15/03/2018 Victoria Derbyshire


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15/03/2018

Victoria hears from a girl who tried to take her own life nine times before getting help, and speaks to people living in Syria on the anniversary of the start of the conflict.


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LineFromTo

Hello, it's 9 o'clock,

I'm Victoria Derbyshire,

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welcome to the programme.

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Our top story today...

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President Trump comes out in support

of the UK's decision to expel 23

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Russian diplomats from Britain

after the nerve agent

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attack in Salisbury.

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The United States stands in absolute

solidarity with Great Britain.

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The United States

believes that Russia

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is responsible for the attack on two

people in the United Kingdom, using

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a military grade nerve agent.

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We will get reaction. Also coming up

on the programme...

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Sherry Denness was 17

when she attempted to take her own

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life nine times in ten

days at the end of last

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year before she got

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the help she needed.

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Her dad's video seeking

support for her went viral.

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Sherry Denness and her mum and dad

wll be here shortly.

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And working repeated

shifts, but for free,

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with no offer of a job

at the end of it.

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There are calls to ban the practice

of unpaid trial shifts

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and it will be debated

in Parliament.

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Did your unpaid shifts

lead to a job, or not?

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Let us know.

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Hello.

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Welcome to the programme.

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We're live until 11 this morning.

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Later, we'll be talking about beer

yoga - where you can enjoy sipping

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a nice, cold lager while

doing the downward dog.

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Can you believe that?

That is after

10am.

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Also, we definitely want to hear

your own experiences of children

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with mental health problems and how

difficult, or otherwise,

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it was to get the right help.

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We've got a searing example of how

it didn't work early

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enough for one teenager.

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We'll be talking to her

at 9.15am.

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Our top story today...

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The White House has given

its backing to Britain's decision

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to expel Russian diplomats

in retaliation for the nerve

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agent attack on Sergei

Skripal and his daughter.

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The US said it was a just response

and America stood in solidarity

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with its closest ally.

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And in a hardening of

President Trump's tone on Russia,

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his spokeswoman accused it

of undermining the security

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of countries worldwide.

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23 staff at the Russian embassy

in London have been given

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a week to leave the UK.

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However, the Kremlin continues

to deny any involvement

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in the attempted murder.

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Keith Doyle reports.

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Late-night comings and goings

at the Russian embassy

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in London - 23 diplomats considered

to be undeclared spies will be

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making preparations to leave Britain

after the decision yesterday

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to expel them.

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While Russia remains defiant

that it was not involved

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in the nerve agent attack,

other major world powers

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are backing Britain.

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Now one member stands accused

of using chemical weapons

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on the sovereign soil

of another member.

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The credibility of this council

will not survive if we fail

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to hold Russia accountable.

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"Russia was to blame,"

the Prime Minister told MPs,

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and that's why action

is being taken.

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So, Mr Speaker, there is no

alternative conclusion other

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than that the Russian state

was culpable for the attempted

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murder of Mr Skripal

and his daughter.

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This represents an unlawful use

of force by the Russian state

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against the United Kingdom.

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The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn,

said the response should be

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based on clear evidence.

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Russia insists it was not involved

and it will retaliate.

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Prime Minister May is destroying

international law and is destroying

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the international relationship.

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Last night, Britain asked

the International Chemical Weapons

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Watchdog to verify Moscow is behind

the attack in Salisbury.

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There is now a fully-blown

diplomatic row,

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a row that looks likely to escalate

with expected tit-for-tat actions.

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And as this goes on,

Sergei Skripal and his daughter

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remain critically ill in hospital.

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Keith Doyle, BBC News.

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Our correspondent Richard

Galpin is in Moscow.

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Norman Smith is in Westminster.

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Richard, what reaction in Russia to

what President Trump has said?

There

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has been another briefing by the

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman in

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which she has said that the idea

that Russia is behind the poisoning

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is insane and she is saying the

truth behind the Skripal poisoning

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is being hidden by the British

authorities and she is of course

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saying they are working on

retaliatory measures, we do not know

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when they will be implemented, but

certainly they are working on them,

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and the widespread assumption is

they will be tit-for-tat, 23 spies,

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Russian spies, are going to be

expelled from London and the

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expectation is British diplomats in

Moscow and those deemed to be spies

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are likely to be expelled. And

possibly further measures mirroring

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what the British Government has

announced. It is interesting the

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development of the international

community, Western powers, rallying

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behind Theresa May and Britain. We

have seen the UN, a lot of

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statements expressing solidarity,

including from Nato, and the key

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question for the Russian government

is whether those countries will do

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something concrete. For example,

whether they would themselves will

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impose more sanctions. That would be

very troubling for the Kremlin.

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Norman at Westminster, 19 Labour MPs

have signed a Commons motion

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supporting the decision of the Prime

Minister to expelled the diplomats,

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spies. Why are they doing that?

Because of widespread anger among

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Labour MPs at Mr Corbyn's response

to the Salisbury attack, in the

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Commons yesterday, he appeared to

question and challenge the evidence

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pointing towards Russia. It was not

just that many Labour MPs thought he

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got the tone wrong, he also attacked

the Government for cuts to the

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police and the National Health

Service, taking Russian money. There

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was not just they thought that was

an inappropriate line to take, it is

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because they felt he failed to live

up to the moment, that at a time

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when people are being attacked, in

Britain, that, they felt, was a

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moment when he needed to stand up as

a national leader and show he was

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ready to stand up to foreign

aggression. More than that, a view

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among some Labour figures he is

betraying the history of the Labour

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Party which has, they say, always

been very patriotic, going back to

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the likes of Clement Attlee, and

there are clear signs of tension

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even right at the very top of the

party with senior figures like the

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Shadow Defence Secretary and the

Shadow Foreign Secretary, Emily

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Thornberry, both uneasy with the

stance Mr Corbyn has taken.

More

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reaction to come of course through

the morning.

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Annita McVeigh is in the BBC

Newsroom with a summary

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of the rest of the day's news.

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The labratory where scientists

helped identify the nerve agent used

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in Salisbury is to get more funding

from the government

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as part of a defence

modernisation programme.

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An extra £48 million

for a new Chemical Weapons Defence

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Centre at Porton Down,

will be announced by Gavin

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Williamson in his first major speech

as Defence Secretary later today.

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The Brexit Secretary,

David Davis, has said he's prepared

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to accept the EU's offer

of a shortened transition period,

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after the UK leaves

the European Union in March, 2019.

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He said he would agree to a call

for the transition to end

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in December, 2020, if that

helped to secure a deal at

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next week's EU summit.

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Ministers are being called

on to introduce a faster phase-out

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of petrol and diesel cars,

currently set for 2040.

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The MPs have also demanded

a new Clean Air Act,

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and they say the motor industry

should finance a clean air fund.

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The Government says it'll

publish its own proposals on air

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pollution later in the year.

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Here's our environment

analyst, Roger Harrabin.

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The air in many of Britain's cities

is officially unfit to breathe.

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And the MPs are angry that,

despite a series of court cases,

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the Government hasn't cleaned it up.

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The young are particularly at risk,

and the MPs' report has drawn

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support from UN children's

organisation, UNICEF,

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which says that Britain's children

deserve to breathe clean air.

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The Government aims to end the sales

of diesel and petrol

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only vehicles by 2040,

but the MPs say that is inadequate.

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India will do it ten years earlier.

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They say government must work

with local councils to stop

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pollution-related deaths.

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This really needs to be stamped out.

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We need to improve it.

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And that's why the whole report

talked about bringing government,

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local authorities together,

so we can work across,

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not just here in London,

but across the whole country.

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The Government says it's looking

beyond cars to smokeless fuel

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and wood stoves in its strategy,

due later in the year.

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Roger Harrabin, BBC News.

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The World Health Organization

is to carry out a review

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of the potential impact of plastic

on human health.

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It follows the release

of a new study by US researchers -

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the largest of its kind -

which discovered plastic particles

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in popular brands of bottled water.

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Scientists say that there is no

evidence yet to suggest

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it is a cause for concern.

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In the past three years,

parents across England and Wales

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have been fined about £24 million

for failing to send

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their children to school.

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A BBC investigation also shows some

councils are issuing penalties

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at rates five times higher

than the average.

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Some parents say they now actively

budget for the cost of fines

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when planning holidays.

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While some councils admit

they have become stricter,

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they say they are protecting

the education of children.

0:10:120:10:15

The use of food and medical

supplies as a weapon of war

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by the Syrian regime has

been branded as utterly

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abhorrent by the Foreign

Secretary, Boris Johnson,

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and International Development

Secretary Penny Mordaunt.

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In a joint statement to mark

the seven years of conflict

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which has gripped the country,

they are branding the war

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as one of the longest

and bloodiest in recent history.

0:10:370:10:40

A 20-year-old woman has been

jailed for six months

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in the American state of Minnesota

for fatally shooting her boyfriend

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in a botched YouTube video

they hoped would go viral.

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Pedro Ruiz convinced Monalisa Perez

to shoot him at close range

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with a powerful pistol,

believing that a thick

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book he held in front

of his chest would shield him.

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He died at the scene.

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Some MPs and lawyers have

called for a blanket ban

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on unpaid shift work.

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Companies can currently invite

prospective employees to do trial

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shifts with the carrot of a job

at the end.

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But there has been a six-fold

increase over three years

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in complaints over unpaid shifts,

according to the trade union Unite.

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On Friday, a Private Members'

Bill which seeks to make

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unpaid trials illegal

will get its second

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parliamentary reading.

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That's a summary of the latest BBC

News - more at 9:30.

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Good morning. Get in touch with us,

you're very welcome. You can use

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Twitter, e-mail or message us on

Facebook.

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In a moment, a pretty heartbreaking

story from a teenager, a young

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woman, who attempted to take her own

life nine times in the space of ten

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days. She is here with her mum and

dad and she will talk specifically

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about the care she found difficult

to access. They want to improve the

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mental health care teenagers and

young people get. Your expenses

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really welcome. We would like to

feed those into the conversation

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with Sherry and her mum and dad. Do

get in touch.

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Let's get some sport with Hugh.

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Most wanted five English sides in

the Champions League, but it is just

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two.

Just two. We saw Man United go

out in such a disappointing way, as

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tough as we thought it would be for

Chelsea last night in the Champions

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League.

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They went away to Spanish League

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leaders Barcelona and had some

confidence after a 1-1 first leg

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draw and the fact they hadn't

lost at the Nou Camp

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on their last four visits.

0:12:550:13:01

However, the were stung

by the five-time Ballon D'or

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winner Lionel Messi.

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Having gone his first eight games

against Chelsea without a goal,

0:13:110:13:18

he scored the equaliser in the first

leg and scored two while setting up

0:13:180:13:21

the other last night.

0:13:210:13:22

And it was a case of the nutmeg!

0:13:220:13:24

The first came after just

a couple of minutes,

0:13:240:13:29

deceiving Thibaut Courtois

in the Chelsea goal.

0:13:290:13:32

His second,

different end, different

0:13:320:13:34

foot, same result.

0:13:340:13:35

In fact it finished 3-0 on the night

to Barca, and means Liverpool

0:13:350:13:38

and Manchester City will be the two

British clubs in the

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quarter-final draw tomorrow.

0:13:410:13:42

There were better scenes

for Arsenal's Women last night -

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they stunned favourites

Manchester City to win

0:13:450:13:46

the Continental Tyres Cup

for a record fifth time -

0:13:460:13:49

1-0 - thanks to

Vivianne Miedema's goal.

0:13:490:13:53

Eddie Jones, disappointing Six

Nations, apologising for offending

0:13:530:13:56

some other home nations.

Not great

for Eddie Jones. England head coach.

0:13:560:14:01

You might remember the pictures of

him being verbally abused by

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Scotland rugby fans and the sport

was left disgusted, but once again

0:14:040:14:09

braced against words from Jones

himself at a port last summer, he

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described the Irish as... And Wales

as not very nice place, shall we

0:14:130:14:20

say. He has apologised unreservedly,

saying he was very sorry for any

0:14:200:14:27

offence, no ski since, he said he

should not have said what he did,

0:14:270:14:30

but added motivation for the Ireland

team -- no excuses.

And no Ruby

0:14:300:14:40

Walsh for the rest of the Cheltenham

Festival. Awful fall for the top

0:14:400:14:44

jockey rest Tony McRae yesterday.

--

awful fall for the top jockey

0:14:440:14:51

yesterday. The serious injury

yesterday, he went to hospital with

0:14:510:14:55

a suspected broken leg, he found

that the second last fence and it

0:14:550:14:59

seems he has broken the same local

four months ago, only just made a

0:14:590:15:05

return to racing, and he will miss

the rest of the festival including

0:15:050:15:11

Freddie's Gold. The Big Race Was The

Queen Mother Champion Chase

0:15:110:15:21

Queen Mother Champion Chase Altior

Easley came home first. Finally,

0:15:240:15:27

some bad news from South Korea. GB

cannot win a medal in the curling.

0:15:270:15:34

They lost Korea in the penultimate

round Robin Knoche. In the

0:15:340:15:43

afternoon's session, Norway's

victory over Slovakia, it means the

0:15:430:15:48

Brits are out, even if they beat

China, some disappointment for

0:15:480:15:53

Paralympics GB in Pyeongchang.

More

through the morning.

0:15:530:16:03

When she was 17, Sherry Denness

tried to kill herself

0:16:030:16:06

nine times in 10 days.

0:16:060:16:07

That was last November.

0:16:070:16:09

Now 18, Sherry's been

diagnosed with a number

0:16:090:16:12

of mental health conditions,

including borderline personality

0:16:120:16:16

disorder and attention deficit

hyperactivity disorder or ADHD.

0:16:160:16:23

On seven of her nine attempts,

Sherry went to A&E,

0:16:230:16:26

where she was patched up and deemed

well enough to be sent home

0:16:260:16:29

with no further help.

0:16:290:16:30

Things came to a head

when she was found near the local

0:16:300:16:33

train station and was eventually

sectioned under

0:16:330:16:35

the Mental Health Act.

0:16:350:16:36

BBC Stories has been

following Sherry.

0:16:360:16:43

She's doing better now.

0:16:430:16:46

We will talk to her in a moment.

0:16:460:16:51

She and her parents

feel she was badly

0:16:510:16:52

let down by mental health services

over a period of many years

0:16:520:16:55

and they feel places like hospitals

should be better equipped to cope

0:16:550:16:58

with children in crisis.

