21/08/2011 Countryfile


21/08/2011

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An unspoiled coast...

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..fringed by rich, fertile farmland.

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An estuary filled up by the tide and full of life.

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This is South Hams, the most southerly sheltered part of Devon.

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A place brimming with natural beauty and a dash of English eccentricity.

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We are here at the first ever South Devon Crab Festival.

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The locals here are very, very passionate

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about the seafood they catch around these shores.

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And it's not all serious because Matt and I

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- well, it could be quite serious - will take on some of these locals

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head-to-head in a crab-cracking competition.

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If we're unsuccessful at that,

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we're going to try and beat them at crab-pot rolling.

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I'll get the pot.

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I'll also take to the water

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to get a different perspective on this stunning scenery

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and discover a rather strange phenomenon.

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-It's incredible, isn't it? It's like a Jacuzzi.

-A cold one!

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Meanwhile, I'm on the South Hams border in search of

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a real live bat cave.

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The greater horseshoe bat is one of Britain's largest and rarest,

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but I have a confession - they aren't my favourite creatures.

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-And was anyone scared?

-ALL: No.

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It was just me, wasn't it?

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THEY LAUGH

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And with vast quantities of perfectly good food

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being thrown away every day in the UK,

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I'll be asking, "Can we change our wasteful ways?"

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Also on Countryfile tonight...

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James is catching a new Devon delicacy -

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sand eels.

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These don't look anything like eels to me.

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I'd say that was a kind of elongated sardine.

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And Adam's hoping for a premium price

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when he takes his sheep to market.

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60. 60 lambs. Lovely!

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What a lovely morning for a lamb sale.

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Nestled among the lush valleys of the South Hams,

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by the creeks of the Salcombe Estuary, several miles

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along the coast from Dartmouth, it's the county's most southern point.

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But sheltered from the Atlantic blasts,

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these are tranquil waters,

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disturbed only by the frequent comings and goings

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of the many boats which moor here.

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This place boasts some of the warmest weather in Britain.

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Once you've factored in the golden sandy beaches and seaside charm,

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you can understand why it's a popular tourist destination.

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But there's a lot more to Salcombe than meets the eye.

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Underneath the waves

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lies one of the most protected marine habitats in Britain,

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home to all kinds of rare sea life.

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But before I get to grips with that,

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I'm exploring above the surface.

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And I'm going in search of parts of the estuary

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that most people who come here never get the chance to see.

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With miles to explore, the Salcombe Estuary is made for canoeing.

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My guide, instructor Dave Halsall, knows it like the back of his hand.

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If you just get in the front of the boat, Matt, and I'll get in the back.

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How often do you get out on this estuary, Dave?

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I'm lucky enough to get out most days, actually.

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And where are you navigating us to?

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We're just going to have a look at little bits on the estuary,

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there's no particular route we need to take.

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We can just go where the wind takes us.

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-It's a perfect day for it, Mike.

-It's beautiful, yeah.

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'We're travelling from Kingsbridge in the north of the estuary

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'back down to Salcombe. Joining us is a team from the National Trust,

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'one of the biggest landowners around here.

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'And, as warden Simon Hill explains,

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'the Trust wants to get more people canoeing.'

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Lots of people would associate the National Trust with stately homes

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on-land, but you're encouraging people to get out on the water.

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Indeed, yeah.

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We very much want people to get out and explore

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and have memorable experiences in the countryside, and it's not just

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necessarily about getting out by feet. We own 700 miles of coastline

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and what better way to get out and explore it by on a boat?

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And how are you encouraging people to get out on the water?

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We're doing that by having a canoe partnership on the Salcombe Estuary

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with Dave here, but also more recently we built on that very much

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to develop a canoe trail for the estuary.

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From a short one-hour beginner trail, right through to something to

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go along the length of the estuary, five hours, and explore everything.

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'They reckon that by canoe you get to see things

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'you might otherwise miss, and it's not long before we find one of them,

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'which Dave likes to call... the phenomenon.'

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-The phenomenon?

-Yes.

-Right, OK.

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-That's all this bubbling, fizzing water?

-That's it.

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The rocks here are porous. They've got lots of little holes in them.

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And when the tide goes out, air's sucked into the holes.

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When the tide comes back in, it forces the air out of the holes

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-and out of the rock and into the water.

-Oh, yeah. Look at the bubbles

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coming up from the holes in the rocks. I can't believe it.

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FIZZING SOUND

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That fizzing sound's being amplified by the canoe, isn't it?

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It comes straight up through the hull. It's fantastic.

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How long does it bubble for, then?

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It'll bubble for about three or four hours while there's water here.

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-It's incredible, isn't it? It's like a Jacuzzi.

-A cold one!

-Yeah!

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'Well, I'm not jumping in just yet,

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'especially when there's so much more of the estuary yet to explore.

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'And not just the wonders of the natural world

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'because there's history here, too.'

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-What's this, then, Dave?

-It's a lime kiln.

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-A lime kiln?

-Yeah.

-OK.

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Why would these have been built right along the edge of the estuary?

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Well, in the 1700s, the roads locally

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would be just mud tracks, so you could bring in limestone and coal

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quite easily by water, so boats used to come in.

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Into here, put the coal and the limestone in the lime kiln,

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burn it, and then at low tide the horse and cart could come round

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and take out the fertiliser which was spread on the lands.

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It supposedly made the fields sweeter.

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There's quite a few of these all the way down the estuary?

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Yeah, there's about 12. And in pretty similar condition to this.

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-Very well preserved. I mean, obviously very well built.

-Yes.

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-I love 'em. They're like little castles.

-Yeah!

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'The tide has turned

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'and the water is beginning to drain from the estuary.

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'Later on, I'll be discovering what secrets it'll reveal.'

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But first, as part of our food and farming series,

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John is tackling the problem of waste.

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Over the last few weeks,

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we've been investigating the threats facing our food supply

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and the global food crisis that's looming on the horizon.

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The startling reality is that, across the world, a third of all food

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is wasted, and what we threw away in the UK is mind-boggling.

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That's 16 million tonnes of it a year, enough to fill

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Wembley Stadium, right to the tip of its magnificent arch 20 times.

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But who do we think the culprits are?

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Who's responsible for this shameful statistic?

