children have

quality contact time with men.

0:22:540:22:58

As part of that early years

strategy, the government

0:22:580:23:00

set up a task force.

0:23:000:23:04

Its aim was to advise them on how

to improve gender diversity.

0:23:040:23:07

It is chaired by

David Wright, he runs

0:23:070:23:12

Paint Box nurseries in Southampton,

and has helped set up a network of

0:23:120:23:15

men in early years across the UK.

0:23:150:23:16

We do have a problem

attracting good staff,

0:23:160:23:19

and 50% of the population

are excluded from that

0:23:190:23:22

because they are not

interested, they don't know

0:23:220:23:28

that they are welcome and there

is a career for them they are.

0:23:280:23:31

So, what is stopping them?

0:23:310:23:33

I think because it is mostly

female staff working here,

0:23:330:23:36

they do act in some sense

as gatekeepers, and I think

0:23:360:23:39

if you were a 16-year-old lad

and you were

0:23:390:23:41

looking to come and work

with young children,

0:23:410:23:45

you would be dissuaded by your

parents, you would probably be

0:23:450:23:51

dissuaded by careers advisers and

teachers, and then there is

0:23:510:23:53

the whole issue around your sense of

masculinity - what do

0:23:530:23:58

you tell your friends down

the pub that you're doing?

0:23:580:24:02

And you're entering into a workforce

where you would be in the

0:24:020:24:05

minority - and again

that is isolating.

0:24:050:24:07

So, the percentage of the workforce

that is male has been

0:24:070:24:09

about 2% for as long as you can

remember, 20 years at least.

0:24:090:24:12

Has the government done

enough in that time to

0:24:120:24:15

try to increase that number?

0:24:150:24:16

I think, to be perfectly

honest, I don't

0:24:160:24:18

think it has been on the

government's agenda at all.

0:24:180:24:20

I don't think it is

something that anybody

0:24:200:24:24

has really looked at,

you know, there have

0:24:240:24:28

been a lot of angst,

a lot of discussions around this,

0:24:280:24:31

a lot of people have tried

to do their own little bit but it

0:24:310:24:34

hasn't been coordinated

and it hasn't had

0:24:340:24:36

leadership or direction from the

government.

0:24:360:24:38

And that is what you're

hoping for now?

0:24:380:24:40

Yes.

0:24:400:24:41

The task force will

recommend improving pay and

0:24:410:24:42

working conditions.

0:24:420:24:44

And they want a national

campaign to promote mixed

0:24:440:24:46

gender teams.

0:24:460:24:47

It will suggest improved

careers advice and training

0:24:470:24:49

for men,

0:24:490:24:50

and would like a target set,

up from the current 2%.

0:24:500:24:52

And crucially suggests

Ofsted could include

0:24:520:24:54

gender diversity in their

inspection criteria.

0:24:540:25:01

We already know boys are twice

as likely as girls to

0:25:010:25:04

lack basic language skills

by the time they start school.

0:25:040:25:06

And that gap only widens over time.

0:25:060:25:13

So, could men in early

years settings actually

0:25:130:25:15

help make a difference?

0:25:150:25:16

# When I come to nursery

hear me shout

0:25:160:25:18

# Stretch up tall and jump about!

#

0:25:180:25:21

Come on, then, back to our story.

0:25:210:25:26

So, this school in London

has spent the last

0:25:260:25:28

ten years ensuring male and female

teachers spend equal time with

0:25:280:25:31

their pupils.

0:25:310:25:33

And they say the results as those

pupils progress through the school

0:25:330:25:36

speak for themselves.

0:25:360:25:42

So, we put people where their best

skills are, we're good

0:25:420:25:50

at picking up teacher training,

when we spot a talent.

0:25:500:25:54

We have seen

men who have a particular bent

0:25:540:25:56

for teaching early years children,

and we encourage them

0:25:560:25:59

by giving them

opportunities to work and develop

0:25:590:26:00

their careers in the early years.

0:26:000:26:02

Tell me about the research you been

doing at the school and the effect

0:26:020:26:05

it has been having

on the children here

0:26:050:26:08

The aim was always to narrow

the gap between girls' and

0:26:080:26:11

boys' attainment.

0:26:110:26:14

The attainment in the school over

the years has continued

0:26:140:26:16

to rise, ever since we have

been keeping records.

0:26:160:26:18

Part of that is to make sure

the gender difference is

0:26:180:26:21

as narrow as possible,

and a strategy for

0:26:210:26:23

doing that is having a workforce

where the teaching methods

0:26:230:26:27

we use on the children are things

that boys in particular would

0:26:270:26:32

respond to, as well as the girls.

0:26:320:26:36

Our girls do extremely well, but so

do our boys, that's the point.

0:26:360:26:39

Why do you think

it is important that

0:26:390:26:41

the number of men in early years

education has increased?

0:26:410:26:44

They see men as positives,

men reading books,

0:26:440:26:45

men talking about things

and being successful in careers,

0:26:450:26:48

and there has been a tendency

in the past for most

0:26:480:26:51

of primary education to be heavily

dominated by women, so it is

0:26:510:26:55

important they see men are nurturing

and not just sort of sporting heroes

0:26:550:26:58

or adventurous people.

0:26:580:27:02

In Bradford, 7% of nursery

teachers employed by

0:27:020:27:04

the council are male.

0:27:040:27:06

That's about two and a half times

the national average.

0:27:060:27:12

Some nurseries there encourage dads

to run reading groups.

0:27:120:27:15

They say it's not only good

for the kids but it's a great

0:27:150:27:19

pipeline for more men

to join the profession.

0:27:190:27:22

Bilal is one of the men working

in Bradford's nurseries.

0:27:220:27:26

He helped engage this man,

whose children attend the nursery,

0:27:260:27:29

and is now training to become

an early years teacher.

0:27:290:27:32

We do a lot of sessions that

are particularly designed for dads.

0:27:320:27:36

We want them to be integrated

with the rest of the nursery, so

0:27:360:27:41

how we do that is by the male

practitioners and even the female

0:27:410:27:44

practitioners making a conscious

effort, you know, trying

0:27:440:27:46

to get the dads involved,

talking to them, engaging with them

0:27:460:27:50

in conversations,

meaningful conversations.

0:27:500:27:58

So you about to start training

to become a practitioner.

0:27:580:28:01

Tell us what your journey was.

0:28:010:28:02

My daughter used to come

to this nursery, Saint

0:28:020:28:04

Edmunds.

0:28:040:28:05

When I saw Bilal here, he was young

and doing something about

0:28:050:28:08

it and dealing with kids,

and I thought to myself,

0:28:080:28:11

I have never seen anyone doing this,

and this

0:28:110:28:13

basically touched me in terms

of that I could think

0:28:130:28:18

about coming to the sector.

0:28:180:28:21

I have got more into it and been

doing voluntary work with

0:28:210:28:23

Saint Edmunds and came up

with the idea that this

0:28:230:28:26

is something I can do.

0:28:260:28:27

It is often said there is a stigma

around men coming into this role.

0:28:270:28:32

How important was it for you to have

someone like Bilal as a role model?

0:28:320:28:36

To be honest, I would say

he was the one that when I looked at

0:28:360:28:39

him as a young person, he was

passionate about his work because I

0:28:390:28:42

have seen him working.

0:28:420:28:44

He used to be a key worker

with my daughter, and I

0:28:440:28:46

thought, OK, if he can

do it, anyone can.

0:28:460:28:54

Research shows that the more dads

are involved with their

0:28:560:28:59

children from an early age, the

better the educational attainment

0:28:590:29:01

levels.

0:29:010:29:02

Do you find that?

0:29:020:29:03

When fathers attend the sessions,

it is not the norm, people tend

0:29:030:29:07

to think my dad is doing this,

they tend to concentrate

0:29:070:29:11

more on what their dad

is helping them do.

0:29:110:29:16

If they are concentrating,

they are picking it up more.

0:29:160:29:22

The dad session used to be small,

but now it is picking up.

0:29:220:29:29

More dads are in these groups.

0:29:290:29:31

Do you think that is

because more dads like Bilal

0:29:310:29:35

are engaged in the sector?

0:29:350:29:36

More dads are now engaged?

0:29:360:29:37

Yes, because of my

personal experience.

0:29:370:29:41

If I had not seen Bilal or any other

male working in the sector,

0:29:410:29:44

I would not even think about coming.

0:29:440:29:49

Despite that figure of 2% not having

changed for almost 20 years,

0:29:490:29:57

thanks to the efforts of people

like Jamal, Bob and Bilal,

0:29:570:30:00

there are pockets across the country

where those numbers are improving.

0:30:000:30:02

And of course, David

and his team want that

0:30:020:30:05

to change across the country.

0:30:050:30:08

We invited the Education Secretary

to come on the programme but instead

0:30:080:30:11

Department for Education gave

us a statement.

0:30:110:30:12

They told us they "want young

children to have both male

0:30:120:30:15

and female role models

in their early years and having

0:30:150:30:18

a diverse range of people working

in childcare has an important part

0:30:180:30:21

to play in this.

0:30:210:30:22

They've set up a group to look

at the number of men working

0:30:220:30:26

in early years in more

depth and to consider

0:30:260:30:30

what more could be done

to encourage men to consider

0:30:300:30:32

this rewarding career.

0:30:320:30:36

If you are a man working in early

years, let me know your experience.

0:30:360:30:40

E-mail us.

0:30:400:30:44

Still to come...

0:30:440:30:45

More on the incredible life

of Stephen Hawking -

0:30:450:30:47

who has passed away

at the age of 76.

0:30:470:30:49

We'll look back on how he changed

the way we look at science.

0:30:490:30:52

And former Strictly star Len Goodman

tells about about a new campaign

0:30:520:30:55

he's heading to stop the over 60s

falling victim to bank scams.

0:30:550:30:58

Time for the latest news -

here's Joanna Gosling.

0:31:020:31:10

Britain's most famous scientist

Professor Steven Hawking has died at

0:31:130:31:16

the age of 76, his fame came from

his bestselling book, A Brief

0:31:160:31:21

History of Time, outlining his

theories of the universe. He had a

0:31:210:31:24

brilliant career despite being

diagnosed with motor neurone disease

0:31:240:31:27

in 1964 and being told he had only a

few years to live.

0:31:270:31:31

Theresa May is expected to announce

sanctions against Russia today

0:31:310:31:33

after the Kremlin failed

to explain their role in a chemical

0:31:330:31:36

attack in Salisbury.

0:31:360:31:37

The Prime Minister will address

Parliament after chairing a meeting

0:31:370:31:40

of the National Security Council.

0:31:400:31:41

Last night, the Russian Embassy

hinted that the expulsion

0:31:410:31:43

of its diplomats from London

would have an impact on their

0:31:430:31:46

British counterparts in Moscow.

0:31:460:31:52

Five councils in England will be

asked to draw up plans to improve

0:31:520:31:55

community cohesion in their areas as

a part of proposals on wider

0:31:550:32:00

integration. In the integrated

amenity green paper, they want to

0:32:000:32:07

promote diversity in schools, and

language tuition for non-English

0:32:070:32:11

speakers.

0:32:110:32:12

Around a third of NHS clinics

and a quarter of private ones

0:32:120:32:15

offering breast implant surgery

in England have not sent any patient

0:32:150:32:17

data to a national safety registry.

0:32:170:32:19

NHS Digital set up the service

in 2016 to safeguard

0:32:190:32:21

patients after the PIP scandal,

when thousands of women

0:32:210:32:23

received faulty implants.

0:32:230:32:26

Women who have had surgery

are now being urged to make

0:32:260:32:28

sure their details are added

to the register.

0:32:280:32:34

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

0:32:340:32:40

Here's some sport now with Hugh.

0:32:400:32:42

Manchester United boss

Jose Mourinho says he doesn't

0:32:420:32:43

want to make a drama

of the Champions League.

0:32:430:32:48

Their last 16 exit at the hands of

Sevilla last night. They were beaten

0:32:480:32:53

2-1 at Old Trafford to miss out on

the quarter finals. After a

0:32:530:32:58

lacklustre display, Jose Mourinho

said he had no regrets.