0:16:580:16:59

Sherry's dad posted this

online to help raise

0:16:590:17:01

awareness of their campaign.

0:17:010:17:03

PIANO PLAYS

0:17:030:17:10

The video has had more

than 5.5 million views

0:18:370:18:41

and the campaign hashtag

"wecaresherry" has

0:18:410:18:43

been shared widely.

0:18:430:18:46

Sherry and her mum Andi and dad

Chris are here now...

0:18:460:18:51

Good morning to all of you. Thank

you for coming on the programme. How

0:18:510:18:56

are you, first of all?

I was

nervous, but I'm OK.

We will look

0:18:560:19:01

after you. Tell us about the

campaign and what it's been like to

0:19:010:19:04

have this incredible support from

millions of people, most of whom are

0:19:040:19:09

strangers.

I can't even... I have

always had the mindset that I am not

0:19:090:19:15

a very liked person because the

issues I have gone through. I was

0:19:150:19:19

bullied at school. I had quite a

rough time with it. I have always

0:19:190:19:24

been of the mindset that not a lot

of people care about me apart from

0:19:240:19:28

the people who have to do, like my

parents! So seeing it exposed, that

0:19:280:19:36

I was under section, when it was

launched, and I had phoned time. I

0:19:360:19:41

saw it, and I thought, wow.

You were

sectioned at that time?

I was in the

0:19:410:19:47

hospital, yes. I was 200 miles away

from my parents. I checked on my

0:19:470:19:51

Facebook and the video that you just

played has come up on there. I was

0:19:510:20:00

like... Where are all these people

coming from?

How did it make you

0:20:000:20:06

feel to know people did care?

Very

important, it made me feel a lot

0:20:060:20:11

better. A lot better.

I know you are

comfortable talking about some of

0:20:110:20:19

your diagnoses, including borderline

personality disorder and ADHD. Can

0:20:190:20:22

you give any insights to our

audience into the kind of voices you

0:20:220:20:28

have heard in your head in the past?

I've had delusions since I was quite

0:20:280:20:33

young. My first delusion was when I

was 12. They come in the forms of

0:20:330:20:40

site, and they come in the forms of

hearing as well. The site is really

0:20:400:20:45

scary because it's, how can you look

at me right now and see in perfect

0:20:450:20:51

detail because I'm right here? --

the sight is really scary. You are

0:20:510:20:57

scared because everyone else tells

you it's not real. The voices are

0:20:570:21:01

the same. Sometimes they can be

inner thoughts. And it will just

0:21:010:21:06

come from within. But sometimes you

will actually hear it as if is

0:21:060:21:09

external. Again, people tell you

nothing is there. It's a really

0:21:090:21:16

dark, scary and lonely place.

There

will be people watching who can

0:21:160:21:20

relate to this. I want to let our

audience know that we will talk in

0:21:200:21:24

detail about the kind of things you

have experienced and perhaps if you

0:21:240:21:28

have young children you might not

want them to hear, but it's your

0:21:280:21:31

decision. What kind of things would

you see and what kind of things with

0:21:310:21:36

the voices say to you?

I used to

have three delusions. They sometimes

0:21:360:21:43

come back when I am in a really bad

state. Or I am emotionally

0:21:430:21:49

regularised. One is called Ciaran,

one is Anna and one is Alice. Ciaran

0:21:490:21:57

is a really horrible man who would

stand outside my window at night and

0:21:570:22:02

wave at me. He would speak to me as

well. Alice was a little girl who

0:22:020:22:09

didn't say anything. She would just

walk around my room. And Anna, when

0:22:090:22:14

I had anorexia, I developed another

voice called Anna, and it was that

0:22:140:22:21

voice who was always telling me,

don't eat. But Ciaran would say

0:22:210:22:26

things like, if you don't hurt

yourself, or if you don't do this to

0:22:260:22:34

yourself, or tell lies, or whatever,

then I will kill your family. It was

0:22:340:22:42

very real. So I would do it because

I was scared for my family. It would

0:22:420:22:49

be visions. When I am in that state,

I'm thinking, he is showing me

0:22:490:22:54

visions, he can actually do this.

It

must have been terrifying.

It was,

0:22:540:23:00

it was horrible. He told me one

night to sit in the garden at three

0:23:000:23:04

in the morning. And not come out,

and cover myself in a black blanket.

0:23:040:23:10

I was cold, I wanted to go in

because I was cold, and he would

0:23:100:23:18

say, no, you don't deserve to. That

kind of stuff.

And this led to last

0:23:180:23:25

November when you are tempted to

take your own life multiple times in

0:23:250:23:29

a short period of time, in ten days.

You were taken to A&E a number of

0:23:290:23:34

times. And then you would be

released when the physical side of

0:23:340:23:40

things had been cleared up, is that

correct?

Yes.

What were you thinking

0:23:400:23:46

when you were discharged?

At that

point in time, I was not in the

0:23:460:23:50

right mindset. I was thinking, good,

because I can do it again.

Really?

0:23:500:23:56

Speaking to your mother now, what

were you thinking when she was

0:23:560:23:59

discharged?

God, yeah, what on

earth?! From our point of view, once

0:23:590:24:07

is enough. We have had to hold

Sherry's hand when she has done

0:24:070:24:14

things to herself and she is in a

coma, and to nurse your child that

0:24:140:24:21

your bedside, watching, no response

to every single pressure point and

0:24:210:24:26

every single thing they do to class

you in a coma, and to see your child

0:24:260:24:33

in that fragile state, it's a bit

like today, it's surreal. Is this

0:24:330:24:39

really happening? This can't really

be happening. And when they let your

0:24:390:24:43

child go, you're just like, what?!

Do you know what I mean? So we were

0:24:430:24:54

just left thinking, what the heck,

literally, what the heck.

And what

0:24:540:24:59

was it like for you as Sherry's dad,

knowing the potentially the physical

0:24:590:25:05

side of things had been treated, but

mentally, clearly, there was so much

0:25:050:25:10

going on.

It was a difficult time

for everyone. It was try to get the

0:25:100:25:14

nurses or somebody on our side, to

say, will you listen to what we are

0:25:140:25:19

saying to you, because if you

release her, she will try and do the

0:25:190:25:23

worst. It kept happening and

happening.

But what you were saying

0:25:230:25:28

would happen, it would happen, and

yet she would still be released.

0:25:280:25:33

Exactly, and this was a pattern that

happened not only in that ten days,

0:25:330:25:37

but since she came onto the radar,

if you like, of mental health, when

0:25:370:25:43

she was 11. I remember the first

time she self harm that 13. We

0:25:430:25:47

looked at each other and thought,

where did that come from? It was a

0:25:470:25:55

progression we never ever

anticipated. And that was really

0:25:550:25:57

tough.

You say Sherry was 11 when

she was first assessed by CAMS.

She

0:25:570:26:13

said -- they said she was naughty

and attention seeking and her

0:26:130:26:15

delusions were fake.

They said that

within earshot of me when I was 11

0:26:150:26:20

years old. They took me in for an

assessment for ADHD and I heard the

0:26:200:26:24

person who assessed me saying to my

mother that she was an attention

0:26:240:26:31

seeker, and it was a behavioural

thing.

That she was looking for

0:26:310:26:36

attention. We have had to fight for

her every step of the way. There

0:26:360:26:39

hasn't been a day gone by that we

haven't been exhausted by the fight.

0:26:390:26:42

You get to the end of it and think,

I can't take any more, and then

0:26:420:26:47

something else happens. And every

day you think, this is the bottom,

0:26:470:26:51

we will get up now, because we are

really positive people. But no,

0:26:510:26:57

there is a new bottom. This kept

happening and happening, over and

0:26:570:27:02

over again. We have always wanted to

launch a campaign, because we have

0:27:020:27:05

always felt there is no help for

young people. We are saying between

0:27:050:27:11

the age of 10-25. Because even

though you are an adult at 18,

0:27:110:27:18

really, what makes you one day a

child and 1-dayer adult?

That's

0:27:180:27:26

normality transition for somebody

with mental health, at 17 you are

0:27:260:27:30

still a child, but at 18 you have

adult responsibilities. For somebody

0:27:300:27:35

with mental health, who doesn't fit

into the category of normal, it's a

0:27:350:27:38

very stressful and hard time. There

should be more support.

But you were

0:27:380:27:43

not getting that support when you

are 17 either really. Until you

0:27:430:27:48

section, which is what you wanted,

which is after the ninth time you

0:27:480:27:51

are tempted to... You were found at

a train station. The police found

0:27:510:27:58

you, and they took the decision to

section you, which you were relieved

0:27:580:28:02

about.

The legs nearly went from

under me. I was gobsmacked.

0:28:020:28:12

under me. I was gobsmacked. PCP

Turcotte and Dan Ayrton are our

0:28:120:28:14

heroes, without a shadow of a doubt.

-- PC Peter Coe. We can't thank

0:28:140:28:23

those individuals enough.

You say

you were seen in that period of ten

0:28:230:28:30

days by 18 different health care

professionals. That's quite

0:28:300:28:32

extraordinary. Are you saying that

nobody was joining the dots up

0:28:320:28:37

effectively?

I don't think it was a

case of them not joining the dots

0:28:370:28:43

up. It was more a case of them not

wanting to. I have been dealt with a

0:28:430:28:47

lot in hospitals, main hospitals,

paediatric wards, and there is a

0:28:470:28:55

massive taboo about it. Nobody

really wants to talk about it,

0:28:550:29:00

nobody really wants to help. That's

why I am continuing with this

0:29:000:29:04

campaign.

There are people who do

want to help and organisations,

0:29:040:29:09

because we have had them on this

programme. It seems really sad you

0:29:090:29:12

were not put in touch with one of

those. Chris Conley you did this

0:29:120:29:18

video that went viral. It's very

poignant, I have to say. -- Chris,

0:29:180:29:25

you did this video. What is the

point of this, it has been seen

0:29:250:29:29

millions of times, so what do you

want to change as a result of your

0:29:290:29:33

family's experience?

All the bad my

family has gone through, we want to

0:29:330:29:38

make a positive change and help

young people, give them support and

0:29:380:29:41

let them know there are people

there. The reason for doing the

0:29:410:29:44

video was to give an insight into

what it is like for Sherry, what she

0:29:440:29:53

was suffering, and give people an

insight on what it is like for

0:29:530:29:57

parents who have children who suffer

with mental health. I did the video

0:29:570:30:01

thinking maybe a couple of hundred

people would watch it, and every

0:30:010:30:05

couple of days it would go up more

and more.

I have some messages.

0:30:050:30:11

There is one I have left over there

from a young woman called Georgina,

0:30:110:30:15

who is 21. She talked about being

diagnosed with mental health

0:30:150:30:20

issues... I can't find it. I have

just printed it out... It is so

0:30:200:30:24

pertinent to you. Let me find it.

0:30:240:30:31

I would like to share my

experiences. I'm 21, diagnosed with

0:30:310:30:37

clinical depression at 13 after a

series of self harm issues. After

0:30:370:30:41

visiting my school nurse and GP, it

took eight months for me to be

0:30:410:30:46

referred to talking therapy with a

child and adolescent mental health

0:30:460:30:50

service. The quality of the therapy

was so poor it worse and my mental

0:30:500:30:54

health and I was under the age of 18

I was refused any appropriate

0:30:540:30:58

medication. I was patronised and

dismissed by the person I was told

0:30:580:31:02

to speak to.

0:31:020:31:12

Discharged and then relapsed, it

took a further five months to get an

0:31:150:31:18

appointment with a psychologist. It

was only when I reached 18 and 20

0:31:180:31:21

university I receive treatment I

needed. I have been on medication

0:31:210:31:22

for over three years now and I am

better than ever. Some of that, you

0:31:220:31:26

can relate to?

Terrible. I can

totally relate to that.

That is what

0:31:260:31:28

struck us, it was not an isolated

case, we knew that, but we did not

0:31:280:31:32

realise just how many people are

just like us and it gave us hope as

0:31:320:31:38

well.

Why don't you explain what

this is, Sherry? Such a wonderful

0:31:380:31:44

idea, you send this out to people

who are feeling like nobody cares.

0:31:440:31:48

On our website, we have at the

bottom of the page a button that

0:31:480:31:53

says, apply for a recovery box. I

make them myself from scratch,

0:31:530:31:59

handmade. I do absolutely

everything.

0:31:590:32:05

everything. There is a little

inventory slip and a message that is

0:32:050:32:13

always personalised, a poem, some

sweet treats, a diary for thoughts,

0:32:130:32:19

colouring, for destruction, stressed

toys -- colouring for distraction,

0:32:190:32:27

stress toys.

This is going to a girl

in Essex.

Yes.

Age?

We're not sure.

0:32:270:32:42

The Government promised in 2015 £1.4

billion over five years to transform

0:32:420:32:49

child and adolescent mental health

services and they are committed to

0:32:490:32:56

employing more therapists and

supervisors, what do you say?

A

0:32:560:33:00

little bit too late, really. The

help needs to happen now, it is

0:33:000:33:05

disgusting, when you look at primary

school, you can start to see

0:33:050:33:09

patterns of children's behaviour, we

are talking about as young as year

0:33:090:33:16

three, four, five, and, really, for

us, it is not websites that are

0:33:160:33:21

needed, paper information, ring this

number, it is face to face. People

0:33:210:33:25

need early intervention. Schools

need to have a person, whether a

0:33:250:33:32

specialist teacher or another type

of classroom assistant, that is

0:33:320:33:37

trained in recognising early-onset

adolescent mental health issues.