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Last year, I discovered that all across Britain

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fields of perfectly good vegetables are being ploughed back into the soil

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as they've failed to meet stringent supermarket specifications.

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50% of this crop may not end up in the food chain

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purely because it doesn't fit the very tight aesthetic parameters

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that are demanded for supermarkets.

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But, in fact, the majority of food waste is created not by retailers

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but by you and me. In our individual homes up and down the country,

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we throw out more than half of Britain's waste.

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But have we got any idea just how much this is costing us?

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According to the Countryfile survey we commissioned, no we don't.

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We asked 1,000 households how much they think

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they throw out each month.

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9% said more than £20 worth,

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with double that, 18%, saying they wasted between £10 and £20 worth.

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But the vast majority, 53% of people,

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said that they wasted less than £10 worth of food every month.

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But official figures show that we actually throw out

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over six times that - an average of £680 per house per year.

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It really seems that most of us have no idea just how wasteful we are.

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Absolutely. But it hasn't always been that way.

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Before World War II,

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we're talking about between 1% and 2%

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of the food we were buying we wasted.

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Then, by the 1980s,

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we were looking at about 6%.

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But now we're looking at as much as 25% of all the food we're buying.

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I mean, that's an incredible leap.

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Is it, do you think, because food is relatively cheap these days?

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Absolutely. In terms of the proportion of our income,

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we spend much less now, compared to how it used to be.

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'To help us discover exactly what we're wasting,

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'we've enlisted the help of Jane Davidson and her family.'

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-What's the date today?

-The 5th.

-That's OK.

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'As a busy mother of two, Jane does her main food shopping once a week.'

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-That is 23rd July!

-THEY LAUGH

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'We're asking her to clear out her fridge

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'to find out which foods she buys ends up uneaten in the bin.

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'But it's not just households who are the culprits.

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'So, while Jane and the kids get to work,

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'I've got another appointment to keep.

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'The next biggest offender for food waste is the hospitality industry,

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'which accounts for a quarter of the UK's total.

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'To learn more, I'm catching up with a man whose organisation is trying

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'to cut the amount of waste restaurants create.'

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The average restaurant in the UK is producing 21 tonnes

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of food waste every year -

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the equivalent to three double-decker buses.

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That seems incredible, why is it?

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There's food waste being produced

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from all parts of the process in the restaurant.

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So, a lot of food goes off when it spoils as stock,

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a lot of food's wasted in the preparation process,

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and ending up in the bin.

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And if you don't finish your meal then food's scraped into the bin.

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And a lot of that ends up in landfill.

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Well, here's some that won't end up in landfill.

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-That looks delicious, thank you very much.

-Thanks very much.

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The restaurant we're in today is taking action.

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It's one of a small but growing minority of food outlets,

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joining the Sustainable Restaurant Association in a bid to slash waste.

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Time for a visit to the kitchen.

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And, Jo, just how seriously are you taking waste?

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We take waste pretty seriously

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and it's something our customers are interested in.

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There are all sorts of different things that we can do.

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So, for example, the ends of the leeks, here,

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we always use in the stock.

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All the bones will also go into a stock.

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We keep all our bread for breadcrumbs,

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anything left over we can feed our staff,

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so we all sit down and eat together.

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And we can put extra things into the daily specials.

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What else would you like to do?

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Food waste goes in with our general waste,

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so it would be great to know what else we can do there.

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Let's take a quick look in their waste bin.

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What do you make of that?

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It's a lot better than many restaurants.

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This is recycling here.

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This is general waste - here's an opportunity to separate general waste

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from some of the food waste in there.

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That gives an opportunity to ensure

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that food waste gets disposed of responsibly.

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And what else can be done?

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What about the size of portions, if people are leaving things?

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We'd like to encourage those people to ask to take it home with them.

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-A doggy bag?

-Exactly, a doggy bag. In the States

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you wouldn't think twice about doing it.

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We're a little bit embarrassed here about asking to do that.

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Do think people are a bit embarrassed?

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Yes, I would say they are embarrassed.

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But we don't have a problem with it. We'd love to see them take it home.

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-And the food, not just for the dog, maybe.

-Definitely not.

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Back in Jane's kitchen, we're tackling the biggest contributor

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to food waste -

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individual households throughout the UK.

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We've asked her to clean out her fridge

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and throw away the food that she wouldn't now use.

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Time to see the results.

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Jane, you've rummaged through your fridge

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and you are casting all these away. Why is that?

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Because they're out of date,

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what I would say is out of date, really.

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-How typical is this?

-Very typical.

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Essentially, 25% of the stuff that we're throwing away

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is fruit, vegetable and salads.

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-Fruit's always a problem, isn't it?

-Yes, definitely.

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Yeah, this says display until the 1st August, which is four days ago.

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Display until is just for the shops.

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You don't need to think about it at all, it's for stock control.

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-So, these are still OK.

-Absolutely.

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Now, what about these blueberries heading for the bin.

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Best before 24th July. Two weeks ago, now.

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There's a golden rule. There are three different types of date.

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The first one is 'display until' or 'sell-by'.

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That's purely for the shop.

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It's stock control, we should never worry about it, we just ignore it.

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The next one is 'best before'.

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Now, that's only about the quality of the food.

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So you can continue to eat it perfectly safely

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after the best-before date.

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Never eat past the use-by date,

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-that's the most important thing.

-That's the golden rule,

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'use by' is what you should take note of.

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What about this spreadable butter stuff?

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Well, butter is a best before, so, again, it's purely quality.

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-We're only on the third, so, have a look at it.

-Yes.

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If you're happy to eat it, because there's no safety issue,

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-you can carry on.

-Food for thought, then.

-Yes, definitely. Good tips.

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But is there a solution to the mountains of food waste?

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Later, I'll be investigating what happens to the 16 million tonnes

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of food we throw out every year

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and asking how we can bring the amount of waste we create

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under control and the consequences if we fail to act.

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-CLARE BALDING:

-This week I'm with Matt, exploring the southernmost tip of Devon.

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Miles of glorious beaches, acre upon acre of beautiful countryside.

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This place has one of the mildest climates in the UK,

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making it perfect for a spot of sunbathing.

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But it's not just sun-worshippers who love this part of South Devon,

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it's also a surprising hit with the least sun-loving of all mammals -

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bats.