0:32:580:33:03

Chelsea take a 1-1 draw to Barcelona

for their second leg later.

0:33:030:33:06

Manager Antonio Conte

says his players will have to suffer

0:33:060:33:08

for periods away against the team

top of the Spanish top flight...

0:33:080:33:11

Great Britain's Menna Fitzpatrick

and her guide Jen Kehoe have

0:33:110:33:13

won their third medal

at the Winter Paralympics

0:33:130:33:15

with silver in the women's visually

impaired giant slalom.

0:33:150:33:17

It takes Britain's tally

in Pyeongchang up to 5...

0:33:170:33:22

Buveur D'Air retained his

Champion Hurdle title on the opening

0:33:220:33:25

day of the Cheltenham Festival.

0:33:250:33:26

The 6-4 on favourite ridden

by Barry Geraghty gave trainer

0:33:260:33:28

Nicky Henderson a seventh victory

in the race.

0:33:280:33:33

That's all of

0:33:330:33:35

the sport for now, more after 10am.

Good morning.

0:33:350:33:41

The government is to spend

50 million pounds trying to create

0:33:410:33:44

more cohesive communities,

especially in five towns and cities

0:33:440:33:46

marked by ethnic and religious

divisions: Bradford,

0:33:460:33:48

Blackburn, Peterborough, Walsall

and Waltham Forest in London.

0:33:480:33:53

There will also be help for people

wanting to improve their spoken

0:33:530:33:55

English and for women wanting

to find jobs.

0:33:550:34:03

Dame Louise Casey

0:34:070:34:09

led the government's review. You

pulled no punches?

I published that

0:34:090:34:16

review at the back end of 2016. I

spent a couple of years, by the time

0:34:160:34:23

we published, looking at some of the

dynamics happening in our

0:34:230:34:26

communities today. I felt, and I

still do, that we are more divided

0:34:260:34:30

than we should be as a nation. That

there are pockets of isolation,

0:34:300:34:34

where it isn't just poverty and

social disadvantage that is going on

0:34:340:34:39

but I would worry about the rights

of women in those sorts of areas as

0:34:390:34:43

well. That isn't just Muslim areas,

there are other significant

0:34:430:34:47

religious minorities that, again,

are not necessarily embracing what I

0:34:470:34:51

would want people to embrace, that

you are equal to a man, or if you

0:34:510:34:57

are gay, you should not be punished,

you should respect differences

0:34:570:35:01

surrounding race and religion. What

I said was that the solution to that

0:35:010:35:07

is obviously things like English

language being a leveller, if

0:35:070:35:10

everybody speaks the same language,

when women suffer domestic violence

0:35:100:35:14

they do not need a man to interpret

for them or to

0:35:140:35:21

for them or to take their son into a

Doctor 's surgery because they do

0:35:220:35:24

not speak enough English. If you do

not have the language, you are not

0:35:240:35:28

equal. Let alone getting a job. I

did focus on issues surrounding

0:35:280:35:32

women.

And you talked about setting

a date by which everyone should be

0:35:320:35:37

speaking English, is that correct?

Did not set that out in the strategy

0:35:370:35:40

but I said we should have an English

language strategy that makes sure. I

0:35:400:35:45

feel like the Moore, a year later,

that actually it would be really

0:35:450:35:50

good if we did something big and

bold around English language.

The

0:35:500:35:55

Communities Secretary himself, Sajid

Javid, he's talking about various

0:35:550:35:59

measures we could take to improve

integration, said on the radio this

0:35:590:36:03

morning that his mother took ten

years to learn English. Is that

0:36:030:36:07

long? -- is that too long?

We had to

remember that the government cut

0:36:070:36:13

significantly, and he is very clear

that they did. He does not pretend

0:36:130:36:16

otherwise. He has been very

straight, over a long period of time

0:36:160:36:21

we cut English language classes and

I think that was a mistake. But I do

0:36:210:36:25

think those English language classes

should be targeted at a working age.

0:36:250:36:29

Women, men, anyone. But working age

people who do not have English,

0:36:290:36:35

personally, I would set a date. It

is or is helpful to say, look, let's

0:36:350:36:40

take five years, let's work through

this. Let's get to a point.

0:36:400:36:44

Governments have done that on other

issues, I don't see why they can't

0:36:440:36:47

in this.

Five years to learn it if

you do not already speak it. Why is

0:36:470:36:54

it important, for example, that

children mix, particularly, in faith

0:36:540:36:58

schools? Not just one faith, in a

lot of faith schools, some children

0:36:580:37:02

can opt out of particular lessons,

like sport come on religious

0:37:020:37:06

grounds?

If it is state schools, I

think, look, we have reached a point

0:37:060:37:12

where actually, doing sport, going

to the theatre, enjoying music. I

0:37:120:37:18

realise it isn't as harmful and

difficult as, say, teaching children

0:37:180:37:24

in segregated environments, telling

them that women are not equal to men

0:37:240:37:27

and their place is in the home, not

work. It is and has harmful as that

0:37:270:37:31

but I would like every child growing

up in this country to experience the

0:37:310:37:35

full country. I'm not going to die

in a ditch over it but I do think it

0:37:350:37:40

is daft. I think it is wrong, it is

common sense. It is also

0:37:400:37:45

caricaturing vast numbers of people

from religious minorities who

0:37:450:37:49

actually really want their children

to enjoy everything. They want their

0:37:490:37:52

children to go to the theatre, to

enjoy everything on offer. We are

0:37:520:37:56

only talking about a minority of

people who do not want to be part of

0:37:560:38:02

that and we should call it out.

And

how do you, we have spoken about

0:38:020:38:07

this every day this week because of

what happened in Telford, and in

0:38:070:38:11

certain grooming abuse scandals,

those in authority have not had the

0:38:110:38:16

confidence to call out, in some

cases, horrific criminal behaviour

0:38:160:38:20

for fear of being accused of being

racist. How do you give people

0:38:200:38:23

confidence to call out, as you put

it, without that worry?

I

0:38:230:38:36

it, without that worry?

I think more

people need to do it and not be

0:38:370:38:38

afraid to do so. That's one of the

reasons why think it is good the

0:38:380:38:41

government has published an

integration strategy. It is good

0:38:410:38:43

that Sajid Javid himself without

today saying that we need to pull

0:38:430:38:45

together. He is talking about his

own experiences. His views on music

0:38:450:38:48

in schools was stronger than mine.

But you cannot say to everybody

0:38:480:38:50

else, it is your responsibility. I

think that government and leaders

0:38:500:38:54

need to take responsibility. When

they don't, bad stuff happens. I

0:38:540:38:57

spent 6-9 months of my life in

Rotherham. I met the women who were

0:38:570:39:02

groomed. There was a dynamic to it

that was about a wrong

0:39:020:39:06

interpretation or a race. It is all

wrong. It brings every single person

0:39:060:39:11

from Pakistani or Muslim heritage

into disrepute. Those men are not

0:39:110:39:16

representative of that community.

But by leaders not calling out, it

0:39:160:39:21

gives the far right grounds to go,

well, look at you, look at you!

0:39:210:39:27

That's what we need to stop, there

is an extreme far right that is not

0:39:270:39:31

mainstream, does not represent

Britain, and it's racist. That is

0:39:310:39:35

not a British tradition or culture.

The same way that we have Islamic

0:39:350:39:40

extremist thoughts, they are not

mainstream either but if we do not

0:39:400:39:43

talk about them, and we do not own

them, we end up in difficult places.

0:39:430:39:47

Thank you very much for coming on

the programme. Dame Louise Casey.

0:39:470:39:51

Your views are welcome of course.

0:39:510:39:55

"There are physicists in a thousand

year's time who will still be

0:39:550:39:58

talking about Hawking" -

that's what Brian Cox has said this

0:39:580:40:04

morning about the legacy

of Professor Stephen Hawking,

0:40:040:40:07

who has died at the age of 76.

0:40:070:40:14

The most-talked about

scientist since Einstein,

0:40:140:40:16

he turned theoretical

0:40:160:40:17

physics into best-selling books,

changed perceptions of people

0:40:170:40:19

with disabilities and made numerous

cameo TV appearances.

0:40:190:40:23

Have a look...

0:40:230:40:31

Theoretical physics is one of the

few fields in which being disabled

0:40:320:40:35

is no handicap. It is all in the

mind.

0:40:350:40:44

I find humour and a few jokes are a

great help in lectures in the

0:40:440:40:51

mysteries of the universe.

I cannot

believe someone I've never heard of

0:40:510:40:54

this hanging out with a guy like me.

It's closing time, who is paying the

0:40:540:40:57

tab...

I am... I didn't say that!

Yes I did... D'oh!

You really didn't

0:40:570:41:13

like our paper?

I liked it very

much. The premise is intriguing.

0:41:130:41:19

Then why are you attacking us?

If

you were sitting in a chair for 40

0:41:190:41:23

years, you would get bored too.

The

quantum fluctuations in the universe

0:41:230:41:30

will not change the cards in your

hand. I call, you are bluffing! And

0:41:300:41:34

you will lose...

Albert!

0:41:340:41:45

you will lose...

Albert!

What if I

reversed the process all the way

0:41:450:41:47

back to see what happened at the

beginning of time itself?

0:41:470:41:53

If Eddie Redmayne won an Oscar for

playing me, it would make up in some

0:41:530:41:56

way for the fact that I am unlikely

to win a Nobel Prize!

0:41:560:42:04

I hope my example will show

disability can be no barrier. One

0:42:140:42:20

can achieve anything, if one is

determined enough.

0:42:200:42:23

Professor Hawkins's children have

paid tribute to their father.

0:42:290:42:34

In a statement, Lucy,

Robert and Tim said:

0:42:340:42:41

Elsewhere, the Prime

Minister has led tributes

0:43:000:43:02

to Professor Hawking.

0:43:020:43:05

Brian Cox said:

0:43:150:43:17

Nasa said:

0:43:320:43:35

The astronaut Chris Hadfield said:

0:43:470:43:53

We have lost a truly beautiful mind,

0:43:530:43:55

an astonishing scientist

and the funniest man I have ever had

0:43:550:43:57

the pleasure to meet.

0:43:570:43:58

And in a statement,

Eddie Redmayne, who won

0:43:580:44:04

an Oscar for his portrayal

of Professor Hawking said: "We have

0:44:040:44:07

lost a truly beautiful mind,

an astonishing scientist

0:44:070:44:09

and the funniest man I have ever had

the pleasure to meet."

0:44:090:44:14

Now, either that was Eddie Redmayne

or Chris Hadfield, unless they have

0:44:140:44:17

both come up with remarkably similar

tributes! I will work that out for

0:44:170:44:21

you in the next hour of the

programme. And your own tributes are

0:44:210:44:25

really welcomed this morning.

0:44:250:44:29

Next...

0:44:290:44:30

The reaction of Russia

to Theresa May's ultimatum

0:44:300:44:32

was probably predictable.

0:44:320:44:33

She'd said she wanted

answers to questions

0:44:330:44:35

about the poisoning by midnight.

0:44:350:44:39

They didn't wait until midnight

before the message came back.

0:44:390:44:43

That they would not be providing any

information about the poisoning in

0:44:430:44:46

such a short space of time and they

would not without being provided

0:44:460:44:52

with a sample. The Russian

ambassador to the EU has made clear

0:44:520:44:56

that the issuing of the deadline did

not go down well in Moscow.

0:44:560:45:02

Russia is not a country to be spoken

to in the language of ultimatums.

It

0:45:020:45:10

is high time that the United Kingdom

learned that.

0:45:100:45:16

learned that.

Now the ball is in

Theresa May's court as she meets her

0:45:190:45:23

National Security Council to decide

how to respond.

0:45:230:45:29

We can speak now to

Professor Robert Service -

0:45:290:45:32

he was an expert witness

during the Alexander Litvinenko

0:45:320:45:34

inquiry and is a Russian

historian, to Mary Dejevsky -

0:45:340:45:37

Former Moscow Correspondent

for The Times and to Anna Belkina -

0:45:370:45:39

Deputy Editor in Chief

of the Russian State

0:45:390:45:41

Broadcaster, RT.