0:33:370:33:45

Because if Sherry had received the

help at 11, just before crossing

0:33:450:33:51

over to senior school, then she

would have been on the right track

0:33:510:33:54

and we may not have gone down the

road of self harm and all of the

0:33:540:33:59

other stuff. Actually, research

shows, self harm is a cry because

0:33:590:34:10

they get so far with their mental

health, there is nowhere to go in

0:34:100:34:15

their head, nowhere to go, and then

you get self harm. We have heard

0:34:150:34:21

stories of parents being given safe

self harming kits, that is

0:34:210:34:26

ludicrous. I do not understand, why

would we be reactive sea society

0:34:260:34:32

when we should be proactive and that

means getting children the help they

0:34:320:34:38

desperately need -- a reactive

society. We are working so hard to

0:34:380:34:45

help other parents, we have a secret

group for parents, carers, foster

0:34:450:34:51

carers, adoptive parents, whoever is

caring for a young person, and we

0:34:510:34:56

help them with different topics,

Q&As weekly, they can ask whatever

0:34:560:35:03

they like, we're not experts, we do

not claim to be experts, but what we

0:35:030:35:09

are is we are experienced in this

through our own experience. If we

0:35:090:35:15

can help, which they say we are

helping, it does not feel like we

0:35:150:35:19

are, but they say massively we are

helping, and if we can help one set

0:35:190:35:25

of parents, then, great. And Sherry

has come on board with the campaign

0:35:250:35:30

recently and she does more live

things on the site and interacts

0:35:300:35:36

with her audience and stuff like

that. That has been really positive

0:35:360:35:41

as well.

Thank you. Well done. Thank

you very much for being on the

0:35:410:35:47

programme. If you want help or

advice on mental health issues,

0:35:470:35:53

please go to the BBC action line

website and I have got some messages

0:35:530:35:59

from you and a lot of love for you

as well, Sherry. I will read some of

0:35:590:36:04

those through the programme.

0:36:040:36:06

Still to come...

0:36:060:36:08

It's seven years since

the war in Syria began.

0:36:080:36:10

We'll speak to people living

through the conflict.

0:36:100:36:12

And could more than 100 homeless

people seeking shelter

0:36:120:36:18

in an empty commercial building

in central London be

0:36:180:36:20

forced to leave?

0:36:200:36:25

Time for the latest news.

0:36:250:36:26

Here's Annita.

0:36:260:36:28

The BBC News

headlines this morning.

0:36:280:36:30

The White House has given

its backing to Britain's

0:36:300:36:33

decision to expel Russian diplomats

in retaliation for the nerve

0:36:330:36:37

agent attack on Sergei

Skripal and his daughter.

0:36:370:36:40

The US said it was a just response

and America stood in solidarity

0:36:400:36:44

with its closest ally.

0:36:440:36:46

And in a hardening of

President Trump's tone on Russia,

0:36:460:36:50

his spokeswoman accused it

of undermining the security

0:36:500:36:52

of countries worldwide.

0:36:520:36:54

23 staff at the Russian embassy

in London have been given

0:36:540:36:57

a week to leave the UK.

0:36:570:36:59

However, the Kremlin continues

to deny any involvement

0:36:590:37:00

in the attempted murder.

0:37:000:37:04

The labratory

where scientists helped identify

0:37:040:37:07

the nerve agent used in Salisbury

is to get more funding from

0:37:070:37:10

the Government as part of a defence

modernisation programme.

0:37:100:37:13

An extra £48 million

for a new Chemical Weapons Defence

0:37:130:37:16

Centre at Porton Down

will be announced by Gavin

0:37:160:37:19

Williamson in his first major speech

as Defence Secretary later today.

0:37:190:37:26

The investigation into the fire

at Grenfell Tower has

0:37:260:37:28

found the fire doors may not have

been as effective as they

0:37:280:37:31

were supposed to be.

0:37:310:37:32

The Metropolitan Police tested

a door designed to resist

0:37:320:37:34

fire for half an hour and found

that it only lasted 15 minutes.

0:37:340:37:37

The investigation is ongoing.

0:37:370:37:44

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis,

has said he's prepared

0:37:440:37:48

to accept the EU's offer

of a shortened transition period,

0:37:480:37:50

after the UK leaves

the European Union in March, 2019.

0:37:500:37:54

He said he would agree to a call

for the transition to end

0:37:540:37:57

in December, 2020, if that

helped to secure a deal at

0:37:570:38:01

next week's EU summit.

0:38:010:38:04

The World Health Organization

is to carry out

0:38:040:38:05

a review of the potential impact

of plastic on human health.

0:38:050:38:13

It follows the release

of a new study by US researchers -

0:38:130:38:17

the largest of its kind -

which discovered plastic particles

0:38:170:38:19

in popular brands of bottled water.

0:38:190:38:21

Scientists say that there is no

evidence yet to suggest

0:38:210:38:23

it is a cause for concern.

0:38:230:38:26

In the past three years,

parents across England and Wales

0:38:260:38:29

have been fined about £24 million

for failing to send

0:38:290:38:32

their children to school.

0:38:320:38:34

A BBC investigation also shows some

councils are issuing

0:38:340:38:36

penalties at rates five times higher

than the average.

0:38:360:38:42

Some parents say they now actively

budget for the cost of fines

0:38:420:38:44

when planning holidays.

0:38:440:38:46

While some councils admit

they have become stricter,

0:38:460:38:48

they say they are protecting

the education of children.

0:38:480:38:52

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

0:38:520:38:58

We will bring you more detail on the

story reported on them, the flat

0:38:580:39:05

doors in Grenfell Tower could only

hold back a blaze for half the time

0:39:050:39:10

they were supposed to, according to

investigators. Messages from Europe

0:39:100:39:14

at the interview with Sherry, Marine

A says, I'm so pleased she is

0:39:140:39:20

receiving the treatment she

deserves. Incredibly brave. From an

0:39:200:39:26

18-year-old who does not wish us to

use her name, I'm 18, struggling

0:39:260:39:31

with depression and an eating

disorder after turning 16, in my

0:39:310:39:35

area, the way to be seen by a mental

health specialist was just under

0:39:350:39:40

three months. For someone struggling

a lot. But someone struggling a lot,

0:39:400:39:45

this time period was extensive and

unsuitable. Once I was finally seen,

0:39:450:39:50

it was difficult not to feel guilty

because you were constantly told how

0:39:500:39:54

many children were on waiting lists.

I felt like saying, you may as well

0:39:540:39:58

give it to them if they needed than

me. When I turned 18, I was going to

0:39:580:40:03

be discharged from the service. I

was at my worst in terms of my

0:40:030:40:10

mental state. Because of me becoming

an adult, it was overnight by mental

0:40:100:40:14

health team were no longer

interested in treating me. I had to

0:40:140:40:18

wait a further eight weeks to be

reviewed by a and adult dental

0:40:180:40:24

health team -- by an adult mental

health team.

0:40:240:40:29

Here's some sport now.

0:40:290:40:30

Chelsea were the latest British

team to be knocked out

0:40:300:40:33

of the Champions League last night

after a 3-0 defeat

0:40:330:40:35

awat at Barcelona.

0:40:350:40:36

Lionel Messi scored

twice on the night.

0:40:360:40:38

It means Manchester City

and Liverpool are the only domestic

0:40:380:40:40

sides in the hat for

Friday's quarterfinal draw.

0:40:400:40:47

Good news for Arsenal fans -

the club secured its first piece

0:40:470:40:49

of silverware this season

as they shocked Manchester City

0:40:490:40:52

to win the Continental Tyres Cup -

it finished 1-0 thanks

0:40:520:40:54

to Vivienne Miedema's winner.

0:40:540:40:55

The Cheltenham Festival's all-time

leading rider Ruby Walsh will miss

0:40:550:40:58

the rest of this week's

event after a fall.

0:40:580:41:01

Walsh has a suspected leg fracture

to the same leg with which he has

0:41:010:41:05

just spent four months away from the

sport with injury. Great Britain

0:41:050:41:08

cannot win a medal in the wheelchair

curling. Defeat to South Korea

0:41:080:41:14

earlier and Norway's victory over

Slovakia means the Brits cannot

0:41:140:41:18

reach the medal play-offs. More

sport in the next hour.

0:41:180:41:23

Seven years ago today, the first

deaths happened in what has

0:41:230:41:25

become the war in Syria.

0:41:250:41:28

It started as a peaceful uprising,

and no-one expected the full-scale

0:41:280:41:30

conflict that unfolded.

0:41:300:41:32

Since then, more than half

a million have been killed.

0:41:320:41:35

6 million people have been forced

to leave their homes.

0:41:350:41:37

And 13 million have

needed humanitarian aid.

0:41:370:41:39

It's a conflict that has

demonstrated both the best

0:41:390:41:41

and the worst of humanity.

0:41:410:41:48

Allegations of a leader using

chemical weapons on his own people

0:41:480:41:50

and starvation and malnutrition

in the harsh winter conditions.

0:41:500:41:52

The Syrian people remain caught

in an international power struggle

0:41:520:42:00

between those that support and those

that oppose President

0:42:000:42:02

Bashar Al-Assad.

0:42:020:42:03

This film is a snapshot of where

we are today in Syria's history.

0:42:030:42:11

It's complicated, so

you might want to sit

0:42:110:42:14

down and take it all in.

0:42:140:42:17

Syria has now been at

war for seven years.

0:42:170:42:19

And if anything, it's getting worse.

0:42:190:42:27

Peaceful protests turned

into a civil war, but,

0:42:270:42:30

and this is the key to understanding

what's really going on,

0:42:300:42:33

that civil war has now morphed

into something else,

0:42:330:42:35

a conflict of global dimensions

playing out within Syria.

0:42:350:42:42

In a second, we'll explore why,

but first, who is involved?

0:42:420:42:45

Well, you've still got the forces

of President Bashar al-Assad.

0:42:450:42:50

He's backed up by Russia,

as well as Iran and various

0:42:500:42:53

powerful Shia militias.

0:42:530:42:54

Then you've got the rebels.

0:42:540:42:57

Now, they've been taking

an absolute battering,

0:42:570:43:00

but they are still fighting on.

0:43:000:43:02

Two of the biggest are called Jaysh

al-Islam and Ahrar al-Sham.

0:43:020:43:05

Up in the north are the Kurds.

0:43:050:43:08

They're an ethnic group that

are spread right across the region,

0:43:080:43:11

and now hold large areas

of the north of the country.

0:43:110:43:14

They're allies of the US.

0:43:140:43:17

There's also Turkey,

which is fighting Kurdish forces.

0:43:170:43:20

And Israel, which is launching air

strikes in the South.

0:43:200:43:26

And finally, the Islamic State

group, the fanatical jihadists

0:43:260:43:28

who took over large parts of Syria

and Iraq, grabbing the world's

0:43:280:43:31

attention with their brutality.

0:43:310:43:33

They've lost almost

all their territory,

0:43:330:43:37

but they are still a threat.

0:43:370:43:40

But if you really want to understand

what's going on in Syria,

0:43:400:43:43

you need to know why

people are fighting.

0:43:430:43:51

Since the very start,

President Assad has had one

0:43:520:43:55

objective - staying in power.

0:43:550:43:57

And he's been prepared to do pretty

much anything to achieve it.

0:43:570:44:04

Although he denies it, the West has

accused him of war crimes.

0:44:040:44:09

From indiscriminate bombing,

to using chemical weapons,

0:44:090:44:11

his forces are thought to have been

responsible for most

0:44:110:44:14

of the conflict's deaths.

0:44:140:44:17

Assad's main target has always been

the groups that he calls terrorists,

0:44:170:44:19

but most others call rebels.

0:44:190:44:21

They share one aim -

to overthrow him.

0:44:210:44:23

But in truth, that's

really all they have

0:44:230:44:26

in common in many cases.

0:44:260:44:28

They started fighting

after the government's brutal

0:44:280:44:32

crackdown on peaceful protests

back in 2011.

0:44:320:44:37

And at first, they included army

defectors, members of civil society.

0:44:370:44:40

But as the war has ground

on and got more brutal,

0:44:400:44:42

many of them have been pushed

out or killed.

0:44:420:44:45

Lots of the groups still fighting

are now hardline Islamists.

0:44:450:44:52

Finally, as I mentioned before,

you've got the Kurds in the north.

0:44:520:44:56

There is more than 20 million

of them across the region,

0:44:560:44:59

but they've never had

their own state.

0:44:590:45:03

Understanding that is crucial

to understanding the Kurds.

0:45:030:45:05

Soon after the start of the war,

Kurdish forces took control

0:45:050:45:08

of the area they call Rojava.

0:45:080:45:11

That's after the

government pulled out.

0:45:110:45:15

Their main fight is for

autonomy and against IS.

0:45:150:45:20

But one of the reasons

Syria is such a mess

0:45:200:45:23

is because it's become a proxy war

for international powers.

0:45:230:45:26

So why did they get involved?

0:45:260:45:30

Well, President Assad is Russia's

closest ally in the region.

0:45:300:45:34

If he fell, Russia would lose

its key foothold in the Middle East.

0:45:340:45:38

It would also lose Tartus,

its only Mediterranean port.

0:45:380:45:41

It could not let that happen.

0:45:410:45:45

For Iran, this was partly

about supporting an old ally,

0:45:450:45:48

but more than that,

it was about countering

0:45:480:45:50

the influence of their regional

rivals, Saudi Arabia,

0:45:500:45:52

and spreading their own

influence across the region.

0:45:520:45:56

The consensus is that

in achieving their goals,

0:45:560:45:59

both Russia and Iran have

outplayed everyone else.

0:45:590:46:02

While the US, Turkey and the Gulf

states offered some support

0:46:020:46:05

to various rebel groups,

Russia and Iran decided not only

0:46:050:46:08

that they wanted Assad to win,

but that they would make

0:46:080:46:11

sure he did.

0:46:110:46:13

Against Russian air power

and Iranian-backed militias,

0:46:130:46:15

the rebels have been badly

outmatched.

0:46:150:46:19

Now no one is seriously

talking about Assad being

0:46:190:46:21

forced to give up power.

0:46:210:46:24

The US always said it

wanted him to leave,

0:46:240:46:27

but never took decisive action

to actually make it happen.

0:46:270:46:31

Maybe as it feared

what would replace him.

0:46:310:46:39

The rise of IS, with their gruesome

propaganda, was a far more

0:46:400:46:43

straightforward enemy,

and became the focus.

0:46:430:46:45

The US worked with, trained

and armed a group called

0:46:450:46:47

The Syrian Democratic Forces.

0:46:470:46:49

Although they're mostly made up

of Kurdish fighters called the YPG.

0:46:490:46:52

They were crucial in driving IS out

of north-eastern Syria.

0:46:520:46:56

One of Turkey's main roles has been

giving shelter to millions

0:46:560:47:00

of Syrians fleeing the conflict,

but they've also supported

0:47:000:47:03

the rebel group called

the Free Syrian Army,

0:47:030:47:08

and are accused

of funding jihadists.