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Not just any bat.

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This corner of South Devon is among the best areas in Europe

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to see one of Britain's largest and rarest,

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the greater horseshoe bat.

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I'm on the furthest edge of the South Hams Conservation Area

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at Berry Head.

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And when this sun sets I'll be heading out

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to see if I can catch a glimpse of some.

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There's just one snag.

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Just got to tell you something,

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I would be game for any challenge, I'm up for anything,

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but I have one major fear,

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call it a phobia if you will,

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and it's bats.

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One flew into my room when I was little, went round and round by my head

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and it made squeaking noises. I had to crawl to the door

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and my father came and I wouldn't go back in until I knew it was gone.

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That kind of phobia. So I might not handle this particularly well.

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Unlike much of Britain's intensively farmed land,

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the Devon countryside is still one of ancient pastures

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and thick hedgerows.

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In fact, there's around 33,000 miles of insect-rich hedges,

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more than any other county in the UK.

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They're perfect larders for the bats

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Berry Head ranger, Chris Smallbones, has been tracking for years.

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-OK?

-What have you got there?

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Just a couple of beetles and a nice harvestman spider, there.

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It's amazing, looking closely at the hedgerow,

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it's all moving, isn't it?

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It is. This is all perfect for bugs.

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-So, what sort of things would they eat?

-Well, I have a collection.

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We have some beetles that the bats really like to feed on.

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They're enormous!

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They are. The greater horseshoe bat is quite a large bat

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and as you can see it needs large prey.

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We've got these guys, here.

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These are the may bug or cockchafers

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and these are Geotropes beetles, or dor beetles.

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Will they always come back to the same spot to feed every night?

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Well, actually, I can show you. So I'll just get my map.

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Because we're on a large headland, sticking out into the sea,

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we're surrounded by water, they've only got one way to go.

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So, this is like a bat motorway?

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Essentially, yeah.

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All this area's lovely little fields

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and all these little lines are all lovely hedgerows.

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It's important, because the bats know where to go as the feed is there.

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But it's not just the hedges that bring in the bats.

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These Red Devon grazing cattle haven't come here for the view,

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they're here because the bats, as well as all the stuff

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they can find in the hedgerows, absolutely love dung beetles

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and for dung beetles, you need dung.

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And there's plenty of that round here.

0:17:560:17:59

With the sun starting to set and my anxiety on the rise,

0:17:590:18:03

it's almost time to face my fears.

0:18:030:18:07

Chris has brought me to this disused limestone quarry.

0:18:070:18:11

So, Chris, how can you be sure that we'll see bats here tonight?

0:18:110:18:15

Well, just under here is where our bat cave is.

0:18:150:18:19

We can pretty much guarantee we're going to have bats

0:18:190:18:22

because we go in and survey them.

0:18:220:18:24

How many bats are we talking?

0:18:240:18:26

How many live here underneath us?

0:18:260:18:28

In the summertime, we have about 75, this year's count,

0:18:280:18:32

with 35 babies which, actually,

0:18:320:18:34

this year was one of our best baby counts.

0:18:340:18:37

But they leave them in a creche,

0:18:370:18:39

so all the babies are in together and they're keeping themselves warm

0:18:390:18:42

in the little creche that they've been left in, essentially.

0:18:420:18:45

In their bat creche, I love it!

0:18:450:18:49

I'm actually starting to quite like them.

0:18:490:18:51

Already.

0:18:510:18:53

There's very little light pollution in this spot.

0:18:530:18:56

New developments are planned with bats in mind.

0:18:560:18:59

You won't find bright porch lights round here.

0:18:590:19:02

So, we'll have to be equally careful,

0:19:020:19:04

we'll be switching to infra red lights very soon.

0:19:040:19:07

And we're about to be joined by 20 girl guides.

0:19:070:19:11

So, hands up, who's excited about tonight?

0:19:130:19:17

Who's scared of bats?

0:19:170:19:20

A few of you are still scared of bats, OK.

0:19:200:19:22

Why are you scared of bats?

0:19:220:19:24

Because, like, the flapping wings scares me a little.

0:19:240:19:28

Now, the big challenge is, one, that none of us will be frightened

0:19:280:19:31

cos we're going to be brave together.

0:19:310:19:33

The second thing is we have to be really, really quiet.

0:19:330:19:36

And we're going to go dark now,

0:19:360:19:38

we're going to switch the camera light off. And wait for the bats.

0:19:380:19:41

'Now, the moment of truth, how will my nerves hold up?

0:19:420:19:47

'The guides certainly seem up for it.'

0:19:470:19:49

They'll be out quite quick because yesterday it rained

0:19:490:19:52

so the bats probably wouldn't have been able to go out and fed.

0:19:520:19:55

Here they come.

0:19:550:19:56

You've got all this vegetation on the edge,

0:19:560:19:58

on the lip of the quarry, here.

0:19:580:20:00

And moths and insects will be coming out of those bushes.

0:20:000:20:03

They'll have a quick, if you like, snack,

0:20:030:20:06

on their way to their feeding areas.

0:20:060:20:08

So, they sort of...

0:20:080:20:10

circle around as if they're in a holding pattern

0:20:100:20:12

before they take off? You can see all these shapes darting across.

0:20:120:20:15

BAT SQUEAKS

0:20:150:20:17

Oh, my word!

0:20:170:20:18

CLARE LAUGHS

0:20:180:20:20

-Do they hunt on their own or in pairs?

-They hunt on their own.

0:20:210:20:25

Oh, wow! That was really close.

0:20:270:20:30

'They're so quick it's a struggle

0:20:300:20:32

'to glimpse them. In their own environment, they aren't half

0:20:320:20:35

'as threatening as I'd imagined.'

0:20:350:20:38

BATS SQUEAK

0:20:380:20:40

Wow, did you see that one?

0:20:400:20:42

-And was anyone scared?

-ALL: No.

-It was just me, wasn't it?

0:20:450:20:48

THEY LAUGH

0:20:480:20:50

'Actually, truth be told,

0:20:500:20:52

'I quite enjoyed it. It's magical watching their nocturnal dance.

0:20:520:20:57

'And the girls seemed to agree.'

0:20:570:21:00

Wow!

0:21:000:21:02

Later on this week's programme...