0:45:410:45:42

Thank you all of you for talking to

us. Mary, what happens now?

Well,

0:45:420:45:49

this is a big question. I think it

was totally unrealistic of Theresa

0:45:490:45:54

May actually to set a 36 hour

deadline. Not because fullness of

0:45:540:46:00

things 36 hours is unreasonable, but

because it's unreasonable in the

0:46:000:46:04

Kremlin's timescale. Whatever the

subject was, they are not going to

0:46:040:46:10

respond to anything within 36 hours

and it's particularly bad week for

0:46:100:46:14

the Kremlin in terms of deadlines

because you've got a brother until

0:46:140:46:17

election on Sunday and although we

may say, well, it's not a proper

0:46:170:46:23

election, Vladimir Putin is bound to

be re-elected, nonetheless, that is

0:46:230:46:27

what is at the forefront of the

Kremlin's attention right now, not

0:46:270:46:31

what happened in a provincial

British city ten days ago. So, what

0:46:310:46:36

I actually think is that far from...

Russia has, if you like, flouted the

0:46:360:46:45

deadline, but what it hasn't done,

which is interesting to me, it has

0:46:450:46:50

not refused to engage with the

request. It's basically throwing it

0:46:500:46:52

back to the UK and said, well, you

are accusing us of a chemical

0:46:520:46:58

weapons violation, you are signed up

to the convention, as we are, so

0:46:580:47:02

abide by the terms of it, and that

means providing the evidence and it

0:47:020:47:07

means a ten day wait, a 10-day

period of grace for Russia to

0:47:070:47:13

respond. And I think that is a real

response and something that the

0:47:130:47:17

British really have to take into

account.

Robert, what do you think

0:47:170:47:23

will happen now? Theresa May has to

do something, doesn't she?

She has

0:47:230:47:27

to do something but she has to give

the Russians time, as Mary has just

0:47:270:47:35

been saying.

There will not be more

time now. The deadline has passed.

0:47:350:47:40

That was the time. It was a

unilateral deadline. It is

0:47:400:47:45

understandable the British want a

response, but was it seriously

0:47:450:47:51

expecting the Russians to...

Do you

think she will now find some wriggle

0:47:510:47:55

room to give them more time or will

this mean the expulsion of

0:47:550:47:58

diplomats, clamping down on Russian

money in London?

I think what has to

0:47:580:48:06

happen is that the British

government has to come clean with

0:48:060:48:10

the British Society as to what, in

broad terms, it knows about what

0:48:100:48:20

happened.

Why does it need to do

that before they can do something?

0:48:200:48:26

Because we are not children. The

British government the last time

0:48:260:48:30

around with Alexander Litvinenko

setup an enquiry which said that on

0:48:300:48:36

the balance of probability,

Litvinenko was killed on the orders

0:48:360:48:42

of Vladimir Putin. But that was it,

there was no further information

0:48:420:48:46

given, and this isn't a way that it

is sensible to treat the British

0:48:460:48:53

Society and it is not a way to get

credit with the Russian society. So

0:48:530:48:57

I think we need a broader scope for

information and not to treat

0:48:570:49:09

everything in this highly secretive

way. It just doesn't work with

0:49:090:49:12

Russians.

Let me bring in Anna if I

may, deputy editor in chief of

0:49:120:49:18

Russia today, the Russian state

broadcaster. What do you think will

0:49:180:49:25

happen now?

Well, in terms of the

position of our channel and our

0:49:250:49:32

position in the UK, we are still

remaining hopeful there will not be

0:49:320:49:38

impacted. We have been operating as

a good-faith broadcaster, abiding by

0:49:380:49:43

the terms of the regulator within

the country, and covering vital

0:49:430:49:49

stories, important stories. Some

people may not like our editorial

0:49:490:49:53

line, but we have been a very

important voice in the UK editorial

0:49:530:50:00

landscape and we have even had

politicians coming onto our Channel

0:50:000:50:05

4 years as a way to reach their own

constituencies. So it has been

0:50:050:50:08

really disappointing to see that RTE

was kind of mixed up into this

0:50:080:50:15

conversation of state affairs and

used almost as something to be

0:50:150:50:19

sacrificed in this political game.

It is very easy to score PR points

0:50:190:50:27

right now, but I think it is

absolutely wrong to attack RT. It

0:50:270:50:31

also goes contrary to the principles

of freedom of speech and freedom of

0:50:310:50:34

the media.

Sorry to interrupt but do

you trust that if you end up being

0:50:340:50:40

taken off air, if you lose your

license, it will be because you are

0:50:400:50:44

not abiding by Ofcom rules? That you

are not truly independent?

This is

0:50:440:50:50

the crux of the problem. Ofcom right

now is reviewing our state is not

0:50:500:50:56

based on any of the rules that we

have broken, and in fact there have

0:50:560:51:01

been no statement as such, but has

referenced particularly the

0:51:010:51:07

political statements made regarding

our situation, mainly by prime

0:51:070:51:11

ministers Theresa May. And that is

what is really troubling. RT has

0:51:110:51:17

record with Ofcom that is better

than many other UK broadcasters and

0:51:170:51:22

until the statements made this week,

our broadcast this week has been the

0:51:220:51:26

same as it was before, so we would

like to be judged on the merit of

0:51:260:51:31

our output, not because of the

political situation that has

0:51:310:51:35

developed.

If/ when Britain make the

decision to punish Russia in some

0:51:350:51:46

way, then they will retaliate.

How?

I would assume they would start with

0:51:460:51:51

expelling diplomats who are working

undercover at the Russian Embassy,

0:51:510:51:57

so intelligence officers. And that

writes a quid pro quo response

0:51:570:52:01

immediately that we lose our people

in a similar status in Russia,

0:52:010:52:07

depriving us of a Channel for

information. If we impose further

0:52:070:52:11

economic sanctions, it's actually

very difficult to see where those

0:52:110:52:15

go, because there are already

economic sanctions because of

0:52:150:52:19

Crimea. They haven't the slightest

effect on Russia except to improve

0:52:190:52:23

its agriculture sector.

What we

don't have in financial situations

0:52:230:52:28

is a stop on Russian money in

London, some of which critics say is

0:52:280:52:34

laundered. We haven't done anything

about that yet? And you know way

0:52:340:52:38

more than me but people said, that

is the waiter had Vladimir Putin.

It

0:52:380:52:43

is the way the herd Vladimir Putin

we should have done more for many

0:52:430:52:48

years than we have done -- it is the

way to hurt Vladimir Putin. We

0:52:480:52:56

thought we had an advantage of

Russian capital being invested here.

0:52:560:52:59

One thing I think would have an

effect is to ban RT. We should laugh

0:52:590:53:08

at RT. It is a terrible TV animal.

The best way to treat it is to

0:53:080:53:13

ridicule it and British people who

go on to it should be made to feel

0:53:130:53:16

ashamed.

OK, well I am obviously

going to ask Anna to respond to

0:53:160:53:22

that. People should laugh at you

rather than take you off air.

It is

0:53:220:53:28

disappointing to hear that and

busily I disagree with that point of

0:53:280:53:31

view entirely. That

0:53:310:53:39

view entirely. That said, I am sure

if RTE was taken -- if RT was taken

0:53:390:53:43

off at, British media operators

within Russia would see a similar

0:53:430:53:50

fate, as has already been indicated

by the Russian government.

OK, thank

0:53:500:53:58

you all very much indeed. We will

bring you the latest news and sport

0:53:580:54:01

at 10am and of course awful weather

forecast just before then.

0:54:010:54:09

forecast just before then. TV

presenter and former strictly come

0:54:090:54:10

dancing head judge Len Goodman wants

to stop the over 60s

0:54:100:54:21

to stop the over 60s falling to --

falling victim to bank scams.

0:54:210:54:26

Specially designed courses

are being offered at branches

0:54:260:54:28

of Santander to try to teach them

what to look out for and stop them

0:54:280:54:31

becoming victims of fraud.

0:54:310:54:32

Len, who is 73, got involved

when his daughter-in law lost

0:54:320:54:35

£16,000 through a cash point scam.

0:54:350:54:36

Good morning.

0:54:360:54:37

How are you? Please tell us what

happened to your daughter-in-law.

0:54:370:54:40

Her scam was slightly different. It

was a phone scam. The phone suddenly

0:54:400:54:45

wouldn't work and what had happened

was

0:54:450:54:51

was somebody had her phone...

Listen, the reason I got involved

0:54:520:54:55

with this is because I am not tech

savvy adult. Somehow, her phone got

0:54:550:55:01

planed and they downloaded all the

information of her phone including

0:55:010:55:07

bank details and Taiwan and the

upshot was she lost £16,000. The

0:55:070:55:12

thing is, this is mainly targeted at

the over 60s, but by

0:55:120:55:19

daughter-in-law, this shows that

anyone... Santander have got this

0:55:190:55:26

scam avoidance school and they

invited me to go along, which I did.

0:55:260:55:31

What did you learn?

I learned so

much.

And what will you do

0:55:310:55:38

differently now?

The thing is, they

tend to try to rush you and us older

0:55:380:55:45

people, we tend to panic and we

don't want anything wrong. If we get

0:55:450:55:48

an e-mail, a phone call and people

are trying to rescue along, don't

0:55:480:55:52

listen. We don't like to be read, we

don't like to switch off the phone.

0:55:520:56:00

If people start to be rushed, you

have got to think, no, something is

0:56:000:56:05

wrong here. You know, don't be

frightened to say, no. And then say,

0:56:050:56:12

well, I want to speak to one of my

family. If they don't want that...

0:56:120:56:17

It is always urgent, you know? What

I like about what Santander have

0:56:170:56:22

done, next week, Monday to Friday,

every Santander branch,

0:56:220:56:29

every Santander branch, all 800 of

them...

Don't mention the bank name

0:56:310:56:36

again. Sorry.

If you pop into any

one of their branches, you can put

0:56:360:56:43

your name down and go on the scam

avoidance scheme. It is totally

0:56:430:56:49

free, it lasts 45 minutes, you don't

necessarily have to be a member of

0:56:490:56:53

that bank. See what I did there? And

although it is mainly aimed at older

0:56:530:57:00

people, anyone can go along. Do you

know, age UK found that over 5

0:57:000:57:07

million over 60 guys feel they have

been targeted.

Have been targeted,

0:57:070:57:14

by scammers? That is an

extraordinary figure, it really is.

0:57:140:57:19

So with all the goodwill in the

world, it was such an eye-opener to

0:57:190:57:24

me, even with your cash machines.

You know, they put hidden cameras in

0:57:240:57:29

there and get your PIN number. The

slot that you put your card and can

0:57:290:57:35

be faked, even the whole front of

the ATM can be false.

I know, it is

0:57:350:57:41

outrageous.

You have got to be aware

of that. Please don't think, it is

0:57:410:57:47

as much for me, I am doing my self a

favour in hopefully helping others,

0:57:470:57:55

so basically, all next week, every

branch, just checking what time and

0:57:550:57:59

date it will be, there were long, if

you can't go along, there are

0:57:590:58:04

leaflets and things to explain all

the points. And it is a serious

0:58:040:58:12

thing done in a very fun way.

There's a quiz, there are jokes.

0:58:120:58:16

It's a good bit of fun and a great

way of hopefully those scammers,

0:58:160:58:22

they target over 60s most of all.

Before you go, please can I ask you

0:58:220:58:31

about Sloan? What did you think --

can I ask you about Strictly? What

0:58:310:58:40

did you think of Shirley?

I thought

she did fantastically. When you step

0:58:400:58:45

into someone's shoes after 12 years,

if the nerve-racking process, but I

0:58:450:58:49

thought you stayed true to herself,

she gave good, constructive

0:58:490:58:54

criticism. I thought she did a

really good job.

She has remained

0:58:540:58:59

really tight-lipped about whether

she will be back for the next

0:58:590:59:02

series. The bookies have stopped

taking money on view coming back.

0:59:020:59:08

Would you come back?

Well, I have

got 50 quid on myself. No, I had a

0:59:080:59:14

wonderful time. I watched it as a

viewer and it was a funny feeling.