0:47:080:47:11

Turkey also fears Kurdish autonomy

in Syria, as it thinks it would fuel

0:47:110:47:14

separatism in Turkey.

0:47:140:47:15

And so it's launched

a war against the YPG,

0:47:150:47:17

who it says are terrorists.

0:47:170:47:20

Although remember, the YPG

are the same fighters who are armed

0:47:200:47:22

by and allied with the US.

0:47:220:47:25

As a consequence, Turkey,

a member of Nato, is now working

0:47:250:47:28

closely with Russia.

0:47:280:47:34

Down south, Israel's main concern

has been the growing

0:47:340:47:37

influence of its arch foe,

Iran, and high-tech weaponry getting

0:47:370:47:40

in the hands of Hezbollah.

0:47:400:47:45

And so a global conflict plays out

within Syria's borders,

0:47:450:47:48

with Russia now calling the shots.

0:47:480:47:51

The war in Syria is as complicated

and bloody as ever.

0:47:510:47:55

People are still dying.

0:47:550:47:56

Lives are still being torn apart.

0:47:560:47:59

And the nation, global powers

and, most importantly,

0:47:590:48:01

the people of Syria,

are being drawn further

0:48:010:48:04

into a situation that it's hard

to see a way out of.

0:48:040:48:12

Let's talk now to Ishmael Hamoud.

0:48:130:48:17

He is the first unaccompanied child

to enter the UK under

0:48:170:48:21

the Dubs Amendment -

that's a tweak to a piece of EU law

0:48:210:48:24

which means a number of children

with no family in the UK have been

0:48:240:48:27

able to come here to live.

0:48:270:48:31

Ahmad Khanshour lives

in Eastern Ghouta where thousands

0:48:310:48:33

of people have been killed over

the past three weeks.

0:48:330:48:37

Lina Shamy left Eastern Aleppo

during the violence

0:48:370:48:40

with her husband.

0:48:400:48:47

Bissan Fakih is a human rights

activist - she escaped from Syria

0:48:470:48:50

to neighbouring Lebanon.

0:48:500:48:51

Thank you for talking to us. We

spoke to you a couple of weeks ago

0:48:510:48:57

in Eastern Ghouta, and our audience

knows it has been bombarded by your

0:48:570:49:02

government. What's it been like

since then?

Good morning, and thank

0:49:020:49:07

you for having me again.

0:49:070:49:12

you for having me again. Assad

exaggerates his violence, using

0:49:130:49:18

another attempt, and his friends

have made it clear they disrespect

0:49:180:49:24

the whole world and international

community. 600 civilians have been

0:49:240:49:31

killed since the resolution in the

UN was passed. I can read to your

0:49:310:49:36

message from a doctor in a recently

surrounded town in Eastern Ghouta.

0:49:360:49:43

We heard last from him yesterday and

nobody knows what has happened there

0:49:430:49:49

since. He says, this town is being

eliminated. The regime army has

0:49:490:49:57

entered the town from the East. I

tried to flee out but couldn't. Our

0:49:570:50:03

whole family was killed in front of

me by an air strike. I returned my

0:50:030:50:11

children to the shelter and came out

alone to tell our story. The army is

0:50:110:50:15

advancing from different points.

Tens of people have been killed,

0:50:150:50:19

more than 5000 people in the town

are threatened with elimination.

0:50:190:50:25

Please send our message to the rest

of the world. This may be the last

0:50:250:50:29

message I can send. The wounded are

on the streets and cannot be

0:50:290:50:33

transferred. They are targeting any

moving object. Families are trying

0:50:330:50:42

to flee under shelling. We don't

know what has happened to them. The

0:50:420:50:48

regime army is shelling the town

with all sorts of weapons and we

0:50:480:50:52

don't know what happened to the

family that fled under the shelling.

0:50:520:50:56

There are many casualties on the

streets, nobody is aiding them.

0:50:560:51:02

Their fate is unknown. We don't know

what will happen to us. There are

0:51:020:51:10

machine guns, artillery shelling and

air strikes targeting people who are

0:51:100:51:13

trying to flee. Please help the town

by bringing our voices to the world.

0:51:130:51:23

We know we only have God, and this

might be the last message from me

0:51:230:51:27

and people in this town.

And you

don't know if the man who posted

0:51:270:51:34

that message is alive or dead?

No,

we have no news about 5000 people in

0:51:340:51:41

that town from last night. We hear

all kinds of weapons are used there.

0:51:410:51:47

It's very close to us but surrounded

by the regime army. We are expecting

0:51:470:51:52

the worst.

0:51:520:51:57

the worst.

Lina, you got out of

Syria. What do you remember about

0:52:000:52:03

the conflict beginning?

Hello and

thank you for having me here. First,

0:52:030:52:12

let me put things in context. The

situation in Syria is compensated

0:52:120:52:20

just as the international community

wants it to be complicated. -- is

0:52:200:52:25

complicated. What happened was a

revolution against the dictatorship.

0:52:250:52:35

It's a brutal dictatorship, like

Nazis in the Middle East.

0:52:360:52:45

Nazis in the Middle East. The world

and international community wants it

0:52:450:52:47

to stay. What happened in Syria was

a revolution against this

0:52:470:52:53

dictatorship who is exterminating

its people, doing a war against them

0:52:530:52:59

with the help of the Russians and

Iran, the help of Iranians militias,

0:52:590:53:06

underground. And also with the help

of the silence of the international

0:53:060:53:09

community. These terrorist

countries, Russia, the Assad regime,

0:53:090:53:17

and Iran, were violating the

international community resolutions.

0:53:170:53:25

All these seven years. And there was

no action at all. This is why the

0:53:250:53:33

international community contributed

in killing the Syrian people and

0:53:330:53:39

violence, the depths of thousands

and thousands of civilians, millions

0:53:390:53:44

of them.

0:53:440:53:49

of them.

Let me ask for a reaction

to that. Lina is right, the

0:53:500:53:55

international community has past few

resolutions and hasn't done a thing.

0:53:550:53:59

This is the pattern we have seen

since the absolute beginning of the

0:53:590:54:02

uprising. Activists from the first

day were risking their lives, images

0:54:020:54:12

of the beautiful protest they were

holding. They were disappeared for

0:54:120:54:16

trying to communicate to the outside

world that they were protesting for

0:54:160:54:19

freedom and being shot at. The

international community has shown so

0:54:190:54:24

much indifference. You are right in

saying earlier that this is the best

0:54:240:54:28

and worst of humanity we are seeing

in Syria. We have witnessed people

0:54:280:54:33

fending for each other in the

country. We have witnessed

0:54:330:54:36

protesters risking their lives to

tell the truth. We have witnessed

0:54:360:54:40

doctors trying to treat patients

under the lights of flashlights

0:54:400:54:43

because there is no electricity. We

have witnessed White helmets saving

0:54:430:54:47

civilians from bombs. All this time

we have known exactly what is

0:54:470:54:51

happening because people risk their

lives to show us, but we have let

0:54:510:54:55

them down miserably. The

international community has had

0:54:550:54:58

absolutely no backbone and frankly

we should be ashamed, particularly

0:54:580:55:03

compared to the stunning bravery

shown by the Syrian people in the

0:55:030:55:06

last few years.

How long do you

think this war will go on for?

Thank

0:55:060:55:13

you for having me here. This war,

after seven years of fighting and

0:55:130:55:21

killing and the conflict in Syria,

we hope it will finish soon, as soon

0:55:210:55:27

as is because the international

community should now move and work

0:55:270:55:30

together. We want to build hope,

British, French and American people,

0:55:300:55:37

should try to stop the war there

because Russia, the first

0:55:370:55:41

responsible country of what is

happening in the Syria now, with the

0:55:410:55:44

support of the Iranians people, it's

eight criminal and chemical

0:55:440:55:50

government.

You were 11 when the

conflict started and you are now a

0:55:500:55:55

young man. The conflict continues,

despite your president crossing what

0:55:550:56:01

was called a red line by then US

president Obama by using chemical

0:56:010:56:06

weapons against his people. What

should happen?

They should work

0:56:060:56:09

together. Russia has used its vote

more than ten times in the UN

0:56:090:56:20

Security Council, creating problems

for the Syrian people. They built

0:56:200:56:23

their hope on the western war.

Thank

you so much for coming on the

0:56:230:56:33

programme. We appreciate it, and

will continue to report on it. We

0:56:330:56:39

will see how and when it ends.

0:56:390:56:44

We will bring you the latest news

and sport in a moment.

0:56:440:56:49

In the past half hour,

we've had an update

0:56:490:56:52

from the Metropolitan Police

about the Grenfell

0:56:520:56:54

Tower fire last June.

0:56:540:56:55

Our correspondent,

Lucinda Adam, is here.

0:56:550:56:58

Tell us what they have told us.

Witnesses to the Grenfell Tower Fire

0:56:580:57:05

and emergency services were shocked

by how quickly the fire spread

0:57:050:57:08

around the building. We know 71

people died and dozens were injured

0:57:080:57:14

when the fire happened last June in

a tower block. Now a door from the

0:57:140:57:19

Grenfell Tower, it has been found it

could only hold backfire for half

0:57:190:57:22

the time it was meant to. The

Metropolitan Police told us that

0:57:220:57:26

this morning. They have done tests

on the door, it was designed to hold

0:57:260:57:30

back a fire for 30 minutes, but

after expert tests, they found it

0:57:300:57:34

only held it back for 15 minutes,

and the Metropolitan Police describe

0:57:340:57:38

it as a much shorter period than

expected.

How does this lead into

0:57:380:57:42

the wider enquiries as to how the

fire happened and how it spread so

0:57:420:57:47

rapidly?

The Metropolitan Police are

still in the middle of looking at

0:57:470:57:51

that, carrying out forensic

examinations at the scene and also

0:57:510:57:55

expert tests off-site. They say they

will not say at the moment whether

0:57:550:57:59

any test results will have any

implications on an overall criminal

0:57:590:58:04

investigation, but they have said

that officers have shared their

0:58:040:58:06

findings with the Ministry of

Housing and Department for

0:58:060:58:10

Communities and Local Government,

for them to take any action

0:58:100:58:13

required.

Housing Secretary Sajid

Javid is going to make a statement

0:58:130:58:18

on the subject from 11:30am which

people can watch here on BBC news.

0:58:180:58:23

No information yet on who made the

doors, who manufactured them, who

0:58:230:58:27

supplied them and who put them into

Grenfell Tower. The news and sport

0:58:270:58:32

is coming up at 10am.

0:58:320:58:33

Let's get the latest

weather update with Alina.

0:58:330:58:36

I thought I would start with some

sunshine, there has been some around

0:58:380:58:42

today. For large parts of the

country it has looks like this, a

0:58:420:58:48

lot of rain around. Northern Ireland

has seen 50 millimetres in the last

0:58:480:58:51

24 hours with more to come. Rain in

the short-term, but over the next

0:58:510:58:57

24-48 hours it will turn colder.

Picking up an easterly wind, and it

0:58:570:59:02

will feed into some snow across the

weekend. The band of rain this

0:59:020:59:06

afternoon clearing away eventually

in Northern Ireland and its way

0:59:060:59:11

north east across northern ingot and

south-west Scotland. North-east

0:59:110:59:14

Scotland will stay largely dry but

it's very windy with wind extending

0:59:140:59:19

down the east coast. Some rain

showers could be heavily heavy and

0:59:190:59:23

thundery. We will keep the strength

of the wind. Snow over higher ground

0:59:230:59:32

in Scotland. Another band of showery

rain pushing in from the south-west

0:59:320:59:35

affecting parts of England and Wales

and temperatures overnight between

0:59:350:59:40

three and seven Celsius. Colder air

coming into Scotland could see icy

0:59:400:59:44

stretches tomorrow morning and

further snow, both the other high

0:59:440:59:48

ground but extending to lower parts

in northern England. Sunshine and

0:59:480:59:53

showers in the south, but they could

be heavy and thundery with some hail

0:59:530:59:56

thrown in. Mild across central and

southern England but colder further

0:59:561:00:03

north and a sign of what's to come

over the weekend because we will

1:00:031:00:06

once again pick up an easterly wind.

The blue colours indicating the cold

1:00:061:00:13

temperatures, not as cold as earlier

in the month, but a dip in

1:00:131:00:17

temperature and a sharp shock to the

system on Saturday. We could see

1:00:171:00:22

snow overnight. Sunny spells and

snow showers. Adding on the strength

1:00:221:00:25

of the wind and it will feel

bitterly cold. Temperatures dropping

1:00:251:00:29

in places by 8-10d. The monitor

might read 2 degrees, but given the

1:00:291:00:36

strength of the wind it will be

bitterly cold. On Sunday, this

1:00:361:00:39

feature will be pushing up from the

south and it could potentially bring

1:00:391:00:44

some significant snow to parts of

southern England and Wales. In

1:00:441:00:51

uncertainty to the timings but we

will likely see some snow around on

1:00:511:00:54

Sunday and it will feel really cold

with temperatures struggling to get

1:00:541:00:58

above freezing. Adding on the

strength of the wind and it will

1:00:581:01:01

feel subzero.

1:01:011:01:08

Hello, it's 10am, I'm

Victoria Derbyshire.

1:01:231:01:25

President Trump comes out in support

of the UK's decision to expel 23

1:01:251:01:28

Russian diplomats from Britain

after the nerve agent

1:01:281:01:30

attack in Salisbury.

1:01:301:01:31

The United States stands in absolute

solidarity with Great Britain.

1:01:311:01:33

The United States

believes that Russia

1:01:331:01:35

is responsible for the attack on two

people in the United Kingdom, using

1:01:351:01:38

a military grade nerve agent.

1:01:381:01:39

We will get reaction.

1:01:391:01:40

Also coming up on the programme...

1:01:401:01:42

Sherry Denness was 17

when she attempted to take her own

1:01:421:01:45

life nine times in ten

days at the end of last

1:01:451:01:47

year - before she got

the help she needed.

1:01:471:01:50

She told us about the problems

she and her family faced

1:01:501:01:52

in getting the right support.

1:01:521:01:55

I have been dealt with a lot in

hospitals, paediatric wards, and it

1:01:551:02:05

is just... There is this massive to

do about it and no one wants to talk

1:02:051:02:09

about it, no one wants to help. One

viewer says the entire mental health

1:02:091:02:15

system in our country needs a

complete overhaul and it is not fit

1:02:151:02:18

for purpose in its current state.