0:21:030:21:06

will Adam get a good price at the sheep auction?

0:21:060:21:09

One, now. 61, now. All away at 63.20.

0:21:090:21:12

£63, £63.20.

0:21:120:21:15

So, I'd have hoped we'd get a bit more than that.

0:21:150:21:18

'Have I got what it takes to become a crabber?'

0:21:180:21:22

Any time today would be helpful.

0:21:220:21:24

Yes, all right.

0:21:240:21:25

'And, find out what the weather has in store for the week ahead

0:21:250:21:28

'with the Countryfile forecast.'

0:21:280:21:31

While Matt and I have been exploring the South Hams,

0:21:390:21:42

James has been further along the Devon coast

0:21:420:21:45

at Teignmouth, finding out how

0:21:450:21:48

a little-loved fish is making its way onto restaurant plates.

0:21:480:21:52

The seas around Devon are absolutely packed with marine life.

0:21:530:21:57

Unsurprisingly, they eat a lot of seafood down here.

0:21:570:22:00

But the fish I'm having for lunch

0:22:000:22:02

is not something you would expect on a menu.

0:22:020:22:04

The shallow seas here are perfect for catching sand eels.

0:22:040:22:09

There's enough demand for them to drum up business for local fishermen.

0:22:090:22:13

But that's mostly to sell to anglers as bait.

0:22:130:22:17

Some people think that sand eels are right for human consumption

0:22:170:22:21

and I've managed to track down a chef who has promised to cook me some up, if I can catch them first.

0:22:210:22:27

'Award-winning chef Tim Bouget is on a one-man mission to rebrand sand eels as a gourmet food.'

0:22:290:22:34

Trevor, good to meet you.

0:22:340:22:36

'And to get the ingredients for lunch, I have enlisted the help of fisherman Trevor Hall.

0:22:360:22:40

'The eels live on a sandbank not far from shore.

0:22:450:22:48

'To catch them, Trevor and his team drag their net between two boats

0:22:480:22:51

'and they've got to get the job done before the tide turns.'

0:22:510:22:54

You say they live up to a foot under the sand. Does this scoop up the sand?

0:22:540:22:59

No. We take the ones swimming in the sea. They'll come out of the sand on the incoming tide.

0:22:590:23:03

-You just pick the occasional one?

-Yeah.

0:23:030:23:05

-As opposed to the whole lot in one go?

-Yeah.

0:23:050:23:08

-How much were you expecting to get?

-Hopefully, we will be up to 20 stone, I hope.

0:23:080:23:13

Wow!

0:23:130:23:14

-So how sustainable is it?

-We feel they're very sustainable.

0:23:160:23:19

We only take what we need. We don't take any other fish.

0:23:190:23:22

'The fish stocks certainly seem healthy

0:23:230:23:25

'and Trevor's team can fill their net in just a matter of a few minutes.'

0:23:250:23:30

-How's that for a catch?

-Yes, very happy.

0:23:300:23:32

-These don't look like eels to me.

-No.

0:23:340:23:37

I'd say that was an elongated sardine.

0:23:370:23:40

And these are different sizes. Some are tiny. Some are enormous.

0:23:400:23:44

This is called a lance. The longer green ones. The others are sand eels.

0:23:440:23:50

-These are sand eels.

-They're not just different ages?

-No, just different species.

0:23:500:23:55

'Despite the name, sand eels are not eels at all.

0:23:570:23:59

'They are actually small fish

0:23:590:24:01

'and Trevor's catch sells for £4 a kilo.'

0:24:010:24:04

-So where are these destined?

-Some will go for food and some will be for angling baits.

0:24:040:24:09

-What's your proportion?

-Angling baits is probably 99%.

0:24:090:24:13

It's incredible. It's quite a new thing people are eating?

0:24:130:24:16

Yeah, it seems to be picking up as the years are going on.

0:24:160:24:20

-Have you eaten them?

-Only the once.

-Once!

-Yeah.

0:24:200:24:23

-How many years have you been fishing for them?

-About 20.

0:24:230:24:26

-Fishing for 20 years. We got about 20 stone today and you've eaten them once?

-Yes.

-Disgraceful!

0:24:260:24:31

'Eels in hand, I've headed across the harbour to the picture-perfect village of Shaldon,

0:24:330:24:38

'where lunch awaits.

0:24:380:24:40

'I'm still missing some vital ingredients, but I won't have to go far to find them,

0:24:400:24:44

'because around here they've their own way of doing things.'

0:24:440:24:47

Everyone around here seems to know each other and where would a Shaldon foodie go for exotic fruit?

0:24:490:24:55

A neighbour's garden, of course.

0:24:550:24:57

-DOG BARKS

-Good morning.

-Hello, James.

0:24:570:25:00

-I've come to forage in your back garden.

-Lucy, shush!

0:25:000:25:04

-Come on, Lucy!

-Come on, there's a good girl.

0:25:040:25:07

Look at this, this is a spectacular fig tree.

0:25:070:25:10

-Yes. She's lovely.

-How long have you had this?

0:25:100:25:12

We think it's about 50 years old. We're not sure. This one here...

0:25:120:25:17

'Figs are not your typical English fruit.

0:25:170:25:20

'They normally grow in warmer climates, like the Mediterranean.

0:25:200:25:23

'But basking here in the South Devon son, Wenna Curry's tree is doing just fine.'

0:25:230:25:28

-You can feel how soft and full of yum it is.

-"Full of yum". I like that.

0:25:280:25:34

I get a bit too enthusiastic, fruit picking,

0:25:360:25:38

but there is one prize-winning one up there.

0:25:380:25:43

'These figs look and smell great and now I've got everything I need for lunch.

0:25:450:25:50

'All that's left is to borrow a venue with a seaside view and Tim has done us proud.'

0:25:500:25:55

Wow! This is amazing!

0:25:550:25:57

I've heard of beach huts, but you've got a kitchen and a bed.

0:25:570:26:01

-Fantastic. What have you got?

-A collection of things.

-Let's have a look.

0:26:010:26:04

I've got everything you ordered. Sand eels, sea lettuce, figs.

0:26:040:26:10

-A whole smorgasbord.

-Absolutely beautiful. Look at that.

0:26:100:26:14

'And the menu's sounding pretty good.'