0:59:140:59:20

It was the right thing to do. It's a

bit like if you split up with a

0:59:200:59:24

girlfriend. You know you are not

getting on...

But you are still

0:59:240:59:30

doing the American version and

people called you a traitor for

0:59:300:59:33

that.

That gets on my wick,

honestly. It is all to do with your

0:59:330:59:37

contract. The BBC, your contract is

manual. They can check you out, they

0:59:370:59:43

can keep you. America, you are

booked for four in a row. Plus, why

0:59:430:59:48

would I not want to go to Los

Angeles in the middle of the winter?

0:59:480:59:51

As my wife wants to come.

That's a

very good point. Before you go, why

0:59:510:59:59

has Brendan Cole left?

I haven't

spoken to Brendan Cole or Shirley. I

0:59:591:00:07

don't know. He was a really

1:00:071:00:13

don't know. He was a really nice

guy, I phoned up America for him to

1:00:141:00:17

take over as a dancer, I read, but

what it was, because that is

1:00:171:00:23

nonsense, I do not know. In America,

they have a pool of professionals

1:00:231:00:27

and some are not on one season and

then the next season, they come

1:00:271:00:32

back, all you missed two. You know,

it changes it up a bit. Whatever the

1:00:321:00:41

BBC do, God bless them, it is with

the right decision.

Thank you very

1:00:411:00:46

much.

I went to mention Santander.

Oh, you are so naughty. You get away

1:00:461:00:54

with it though. You are so cheeky.

Now, what do you think about looking

1:00:541:01:02

at -- letting a man after your child

at nursery? Coming up in the next

1:01:021:01:06

hour. Right, let's bring you the

webinar.

1:01:061:01:12

Thank you.

Not a bad start for many across the

1:01:121:01:18

day. This is the scene over the

river Tay in Dundee, a lovely

1:01:181:01:21

sunrise. Conditions like that in the

east, but in the West, outbreaks of

1:01:211:01:27

rain and for many in the West,

conditions like this through the

1:01:271:01:29

day. This area of low pressure will

be throwing in areas of rain

1:01:291:01:35

throughout. Strengthening winds,

touching gale force in the West. It

1:01:351:01:40

also drags in milder air across much

of the country. After a chilly start

1:01:401:01:45

in the East, sunshine overhead.

1:01:451:01:50

in the East, sunshine overhead. In

the West, staying with grey

1:01:501:01:52

conditions throughout, and in the

afternoon here, it is going to stay

1:01:521:01:56

not just wet but also windy. In

Devon and all, they could be up to

1:01:561:02:02

25 millimetres or more of rain

across the moors, going through

1:02:021:02:08

tonight, affecting Wales and the

Isle of Man. Wet through the day in

1:02:081:02:14

Northern Ireland, and into Scotland.

Western areas are always windy. A

1:02:141:02:18

breeze in the east. With hazy

sunshine, after subzero temperatures

1:02:181:02:22

in some areas, it could hit 12

degrees in the central belt and

1:02:221:02:26

north of London. Pushing the 60

Fahrenheit mark. Don't get

1:02:261:02:32

complacent, colder weather on the

way. Not tonight, it stays mild

1:02:321:02:36

towards the south and west of the

country. Cloud and rain pushing in

1:02:361:02:40

across Wales, the Midlands and the

south-east towards the end of

1:02:401:02:44

tonight. Chilly across eastern

Scotland and North England. Here, we

1:02:441:02:49

go into tomorrow with some of the

brightest conditions and morning

1:02:491:02:52

sunshine. Some sunshine to start the

day in West England and Wales. Heavy

1:02:521:02:56

and thundery showers pushing in. A

look at the rain. In Northern

1:02:561:03:01

Ireland, the Midlands and the

south-east, turning dry, rain pushes

1:03:011:03:05

into southern England and southern

Scotland through the day. Wintry

1:03:051:03:09

flurries over the hills of Scotland

as well. Tomorrow, 6 degrees in

1:03:091:03:12

Aberdeen

1:03:121:03:17

as well. Tomorrow, 6 degrees in

Aberdeen. Colder air pushes in

1:03:171:03:18

across the North with a greater

chance of snow on the hills.

1:03:181:03:27

I don't have much positive things

to say about Motor Neurone disease

1:03:271:03:30

but it taught me not to pity myself

and to get on with

1:03:301:03:33

what I still could do.

1:03:331:03:34

I'm happier now than I was before

I developed the condition.

1:03:341:03:40

Professor Stephen Hawking -

world-famous for his ground-breaking

1:03:401:03:44

scientific work on black holes

and for re-defining perceptions

1:03:441:03:49

of people with disabilities -

has died at the age of 76.

1:03:491:03:52

We'll be assessing his

impact and legacy.

1:03:521:03:58

The trouble of getting men to work

with kids in nurseries.

1:03:581:04:03

Figures show just 2% of the total

work force over the past 20

1:04:031:04:06

years have been male.

1:04:061:04:07

So why is it happening?

1:04:071:04:08

Some in the industry say

they're being turned

1:04:081:04:10

away because of negative

pre-conceptions.

1:04:101:04:11

Because I was a man, umm... It

wouldn't be appropriate for me to

1:04:111:04:15

work in early years. Basically.

Because of safeguarding concerns,

1:04:151:04:20

they were worried, particularly,

what parents might think and stuff

1:04:201:04:25

like that.

This tweet saying that

all children should be learning from

1:04:251:04:30

both sexes, especially in the early

stages of school life.

1:04:301:04:34

So can -- some kids do not have a

father figure, I'm shocked at the

1:04:341:04:38

prejudice that these men face.

Your experiences are particularly

1:04:381:04:42

welcome.

We will be talking more about that

1:04:421:04:44

in the next hour.

Also...

1:04:441:04:50

The government is spending £50

million to make more cohesive

1:04:501:04:53

communities,

1:04:531:04:53

will it make a difference?

We have members of various different

1:04:531:04:57

communities saying they have

experienced various segregation.

1:04:571:05:03

Good morning.

1:05:031:05:04

Here's Joanna Gosling

in the BBC Newsroom

1:05:041:05:06

with a summary of today's news.

1:05:061:05:08

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

1:05:081:05:10

has died at the age of 76.

1:05:101:05:12

Hawking's fame

came largely from his best-selling

1:05:121:05:13

book, "A Brief History of Time"

which outlined his theories

1:05:131:05:16

about the universe.

1:05:161:05:21

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

1:05:211:05:23

neurone disease in 1964

and being told he had just

1:05:231:05:25

a few years to live.

1:05:251:05:27

Professor Hawkins's children have

paid tribute to their father.

1:05:271:05:31

In a statement, Lucy,

Robert and Tim said: "We are deeply

1:05:311:05:34

saddened that our beloved father

passed away today.

1:05:341:05:36

He was a great scientist

and an extraordinary man whose work

1:05:361:05:38

and legacy will live

on for many years.

1:05:381:05:40

His courage and persistence

with his brilliance and humour

1:05:401:05:42

inspired people across the world.

1:05:421:05:47

He once said, 'It would not be much

of a universe if it wasn't home

1:05:471:05:50

to the people you love'.

1:05:501:05:52

We will miss him forever."

1:05:521:05:57

Moscow has warned it will respond to

any measures imposed by the British

1:05:571:06:01

government after a Soviet nerve

agent was used in Salisbury. The

1:06:011:06:05

Kremlin has insisted that it is in

no way connected to the poisoning of

1:06:051:06:09

a former Russian double agent Sergei

Skripal and his daughter. Theresa

1:06:091:06:14

May is expected to announce a

response today after chairing a

1:06:141:06:17

meeting at the National Security

Council.

1:06:171:06:18

The Outgoing US Secretary of State,

Rex Tillerson, who was fired

1:06:181:06:21

by President Donald Trump yesterday,

has described the poisoning

1:06:211:06:23

as a "really egregious act...

1:06:231:06:25

That "clearly came from Russia"

and there should be

1:06:251:06:27

"serious consequences".

1:06:271:06:31

Much work remains to respond

to the troubling behaviour

1:06:311:06:33

and actions on the part

of the Russian government.

1:06:331:06:38

Russia must assess carefully

as to how its actions

1:06:381:06:40

are in the best interest

of the Russian people,

1:06:401:06:42

and of the world more broadly.

1:06:421:06:44

Continuing on their current

trajectory is likely to lead

1:06:441:06:46

to greater isolation on their part.

1:06:461:06:50

A situation which is not

in any one's interest.

1:06:501:06:57

Five councils in England will be

asked to draw up plans to improve

1:06:571:07:02

community cohesion in their areas as

part of wider proposals on

1:07:021:07:06

integration. Other proposals

outlined in the government's

1:07:061:07:09

integrated communities strategy

green paper included teaching

1:07:091:07:12

British values in schools, promoting

the English language and for

1:07:121:07:16

councils to provide language tuition

to non-English speakers.

1:07:161:07:19

Women who have had breast implant

surgery are being urged to make

1:07:191:07:22

sure their details are registered.

1:07:221:07:23

Around a third of NHS clinics

and a quarter of private ones

1:07:231:07:26

offering the surgery in England have

not sent any patient data

1:07:261:07:29

to a national safety registry.

1:07:291:07:31

NHS Digital set up the service

in 2016 to safeguard

1:07:311:07:33

patients after the PIP.

1:07:331:07:40

scandal, when thousands of women

received faulty implants.

1:07:401:07:48

The University of Mosul, in Iraq -

which was left in ruins

1:07:521:07:55

by Islamic State militants -

is to begin re-stocking its library,

1:07:551:07:58

with new books donated from the UK.

1:07:581:08:00

It's believed that well over 100,000

manuscripts were destroyed

1:08:001:08:02

or looted during the IS occupation.

1:08:021:08:03

A lecturer told the BBC

he was so happy when the books

1:08:031:08:06

arrived from Britain, he danced.

1:08:061:08:07

That's a summary of the latest BBC

News - more at 10.30.

1:08:071:08:10

Joanna, thank you. Thank you for

your messages about Professor Steven

1:08:101:08:13

Hawking. Colin says a truly inspired

man.

1:08:131:08:20

A great ambassador for Britain and

his legacy will be far more than

1:08:201:08:24

simply academic. Simon said that

this man inspired him to go into

1:08:241:08:28

physics and into always wanting to

be more and never giving up. He was

1:08:281:08:33

a truly inspiring individual who

will be sadly missed. Never let

1:08:331:08:36

down, always looked to the stars. --

never look down.

1:08:361:08:41

Colin on Facebook says that he is

disabled with MS, he has a similar

1:08:411:08:48

attitude to his disability.

He does not garner sympathy and he

1:08:481:08:51

hates it when people pity him feel

sorry for him. It rather they have

1:08:511:08:55

compassion and understanding. I do

not mind if someone asks me about my

1:08:551:09:00

MS, I keep active. Last year I had

two-week holiday in Cyprus on my

1:09:001:09:05

own. I don't think much about the

future at all, live for the moment.

1:09:051:09:09

And one more, this text says that

they were a hairdresser in Cambridge

1:09:091:09:14

and the use to cut his hair. A

wonderful and generous man, an

1:09:141:09:18

honour and a privilege to have spent

time with him. Thank you to the BBC

1:09:181:09:22

for all of the tributes to such a

great man.

1:09:221:09:24

Thank you for those, keep them

coming in. Use the hashtag, you can

1:09:241:09:27

text, WhatsApp or use Facebook.

1:09:271:09:31

Here's some sport now with Hugh.

1:09:311:09:36

Manchester United manager

Jose Mourinho says he "doesn't

1:09:361:09:38

want to make a drama"

of their Champions League last 16

1:09:381:09:41

tie with Spanish side Sevilla...

1:09:411:09:42

The first leg finished goalless

in Spain, and Sevilla took control

1:09:421:09:45

by scoring a crucial away goal

with less than 20 minutes left.

1:09:451:09:52

The Spanish side put things to bed

1:09:521:09:54

with a second soon afterwards,

Wissam Ben Yedder's second.

1:09:541:09:56

Manchester United fans won't be too

pleased with Mourinho's view

1:09:561:10:02

that the 2-1 defeat's "not

the end of the world."