More messages from you so why will

1:02:181:02:24

read those in the next hour. Also...

1:02:241:02:29

Working repeated shifts for free -

and with no offer

1:02:291:02:31

of a job at the end.

1:02:311:02:33

As calls to ban the practice

of unpaid trial shifts are debated

1:02:331:02:36

in Parliament, do let us

know your experiences.

1:02:361:02:38

And we'll hear about the latest

fitness craze - beer yoga -

1:02:381:02:41

where you can enjoy sipping a nice

cold lager while doing

1:02:411:02:43

the downward dog.

1:02:431:02:50

Good morning.

1:02:511:02:53

Here's Annita McVeigh

in the BBC Newsroom

1:02:531:02:54

with a summary of today's news.

1:02:541:02:58

Good morning.

1:02:581:02:59

The White House has

given its backing to Britain's

1:02:591:03:01

decision to expel Russian diplomats

in retaliation for the nerve

1:03:011:03:03

agent attack on Sergei

Skripal and his daughter.

1:03:031:03:06

The US said it was a just response

and America stood in solidarity

1:03:061:03:10

with its closest ally.

1:03:101:03:12

Russia says it is working

on retaliatory measures

1:03:121:03:15

after 23 of its diplomats

were expelled from Britain.

1:03:151:03:21

The labratory where scientists

helped identify the nerve agent used

1:03:211:03:27

in Salisbury is to get more

funding from the Government

1:03:271:03:29

as part of a defence

modernisation programme.

1:03:291:03:31

An extra £48 million

for a new Chemical Weapons Defence

1:03:311:03:35

Centre at Porton Down

will be announced by Gavin

1:03:351:03:40

Williamson in his first major speech

as Defence Secretary later today.

1:03:401:03:46

The investigation into the fire

at Grenfell Tower has

1:03:461:03:48

found the fire doors may not have

been as effective as they

1:03:481:03:51

were supposed to be.

1:03:511:03:52

The Metropolitan Police tested

a door designed to resist fire

1:03:521:03:54

for half an hour and found that it

only lasted 15 minutes.

1:03:541:03:57

The investigation is ongoing.

1:03:571:03:59

The Brexit Secretary,

David Davis, has said he's prepared

1:03:591:04:01

to accept the EU's offer

of a shortened transition period,

1:04:011:04:04

after the UK leaves

the European Union in March, 2019.

1:04:041:04:06

He said he would agree to a call

for the transition to end

1:04:061:04:09

in December, 2020, if that

helped to secure a deal at

1:04:091:04:12

next week's EU summit.

1:04:121:04:18

The World Health Organization

is to carry out a review

1:04:181:04:22

of the potential impact

of plastic on human health.

1:04:221:04:24

It follows the release

of a new study by US researchers -

1:04:241:04:29

the largest of its kind -

which discovered plastic particles

1:04:291:04:31

in popular brands of bottled water.

1:04:311:04:38

Scientists say there is no evidence

yet to suggest it is a cause for

1:04:381:04:42

concern.

1:04:421:04:45

A 20-year-old woman has been

jailed for six months

1:04:451:04:47

in the American state of Minnesota

for fatally shooting her boyfriend

1:04:471:04:50

in a botched YouTube video

they hoped would go viral.

1:04:501:04:52

Pedro Ruiz convinced Monalisa Perez

to shoot him at close range

1:04:521:04:55

with a powerful pistol,

believing that a thick

1:04:551:04:57

book he held in front

of his chest would shield him.

1:04:571:05:00

He died at the scene.

1:05:001:05:07

In the past three years, parents

across England and Wales have been

1:05:071:05:11

fined around £24 million for failing

to send their children to school. A

1:05:111:05:16

BBC investigation shows some

councils are you issuing penalties

1:05:161:05:19

at rates five times higher than the

average and some parents say they

1:05:191:05:23

now actively budget for the cost of

fines when planning holidays. Some

1:05:231:05:27

councils admit they have become

stricter but they say they are

1:05:271:05:31

protecting the education of

children. Some MPs and lawyers have

1:05:311:05:35

called for a blanket ban on page

shiftwork. Companies currently

1:05:351:05:38

invite prospective employees to do

trial shifts. But there has been a

1:05:381:05:45

sixfold increase over three years in

complaints about unpaid shifts

1:05:451:05:49

according to the trade union Unite.

On Friday a Private Members' Bill

1:05:491:05:55

seeking to make unpaid trials

illegal will get its second

1:05:551:06:00

parliamentary reading.

1:06:001:06:01

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

1:06:011:06:03

More at 10.30am.

1:06:031:06:05

This tweet, I have borderline

personality disorder, I often

1:06:051:06:09

describe it as the angel on one

shoulder, the devil on the other. I

1:06:091:06:13

eventually received the right

treatment. I hope the beautiful

1:06:131:06:18

young woman on your programme today,

Sherry, gets the right help.

1:06:181:06:22

Caroline says, I was 45 and had of

short-term psychotic breakdown. My

1:06:221:06:27

brother-in-law took me to A&E with

hallucinations and flashing lights

1:06:271:06:32

at 3:30am, I asked her sleeping

tablets, they sent me home with

1:06:321:06:37

nothing. At 9pm the next night, I

attempted to take my own life. A&E

1:06:371:06:42

have failed me. There are a number

of those which I will read through

1:06:421:06:47

the next hour of the programme. If

you want to send us an e-mail, you

1:06:471:06:51

do not have to use your name, you

can use Twitter, and if you text,

1:06:511:06:56

you will be charged that the

standard network rate.

1:06:561:07:01

Here's some sport now with Hugh.

1:07:011:07:03

Well, we knew it was a sizeable

task for Chelsea in

1:07:031:07:05

the Champions League,

away at Spanish League leaders

1:07:051:07:07

Barcelona, and as some may have

predicted, a great performance

1:07:071:07:11

from five-time Ballon D'or winner

Lionel Messi was the difference.

1:07:111:07:19

He scored two and set the other

up in their 3-0 win.

1:07:201:07:22

The first came after just

a couple of minutes,

1:07:221:07:25

deceiving Thibaut Courtois

in the Chelsea goal,

1:07:251:07:26

before his second -

different end, different

1:07:261:07:28

foot, same result.

1:07:281:07:36

A 4-1 aggregate win for Messi

and Barca which means

1:07:361:07:38

Liverpool and Manchester City

1:07:381:07:39

will be the two British

clubs in the quarterfinal

1:07:391:07:42

draw tomorrow.

1:07:421:07:43

Our start was terrible, to concede a

goal after only two minutes, but

1:07:431:07:49

after this, I think we tried to play

football. For a long time, we

1:07:491:08:00

dominated, we created chances to

score.

1:08:001:08:03

There were better scenes

for Arsenal's Women last night.

1:08:031:08:05

They stunned favourites

Manchester City to win

1:08:051:08:07

the Continental Tyres Cup

for a record fifth time

1:08:071:08:09

1-0, thanks to Vivianne

Miedema's goal.

1:08:091:08:11

England Rugby Union head coach

Eddie Jones has apologised

1:08:111:08:15

for making derogatory comments

regarding Ireland and Wales.

1:08:151:08:19

At a sponsors' talk last summer,

it's emerged he described the Irish

1:08:191:08:24

as "scummy" and Wales as, well,

not a very nice little

1:08:241:08:29

place, shall we say?

1:08:291:08:32

Well, Jones has apologised

unreservedly, adding, "No excuses,

1:08:321:08:34

I shouldn't have said what I did."

1:08:341:08:39

England host Ireland

in the Six Nations at

1:08:391:08:41

Twickenham on Saturday.

1:08:411:08:42

It's day three of the Cheltenham

Festival but it'll be missing one

1:08:421:08:45

of racing's biggest stars.

1:08:451:08:46

That's after a serious injury

to jockey Ruby Walsh yesterday.

1:08:461:08:49

He went to hospital with a suspected

broken leg when he fell

1:08:491:08:52

at the second last fence.

1:08:521:08:53

He broke the same leg four months

ago and had only just

1:08:531:08:56

made his return to racing.

1:08:561:08:58

Now he'll miss the rest

of the festival, including

1:08:581:09:00

Friday's Gold Cup.

1:09:001:09:02

But on a difficult day

for the Walsh family,

1:09:021:09:07

there was some success

for Ruby's sister, Katy.

1:09:071:09:15

She won on board the

25-to-1 shot Relegate

1:09:171:09:18

in the final race of the day.

1:09:181:09:21

The big race of the day, though,

was the Queen Mother Champion Chase.

1:09:211:09:24

It was billed as a straight fight

between the British trained Altior

1:09:241:09:27

and Irish horse Douvan.

1:09:271:09:28

But after Douvan fell

with four fences to jump,

1:09:281:09:30

the evens favourite Altior ridden

by Nico de Boinville easily came

1:09:301:09:33

home first in the end.

1:09:331:09:34

And Great Britain can't win a medal

in the wheelchair curling

1:09:341:09:37

at the Winter Parlympics.

1:09:371:09:38

Earlier they lost to hosts Korea

in their penultimate

1:09:381:09:40

round-robin match.

1:09:401:09:41

That result meant they had to rely

on others to see if they could make

1:09:411:09:45

the medal playoffs.

1:09:451:09:47

But in the afternoon session,

Norway's victory over Slovakia means

1:09:471:09:51

that Britain are out,

even if they win their final pool

1:09:511:09:53

match against China.

1:09:531:09:56

More sport later on. Thank you.

1:09:561:10:01

The United States says it stands

in solidarity with the UK

1:10:011:10:04

following the Prime Minister's

decision to expel 23 Russian

1:10:041:10:06

diplomats after Moscow refused

to explain how a Russian-made nerve

1:10:061:10:08

agent was used in a murder

attempt on a former spy.

1:10:081:10:11

Theresa May has also

revoked an invitation

1:10:111:10:15

to Russia's foreign minister

and said the royal family would not

1:10:151:10:17

attend the Fifa World

Cup later this year.

1:10:171:10:22

The Russian Embassy

said the expulsions

1:10:221:10:25

were "unacceptable,

unjustified and short-sighted".

1:10:251:10:27

In a hardening of President Trump's

tone on Russia, his spokeswoman

1:10:271:10:29

accused it of undermining

the security of countries worldwide.

1:10:291:10:32

The White House's comment

were echoed by the US

1:10:321:10:35

Ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley,

during an emergency meeting

1:10:351:10:37

of the Security Council.

1:10:371:10:43

The United States stands in absolute

solidarity with Great Britain. The

1:10:431:10:49

United States believes Russia is

responsible for the attack on two

1:10:491:10:52

people in the UK using a military

grade nerve agent but this is not an

1:10:521:10:57

isolated incident. The assassination

attempt in Salisbury is part of an

1:10:571:11:02

alarming increase in the use of

chemical weapons. Russia must fully

1:11:021:11:06

cooperate with the UK's

investigation and come clean about

1:11:061:11:11

its own chemical weapons programme.

Russia is a permanent member of the

1:11:111:11:16

Security Council. It is entrusted in

the United Nations Charter with

1:11:161:11:21

upholding international peace and

security. It must account for

1:11:211:11:24

exceptions.

We have a lot of people

to speak to. Let us introduce them.

1:11:241:11:32

Let's speak now to Mark Lyall-Grant,

a former National Security Adviser

1:11:321:11:34

and UK Ambassador to the UN.

1:11:341:11:38

Oliver Miles, Ambassador to Libya

when PC Yvonne Fletcher

1:11:381:11:40

was killed and Britain severed

diplomatic ties with them,

1:11:401:11:42

and Hamish De Bretton Gordon,

who is the former commanding officer

1:11:421:11:44

of the British Army's Chemical,

Biological, Radiological

1:11:441:11:46

and Nuclear Regiment.

1:11:461:11:54

Chris Bryant -

1:11:551:11:56

Labour MP, Chair of

the all-party group on Russia

1:11:561:11:58

and member of the Foreign

Affairs Select Committee.

1:11:581:12:00

The significance of Donald Trump

racking Theresa May.

It is very

1:12:001:12:05

significant, there were some

concerns he had not been as

1:12:051:12:09

forthright as he might have been --

racking Theresa May. Following

1:12:091:12:13

comments by the ambassador at the UN

last night, extremely strong, the

1:12:131:12:18

White House itself has come out and

echoed those comments and I think

1:12:181:12:21

that is really important because

part of the purpose behind last

1:12:211:12:26

night's emergency meeting of the UN

Security Council was to secure

1:12:261:12:30

messages of support from our allies

and friends around the world and to

1:12:301:12:35

bring to the attention of the

international community the facts of

1:12:351:12:39

this horrendous case.

Oliver Miles,

what should happen now?

I think

1:12:391:12:45

there are two points I would like to

make about the Libyan affair which I

1:12:451:12:50

was involved in in 1984 when I was

responsible for breaking off

1:12:501:12:53

relations with the Libyan

government. One which struck me when

1:12:531:12:57

I read recently, I did not know at

the time, was Mrs Thatcher, the

1:12:571:13:01

Prime Minister at the time, very

reluctant at first to break off

1:13:011:13:05

relations because she could see the

consequences were literally

1:13:051:13:09

incalculable, unforeseeable. The

second point I want to make, the

1:13:091:13:15

consequences were in fact very bad

for Britain because it was after we

1:13:151:13:18

broke off relations that Gaddafi

gave some text of the IRA which was

1:13:181:13:22

I think the most damaging thing he

ever did --

1:13:221:13:31

ever did -- gave Semtex. The lesson

I would draw in a word from that

1:13:311:13:34

event to be applied in the present

crisis is, think carefully before

1:13:341:13:40

you act, take it slowly.

Let me

bring in Chris Bryant, Labour MP,

1:13:401:13:44

that is potentially what your leader

is saying, some believe he is, but

1:13:441:13:50

there are Labour MPs criticising him

for not condemning Russia, for not

1:13:501:13:55

apportioning blame to Russia?

I do

not think the important point at

1:13:551:13:59

this stage is what the Labour Party

thinks, if I'm honest.

The Leader of

1:13:591:14:04

the Opposition, he wants to be in

Number 10.