0:26:140:26:16

I'll make a salad with the figs and we've got eels and we we'll do the eels in two ways.

0:26:160:26:20

We'll pickle them and do a lovely fried dish.

0:26:200:26:23

What is the texture like? It looks like a white fish as opposed to an oily one.

0:26:260:26:30

-Is it like giant whitebait?

-Yeah, I prefer calling them little sea bass, really.

0:26:300:26:37

It has a backbone through the eel, but it's so fine.

0:26:370:26:40

You get a slight crunch, but you'll get more of a crunch from the breadcrumbs.

0:26:400:26:45

-This might be a silly question. Why sand eels? They'll hardly be on a restaurant supplier's list.

-No.

0:26:480:26:53

But they are on our doorstep, they're very sustainable.

0:26:530:26:56

They're competitively priced, so there's a nice, natural circle.

0:26:560:27:01

If they're so good, why does no one eat them?

0:27:030:27:06

I think it's our best-kept secret, really.

0:27:060:27:09

'But eels aren't the only thing on my mind.'

0:27:090:27:12

Tell me about this beach hut.

0:27:120:27:14

It's bigger than my apartment and a lot posher than my apartment.

0:27:140:27:18

These are special huts. Underfloor heating, state-of-the-art technology, great kitchens.

0:27:180:27:24

Rumour has it that we're talking a quarter of a million pounds for this beach hut.

0:27:240:27:28

-It's quite special.

-I won't be moving in any time soon!

0:27:280:27:31

'But it is a fitting setting for our special lunch,

0:27:310:27:35

'which is just about ready.'

0:27:350:27:36

-Try it with the fig sauce.

-OK. Fish and figs.

0:27:370:27:40

We'll see if it's a marriage made in heaven.

0:27:400:27:43

-That's pretty good.

-It's not bad.

-To be honest, I had my doubts.

0:27:460:27:52

That's fantastic. It's sweet and sour.

0:27:520:27:55

-A little bit zesty, lemon.

-It's like a fruity sweet-and-sour sauce.

0:27:550:27:58

It's incredible.

0:27:580:28:00

People pay a fortune for cod, which is not as sophisticated or interesting and not as sustainable.

0:28:000:28:05

So that's the cooked one, James. Let's try these.

0:28:050:28:08

This is the cured salad.

0:28:080:28:09

I feel quite vulgar going in with my fingers on a salad like this, but...

0:28:090:28:13

That's possibly even nicer.

0:28:150:28:17

I've got to say pickled eels isn't a great seller, but that's fantastic.

0:28:170:28:23

'Add cider champagne

0:28:230:28:25

'and this delicious meal of nearly all fresh local produce is going to go down a treat.'

0:28:250:28:30

-What shall we toast to, sand eels?

-Sand eels, I think.

-To sand eels.

0:28:300:28:35

Cheers.

0:28:350:28:37

-MATT BAKER:

-'Back in Salcombe, we're following the retreating tide towards the sea.

0:28:400:28:45

'As the low water beckons, the estuary's secrets are beginning to be revealed.'

0:28:450:28:49

What's the story here, Dave?

0:28:510:28:53

This is the wreck of the Iverna, which used to be a racing yacht.

0:28:530:28:59

And why is she in this state now, then?

0:28:590:29:01

-She finished her racing days and then she was used on the estuary as a houseboat.

-Right.

0:29:010:29:07

She sprung a leak, unfortunately, and was beached and stripped of her valuable timber.

0:29:070:29:12

-How good was she?

-She was fast. In her heyday, she won all the races.

0:29:130:29:18

So she was the top boat of the day.

0:29:180:29:21

She used to race against the King's boat

0:29:210:29:23

and the Kaiser's boat, anyone else who had one.

0:29:230:29:27

-People with money would have a racing yacht. She would beat them all.

-Oh, wow! Look at that sail!

0:29:270:29:32

-Oh, my word.

-A lot of sail area.

-Yeah.

0:29:320:29:36

-Can you see the man?

-There's somebody up there! Yeah. That's incredible, isn't it?

0:29:360:29:41

-And this is one when she was beached.

-Oh, wow.

0:29:410:29:45

Yes. She was lovely, wasn't she?

0:29:450:29:47

Such a shame to see her like that and then look back at what's left. Basically, just there for the fish.

0:29:470:29:55

And the Iverna is not alone.

0:29:580:30:00

There are traces of seven more wrecks in this one ship's graveyard.

0:30:000:30:04

Everyone has its own story to tell. But all have been left to rot

0:30:040:30:09

and be slowly carried away on the tides.

0:30:090:30:11

Now, as John has been discovering, we throw away huge amounts of perfectly good food in this country,

0:30:130:30:19

so is there any way we can change that?

0:30:190:30:22

Earlier, I learned how it's our own households up and down the country

0:30:310:30:34

that are the main culprits when it comes to wasting food,

0:30:340:30:38

with an estimated quarter of all the food we buy ending up in the bin.

0:30:380:30:43

But the problems extend across the board, from homes to schools, to restaurants to supermarkets.

0:30:430:30:49

As pressure grows on our food resources, it seems to me

0:30:500:30:54

there are two things we have to do about waste.

0:30:540:30:57

Crack down on it, but also make use of whatever's left.

0:30:570:31:01

At the moment, almost 40% of all the food we waste ends up in landfill sites,

0:31:010:31:06

where it slowly breaks down, giving off around 20% of the UK's greenhouse-gas methane emissions.

0:31:060:31:14

Not only that, we're running out of landfill sites

0:31:140:31:17

and one of the answers is to have more of these - anaerobic digesters.

0:31:170:31:22

This one is on a farm in Staffordshire

0:31:220:31:24

and turns food waste into electricity for around 1,300 houses.

0:31:240:31:28

Anaerobic digesters are the Government's preferred method

0:31:300:31:33

of treating food waste, and the benefits seem obvious.

0:31:330:31:37

Food goes in and electricity or gas comes out.

0:31:370:31:39

In fact, the Government is so keen on them, it wants to expand plants like this

0:31:390:31:44

to handle 5 million tonnes of food a year -

0:31:440:31:47

a third of the UK's total waste.

0:31:470:31:51

How many of these anaerobic digesters are there at the moment operating?