1:10:021:10:04

I sit in this chair twice

in the Champions League and I have

1:10:041:10:09

knocked out Man United

at home at Old Trafford.

1:10:091:10:11

I sit in this chair

with Porto, Man United out.

1:10:111:10:14

I sit in this chair

with Real Madrid, Man United out.

1:10:141:10:17

So I don't think it's

something new for the club.

1:10:171:10:22

And of course, being

Manchester United manager and losing

1:10:221:10:24

a Champions League tie,

at home, is a delusion, obviously.

1:10:241:10:32

Well, Spurs and United are out -

but can Chelsea make it three

1:10:371:10:41

English sides in the last eight?

1:10:411:10:43

Manager Antonio Conte says

there will be moments his team 'has

1:10:431:10:45

to suffer' as they visit

Lionel Messi and the Spanish league

1:10:451:10:48

leaders Barcelona at the Nou Camp.

1:10:481:10:49

It's finished 1-1 in the first leg.

1:10:491:10:52

Every single player wants

to play this type of game

1:10:521:10:54

against Barcelona at the Nou Camp.

1:10:541:10:56

You must be excited.

1:10:561:11:00

A lot of my players have never

played in this stadium,

1:11:001:11:02

at the Nou Camp, but this

is the first time and we want

1:11:021:11:06

to try to do our best.

1:11:061:11:14

More good news for Great Britain at

the Paralympics.

1:11:141:11:18

There's been another medal

for Great Britain at the Winter

1:11:181:11:20

paralympics in Pyeongchang.

1:11:201:11:22

Kate Grey has the details.

1:11:221:11:24

If you have been watching the

Paralympic Games over the last few

1:11:241:11:27

days, you know the names well, Menna

Fitzpatrick and her guide, Jen

1:11:271:11:31

Kehoe, have got their third medal of

the games, to add to the silver and

1:11:311:11:35

bronze that they won earlier this

week.

This time it was a silver

1:11:351:11:39

medal in the giant slalom. They get

two runs down the giant slalom

1:11:391:11:44

course and in the first run, they

managed to finish in second place as

1:11:441:11:49

they move into the second run, they

managed to maintain a silver medal

1:11:491:11:54

position, just behind Slovakian

Henrieta Farkasova, who has

1:11:541:11:58

dominated the class from day one

here in Pyeongchang. The British

1:11:581:12:02

pair managed to safely negotiate

their way around the winding course.

1:12:021:12:06

They were over the moon when they

got to the end of their race.

1:12:061:12:09

Clearly thriving in this Paralympic

environment. This is their first

1:12:091:12:13

games, a brilliant achievement for

them and hopefully much more to

1:12:131:12:16

come.

1:12:161:12:18

Despite wet ground underfoot the sun

was shining on the opening day

1:12:181:12:21

of the Cheltenhamn Festival

as Buveur D'Air took

1:12:211:12:23

the big race on day one...

1:12:231:12:25

The odds-on favourite -

under jockey Barry Geraghty -

1:12:251:12:27

was pushed all the way

in the Champion Hurdle...

1:12:271:12:29

By the seven to one shot

Melon, winning by barely

1:12:291:12:32

a neck on the line.

1:12:321:12:34

It means Buveaur D'Air

retains his title and gives trainer

1:12:341:12:36

Nicky Henderson his seventh winner

in the race.

1:12:361:12:40

The Queen Mother Champion Chase

is the feature race today...

1:12:401:12:42

Coverage on Radio 5live from 1pm.

1:12:421:12:50

Good morning. A brilliant and

extraordinary mind, one of the great

1:12:501:12:55

scientists of his generation. Just

one of thousands of tributes to

1:12:551:12:58

Professor Steven Hawking, who has

died at the age of 76. The most

1:12:581:13:03

talked about scientist since

Einstein, he turned theoretical

1:13:031:13:07

physics bestselling books, and

changed perceptions of with

1:13:071:13:10

disabilities and made quite a few

cameo TV appearances.

1:13:101:13:18

The British astronaut Tim Peake

is among those who have paid tribute

1:13:181:13:20

to Professor Hawking.

1:13:201:13:24

He said...

1:13:241:13:35

The Stargazing Live presenter Dara

O'Briain said;...

1:13:411:13:48

And Nasa said...

1:14:021:14:04

Joining me from our Oxford Studio

is Professor Chris Lintott,

1:14:171:14:20

who presents BBC Four's

The Sky At Night and is

1:14:201:14:22

a professor of astrophysics

at Oxford University.

1:14:221:14:28

And Chris James is the Director

of External Affairs at the Motor

1:14:281:14:31

Neurone Disease Association -

he joins us via webcam

1:14:311:14:33

from North London.

1:14:331:14:36

And we're also joined by professor

of Extragalactic Astronomy

1:14:361:14:38

and head of physics

at Bath University Carol Mundell -

1:14:381:14:42

speaking to us on webcam from Bath.

1:14:421:14:42

Welcome to all of you, thank you for

coming on the programme. Chris, how

1:14:421:14:45

would you assess what this man

achieved?

Well, you have mentioned

1:14:451:14:49

his work as a communicator. That was

hugely important but even without

1:14:491:14:52

that he was one of the greats of

20th-century physics. He told us for

1:14:521:14:57

the first time with others that the

Big Bang was a real thing. That it

1:14:571:15:03

allowed the universe to start in

this hot and dense state, allowed by

1:15:031:15:08

Einstein's equations. He went on to

explain a lot of the formula that

1:15:081:15:12

surrounded black holes, the most

mysterious objects in the universe.

1:15:121:15:16

There are armies of people today

following up on his insights that he

1:15:161:15:20

gave us over many decades of

productive physics.

And Carol, what

1:15:201:15:24

would you draw from what he

achieved?

For me, it is the

1:15:241:15:30

immensity of the theoretical physics

and cosmology, the breadth of the

1:15:301:15:33

problems he worked on. As Chris

said, these theoretical predictions,

1:15:331:15:37

many of us will be designing

experiments for generations to come

1:15:371:15:41

to test. For me, working at the

forefront of general relativity,

1:15:411:15:46

physics on the largest scale,

governed by gravity, combining

1:15:461:15:51

physics and the tiniest scale with

quantum mechanics come he was

1:15:511:15:55

pioneering in working with these new

theories and quantum gravity. We

1:15:551:15:58

don't yet have a complete theory of

quantum gravity. I think of him as

1:15:581:16:04

an Einstein of our time, really.

I'm

getting messages from people like

1:16:041:16:08

Simon, for example. Saying that they

were inspired to go into physics

1:16:081:16:14

because of him?

It wasn't just the

immensity of the physics that he was

1:16:141:16:19

thinking about in how he approached

his problems. Mathematically he was

1:16:191:16:22

very gifted but he was able to be

very creative and think differently

1:16:221:16:26

about the universe. Turning that

into a serial hypothesis. He was

1:16:261:16:32

able to communicate the wonder of

the universe, where he said do not

1:16:321:16:35

look down at your feet, remember to

look up at the stars. For me, he was

1:16:351:16:43

a scientist. We don't talk about a

disabled scientist or his

1:16:431:16:47

disability, because it was not a

disability. He was an eminent

1:16:471:16:50

physicist. We were all rather in awe

of him. He had incredible wit, and

1:16:501:16:57

he was quite miss GB is with his

wit. He was keen to travel into

1:16:571:17:02

space as well and think about the

future of humankind. He used to

1:17:021:17:06

mention that the fact that humans

were made of star stuff, and

1:17:061:17:11

connected with the universe. But

also our place on our planet, caring

1:17:111:17:15

for it and thinking of the dangers

of artificial intelligence. He was a

1:17:151:17:19

great mind far in and beyond

physics.

Chris James, from the motor

1:17:191:17:24

neurone disease Association, what

did you think of his approach to his

1:17:241:17:29

illness?

He really was quite an

extraordinary man. It is a sad day,

1:17:291:17:33

he really wasn't defined by his

motor neurone disease. He caught it

1:17:331:17:38

at a very early stage in his life.

He overcame many of the challenges

1:17:381:17:42

that he faced. He understood that

when he was diagnosed, he only had a

1:17:421:17:54

few used to live, he was told. Some

people with it die with thin two

1:17:541:18:01

years of diagnosis. But he was a

brilliant man and a brilliant

1:18:011:18:06

physicist. He did a tremendous

amount to raise awareness of MND and

1:18:061:18:10

to support the association.

Am

getting messages from people with

1:18:101:18:16

disabilities, who said that his

approach inspired the way that they

1:18:161:18:20

concentrated on what they could do

their own what they couldn't do?

He

1:18:201:18:26

was very much like that, encouraging

people to live their lives, and not

1:18:261:18:30

be defined by their disease and to

really try and achieve as much as

1:18:301:18:36

they possibly could.

And Chris,

something that Brian Cox said this

1:18:361:18:40

morning that sticks in my head. In

thousands of years, when we are long

1:18:401:18:44

gone, people will still be talking

about Professor Steven Hawking.

At

1:18:441:18:52

arguing about his ideas, how he

would have wanted it! He was

1:18:521:18:57

brilliant at making connections,

that is why his physics communicates

1:18:571:19:00

to physicists. He has these great

series, showing that they were

1:19:001:19:04

connected at a deep level. That is

what he was doing in his

1:19:041:19:08

communication as well. Taking very

abstract and theoretical work that

1:19:081:19:11

he was doing and connecting it to

everyday life. To the kinds of

1:19:111:19:17

thoughts that we all, as humans,

have as well as physicists. I think

1:19:171:19:21

the greatness of his mind was in

making those leaps and allowing the

1:19:211:19:25

rest of us to follow along the

bridges that he set out for us. It

1:19:251:19:30

is amazing to see the connections

between this two house and see that

1:19:301:19:33

he was doing the same thing

throughout.

Thank you all, we really

1:19:331:19:38

appreciate your time.

1:19:381:19:42

Still to come...

1:19:421:19:43

What can be done to help Muslim

communities integrate better

1:19:431:19:46

into British society?

1:19:461:19:47

Community leaders share their views

on a plan to help address

1:19:471:19:49

If your child is under 5 -

the chances of a man

1:19:511:19:54

teaching them is very slim.

1:19:541:19:55

The numbers of men working as early

years teachers has always been low.

1:19:551:20:02

In fact, for the past 20 years,

it's been around 2 per cent

1:20:021:20:05

of the total workforce

in the sector.

1:20:051:20:07

There are currently around 25,000

job vacancies and the Government has

1:20:071:20:09

recognised how important men

in early years can be

1:20:091:20:11

to the children they teach.

1:20:111:20:19

Efforts have been made by small

groups across the country

1:20:201:20:22

to increase those numbers,

and we've been given exclusive

1:20:221:20:25

access to proposals being drawn up

to advise the Government about how

1:20:251:20:27

they can help.

1:20:271:20:32

Chris Hemmings reports.

1:20:321:20:37

Jamal Campbell is a rarity.

1:20:371:20:38

He's a member of the London

early years foundation,

1:20:381:20:41

and part of the just 2%

of the teaching bid teachers

1:20:411:20:43

under five who are male.

1:20:431:20:44

He started teaching 16 years ago,

and is still frustrated by how

1:20:441:20:47

little status is given to his job.

1:20:471:20:50

We deserve more.

1:20:501:20:54

We deserve more because it is such

an important profession, you know,

1:20:541:21:02

we spend more time with their

children than they do.

1:21:031:21:05

And we're helping them

so when they go to primary school,

1:21:051:21:08

when they go to secondary school,

they've got the tools.

1:21:081:21:16

Yes, there is a lot of stigma based

on negative stories that are out

1:21:221:21:25

there about men in childcare,

you know, and just children

1:21:251:21:28

being at risk, men not

being able to be nurturing,

1:21:281:21:30

men not being able to work

with children so small.

1:21:301:21:38

James is just 23 years old,

and in January this year,

1:21:501:21:52

parents had him removed from a class

on the first day

1:21:521:21:55

of his very first job.

1:21:551:21:58

Because I was a man,

1:21:581:22:00

it wouldn't be appropriate for me

to work in early years, basically

1:22:001:22:02

because of safeguarding concerns,

they were worried particularly

1:22:021:22:04

what the parents might think

and stuff like that.