I fully understand that,

1:14:041:14:08

but I think this is really about how

Britain make sure we in this country

1:14:081:14:13

are safe, it is about how the

international community comes

1:14:131:14:17

together to say to Russia that we

will not put up with this. I think,

1:14:171:14:22

for instance, removing 23 diplomats

from the UK will seriously degrade

1:14:221:14:29

their ability to gather intelligence

in the UK and that is an important

1:14:291:14:32

factor. I do not think Theresa May

has over at the pudding, if

1:14:321:14:37

anything, she has gone admirably

steadily and there may be further

1:14:371:14:43

things she wants to do, I would be

slightly critical of her in that it

1:14:431:14:48

has taken quite a long time for us

to get here. Actually, Putin's track

1:14:481:14:52

record is very clear of readily and

repeatedly using excessive violence,

1:14:521:14:56

whether in the Moscow State siege or

Ukraine, bringing down of the MH17

1:14:561:15:05

plane, we have a track record here,

a clear motive for Russia to be

1:15:051:15:10

involved in this, and having read

quite a lot... I am not a chemist,

1:15:101:15:15

but having read quite a lot of the

international chemists experts in

1:15:151:15:22

this field, their reading of the

situation, it seems to point very

1:15:221:15:26

clearly to Putin.

I will ask you

again, why won't your leader, Jeremy

1:15:261:15:31

Corbyn, condemn Russia for this

chemical weapons attack?

As I

1:15:311:15:35

understand it, he has.

He has called

it an appalling attack, he has not

1:15:351:15:40

apportion blame to Russia.

I

understand he has. The story has

1:15:401:15:45

moved on and Emily Thornberry, and

the Shadow Defence Secretary, they

1:15:451:15:51

were clear we as a party stand full

square...

What has Jeremy Corbyn

1:15:511:15:55

said?

I have not seen the statement

himself, I have only seen reports of

1:15:551:16:01

it. You saw in the House of Commons

yesterday, and the leader of the

1:16:011:16:06

Welsh Labour Party on the Scottish

Nationalists and the Welsh

1:16:061:16:08

Nationalists, everybody is very

clear that this is a question of

1:16:081:16:12

national security and the country

has to stand together.

1:16:121:16:19

Hamish, can I ask you about the new

1:16:201:16:22

Hamish, can I ask you about the new

facility at Porton down being

1:16:221:16:24

announced today, there were plans in

the pipeline and it has been

1:16:241:16:30

hastened on British soil, what

difference will it make for people

1:16:301:16:33

in Britain from eight chemical

weapons attack?

First of all we

1:16:331:16:37

recognise there is a gap in

capability. We were blindsided by

1:16:371:16:48

the attack in Salisbury. Now the

threat is apparent we need to make

1:16:481:16:51

sure our military have the

capability to be able to defend this

1:16:511:16:56

country on our shores and outside

with the right capability.

If

1:16:561:17:02

somebody's food or drink is spiked

or a droplet of stuff sprayed in

1:17:021:17:05

their face can kill them, how can

this new facility potentially stop

1:17:051:17:10

that happening again?

I expect it is

part of a range of capabilities. Now

1:17:101:17:17

we know the threat exists, and I

would say that the only people...

1:17:171:17:22

The only tiny doubt the Russians are

involved, only the Russians can help

1:17:221:17:27

with that. We know they are the only

ones who make this agent, and the

1:17:271:17:36

Russians confirmed that yesterday.

There is only one place where

1:17:361:17:41

Novichok is made, and that is in

Russia. If the Prohibition of

1:17:411:17:46

chemical weapons envoy can go to

Russia, at the moment it looks Irish

1:17:461:17:59

is the only explanation. We will

develop capabilities to keep people

1:17:591:18:02

safe in this country.

The Russian

Foreign Ministry says Russia will

1:18:021:18:05

expel British diplomats soon, we are

just hearing. You would expect that.

1:18:051:18:11

You would expect that, it see

standard Russian response.

1:18:111:18:21

standard Russian response. That was

fully expected and factored into the

1:18:211:18:24

government's original decision, I'm

sure.

Chris Bryant...

I do agree,

1:18:241:18:30

incidentally, that was obvious.

Is

that it for diplomatic relations

1:18:301:18:34

between us and pressure for a period

of time? Do we now enter potentially

1:18:341:18:40

a second Cold War?

No, because if we

were to send the whole diplomatic

1:18:401:18:45

team back, and suspend diplomatic

relations, which we are clearly not.

1:18:451:18:50

Incidentally, there are some

questions that are not quite

1:18:501:18:52

answered yet. It's not quite clear

what the government's intention is

1:18:521:19:01

with regard to people who are very

close to the Putin regime who has

1:19:011:19:04

significant assets in the UK on the

basis of unexplained wealth. I hope

1:19:041:19:07

we will freeze those assets as soon

as possible. It's not quite clear

1:19:071:19:10

what we will be doing about the

Magnitsky Act or quite what the

1:19:101:19:17

government intends. And it's not

clear if we are suspending all

1:19:171:19:20

operations with regard security for

the World Cup. We did not suspend it

1:19:201:19:26

with Sochi, meaning the Sochi

Olympics could proceed safely. My

1:19:261:19:31

anxiety, and I'm a Welshman, so it's

none of my business whether England

1:19:311:19:34

goes to play football in the World

Cup, but my anxiety is whether it

1:19:341:19:38

will actually be safe in Russia. We

have often seen that Russian fans

1:19:381:19:45

are sometimes inspired by Russian

government activity and have been

1:19:451:19:50

engaged in pretty violent attacks on

other fans. My anxiety about the

1:19:501:19:54

World Cup is whether it will be

safe, simply.

Thank you to all of

1:19:541:19:57

you.

1:19:571:20:01

Still to come, could it be possible

to introduce individualised cancer

1:20:011:20:07

vaccines? We will hear about major

trials planned on both sides of the

1:20:071:20:11

Atlantic that will start next year.

1:20:111:20:18

Now a group of activists who have

taken over a four-storey building

1:20:181:20:23

that has been reportedly empty for

15 years in the centre of London. In

1:20:231:20:27

order to give shelter to 100

homeless people. In their own words,

1:20:271:20:30

they say they are saving people's

lives because they have nowhere else

1:20:301:20:33

to go.

1:20:331:20:36

OK, so when we have

somebody new come in,

1:20:361:20:38

they come in the front door.

1:20:381:20:40

They will be greeted here.

1:20:401:20:41

We'll ask them what they

need, how they are.

1:20:411:20:44

What the priority is,

whether they need to go

1:20:441:20:46

straight to sleep, to eat.

1:20:461:20:48

We have the kitchen

down the end there.

1:20:481:20:51

And we are providing hot,

nutritious food all the time.

1:20:511:20:53

There's tea and coffee.

1:20:531:20:56

We have some medical supplies,

and we have people who know how

1:20:561:20:59

to look after people,

so if somebody needs

1:20:591:21:01

some attention to wounds

or infections, we can do that.

1:21:011:21:05

The sleeping area's on the ground

floor here, and on the first floor.

1:21:051:21:09

There was electricity

already on in the building,

1:21:091:21:11

and the water was already on.

1:21:111:21:14

We just tidied up the plumbing

where there were leaks and stuff,

1:21:141:21:17

made sure everything

was safe and secure.

1:21:171:21:19

We have qualified electricians

helping us, and I'm

1:21:191:21:21

a plumber-builder as well,

so we do safety checks every day,

1:21:211:21:24

make sure there's nothing dangerous,

no cables to trip over,

1:21:241:21:27

everything's lit properly,

so people don't...

1:21:271:21:28

Yeah, we are keeping people safe.

1:21:281:21:31

I left home at 15 years of age.

1:21:311:21:33

I started going into

the hostel system.

1:21:331:21:36

There was a big battle

because of social services,

1:21:361:21:39

and a lot of things happened

in a short amount of time.

1:21:391:21:43

And I've been homeless recently due

to a lot going on in my life.

1:21:431:21:47

There was no help being given.

1:21:471:21:49

There was nothing available,

no services wanting to obviously

1:21:491:21:54

understand or were willing to help,

so I had no choice but to have

1:21:541:21:58

nowhere to go, because there's

nowhere for us to go.

1:21:581:22:01

I mean, it's out there.

1:22:011:22:04

I mean, it's hard out there.

1:22:041:22:06

What about others that might say

you've got no business being here,

1:22:061:22:09

you don't own the building,

that you're not paying

1:22:091:22:11

rent for the building.

1:22:111:22:12

What would you say to them?

1:22:121:22:16

Our brothers and sisters have no

business being on the street.

1:22:161:22:19

Freezing, dying.

1:22:191:22:23

And there are ten empty commercial

buildings for every person who's

1:22:231:22:25

registered street sleeping.

1:22:251:22:27

Ten empty commercial buildings

for every person who's registered

1:22:271:22:29

as sleeping on the streets.

1:22:291:22:31

I'm sorry.

1:22:311:22:33

What business model is that?

1:22:331:22:36

So, yeah, no business being here?

1:22:361:22:38

We've a hundred people here.

1:22:381:22:39

Eating, sleeping, comfortable.

1:22:391:22:41

We're saving lives here.

1:22:411:22:45

I'm sorry.

1:22:451:22:48

Property.

1:22:481:22:50

I've a disregard for that.

1:22:501:22:55

When the building's been

empty for 15 years,

1:22:551:22:57

and we can save lives with it?

1:22:571:22:58

It's our moral duty

to save those lives.

1:22:581:23:02

Here's an update: there

was a legal hearing yesterday

1:23:021:23:08

and the company that owns

the building - W1 Properties -

1:23:081:23:11

was issued with a possession order -

meaning the firm has the legal right

1:23:111:23:14

to evict those living the building.

1:23:141:23:16

Lets talk now to Steve Broe

who has been volunteering

1:23:161:23:19

at the centre.

1:23:191:23:27

Stush, who has been using the Centre

since it opened on the 1st of March.

1:23:271:23:31

And joining us from the Centre

1:23:311:23:39

are Freddie and Rose,

two of the Centre's users.

1:23:391:23:43

How are you feeling this morning?

It

was kind of disappointing, but we

1:23:431:23:48

did expect it. There's always a

possibility to get more time to help

1:23:481:23:52

people and get them relocated.

Do

you mean a bit of extra time in that

1:23:521:23:56

building, or do you mean you have

found another building?

The thing

1:23:561:23:59

about that is, we need a certain

amount of notice. We had 160 people

1:23:591:24:05

there last night. In what way can we

just send them out to the streets?

1:24:051:24:11

We are hoping to get a bit of leeway

and time. Yes, there might be

1:24:111:24:17

alternatives.

It could be as early

as tonight, is my understanding, if

1:24:171:24:24

officials or bailiffs turn up and

ask 160 people to leave, will they

1:24:241:24:28

leave?

...

Will you leave?

That's a

very good question and one I can't

1:24:281:24:36

answer until it happens.

And would

you leave?

As Steve says, we will

1:24:361:24:42

not know until the time occurs. But

in general, if the bailiffs turn up,

1:24:421:24:47

as they do, and a lot of time they

are mob handed, for a better turn of

1:24:471:24:53

phrase, they may leave us no choice

in the matter. And depending if

1:24:531:25:00

people do resist, because some

people have literally fought tooth

1:25:001:25:03

and nail their entire lives. Some of

the people in the building have

1:25:031:25:08

experience of homelessness that goes

well beyond just sleeping on the

1:25:081:25:11

street. If you had a guest on

earlier who is suffering from the

1:25:111:25:20

mental issues that she has, and a

lot of people, if they didn't have

1:25:201:25:25

one before, they've certainly got

one now. And they will potentially

1:25:251:25:29

fight tooth and nail just not to be

put in potentially the same

1:25:291:25:33

position. You can understand why

somebody wouldn't want to be made

1:25:331:25:38

homeless ahead of the weekend that

is showing signs of having whether

1:25:381:25:44

by you need to be inside. In a

building that has been empty for a

1:25:441:25:48

very long time, and was of no

interest to the owner until this

1:25:481:25:51

time.

But it doesn't belong to you,

that's what people say, it belongs

1:25:511:25:57

to them.

It's perfectly valid that

it might belong to somebody, but if

1:25:571:26:02

they are not using it and we can

save lives with it, I don't see the

1:26:021:26:06

problem with that.

Let me bring in

Freddie and Rose. Hello and good

1:26:061:26:13

morning. Tell us what it's been like

for you living there and what it has

1:26:131:26:19

meant to use.

1:26:191:26:24

meant to use.

I am very, very

friendly with the people. It is so

1:26:291:26:36

hard for me. Seeing people outside

sleeping. A few weeks ago four

1:26:361:26:45

people died because of the snow.

It's hard to me. I can't believe,

1:26:451:26:54

London is a rich city, but there is

a lot of people sleeping outside.

1:26:541:27:04

It's raining, snowing. It's hard for

me to see that.

Freddie, where were

1:27:041:27:17

you sleeping before you came to this

building?

Outside.

I was sleeping in

1:27:171:27:29

a cold and unheated domestic

environment. I came here for a

1:27:291:27:35

reason. I knew this building because

for many years I was dispatch riding

1:27:351:27:38

and I used to deliver and collect

items from here. It seems ridiculous

1:27:381:27:43

that when it ceases to be used, it

just sits vacant, doing precisely

1:27:431:27:49

nothing for anybody. Except maybe

accruing in value, so it is a

1:27:491:27:55

speculative tool rather than the

incredibly

1:27:551:28:04

incredibly creative and interesting

environment that has been created to

1:28:041:28:06

save people's lives in real terms.

We can see the environment behind

1:28:061:28:11

you, but describe it for those who

want to know more about what's going

1:28:111:28:15

on in the four stories.

It's very

simple. People need to have a

1:28:151:28:22

temperature which will not endanger

their lives. So for every degree

1:28:221:28:29

above a certain point, people are

far better off. This is a factory

1:28:291:28:35

for saving lives. You could put it

like that, because it does something

1:28:351:28:42

real for people.

Steve, a factory

for saving lives, is that an apt

1:28:421:28:50

description?

Yes. What we have are

people coming in, not just being fed

1:28:501:28:59

and rested, but they socialise as

well. There is an amazing amount of

1:28:591:29:03

kindness, caring and empathy because

everybody knows what it is like. You

1:29:031:29:08

have people coming out after a good

nights sleep and food. They think

1:29:081:29:14

it's great, it feels wonderful. It's

a phrase I have used a lot, you can

1:29:141:29:21

see them wake up and shake off all

that pressure they have been under.