0:31:510:31:55

There are about 60 to 70. If we're going to get near

0:31:550:31:58

tackling the 16 million tonnes of food waste

0:31:580:32:01

which the Government recently identified for UK producers,

0:32:010:32:04

then we'll have to see more of them come online quickly.

0:32:040:32:07

And there must be a catch?

0:32:070:32:09

So, contracts for food waste tend to be quite short term,

0:32:090:32:12

and the payback for a plant is going to be longer than that.

0:32:120:32:15

We need longer-term contracts from local authorities

0:32:150:32:18

and waste producers to really bring the industry forward.

0:32:180:32:22

And why aren't councils doing that?

0:32:220:32:24

Some of them have been hesitant about cost.

0:32:240:32:26

The examples where councils segregate waste

0:32:260:32:29

have seen that they can do it at the same cost as normal waste collection,

0:32:290:32:33

and they save an awful lot on landfill.

0:32:330:32:35

Anaerobic digestion seems to be popular with everyone from policy-makers to environmentalists,

0:32:400:32:45

but a word of caution is being added.

0:32:450:32:48

And that is that our priority must be feeding people with as little waste as possible

0:32:480:32:53

before we turn to feeding machines like this.

0:32:530:32:56

I'm visiting a place that is doing just that

0:32:570:33:00

and which gives a stark illustration of just how wasteful our society has become.

0:33:000:33:06

Shelves stacked high with food.

0:33:060:33:08

It looks like a supermarket warehouse to me.

0:33:080:33:11

We are in a way, but we're just a charity that redistributes food rather than sells it.

0:33:110:33:16

What about this - long-life orange juice - how did you come by these?

0:33:160:33:20

This is a great example of supply and demand.

0:33:200:33:22

The manufacturer of that

0:33:220:33:25

has to keep the supermarket happy by having enough of that stock in.

0:33:250:33:29

We get a cold snap, you and I drink a little less - there is a surplus.

0:33:290:33:34

Fareshare say it is cheaper for retailers to send food to them than to use landfill,

0:33:340:33:40

and it's redistributed to many charities.

0:33:400:33:43

The latest consignment. What have we got? Fresh fruit and veg.

0:33:440:33:48

-It's always exciting. You never know what you're going to get.

-How much food per day do you take in?

0:33:480:33:53

In total last year, we distributed 3,600 tonnes.

0:33:530:33:58

That averages 35,500 people being fed a day.

0:33:580:34:02

-And well fed, by the look of it.

-Yeah, it's good quality.

-Strawberries here. Asparagus, even!

0:34:020:34:08

But is this all stuff that is now past its sell-by date?

0:34:080:34:12

No, this is all within date. Everything that we pass out is fit for retail.

0:34:120:34:16

It's within date and fit for human consumption.

0:34:160:34:20

-I suppose that makes things even more scandalous.

-Yes.

0:34:200:34:24

That it's actually fit to eat and yet it's been thrown away!

0:34:240:34:28

While schemes like this are great, they hardly touch the sides

0:34:280:34:32

of the 16 million tonnes of food we waste each year.

0:34:320:34:36

And with world demand for food expected to increase by 50%

0:34:360:34:40

by the middle of the century, we simply have to waste less.

0:34:400:34:44

As increased demand drives prices up, ultimately it may be cost

0:34:440:34:48

rather than conscience that forces us to change our wasteful ways.

0:34:480:34:53

To find out more about food waste and other countryside issues,

0:34:540:34:57

tune into Farming Today on Radio 4 every weekday morning at 5.45.

0:34:570:35:02

Still to come on Countryfile -

0:35:060:35:07

can Clare and I beat the locals in our crab-cracking challenge?

0:35:070:35:11

-Don't do it like that.

-Oh, shut up!

0:35:110:35:14

And will there be a nip in the air in the week ahead?

0:35:140:35:18

Find out with the Countryfile forecast.

0:35:180:35:21

But first, summer is a busy time on the farm

0:35:290:35:32

and Adam is having a break from the harvest

0:35:320:35:35

to take some of his ewes to a prestigious sheep sale.

0:35:350:35:38

But will he get the price that he's hoping for?

0:35:380:35:41

I love summer. It's a time of year

0:35:440:35:47

when we can start reaping the rewards of all our hard work. Harvest is underway,

0:35:470:35:51

and plenty of my animals are in good shape for market.

0:35:510:35:55

We've got around 2,000 sheep on the farm at the moment, and I really enjoy sheep farming.

0:35:560:36:01

It's an exciting part of the business, and quite important to us. The price of lamb is quite high,

0:36:010:36:07

and I'd usually sell quite a few of these lambs for meat,

0:36:070:36:10

but I'm going to try my hand at selling them as breeding females.

0:36:100:36:13

We picked out the very best females and I'll take them to Honeybourne sale.

0:36:130:36:18

So I'm just going to get them loaded up.

0:36:180:36:20

We've got a healthy flock and I'm feeling positive about these ewe lambs.

0:36:200:36:24

But selling my sheep is always a nervous time, as you never know what they'll fetch at auction.

0:36:240:36:30

The price of sheep has soared recently.

0:36:320:36:35

That's partly because New Zealand lamb is going into China,

0:36:350:36:38

and there's a big demand for UK lamb into Europe.

0:36:380:36:41

And that's great news for sheep farmers and great news for me,

0:36:410:36:45

particularly with these 60 lambs in the back to sell.

0:36:450:36:48

60, 60 lambs. Lovely. What a lovely morning for a lamb sale.

0:36:550:37:00

Honeybourne sheep sale goes back to the 1800s.

0:37:000:37:04

The sale field is owned by Edward Righton.

0:37:040:37:07

There's been an auction here stretching back to him great-grandfather's time,

0:37:070:37:11

so I'm keen to meet Edward to find out what makes this traditional sheep sale so special.

0:37:110:37:16

-Very nice to meet you.

-And you.

-It's a real annual get-together,

0:37:160:37:20

and when I was young, farmers brought their year's production here.

0:37:200:37:24

This was their main cheque and livelihood for the year.

0:37:240:37:27

Some ridges have been occupied by the same farming families at this sale for several generations.

0:37:270:37:33

Do you think it will carry on? Will you let the field out to them?

0:37:330:37:36

If farmers' fortunes are good and they want to support it, I'm happy for it to carry on.