1:22:041:22:11

I was obviously shocked

as you might expect,

1:22:111:22:13

but also I had heard stories

and rumours that this was the kind

1:22:131:22:16

of thing you could kind of expect.

1:22:161:22:24

As part of that early years

strategy, the government

1:22:281:22:30

set up a task force.

1:22:301:22:31

Its aim was to advise them on how

to improve gender diversity.

1:22:311:22:34

It is chaired by David Wright,

he runs Paint Box nurseries

1:22:341:22:37

in Southampton, and has helped set

up a network of men in early

1:22:371:22:40

years across the UK.

1:22:401:22:41

We do have a problem

attracting good staff,

1:22:411:22:43

and 50% of the population

are excluded from that

1:22:431:22:45

because they are not

interested, they don't know

1:22:451:22:47

that they are welcome and there

is a career for them they are.

1:22:471:22:50

Because it is mostly

female staff working here,

1:22:501:22:52

they do act in some sense

as gatekeepers, and I think

1:22:521:22:55

there is the whole issue

1:22:551:22:56

around your sense of masculinity -

what do you tell your friends down

1:22:561:22:59

the pub that you're doing?

1:22:591:23:07

Despite that figure of 2% not having

changed almost 20 years, there are

1:23:221:23:28

pockets across the country where

those are improving and David and

1:23:281:23:32

his team want that to improve across

the country.

1:23:321:23:39

Let's talk to David Wright -

he runs Paintpot Nurseries

1:23:391:23:41

in Southampton and is Chair

of the Government's Taskforce

1:23:411:23:44

on increasing the number

of men in early years.

1:23:441:23:46

June O'Sullivan's from

the London Early Years

1:23:461:23:47

Foundation, who are today

launching their strategy

1:23:471:23:49

for increasing men in early years.

1:23:491:23:51

Shaddai Tembo is Head of the Bristol

Men in Early Years Network

1:23:511:23:53

and Imran Hafeez is from

the National Literacy Trust

1:23:531:23:57

in Bradford and works to encourage

more men to get involved

1:23:571:24:00

with the early years sector.

1:24:001:24:03

Welcome, all of you. I start with

this message from Simon. I started

1:24:031:24:07

my career as a nursery nurse/

teaching assistant when I was 16. I

1:24:071:24:12

am now 33 and I am in early years

teacher. So much has changed. I

1:24:121:24:21

remember a comment from a teacher

saying I must be a paedophile to

1:24:211:24:24

want to work with young children. At

the time, this mortified me and made

1:24:241:24:28

me question my choice. However, I

realised this was the very reason I

1:24:281:24:34

needed to carry on, to challenge

these damaging perceptions and to

1:24:341:24:38

encourage other men to consider this

career. Let's cut to the chase, this

1:24:381:24:43

is one of the issues that puts

people off?

Absolutely. There is

1:24:431:24:47

still a massive stereotype of men

working in early years and it's been

1:24:471:24:50

that way for a long time and is

still the case now, which is why we

1:24:501:24:54

are here today to promote the

message that men working in early

1:24:541:24:58

years is a good thing for boys and

girls, to promote equality in wider

1:24:581:25:03

society.

How do we overturn that

worried for some parents, that

1:25:031:25:09

misconception from some parents,

that prejudice from some parents?

I

1:25:091:25:14

suppose it is down to the

representation that we have now in

1:25:141:25:17

early years settings and education

settings, for that to represent

1:25:171:25:20

society as a whole so that when we

go into early years settings that

1:25:201:25:25

Mono gendered monocultural, it is

not representative of society. There

1:25:251:25:32

has been a space for the debate to

happen for many years where that has

1:25:321:25:37

been a space for a father to be

involved as well and over that

1:25:371:25:41

change has happened.

You wouldn't

necessarily get the same attitude

1:25:411:25:46

towards male teachers in primary or

secondary schools, would you?

As you

1:25:461:25:53

come down the age groups in terms of

education, you do see more concern

1:25:531:25:58

and people express this as a sense

of fear and a feeling they have that

1:25:581:26:03

it's inappropriate for men to be

involved with children, the younger

1:26:031:26:06

they are, and we do see that in

primary schools. 55% of primary

1:26:061:26:13

schools have no men in them and only

about 14% of the workforce are mild

1:26:131:26:17

air. And most men are often in

leadership roles, not with younger

1:26:171:26:27

age groups.

This is madness. As we

said in the introduction, 25,000

1:26:271:26:34

vacancies?

I know. Eight years ago

we did research and we have only

1:26:341:26:38

slightly improved. We have always

had quite a lot of men in Battersea

1:26:381:26:42

but you need women to support men.

That is the irony. The barrier isn't

1:26:421:26:48

necessarily the men, it's the

women's anxiety about letting men

1:26:481:26:51

into what is often a comfortable

women's zone. Often also head

1:26:511:26:57

teachers like me have to be brave

about supporting men so that when

1:26:571:27:01

parents say things like oh, I don't

want him changing my Child's nappy,

1:27:011:27:08

you as the CEO have got to say, I'm

sorry, we are not putting up extra

1:27:081:27:15

cameras, we have a trusting

relationship with this person and if

1:27:151:27:18

you do not agree with that, you are

in the wrong nursery, I am sorry.

1:27:181:27:23

When I ask the men who work for me,

there are 22 of them, they said they

1:27:231:27:29

want the women to appreciate the

fact that they are part of the game.

1:27:291:27:34

What do you mean?

That you are all

part of the team. Sometimes women

1:27:341:27:40

can be insensitive to that sort of

stuff, so it is quite complex but

1:27:401:27:46

it's quite interesting, actually,

did a different elements and also

1:27:461:27:50

look at children.

That is

fascinating. What difference does it

1:27:501:27:55

make having male teachers, male

nursery workers around toddlers?

I

1:27:551:28:00

guess the end goal for what we're

doing to challenge stereotypes in

1:28:001:28:05

wider society and we know the best

place to do that is in early years.

1:28:051:28:09

With more men in early years, we

increase the diversity of the

1:28:091:28:13

workforce.

But when you are free,

you are not -- when you are three,

1:28:131:28:18

you are not bothered about gender

diversity, are you?

You are not

1:28:181:28:23

looking at it specifically but if

you have a greater diversity of role

1:28:231:28:30

models in early years, that

increases the scope of role models

1:28:301:28:33

and what they can be when they are

older.

What is your view on why it

1:28:331:28:38

is important to toddlers to have men

around when they are little.

They

1:28:381:28:43

are bothered about gender roles in

that they want men to interact with

1:28:431:28:50

at this stage in their life.

Sorry,

let's not get on top on this. They

1:28:501:28:55

are not bothered if it is the man or

woman when they are two or three,

1:28:551:28:58

they just want to play.

We really

need to be looking at their being

1:28:581:29:03

men there for them to play with. All

sorts of men, we don't want to

1:29:031:29:09

stereotype in terms of what we are

offering two children, but also the

1:29:091:29:12

children are not getting the

opportunity to interact with men in

1:29:121:29:16

life, and these formative years were

the children and we need to be

1:29:161:29:21

developing Norman relations for them

with men and women. If we want a

1:29:211:29:27

diverse and inclusive society, then

this is when it starts, in the early

1:29:271:29:31

years. And there is research to say

that men and women interact in

1:29:311:29:35

different ways with children. It is

a question of balance, a question of

1:29:351:29:39

broadening that experience for

children.

Imran, you are reborn a

1:29:391:29:44

nursery teacher yourself and you try

to encourage more men into that

1:29:441:29:48

sector. How do you do that? -- you

are a former nursery teacher

1:29:481:29:52

yourself.

One of the things in

education at the moment is around

1:29:521:30:00

the gender gap in literacy and that

is the focus we have in Bradford

1:30:001:30:05

between girls and boys and the issue

is that it starts at the very early

1:30:051:30:08

age and it relates to how children

are supported at home and actually

1:30:081:30:12

what goes on in the early years

settings. If we can encourage and

1:30:121:30:17

support more role models like we saw

in the film earlier into early

1:30:171:30:23

years, if we can encourage more dads

as well...

How, what do you say? You

1:30:231:30:28

need to be here because, what?

It is

to do with the significance you

1:30:281:30:33

having your child's upbringing and

development and lots of research

1:30:331:30:38

shows that reading is one of the

parent tasks that we do, there is

1:30:381:30:47

research that shows that you as a

dad will have more of an impact with

1:30:471:30:51

your child if you read a book with

them.

I love that. Don't you?

As

1:30:511:30:57

well as the power of dads to see the

power that they carried from a very

1:30:571:31:07

young age...

What did you say?

Bless

all wound. I had a very positive

1:31:071:31:15

upbringing and I am blessed, but for

those who have not had a positive

1:31:151:31:22

upbringing, researchers and family

dynamics will say if there has been

1:31:221:31:27

abuse, for example, that can be

accentuated and seen in

1:31:271:31:30

relationships later on in life as

well. Those messages really resonate

1:31:301:31:34

and if we as professionals in early

years settings ask that question,

1:31:341:31:37

what are we doing about our own

gender stereotypes and how that

1:31:371:31:41

impacts on our service users, then

we begin to look at the timing of

1:31:411:31:45

the sessions that will suit the

needs of the men. Is this particular

1:31:451:31:51

display the right colour?

Really

basic stuff that's worth thinking

1:31:511:31:55

about.

Yes.

June, this strategy you

were working today, how are we going

1:31:551:32:03

to get more men working in the early

years sector?

We need more

1:32:031:32:08

ambassadors. We find it very

interesting that younger boys never

1:32:081:32:11

considered this but when we work

with boys in schools they are

1:32:111:32:14

fascinated by the idea of being a

man in child care about being part

1:32:141:32:19

of the teaching team. They are very

interested in child development and

1:32:191:32:23

I think that is exactly what Imran

is saying is the spin off, because

1:32:231:32:27

the research in literacy in boys is

scary. The more we can do to support

1:32:271:32:32

that by having boys reading, being

part of the experience, having those

1:32:321:32:36

conversations. The other thing is we

need a national debate on this, and

1:32:361:32:41

National advisory board where all

the really interesting things that

1:32:411:32:44

are going on our centralised.

1:32:441:32:51

are going on our centralised. So

there is a point where you can go in

1:32:511:32:53

and buy things out. For example,

when you recruit boys, when you

1:32:531:32:56

advertise to men, you have to use

different language.

Give me an

1:32:561:32:58

example. What words do you use?

We

use more scientific words, like you

1:32:581:33:07

do with dads. Not the soft words

like caring and nurturing, we use

1:33:071:33:13

science and brave words. We also add

them, so when they came for their

1:33:131:33:16

open day, we had a lot of feed and

that was really interesting.

If it

1:33:161:33:21

works, hey!

We pizza and all that

and it did draw a lot more young men

1:33:211:33:28

in.

Anthony has Techfit to say he

thinks it's grossly unfair that

1:33:281:33:34

young men are not considered fit to

teach young children. This will have

1:33:341:33:39

a considerable negative impact when

it comes to teaching and men and

1:33:391:33:43

women. Another one from Simon saying

he taught early years were 26 years,

1:33:431:33:48

rewarding and challenging and I was

lucky enough to work with

1:33:481:33:51

headteachers who valued by passion

and gave me the opportunity to

1:33:511:33:54

develop high quality provision for

children and families. The problem

1:33:541:33:57

with a greeting to this sector is

that there is a lack of

1:33:571:34:02

encouragement to go into early years

education let alone on men. Thank

1:34:021:34:08

you very much all of you. We really

appreciate your time and patience.

1:34:081:34:13

Still to come in the last half an

hour of the programme, the Prime

1:34:131:34:17

Minister is expected to announce her

response to the Salisbury nerve

1:34:171:34:20

agent attack this lunchtime. And we

would talk more about what we can

1:34:201:34:24

expect with Norman

1:34:241:34:25

Smith from Westminster.

1:34:251:34:29

And the student march aimed

at challenging America's

1:34:291:34:31

controversial gun laws.