1:29:211:29:25

They will have breakfast and go,

there are dishes to wash, I will do

1:29:251:29:31

that. People are mopping floors,

doing the dishes, helping to cook.

1:29:311:29:36

People bring their skills. We have

plumbers and carpenters, people who

1:29:361:29:42

are finding something to do within

their own skill set, and reminding

1:29:421:29:47

themselves that it is possible and

they might actually get back to work

1:29:471:29:50

and get back into life. But out on

the street when freezing cold, they

1:29:501:29:56

can only concentrate on surviving.

Give them a break from that and they

1:29:561:30:00

start to think, maybe I can have the

time now to look for work, maybe I

1:30:001:30:05

can go to the building site down the

road and get back on my feet.

This

1:30:051:30:09

is what Westminster City Council

tell us, they say the building is

1:30:091:30:12

privately owned and as such any

further legal action is up to the

1:30:121:30:16

owner to take. But Westminster has a

well-established route to help

1:30:161:30:23

people who might be sleeping rough

and who are homeless through street

1:30:251:30:27

link. The council spends £6.5

million per year on rough sleeping

1:30:271:30:30

services and hostel and rough bed

spaces are available every night and

1:30:301:30:37

council workers are out every night

offering help to rough sleepers.

1:30:371:30:44

I will give you the polite version,

it is not working, our organisation,

1:30:441:30:51

they have been doing outreach in

three different locations most

1:30:511:30:57

nights of the week in London,

Hackney, Central London, Camden,

1:30:571:31:01

they talk to people, if somebody

wants to be connected to StreetLink,

1:31:011:31:06

we try to make phone calls, even if

we gave our mobile numbers, call us

1:31:061:31:12

back, they will say, if you get

through to them, really hard, they

1:31:121:31:16

might say, we will try to get to you

within three hours. Get the person

1:31:161:31:21

to stay where they are... We have

quite a few stories of people

1:31:211:31:25

staying in the same place for five

days, no call-back, no pick-up.

We

1:31:251:31:31

will see what StreetLink have to

say. Thank you. We will see what

1:31:311:31:35

happens when the eviction occurs.

Thank you for coming on the

1:31:351:31:40

programme.

Thank you for hearing us.

Is not a problem.

1:31:401:31:47

Time for the latest news.

1:31:471:31:50

The BBC News headlines.

1:31:501:31:53

The White House has

given its backing to Britain's

1:31:531:31:55

decision to expel Russian diplomats

in retaliation for the nerve

1:31:551:31:58

agent attack on Sergei

Skripal and his daughter.

1:31:581:32:00

The US said it was a just

response and America stood

1:32:001:32:02

in solidarity with its closest ally.

1:32:021:32:04

Russia says it is working

on retaliatory measures

1:32:041:32:08

after 23 of its diplomats

were expelled from Britain.

1:32:081:32:11

The labratory

where scientists helped identify

1:32:111:32:16

the nerve agent used in Salisbury

is to get more funding from

1:32:161:32:18

the Government as part of a defence

modernisation programme.

1:32:181:32:21

An extra £48 million

for a new Chemical Weapons Defence

1:32:211:32:23

Centre at Porton Down

will be announced by Gavin

1:32:231:32:25

Williamson in his first major speech

as Defence Secretary later today.

1:32:251:32:33

The investigation into the fire

at Grenfell Tower has

1:32:331:32:36

found the fire doors may not have

been as effective as they

1:32:361:32:38

were supposed to be.

1:32:381:32:40

The Metropolitan Police

tested a door designed to resist

1:32:401:32:43

fire for half an hour and found

that it only lasted 15 minutes.

1:32:431:32:46

The investigation is ongoing.

1:32:461:32:49

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

1:32:491:32:54

Here's some sport now with Hugh.

1:32:541:32:57

Chelsea were the latest British

team to be knocked out

1:32:571:33:00

of the Champions League last night

after a 3-0 defeat

1:33:001:33:03

away at Barcelona.

1:33:031:33:05

Lionel Messi scored

twice on the night.

1:33:051:33:07

It means Manchester City

and Liverpool are the only domestic

1:33:071:33:11

sides in the hat for

Friday's quarterfinal draw.

1:33:111:33:18

Good news for Arsenal fans -

the club secured its first piece

1:33:181:33:21

of silverware this season

as they shocked Manchester City

1:33:211:33:24

to win the Continental Tyres Cup.

1:33:241:33:27

It finished 1-0 thanks

to Vivienne Miedema's winner.

1:33:271:33:29

The Cheltenham Festival's all-time

leading rider Ruby Walsh will miss

1:33:291:33:31

the rest of this week's event

after a fall yesterday.

1:33:311:33:35

Walsh has a suspected leg

fracture to the same leg

1:33:351:33:40

with which he just spent four months

away from the sport with injury.

1:33:401:33:43

And Great Britain cannot win a medal

in the wheelchair curling

1:33:431:33:45

at the Winter Parlympics.

1:33:451:33:47

Defeat to South Korea

in their penultimate round-robin

1:33:471:33:48

match and Norway's victory over

Slovakia means the Britons cannot

1:33:481:33:51

reach the medal play-off.

1:33:511:33:52

They do have one match remaining.

All the sport for now. More after

1:33:521:33:57

11am.

1:33:571:34:00

When you're drinking bottled water,

do you know what you're

1:34:001:34:03

putting into your body?

1:34:031:34:04

Not just water, it seems,

after a study suggested most major

1:34:041:34:06

brands contain so-called

microplastics - particles that

1:34:061:34:08

are small enough to be ingested.

1:34:081:34:09

The World Health Organization is now

going to review the potential risks

1:34:091:34:12

of plastic in drinking water.

1:34:121:34:15

It absorbs to the surface of the

plastics and under certain

1:34:341:34:41

wavelengths of light, it causes them

to basically sparkle like stars in

1:34:411:34:48

the night sky.

1:34:481:34:51

Let us talk now to Andrew Mayes, one

of the pioneers of the Nile red

1:35:551:36:05

technique, and managing director of

food packaging foundation. What do

1:36:051:36:08

you make of this, Andrew Mayes?

A

very interesting story and it

1:36:081:36:15

highlights the fact micro-plastics

all around us, everywhere look,

1:36:151:36:21

everything we touch, our whole

environment is full of plastic and I

1:36:211:36:25

think this is an excellent highlight

of the fact that it is in

1:36:251:36:30

everything.

Jane, we do not yet have

the research suggesting what Chris,

1:36:301:36:37

if any, there is to human beings,

how do you react to this?

-- what

1:36:371:36:43

risk. It is reasonable to assume

everyone is exposed to these plastic

1:36:431:36:49

particles and that in itself means

the risk is quite high. At the same

1:36:491:36:53

time, what we do not know...

We do

not know that.

We do not know what

1:36:531:36:59

the toxicity is, that is what we do

not know, but exposure seems to be

1:36:591:37:03

very high, we know that.

Do we need

to change the way we bottled water?

1:37:031:37:08

It is premature to say that. The

next step should be to identify in

1:37:081:37:14

great detail what the source is, is

it the packaging, the bottling

1:37:141:37:19

process or and environmental source?

The next step is to reduce the

1:37:191:37:23

exposure levels.

Tell us more about

the Nile red technique works.

It is

1:37:231:37:31

a method where you heard a

fluorescent dye called Nile red to

1:37:311:37:35

the sample and it binds to the

surface of the tiny plastic

1:37:351:37:41

particles -- wear you read. It makes

them grow when you shine a blue

1:37:411:37:45

light on them so you can observe the

samples through an orange filter

1:37:451:37:49

with blue light shining on it and

you can see the particles glowing

1:37:491:37:54

brightly so you can identify them

and count them.

Does it change... Go

1:37:541:37:58

ahead.

I was just going to say, the

reason we developed this technique

1:37:581:38:07

is to allow people to do studies

exactly like this, to be able to do

1:38:071:38:11

large-scale sampling, look at a very

large numbers, and that way you can

1:38:111:38:17

get a much clearer picture of what

is going on in a situation like

1:38:171:38:21

this.

Does it change your behaviour

when it comes to buying bottled

1:38:211:38:25

water?

Well, I would like to think I

am quite environmentally focused

1:38:251:38:32

anyway so I try very hard not to buy

bottled water. But it is very clear

1:38:321:38:38

that worldwide we have to do

something about this problem because

1:38:381:38:42

currently 480 billion bottles are

being sold every year worldwide and

1:38:421:38:48

it is more than one per person per

week for the whole population of the

1:38:481:38:53

planet and this is clearly insane.

We need to think about this in an

1:38:531:38:57

entirely different way.

Would you

agree with that?

I do agree that we

1:38:571:39:01

need to have a discussion as a

society on how we use plastics and

1:39:011:39:07

how we packaged food, consume foods

and how we produce them. I agree

1:39:071:39:12

that this is not a sustainable path

forwards.

Thank you very much, both

1:39:121:39:17

of you.

1:39:171:39:25

of you. Andrew Mayes, one of the

pioneers of the Nile red technique.

1:39:251:39:30

We spoke to water companies, this is

a selection, Nestle told us it's

1:39:301:39:35

internal testing began two years ago

and they have not detected any above

1:39:351:39:42

trace level, Coca-Cola said it has

some of the most stringent quality

1:39:421:39:45

standards and used a multistep

filtration process. It acknowledged

1:39:451:39:53

micro-plastics appear to be

ubiquitous. Tenon said it could not

1:39:531:39:57

comment on the study because, the

methodology used is unclear, but it

1:39:571:40:02

added its own bottles had food grade

packaging. -- Danone.

1:40:021:40:10

Big clinical trials are opening next

year on both sides of the Atlantic

1:40:111:40:14

to find out whether it's possible

to produce individualised

1:40:141:40:17

cancer vaccines to stop

patients who've had cancer

1:40:171:40:19

getting it again.

1:40:191:40:20

A cancer vaccine is one of the holy

grails of modern medical research.

1:40:201:40:24

To talk about this, let me introduce

you to Peter Johnson,

1:40:241:40:26

Cancer Research UK's

professor of medical oncology

1:40:261:40:28

at the University of

Southampton and director

1:40:281:40:29

of the Francis Crick Institute

Cancer Research Network.

1:40:291:40:34

Dr Sophie Acton is a Cancer Research

UK research fellow who

1:40:341:40:36

specialises in immunology.

1:40:361:40:40

And Adrian Webb who was diagnosed

with skin cancer in 2012.

1:40:401:40:48

He had treatment, but a year later

was given the devastating news

1:40:491:40:52

that his cancer had spread

to his lungs, bowel,

1:40:521:40:54

spine, liver and spleen.

1:40:541:40:59

He immediately started on a course

of targeted treatments, including

1:40:591:41:01

immunotherapy drugs,

and five years later, he's

1:41:011:41:05

here to tell us all about it.

1:41:051:41:11

I hope so!

Starting with you, Peter

Johnson. I want to talk about the

1:41:111:41:16

clinical trials beginning next year,

big clinical trials, there have been

1:41:161:41:21

very small ones, into cancer

vaccines. It is worth you explaining

1:41:211:41:25

first of all how a vaccine works,

we're all familiar with the measles

1:41:251:41:28

vaccine, how does it work?

We have

thought for many years it should be

1:41:281:41:32

possible to get the body's immune

system to recognise what is

1:41:321:41:38

different about cancer, they are

different, the mutations, different

1:41:381:41:42

to normal cells of the body, but it

has been very difficult previously

1:41:421:41:46

to get the immune system to lock

onto them. In the last few years, we

1:41:461:41:51

have had treatments switching the

switches of the immune system so it

1:41:511:41:54

cuts the brakes and allows it to

recognise the cancer cells. Now we

1:41:541:41:59

can do that, we want to steer it,

instead of just cutting the brakes

1:41:591:42:03

and letting it roll, we want to

steer it against what is

1:42:031:42:15

particularly abnormal in a

particular person. The technology

1:42:151:42:17

for sequencing the genes in a cancer

cell is available so we can use that

1:42:171:42:20

to work out what it is about the

cancer that might be most visible to

1:42:201:42:23

the immune system.

You would take a

biopsy of someone's cancer, sequence

1:42:231:42:25

the genes, use it to make a

potentially individualised vaccine.

1:42:251:42:33

It is at the cutting edge. We have

seen a few preliminary results in

1:42:331:42:38

small numbers of patients and the

exciting thing as it will now start

1:42:381:42:40

going into much larger trials.

Could

you theoretically do that for all

1:42:401:42:45

people who have had a cancer?

At the

moment, the cancer is responding

1:42:451:42:51

best to the immune therapy are the

ones with lots of mutations, lots of

1:42:511:42:56

abnormalities. Those are the ones we

will focus on, things like melanoma,

1:42:561:43:01

lung cancer, bladder cancer, we know

the way the cancer develops has

1:43:011:43:06

caused damage to the DNA making the

most visible.

Two very small first

1:43:061:43:12

aid Schumann trials have taken place

using the newly created cancer

1:43:121:43:20

vaccine -- human trials. But the

results, would you say they are

1:43:201:43:26

promising, 12 out of the 19 patients

well cancer free up to two years

1:43:261:43:31

later?

Very exciting. Very

preliminary and I do not want people

1:43:311:43:35

watching to think this is going to

be a routine treatment tomorrow,

1:43:351:43:39

really important to emphasise, we

need the evidence, but it is very

1:43:391:43:45

exciting to see that using this

technology, we can get the immune

1:43:451:43:48

system to lock onto the cancers.

We

had a chat last week, you gave me a

1:43:481:43:53

brilliant analogy of how cancer

cells work and they work like a

1:43:531:43:57

woman's placenta does when it stops

the immune system attacking the

1:43:571:44:00

foetus as it grows inside the

uterus, fellow audience about that.

1:44:001:44:05

One of the reasons cancers can

escape the immune system, Sophie

1:44:051:44:09

knows more about this, we have all

sorts of defence mechanisms to stop

1:44:091:44:13

the immune system attacking our body

and particularly if you have to

1:44:131:44:18

carry a baby, a baby is only half

like you genetically.

An alien thing

1:44:181:44:23

inside you.

It is a transplant you

have to carry safely for nine

1:44:231:44:28

months. The mechanisms in the

placenta stopping the immune system

1:44:281:44:31

getting to the baby are exactly the

same as some programmes cancer can

1:44:311:44:35

call on to evade the immune system

themselves.