0:37:360:37:41

It's not long now until the buyers arrive,

0:37:430:37:45

but before they cast their eyes over my ewe lambs, I need to sort them into size and breed.

0:37:450:37:50

We've got Charollais, which are these ones with the slightly more tanny face.

0:37:500:37:55

And we've got Texels, like these white-faced lambs.

0:37:550:37:59

And the buyers want to be looking at a pen of even lambs,

0:37:590:38:02

and so we're going to take the Texels out

0:38:020:38:05

and sell the Charollais on their own.

0:38:050:38:07

Tom Greener, one of the auctioneers, has kindly offered to give me a hand.

0:38:100:38:14

It's great to get some of his expert advice.

0:38:140:38:17

The worst lamb will always bring a pen down.

0:38:170:38:19

The best one doesn't bring it up. So if you have got a good one...

0:38:190:38:24

What sort of money do you think we might make for these?

0:38:270:38:31

-The Texels will be good money. We'll see £80 to £85 on them.

-Great.

0:38:310:38:36

Anywhere between 70 and 80 and I'll be happy.

0:38:360:38:39

-The Charollais, these'll be £55, £60, this pen.

-I'd be more than happy than that.

0:38:390:38:45

A couple of years ago, I was getting roughly half that price.

0:38:450:38:48

The atmosphere here is buzzing.

0:38:480:38:51

Sheep are literally arriving by the lorry-load.

0:38:510:38:53

Sad as it may sound, I just love all these great big lorries unloading these lambs.

0:38:530:38:58

There's about 400 on here.

0:38:580:39:00

When I was a kid, I used to mess around in the living room with pillows

0:39:000:39:04

and pretend I was loading and unloading sheep. It's just fantastic.

0:39:040:39:08

I'm small, in comparison to these big boys.

0:39:080:39:10

BELL RINGS

0:39:100:39:13

As the bell rings, it signals the start of the auction, and Tom gets things underway.

0:39:130:39:18

ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much for turning out today. We'll get underway.

0:39:180:39:23

The first lot - what are they going to be?

0:39:230:39:26

-£80. 75.

-70.

-70 bid. 70 bid there.

0:39:260:39:30

2? At 72, 72. 72.

0:39:300:39:32

I have. 3, I have. At 73. At 3, at 3, at 3...

0:39:320:39:37

At 73, sold, you've got them, at £73.50. And on we go.

0:39:370:39:42

So, the first lot sold for £73.50 per lamb.

0:39:420:39:45

A fair price. This gives me high hopes.

0:39:450:39:48

But there's no time to hang around. The horse and cart moves along from pen to pen

0:39:480:39:52

with the auctioneers selling the lambs.

0:39:520:39:55

On this side, all the buyers are jostling for space trying to outbid each other,

0:39:550:39:59

winking and nodding and a flick of the hand, and they'll be buying these lambs.

0:39:590:40:03

61... And a half one? 61...

0:40:030:40:07

These are Charollais lambs. They look a bit like mine.

0:40:070:40:10

£63. £63.20.

0:40:100:40:14

-So, I would hope we would get a bit more than that.

-£61.50.

0:40:140:40:18

Right, it's my Texel sheep next. £70-£80 would be a fair price.

0:40:180:40:24

Texel ewe lambs. Look at them, they are good, strong ewe lambs.

0:40:240:40:29

What are they going to be? 85?

0:40:290:40:32

-I am really pleased with how my lambs look.

-These are ewe lambs?

-All ewe lambs, yeah.

0:40:320:40:37

75. Come on, start me.

0:40:370:40:38

-The starting price dropped a bit to get the bidding going.

-Half six...half seven.

0:40:380:40:43

-There's lots of interest.

-80 half, 80 half, 80 half.

0:40:430:40:46

-86. 86. 86...

-This is sounding really good.

0:40:460:40:49

-Before I know it, the hammer goes down.

-At 93. 93, 93. Sold. Away at 93.

0:40:490:40:55

£93.

0:40:550:40:56

That's good. I'm very, very happy with that.

0:40:560:40:58

My second lot of Texels go for £87.50. Another good result.

0:40:580:41:03

Seven-and-a-half.

0:41:030:41:05

Right, let's see what the Charollais make.

0:41:050:41:09

It's harder to guess what the larger Charollais will fetch.

0:41:090:41:12

-They're not as popular as the Texels.

-At 88-and-a-half...

0:41:120:41:18

That's £88.50 a lamb for these Charollais. That's good.

0:41:180:41:21

Let's see what the last ones make. Up next, the small Charollais. Tom thought these would fetch less.

0:41:210:41:28

-67, 67, 67... Sold! Away they go at £67.

-They all sold well.

0:41:280:41:35

I'm going to catch up with one of the buyers to find out what his plans are for the lambs.

0:41:350:41:39

-Where will they be going now?

-Down to South Wales now.

0:41:390:41:43

They'll be bred on until next year. I'll sell them at market.

0:41:430:41:47

-So you will run them on at your farm and try and make a bit on them next year?

-Yes.

-Excellent.

0:41:470:41:53

-They won't end up for meat. They'll go for breeding?

-Yes.

-Great.

0:41:530:41:56

One and a half...32, 32.

0:41:560:41:59

The sale will carry on for hours. But my work here's done.

0:41:590:42:03

I just picked up my sale ticket from the office and I'm delighted with how they went.

0:42:030:42:08

The top pen sold very well. These ones, not quite so good.

0:42:080:42:11

But the overall average was about £85 a lamb.

0:42:110:42:14

So I'm taking home best part of five grand. A good day's work.

0:42:140:42:18

While my livestock sales have been a success, my crops haven't fared so well.

0:42:200:42:24

My winter barley is down 20% from last year.

0:42:240:42:28

This week, we're harvesting the oilseed rape, and I'm praying for better results.

0:42:280:42:33

The oilseed rape was planted this time last year

0:42:330:42:36

and just over a fortnight ago, we sprayed it off with a weedkiller.

0:42:360:42:40

It not only kills the weeds but it kills off the rape too, so it's all even and brown and dry

0:42:400:42:45

to make easy work for the combine.

0:42:450:42:47

It's a far cry from what it looked like in the spring, when it was bright yellow and in flower.

0:42:470:42:52

The combine is cutting off the plants that go up into a massive crushing mechanism.