1:34:311:34:34

Students will leave the classrooms

for 17 minutes to honour the 17

1:34:341:34:38

students killed in the recent

shootings in Florida. We will speak

1:34:381:34:42

to some of those students behind the

movement in the next half an hour.

1:34:421:34:47

Time for the latest news -

here's Joanna Gosling.

1:34:471:34:49

Britain's most famous scientist,

Professor Stephen Hawking,

1:34:491:34:51

has died at the age of 76.

1:34:511:34:57

Hawking's fame came largely

from his best-selling

1:34:571:34:59

book, "A Brief History of Time"

which outlined his theories

1:34:591:35:01

about the universe.

1:35:011:35:02

He had a brilliant career

despite being diagnosed with motor

1:35:021:35:04

neurone disease in 1964

and being told he had just

1:35:041:35:07

a few years to live.

1:35:071:35:14

Russia's Foreign Minister Sergei

Lavrov has accused the British

1:35:141:35:19

government are flagrantly trying to

mislead the international community

1:35:191:35:21

over claims is of year nerve agent

was used in Salisbury. The Kremlin

1:35:211:35:25

has insisted they are way connected

to the poisoning of the former

1:35:251:35:30

Russian double agent Sergei Skripal

and his daughter. Theresa May is to

1:35:301:35:34

respond today after chairing a

meeting of the National Security

1:35:341:35:37

Council.

1:35:371:35:38

Five councils in England will be

asked to draw up plans to improve

1:35:381:35:41

community cohesion in their areas

as part of wider

1:35:411:35:43

proposals on integration.

1:35:431:35:44

Other proposals outlined

in the government's

1:35:441:35:45

Integrated Communities Strategy

green paper include teaching

1:35:451:35:47

British values in schools,

promoting the English language

1:35:471:35:49

and for councils to provide language

tuition to non-English speakers.

1:35:491:35:57

Around a third of NHS clinics

and a quarter of private ones

1:35:571:36:00

offering breast implant surgery

in England have not sent any patient

1:36:001:36:02

data to a national safety registry.

1:36:021:36:04

NHS Digital set up the service

in 2016 to safeguard

1:36:041:36:06

patients after the PIP

1:36:061:36:07

scandal, when thousands of women

received faulty implants.

1:36:071:36:15

Women who have had surgery

are now being urged to make

1:36:161:36:18

sure their details are added

to the register.

1:36:181:36:21

The creators of The Crown have

admitted Claire Foy who portrays

1:36:211:36:24

the Queen was paid less

than her male counterpart.

1:36:241:36:25

Matt Smith's portrayal of a young

Duke of Edinburgh earned him more

1:36:251:36:28

than Foy's Golden Globe-winning

performance as Queen Elizabeth

1:36:281:36:30

in the Netflix drama.

1:36:301:36:37

The show's producers said Smith's

previous starring role

1:36:371:36:39

in Doctor Who meant he was paid more

than his co-star.

1:36:391:36:46

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

1:36:461:36:49

Thank you.

1:36:491:36:50

Here's some sport now with Hugh.

1:36:501:36:57

Manchester United boss Jose Mourinho

says he doesn't want to make a drama

1:36:571:37:01

of the Champions League last 16 exit

at the hands of Sevilla.

1:37:011:37:03

United were beaten 2-1

at Old Trafford to miss out

1:37:031:37:06

on the quarter finals.

1:37:061:37:07

After the lacklustre display,

Mourinho said he had 'no regrets'.

1:37:071:37:15

Chelsea take a 1-1 draw to Barcelona

for their second leg later.

1:37:161:37:18

Manager Antonio Conte

says his players will have to suffer

1:37:181:37:21

for periods away against the team

top of the Spanish top flight.

1:37:211:37:24

Great Britain's Menna Fitzpatrick

and her guide Jen Kehoe have

1:37:241:37:27

won their third medal

at the Winter Paralympics

1:37:271:37:29

with silver in the women's visually

impaired giant slalom.

1:37:291:37:31

It takes Britain's tally

in Pyeongchang up to 5...

1:37:311:37:39

One away from the seven medals that

they targeted. Finally...

1:37:401:37:44

And Buveur D'Air retained his

Champion Hurdle title on the opening

1:37:441:37:47

day of the Cheltenham Festival.

1:37:471:37:48

The '6-4 on' favourite ridden

by Barry Geraghty gave trainer

1:37:481:37:50

Nicky Henderson a seventh victory

in the race.

1:37:501:37:53

That some of the sport now, more

after 11am.

1:37:531:37:58

This lunchtime, the Prime Minister

will set out measures the government

1:37:581:38:01

will take against Russia

because of the nerve agent

1:38:011:38:03

attack in Salisbury.

1:38:031:38:04

In the last 30 minutes, the Russian

Foreign Minister has said that there

1:38:041:38:09

has been no progress in discussions

with Britain about the attack and

1:38:091:38:12

they have claimed the UK is"

flagrantly trying to mislead the

1:38:121:38:23

international community". Norman

Smith is at Westminster. What kinds

1:38:231:38:27

of things will Theresa up with at

lunchtime?

She will be looking at

1:38:271:38:31

whether we kick out a whole load of

Russian diplomats based in London

1:38:311:38:35

who we may suspect of being spies,

for want of a better word. We may

1:38:351:38:39

also look at expanding asset freezes

and travel bans on some of Putin's

1:38:391:38:46

close allies. And possibly saying

officials and dignitaries linked to

1:38:461:38:52

the British double team do not go to

the World Cup. We may press for RT

1:38:521:39:02

and Russia Today to be taken off the

airwaves. That comes with problems.

1:39:021:39:06

There is a lot of unease about the

idea of closing down a Russian

1:39:061:39:11

television station, a lot in

Westminster take the view that is

1:39:111:39:14

not what Western democracy does,

that is the kind of thing

1:39:141:39:18

totalitarian regimes get up to. Real

reluctance to go down that road.

1:39:181:39:23

Similarly, some talk about maybe

just the England football team not

1:39:231:39:27

to go to Russia. I think there is

the view that the only people that

1:39:271:39:31

would hurt would be England football

fans. In terms of asset freezes and

1:39:311:39:34

travel bans, actually, there are a

lot of those up and running already.

1:39:341:39:41

After the Russian invasion of

Crimea, the EU imposed asset freezes

1:39:411:39:47

and travel bans on 149 people linked

to President Putin. It is not

1:39:471:39:53

immediately obvious. There are a

load of other people out there Matt

1:39:531:39:56

McCants that these bans on. The

range of options, when you get down

1:39:561:40:03

to the nitty-gritty, and the

economic sanctions against Russia, a

1:40:031:40:07

lot of those are already in place --

a lot of other people there that

1:40:071:40:11

they can put these bans on. The

range of options that Theresa May

1:40:111:40:15

has is quite difficult and limited.

Norman, thank you.

1:40:151:40:20

You will be able to see what the

Prime Minister comes up with

1:40:201:40:28

here on BBC News. Too many

communities in this country are too

1:40:281:40:33

segregated, the government says, and

it's time to put an end to that. It

1:40:331:40:37

is planning to spend £50 million

over the next two is to help people

1:40:371:40:41

become more integrated. Teaching

English is a big part of that, as

1:40:411:40:45

Sajid Javid, Communities

1:40:451:40:46

Secretary, has explained this

morning.

In the strategy this

1:40:461:40:51

morning, one of the top is boosting

English-language skills. We estimate

1:40:511:40:56

there is about 770,000 people

settled in Britain, who speak or

1:40:561:41:05

know a tiny bit of English. If you

cannot speak the language of

1:41:051:41:08

Britain, how will you get on in

society and take advantage of all of

1:41:081:41:12

the opportunities there? We will be

working with the Department for

1:41:121:41:18

Education and one thing that we will

do is work through community-based

1:41:181:41:21

groups. It isn't just going to work.

If you have a lady from Bangladesh

1:41:211:41:25

who has been here for 30 years and

not learned English, you can't just

1:41:251:41:30

knock on her door and give her a

leaflet. You need someone from her

1:41:301:41:34

own community to meet and encourage

her, take her to a place or

1:41:341:41:38

community centre that she knows what

is familiar with. These are the

1:41:381:41:41

strategies we will roll out

1:41:411:41:43

across the country.

The Communities

Secretary there. Earlier I spoke to

1:41:431:41:50

Dame Louise Casey, she was the

author of the government integration

1:41:501:41:53

review.

We had to remember that the

government cut significantly, and

1:41:531:41:57

Sajid is clear on that. It was over

a long period of time, we cut

1:41:571:42:05

English-language classes and I think

that was a mistake but those English

1:42:051:42:10

language classes should be targeted

at working age women and everybody,

1:42:101:42:15

working age people who do not have

English. Personally I would set a

1:42:151:42:19

date. It is or is helpful to say,

look, let's take five years, let's

1:42:191:42:25

work our way through this.

Governments have done that on other

1:42:251:42:27

issues. I don't see why they cannot

on this.

1:42:271:42:32

Let's talk now to Samayya Afzal

who grew up during the race riots

1:42:321:42:35

of 2001 in Bradford,

she's now engagement manager

1:42:351:42:37

at Muslim Council of Britain.

1:42:371:42:40

Rupa Huq is Labour MP for Ealing

and this week received

1:42:401:42:43

an Islamaphobic "punish

a Muslim letter."

1:42:431:42:47

We discussed this on the programme

on Monday. Welcome to both of you. I

1:42:471:42:51

would like to get your reaction to

some of the things that have been

1:42:511:42:55

suggested in this consultation green

paper from the Communities

1:42:551:42:59

Secretary. The first is spending

money to ensure that everybody

1:42:591:43:02

learns the English language. Louise

Casey said within five years, how do

1:43:021:43:05

you react to that?

Of course,

everybody learning the English

1:43:051:43:09

language and being able to

communicate is a welcome proposal. I

1:43:091:43:12

think that we need to find out more

information as to how

1:43:121:43:20

information as to how that will

impact communities and what kind of

1:43:231:43:24

funding will go into it, where it

will come from, those kinds of

1:43:241:43:27

issues.

And how do you react to

that? I agree that the

1:43:271:43:29

English-language is a good thing but

this government has cut funding for

1:43:291:43:32

English as a foreign language

course.

There's a college in my

1:43:321:43:34

constituency, they came to

Parliament in protest of that. They

1:43:341:43:39

need to match rhetoric with that. It

is another consultation, another

1:43:391:43:43

green paper. Often we know the

problem in these cases but I fear

1:43:431:43:47

that people have consultation

fatigue.

Rather than taking action.

1:43:471:43:50

What would you say the main barriers

are to people being integrated? I

1:43:501:43:58

grew up in Bradford, in one of the

most deprived areas in Bradford, if

1:43:581:44:02

not the UK. We had consultations

there and respect people. When we

1:44:021:44:07

talk about barriers, it is greater

than what has been sensationalised.

1:44:071:44:13

What are these barriers to

integration? Did you feel that there

1:44:131:44:16

were barriers to integrating?

In

terms of poverty and accessing

1:44:161:44:20

education at a level that is

conducive to being able to

1:44:201:44:27

contribute to society. I think that

way you live is a huge indicator of

1:44:271:44:32

how well you will do in your life as

well. There are a lot of barriers

1:44:321:44:39

that are structural. I think those

are the kinds of things that we need

1:44:391:44:42

to be looking at, if the government

is serious on integration.

Do you

1:44:421:44:47

think it is all right that people

want to live with people who aren't

1:44:471:44:50

like them?

I mean, there is a phrase

birds of a feather flock together. I

1:44:501:44:56

represent a multicultural seat,

there are 360,000 people in the

1:44:561:45:10

borough, I represent 70 5000. There

is a Polish community, we have

1:45:101:45:14

Synagogues and mosques. There a

balance between keeping

1:45:141:45:17

distinctiveness and getting along

together and integration is a

1:45:171:45:21

two-way process. We have fish and

chips as our national dish, that

1:45:211:45:25

came from the Middle East. Tea is

our national drink, it comes from

1:45:251:45:32

India or China but there are no tea

Hills in Ealing and Acton. This

1:45:321:45:39

country is richer for it.