Sophie, I will bring you

1:44:351:44:40

in in a minute, I want to talk to a

dream, skin cancer, one year later,

1:44:401:44:45

it had spread to many of your organs

-- I want to talk to Adrian. You

1:44:451:44:51

were told you had 12 months to live,

five years ago, what did they do to

1:44:511:44:56

you?

Immune therapy. I was fortunate

enough at that time to be offered a

1:44:561:45:02

trial drug programme. I was in

Birmingham, I jumped at the

1:45:021:45:07

opportunity, given only a potential

12 months to survive, and from then

1:45:071:45:13

on, things moved on rather rapidly.

Fortunately, my body, my immune

1:45:131:45:19

system, it accepted the trial drug

programme. I never really felt ill

1:45:191:45:23

though we went through an

instability where we got the balance

1:45:231:45:26

right and the drug basically the

volume of periodic drugs while body

1:45:261:45:31

would feel comfortable with. And

that was a 12 month programme. We

1:45:311:45:37

changed that because I believed it

was explained to me that melanomas

1:45:371:45:45

are very aggressive, very

intelligent cancer, they can

1:45:451:45:47

potentially outthink the drugs. We

went on then to an intravenous drug,

1:45:471:45:52

and I had two successful different

intravenous... Again, my body

1:45:521:46:02

accepted it. Modern day chemotherapy

type drugs, I accepted them quite

1:46:021:46:08

well, one of the lucky ones.

Your

cancer has shrunk to what?

If I dare

1:46:081:46:16

say, a trace, if I dare say, today I

am cancer free. It is an amazing...

1:46:161:46:22

I have been two years drug-free, so

this was all in the first three

1:46:221:46:27

years. I have led a very active

normal life in the drug periods and

1:46:271:46:33

certainly now that, you know, I am

very fortunate, through people

1:46:331:46:41

around the table today, modern

immune therapies, I was on early

1:46:411:46:46

stages of the immune therapies, as

Peter has explained, and things are

1:46:461:46:49

changing.

1:46:491:46:54

This immunotherapy is the latest

frontier in terms of trying to treat

1:46:541:47:00

cancer. Doctor Acton, in your work

you are trying to figure out, under

1:47:001:47:07

this label of immunotherapy, the

tricks that cancer cells play so you

1:47:071:47:12

can unlock those tricks and counter

them with brand-new treatments.

Yes,

1:47:121:47:18

the treatments out there that

patients are receiving now, as Peter

1:47:181:47:23

described, to take the brakes off so

cancer can trick your activated

1:47:231:47:27

immune cells. Even if we had a great

vaccine and get to the cancer cells,

1:47:271:47:31

the Cancer can switch them off, so

we want to stop them doing that.

1:47:311:47:35

That's some of the immunotherapy out

there now. But there are lots of

1:47:351:47:38

other tricks and other healthy cells

that cancer bring in and change

1:47:381:47:44

their behaviour and we need to find

new ways to design new drugs.

There

1:47:441:47:49

are several issues to unravel.

Beginning with getting our own

1:47:491:47:53

selves to recognise cancer cells and

tumours.

Yes, and it is difficult.

1:47:531:47:57

Something like a vaccine against

measles, as you suggest, it's a

1:47:571:48:02

virus, foreign, definitely not a

human cell and it's difficult for

1:48:021:48:07

our immune system to see and attack.

It knows it is foreign and can kill

1:48:071:48:12

it, as it will kill infected cells.

Cancer comes from the patient's on

1:48:121:48:18

original healthy cells. While they

are different, and we know they are

1:48:181:48:21

misbehaving and we want to get rid

of them, they look much more similar

1:48:211:48:25

to healthy cells than a virus. So

the breakthrough is there,

1:48:251:48:33

sequencing the genomes to find the

sequences and using them for the

1:48:331:48:38

immune system to recognise and

destroy those cells.

The next issue

1:48:381:48:41

is getting the cells inside the

tumour to fight it.

It's more

1:48:411:48:44

competent than just getting

activated immune cells, we need

1:48:441:48:47

those cells to get into the tumours

and find the cells and kill them.

1:48:471:48:52

That much more complicated. A lot of

tumours will going to active

1:48:521:48:59

surrounding cells and form a kind of

scar around them to protect

1:48:591:49:08

themselves. These are other angles

we can take to enhance

1:49:081:49:12

immunotherapy.

Why do healthy cells

sometimes go wrong?

There are a lot

1:49:121:49:16

of environmental factors that we

have heard about in the news and

1:49:161:49:19

agencies like Cancer Research UK,

giving us advice on how to avoid

1:49:191:49:24

them and keep ourselves healthy.

Fundamentally, the human body has

1:49:241:49:30

trillions of cells, dividing all the

time as we grow and age. Every time

1:49:301:49:33

we defined, we have to make a

perfect copy of our whole DNA. If

1:49:331:49:38

you try to do that with trillions of

sells for 90 years, there will

1:49:381:49:43

sometimes be mistakes. Most of those

mistakes are not harmful at all and

1:49:431:49:46

the cells can cope or die. But

sometimes those mistakes happen in

1:49:461:49:52

key areas and that cell can become

cancer.

Cells going wrong is a

1:49:521:49:59

natural consequence of us living so

much longer?

Partly, and partly some

1:49:591:50:03

of the things we do to ourselves,

like ultraviolet radiation in the

1:50:031:50:09

sunshine, smoking cigarettes, being

too heavy, and eating diets that are

1:50:091:50:12

high in saturated fats, all these

things increasing the damage and

1:50:121:50:16

likelihood that some cells will go

wrong. But quite a lot of cancer is

1:50:161:50:20

just down to the play of chance in

the genomes.

A question I know not

1:50:201:50:24

like, but I have to ask, we talked

about the big clinical trial

1:50:241:50:33

starting next year and to customise

cancer vaccines, so how many years

1:50:331:50:37

away from that potentially being on

the market are we?

It will take

1:50:371:50:41

several years to get the trials and

understand the results and see if it

1:50:411:50:44

really works, but it moves

incredibly fast, these checkpoint

1:50:441:50:49

antibodies, cutting the brakes on

the immune system, that we use quite

1:50:491:50:52

widely now, were not even thought of

ten years ago. So once you get the

1:50:521:50:56

information and start to see the

results of the trials, things can

1:50:561:51:00

move very fast, but that's what we

have to do.

Thank you all very much

1:51:001:51:03

for coming in.

1:51:031:51:09

Some breaking news, a man called

Neville horde has pleaded guilty at

1:51:101:51:16

Bradford Crown Court for murdering a

supermarket worker, stabbed to death

1:51:161:51:22

outside and Aldi store just before

Christmas. Jody Wilshere was stabbed

1:51:221:51:30

to death in an Aldi store in

Yorkshire just before Christmas.

1:51:301:51:36

Have you ever worked

a shift for free?

1:51:371:51:39

Or even lots of shifts?

1:51:391:51:40

With no job offer

at the end of it all?

1:51:401:51:46

A call to ban unpaid

trial shifts is being

1:51:461:51:48

debated in Parliament.

1:51:481:51:51

We can speak to SNP MP Stuart

McDonald who is raising the issue in

1:51:511:51:57

Parliament. Daniel is a waiter who

has done on page trials shift. And

1:51:571:52:03

on the phone we have James, not his

real name, who works in catering and

1:52:031:52:07

has also done on page shifts and has

recruited others to do them. James,

1:52:071:52:12

why are you doing these unpaid

shifts?

You do them when you apply

1:52:121:52:16

for a job. If you want to go for the

job and get the job to pay your

1:52:161:52:24

bills etc. On the other side, we are

told as managers within the catering

1:52:241:52:30

industry to recruit staff and go

through the trial process. If you

1:52:301:52:34

don't follow that then you could end

up in disciplinary and stuff like

1:52:341:52:39

that, because you haven't followed

company procedure.

How often do you

1:52:391:52:42

give people a job at the end of an

on page trials shift?

It depends. We

1:52:421:52:47

recruit kitchen porters, chefs,

generally if you get a lot of

1:52:471:52:52

applicants you will pick the best

for the job. With a kitchen porter,

1:52:521:52:56

you could get six or seven people

applying.

Why can't you just give

1:52:561:53:03

somebody a job through the

conventional process of looking at

1:53:031:53:07

their CV and interviewing them?

Sometimes it's a skill set. We want

1:53:071:53:13

to make sure they fit in with a

team, have the right enthusiasm and

1:53:131:53:16

stuff like that. That's what we are

told by the hate charred apartment,

1:53:161:53:20

we need to look at that and make

sure they fit in. -- by the HR

1:53:201:53:27

department. We need to make sure

they fit in and can do the job.

Do

1:53:271:53:30

you think it is fair?

I don't. I'm a

very unions person. I think it is

1:53:301:53:35

unfair. I think people should be

paid for what they do.

Daniel, you

1:53:351:53:43

had three trial shifts for jobs in

the past. All of them unpaid. Did

1:53:431:53:49

you get a job at the end of any of

them?

The third and final trials

1:53:491:53:54

shift I went to, I was given the

job, thank goodness. I was very

1:53:541:53:59

relieved to be given a job as the

previous trial shifts I had done

1:53:591:54:02

were six hours unpaid, and they said

they would get back to me within a

1:54:021:54:08

week but I never heard from them

again.

Could that be you are not the

1:54:081:54:11

right person for the job, or do you

think they were taking the Mick?

I

1:54:111:54:15

think they were taking the Mick. Of

the two trial shifts I never heard

1:54:151:54:22

anything again, I had done a

face-to-face interview, so they knew

1:54:221:54:27

my personality. I don't think they

had a reason not to get back to me.

1:54:271:54:31

Did you try to contact them and ask

what was going on?

I did. Two of

1:54:311:54:36

them I tried to ask what was going

on and I was met with, sorry, you're

1:54:361:54:40

not the right candidate for the

role. There was no further

1:54:401:54:43

explanation and they put the phone

down on me.

How did you feel about

1:54:431:54:47

that?

I was gutted. I'd worked

six-hour shifts with the promise, if

1:54:471:54:55

we think you are the right candidate

and you do well on the shift, you

1:54:551:54:58

will almost certainly get the job,

and to have it taken away from you

1:54:581:55:02

at the end when you have slaved in

the restaurant, and they often put

1:55:021:55:04

you on the busiest time of the week,

so I was on a Saturday night,

1:55:041:55:09

working six hours with the promise

of a job, but it wasn't to be.

1:55:091:55:13

Stuart McDonald, SNP MP. There is

nothing illegal about asking a

1:55:131:55:17

worker to do a voluntary trials

shift, is there?

As the law stands

1:55:171:55:21

at the minute, I think it needs to

be fixed. In 20 years of the

1:55:211:55:25

national minimum wage act, there

hasn't been a single place, a single

1:55:251:55:30

tribunal, fine, ticking off, naming

and shaming, nothing. In 20 years of

1:55:301:55:36

the act, against the use of an

unpaid trials shift. My bill

1:55:361:55:40

proposes to amend the national

minimum wage act to make it crystal

1:55:401:55:44

clear that the cases your callers

have explained this morning will be

1:55:441:55:47

outlawed.

Smaller businesses in

particular rely on these kinds of

1:55:471:55:52

things as part of a recruitment

process. They absolutely have to get

1:55:521:55:56

the right personality in a small

business.

They absolutely do, and

1:55:561:55:59

this isn't about banning the

practice of trialling people. Nobody

1:55:591:56:03

would wish to do that. This is about

unpaid trial shifts and the

1:56:031:56:08

miserable, cynical exploitation that

almost always seems to accompany

1:56:081:56:11

them. It's aggravated by the fact

your first call this morning can't

1:56:111:56:17

even use his own name, so ashamed

people in the industry of them,

1:56:171:56:21

because he is forced to because of

his bosses. I would say to

1:56:211:56:26

businesses, employment law is

currently so heavily stacked in

1:56:261:56:30

favour of the ploy, why not put

people on probation periods, as is

1:56:301:56:34

normal in almost every other

mainstream work? The people who

1:56:341:56:38

suffer here are the lowest paid, and

people who often don't know their

1:56:381:56:42

rights in order to stand up for

them. My bill brings in the

1:56:421:56:46

protections to make sure people

can't be exploited. That where they

1:56:461:56:49

are offered a trial they are paid at

least the minimum weight. I think

1:56:491:56:53

that is good for business.

Let me

read a message, a Tweet, I have

1:56:531:56:58

worked in bars before and been

management before. I have been told

1:56:581:57:03

by higher up people to give trials

shift to people with not a chance of

1:57:031:57:07

getting a job, just because it was

an understaffed weekend.

I hear that

1:57:071:57:10

a lot. And can you think of a more

cynical practice, and can you

1:57:101:57:14

imagine if that was your first

introduction to the world of work?

1:57:141:57:19

Often people covering sicknesses or

holidays of other staff members and

1:57:191:57:23

being strung along. Often working

long hours, without a job to give

1:57:231:57:26

them at the end of it. It's time for

parliament to put an end to it,

1:57:261:57:31

that's what my bill does and I hope

MPs will back it tomorrow.

James, do

1:57:311:57:35

you agree that trials shift is fine,

but paid a person. Would you like to

1:57:351:57:41

see that in law?

Yes, I would. I

think it's fair because they are

1:57:411:57:44

giving up their time coming in. I

think it's all about fairness. In my

1:57:441:57:52

25 years of working in the catering

industry, just the way they treat

1:57:521:57:56

lower paid staff is quite bad. I

believe this is another thing they

1:57:561:58:02

use, being told, bring people in on

busy shifts when you have lots of

1:58:021:58:06

functions going on in your hotel.

Bring in people so you don't have to

1:58:061:58:10

pay that on your Labour budget.

Thank you, James. Thank you to

1:58:101:58:17

Daniel, and continued success with

your job. And thank you to Stuart

1:58:171:58:20

McDonald as well. Thank you for your

company today. Have a good day, we

1:58:201:58:24

will be back tomorrow at 9am. Thank

1:58:241:58:26

Victoria hears from a girl who tried to take her own life nine times in ten days before getting the help she needed, and speaks to people living in Syria on the seventh anniversary of the start of the conflict.

And could it be possible to produce individualised cancer vaccines? Victoria learns more about major trials planned on both sides of the Atlantic.