It depends

on, in my case, where my

1:45:391:45:46

grandparents settled and where they

came from. Whether they could find

1:45:461:45:49

work. In city areas, where they

could find affordable housing. You

1:45:491:45:54

go to schools in your catchment

area, it isn't just due to choices

1:45:541:45:58

you have made yourself but choices

made for you. These are the kinds of

1:45:581:46:02

things where, if we want to

practically look at integration,

1:46:021:46:05

those are the kinds of things we

need to look at and celebrating the

1:46:051:46:10

diversity of British Muslims,

looking at how faith communities

1:46:101:46:13

integrate. Only last month, 200

mosques around the UK opened their

1:46:131:46:17

doors for people breaking down

barriers, and I think these kinds of

1:46:171:46:25

things are constantly happening.

From where I am from as well. It is

1:46:251:46:30

much broader than what has been

discussed.

1:46:301:46:36

I would like to ask you about the

letter that you received and other

1:46:361:46:43

politicians, other councillors

received. This punisher Muslim

1:46:431:46:44

letter. Did you open it ordered a

member of your staff?

It is being

1:46:441:46:52

treated as a hate crime because it

was received by Parliamentary

1:46:521:46:56

office, so stuff is meant to be

screened that comes in there. I was

1:46:561:47:01

actually in my committee, but it was

one of my staff who opened what

1:47:011:47:05

looks like a normal letter and

suddenly there is liquid easing out

1:47:051:47:10

of it. He is actually an ex-special

constables he called the police

1:47:101:47:15

immediately.

They can very quickly.

So along with the letter, you get a

1:47:151:47:22

number of points of what will happen

if you do this to a Muslim etc, out

1:47:221:47:29

came a liquid?

Yes, it is being

investigated at the moment by

1:47:291:47:36

counterterrorism officers. Because

on the one hand, MPs like myself are

1:47:361:47:40

used to getting rubbish. Last time I

was ideal programme was to talk

1:47:401:47:44

about this kind of thing. But I

think these things should be treated

1:47:441:47:48

seriously because at the same time,

you don't know if it's a seriously

1:47:481:47:52

noxious one. The particular person

who opened it, I think what happened

1:47:521:47:55

then, the office was sealed off. The

people who were in there with him

1:47:551:48:00

were quarantined.

1:48:001:48:05

were quarantined. There were people

with boiler suits hovering around.

1:48:051:48:07

They had to isolate him and taken to

hospital to check him out. It proved

1:48:071:48:10

to be not anything seriously but it

was a low-level irritant, I think

1:48:101:48:13

they called it.

And the latter is

self. How do you react to that?

It

1:48:131:48:18

was the same letter that has been

doing the rounds, widely publicised,

1:48:181:48:23

but I think Muslim MPs are being

focused to receive it. More people

1:48:231:48:28

may be opening them today, so why

would say people should be vigilant.

1:48:281:48:32

But does the content of it is

appalling, despicable. We are in a

1:48:321:48:37

climate now where maybe

post-referendum, we did see a spike

1:48:371:48:40

in hate crime, didn't we? Maybe that

has been this climate where people

1:48:401:48:44

feel a bit more emboldened to do

such things.

OK, thank you very

1:48:441:48:49

much, thank you for coming on the

programme.

1:48:491:48:53

Today marks one month

since Nikolas Cruz allegedly walked

1:48:531:48:55

into a Florida high school and shot

dead 17 people and

1:48:551:48:58

injured another 17.

1:48:581:49:02

It was announced yesterday that

prosecutors would seek the death

1:49:021:49:04

penalty for the teen.

1:49:041:49:06

But in response to the tragedy,

students from the Marjory Stoneman

1:49:061:49:09

Douglas High School in Parkland

are leaving their classrooms today

1:49:091:49:13

in a mass walk-out that will involve

students across the United States,

1:49:131:49:18

in a bid to demand tougher gun laws

and also pay tribute

1:49:181:49:21

to those who were killed.

1:49:211:49:27

There's also a March

for Our Lives student protest

1:49:271:49:29

planned which will take place

in Washington a week on Saturday.

1:49:291:49:37

Let's talk now to two students

who have organised walk-outs

1:49:381:49:40

in their respective schools.

1:49:401:49:43

17-year-old Meghan Ziembowicz

from Michigan and 16-year-old

1:49:431:49:50

Jamison Mae from Massachusetts.

1:49:501:49:54

Thank you very much, both of you,

for talking to our British audience.

1:49:541:49:59

Meghan, what do you hope to achieve?

We hope to achieve spreading

1:49:591:50:04

awareness that young people will not

sit around any longer in America and

1:50:041:50:09

allow pilots to occur. I don't want

a death in my community or any

1:50:091:50:13

community and I hope the walk-outs.

The show our politicians that we

1:50:131:50:17

have said enough is enough.

Jamison,

what do you hope it will achieve?

1:50:171:50:24

Exactly the same thing, showing our

government that we need common-sense

1:50:241:50:27

gun laws and we need to feel safer

in schools. I should not have the

1:50:271:50:33

walk in a hallway and think, where

should I hide if a school shooter

1:50:331:50:37

game in right now? I should be

thinking about what I'm doing with

1:50:371:50:41

my friend as we can do what I got my

maths test.

Megan, do you

1:50:411:50:47

acknowledge that some measures are

going to be brought in, controls

1:50:471:50:51

with people with mental health

issues and certain devices will be

1:50:511:50:54

bad that could make an assault

weapon even more dangerous? How much

1:50:541:50:58

progress do you think is being made?

I think that progress is being made,

1:50:581:51:03

although progress is slow and I

think the continual movement and the

1:51:031:51:06

continual push from adults,

educators, students and from all

1:51:061:51:12

people in the United States does

need to keep going until we reach

1:51:121:51:14

the progress that we are trying to

achieve.

Jamison, I think you have

1:51:141:51:19

written a letter to Senator 's that

you hope students attending the

1:51:191:51:29

protest will sign. Could you read

some for us?

Of course. To whom it

1:51:291:51:35

may concern, never again. These

words have inspired so many to speak

1:51:351:51:41

out against gun violence seen in

this country. We are writing to you

1:51:411:51:44

from our high school. This school

community is the heart and soul of

1:51:441:51:52

our town. The fact that we are even

writing this letter to you today all

1:51:521:51:56

that school shootings have become

somewhat of a norm in the United

1:51:561:52:00

States population is appalling to

us. Gun violence in schools across

1:52:001:52:03

the population has skyrocketed in

years past and that needs to be

1:52:031:52:08

addressed at the soonest possible

moment or the consequences could,

1:52:081:52:11

quite frankly, the deadly. No person

in the country should have to fear

1:52:111:52:16

going to work, school or any whereas

for that matter. How can we as a

1:52:161:52:20

nation so that we are a land of the

free when people are terrified they

1:52:201:52:24

could be killed for being in the

wrong place at the wrong time.

1:52:241:52:27

Living in fear is something that no

American should ever have to worry

1:52:271:52:31

about. Stronger gun laws need to be

implemented not only in

1:52:311:52:35

Massachusetts, what we have also

concerned that are considered to be

1:52:351:52:40

the best nation in the world, the

United States of America. Every

1:52:401:52:43

system has its faults and together

we can start a system that needs to

1:52:431:52:47

happen. The young people of this

nation will begin that change.

1:52:471:52:52

Changing the requirements to

purchase and buy a firearm can save

1:52:521:52:58

countless lives. Should I keep

going, or...

That is absolutely

1:52:581:53:03

amazing. Thank you so much, Jamison.

We really appreciate that and we

1:53:031:53:07

wish you all the best. Thank you

both very much for coming on the

1:53:071:53:12

programme, we appreciate it. Megan

is from Michigan.

1:53:121:53:18

The most famous physicist, the most

famous scientist of our time, has

1:53:191:53:25

died at the age of 76. He did

pioneering work on black holes

1:53:251:53:30

provided inspiration to countless

people with disabilities. As he

1:53:301:53:35

himself said it was no barrier to

his astonishing work.

1:53:351:53:42

his astonishing work.

Theoretical

physics is one of the few fields in

1:53:451:53:47

which being disabled is no handicap.

It is all in the mind. I find

1:53:471:54:04

humour...

I can't believe someone I

never heard of it hanging out with a

1:54:041:54:07

guy like me.

All right, it is

closing time.

He was paying the tab?

1:54:071:54:13

I didn't say that.

Yes I did. D'oh!

!

You really didn't like our paper?

1:54:131:54:29

I liked your paper very much.

Then

why are you attacking us?

If you

1:54:291:54:36

were sitting in a chair for 40

years, then you would get bored too.

1:54:361:54:42

All the quantum fluctuations in the

universe went change the cards in

1:54:421:54:45

your hand. I call. You are bluffing

and you will lose.

Wrong again,

1:54:451:54:50

Albert.

1:54:501:54:58

Albert.

What if I reverse the

process all the way back to see what

1:54:581:55:01

happened at the beginning of time

itself?

If Eddie read Mein won an

1:55:011:55:06

Oscar for playing me, it would make

up in some way for the fact that I

1:55:061:55:11

am unlikely to win a Nobel Prize.

1:55:111:55:14

I hope my example will show

disability can be no barrier. One

1:55:271:55:33

can achieve anything if one is

determined enough.

1:55:331:55:41

Well, Colin Farmer from Lincolnshire

got in touch with us. He was

1:55:411:55:45

diagnosed with MS 15 years ago and

he was one of those who found

1:55:451:55:51

inspiration from professional

Hawkins. Thank you very much for

1:55:511:55:54

talking to us, Colin. -- from

Professor Hawkins. Tell us in what

1:55:541:55:59

way you feel inspired by Stephen

Hawkins.

I haven't followed his

1:55:591:56:05

career as such but seeing him do

what he does being now or as he was

1:56:051:56:09

totally disabled, it is like an

impetus. It doesn't matter what your

1:56:091:56:19

disability is, you can always do

something. Not to sit there and feel

1:56:191:56:23

sorry for yourself and wallow in

your own misery and self-pity, but

1:56:231:56:29

get there, do stuff. He has shown

the way to go and I am hoping that

1:56:291:56:39

he inspires a lot of people with

disability. I know there is one

1:56:391:56:45

woman that I know that just sits and

feels sorry for themselves and I try

1:56:451:56:49

to a command to do something, even

though they are more disabled than I

1:56:491:56:54

am, to take a lesson from this, that

you can do something, even if it is

1:56:541:57:00

not a lot. You can still do

something, make something of your

1:57:001:57:04

life.

And you clearly, from what you

are saying, you have tried not to

1:57:041:57:09

let MS getting the way of what you

want to do?

Oh, no, no way. I will

1:57:091:57:15

do what ever I can whenever I can

and however I can. Although there

1:57:151:57:22

are things because of my disability

that I maybe shouldn't be doing, but

1:57:221:57:27

hang on a minute, his life is this?

It's not yours, it's mine. I'm going

1:57:271:57:33

to do it, whatever.

Thank you very

much, Colin. It's really nice to

1:57:331:57:37

talk to you. Thank you for coming on

the programme. Thank you, Colin

1:57:371:57:43

Farmer in Lincolnshire, aged 70 and

has MS. This e-mail from Paul. I was

1:57:431:57:48

saddened to hear of the death of

Stephen Hawking this morning. I had

1:57:481:57:53

originally graduated as an engineer

but it was a TV programme about

1:57:531:57:56

Professor Hawkins life and work

which motivated me to complete a

1:57:561:58:01

further degree in physics and I'm

there are countless others who have

1:58:011:58:07

likewise been inspired. Joy says, I

am nearing the end of my life since

1:58:071:58:11

first getting breast cancer 20 years

ago. Like Stephen, I have also never

1:58:111:58:16

felt quite so happy and full of life

as the last few years. Thank you

1:58:161:58:22

very much for those. BBC newsroom

live is next. Have a good day.

1:58:221:58:28

Victoria looks at the struggle of getting men to work with kids in nurseries, with exclusive access to proposals being drawn up to advise the government on how they can help. Tributes are paid to Professor Stephen Hawking, who has died at the age of 76. And ballroom star Len Goodman talks Strictly and the campaign he is fronting to try to stop over-60s falling victim to bank scams.