0:42:520:42:58

It then bashes the crop to hopefully extract all the oilseed.

0:42:580:43:04

And there's the black oilseed. That's what we're after.

0:43:040:43:07

I sell this to a neighbour who crushes it and from it gets the rape oil

0:43:070:43:13

that you can use for frying, or to replace olive oil, really. It's lovely stuff.

0:43:130:43:17

It's a mammoth task, harvesting these crops.

0:43:190:43:22

The team work in shifts to keep the combine moving. It's my turn to take over in the cab.

0:43:220:43:27

Just setting the cutter knife going.

0:43:270:43:31

It was always my dream as a boy to be the combine driver

0:43:330:43:36

and when I was a lad, I was never allowed to.

0:43:360:43:39

There were tractor drivers on the farm, it was their pride and joy

0:43:390:43:43

looking after the combine and driving it. And as I got older,

0:43:430:43:47

I was eventually allowed the job of driving the combine.

0:43:470:43:51

Oh, look, there goes a deer fawn. You can see it jumping around.

0:43:530:43:58

This oilseed rape crop makes a wonderful canopy.

0:43:580:44:02

It's like a little forest, and you get lots of wildlife.

0:44:020:44:05

You get foxes and rabbits and pheasants and all sorts in here.

0:44:050:44:09

The tractor is just coming up alongside now to unload,

0:44:090:44:13

so I need to put out the unloading auger,

0:44:130:44:16

and once the spout is over the trailer,

0:44:160:44:18

I will press this button and start unloading.

0:44:180:44:21

That's it now.

0:44:210:44:23

And you want to unload on the move because it saves time,

0:44:230:44:27

and while the sun is shining, we really want to make the most of it.

0:44:270:44:31

This trailer carries about 12.5 tonne of rape.

0:44:370:44:41

I'll climb in and show it to you. Here it is. The lovely rapeseed.

0:44:410:44:45

It's amazing the job the combine makes. It's a really lovely sample.

0:44:450:44:50

And this trailer has got about £3,500 worth in it. Pretty valuable.

0:44:500:44:54

The price is high at the moment.

0:44:540:44:56

And for us, this is the culmination of a year's hard work all coming together.

0:44:560:45:01

It's pretty satisfying, I can tell you.

0:45:010:45:03

My canoe journey in Salcombe is nearing its end.

0:45:190:45:21

But as we reach the mouth of the estuary, the going is getting tougher.

0:45:210:45:26

The tide is going out so it's pushing us along this way,

0:45:260:45:29

but we are padding into the wind,

0:45:290:45:31

and the water looks choppier, so it just seems a little bit more frantic here.

0:45:310:45:36

We're headed for the beach to go snorkelling.

0:45:360:45:39

The sea-life here is so rare that the estuary is one of only two marine environments

0:45:410:45:45

in the whole of the UK to be given legal protection

0:45:450:45:48

as a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

0:45:480:45:51

Here to tell me why, is marine conservationist, Nigel Mortimer.

0:45:510:45:55

OK, before dive, give us an idea of why the marine life around here is so special.

0:45:550:45:59

It's a very special estuary.

0:45:590:46:02

In fact, in some ways it's not an estuary at all.

0:46:020:46:04

There's no river flowing into it, so it's a very sheltered marine inlet.

0:46:040:46:09

The diversity of habitats and wildlife here is something special.

0:46:090:46:13

Well, you're suited up.

0:46:130:46:14

I'll get the wetsuit on and we'll get in there and have a good look.

0:46:140:46:19

Nigel wants to show me something called seagrass.

0:46:190:46:23

At first glance, it doesn't look anything special

0:46:230:46:26

but it's actually quite rare.

0:46:260:46:28

Around here, though, there's tons of it.

0:46:280:46:31

Well, Nigel, as its name suggests, seagrass is a grass.

0:46:410:46:44

It looks similar to grass but why is it so special?

0:46:440:46:47

All the other vegetation in the sea is all seaweeds.

0:46:470:46:50

This is a flowering plant from the land that's made its way back into the sea again.

0:46:500:46:55

It's got roots, leaves and it's actually got flowers.

0:46:550:46:58

What's incredible about it is it gives a whole lot of cover

0:46:580:47:01

for a lot of animals to thrive in.

0:47:010:47:04

But seagrass is under threat. Over the past 60 years,

0:47:040:47:08

huge swathes of it have been lost across the north-east Atlantic.

0:47:080:47:13

100 years ago, there would have been ten times as much.

0:47:130:47:17

It was hit by a wasting disease thought to be pollution related,

0:47:170:47:22

-so we're keen to protect what we do have now.

-Is it still in decline today?

0:47:220:47:28

Locally, we believe that, if anything, it's starting to grow back a little bit

0:47:280:47:32

but around the coast,

0:47:320:47:34

it's under some threat just from human activities.

0:47:340:47:38

There's plenty more to see here, though, besides the grass.

0:47:380:47:42

I'll only get to glimpse a fraction of it today

0:47:420:47:45

but along the length of the estuary, a dazzling array

0:47:450:47:48

of colourful creatures is hiding beneath the waves.

0:47:480:47:51

Now, if you've been inspired by our snorkelling

0:48:040:48:08

and are keen to get out into the great outdoors,

0:48:080:48:10

log on to our website and click on "things to do".

0:48:100:48:13

The BBC has teamed up with a range of organisations that offer

0:48:130:48:16

some fantastic activities

0:48:160:48:18

so I'm sure you'll find something that'll whet your appetite.

0:48:180:48:21

But don't rush off just yet, because whatever you've got planned,

0:48:210:48:25

you'll need the Countryfile weather forecast for the week ahead.

0:48:250:48:29

Today, Matt and I have been exploring the sprawling

0:51:070:51:10

tidal estuaries of South Hams.

0:51:100:51:12

Our final stop it brings us to the picture-postcard village of South Pool.

0:51:120:51:17

In a few hours' time, this peaceful village will be buzzing with people paying homage

0:51:170:51:22

to one of the area's finest residents, the south Devon crab.

0:51:220:51:26

It even has its own festival.

0:51:260:51:29

They land over 2,000 tonnes a year of these critters in south Devon

0:51:300:51:34

but two-thirds of them head back overseas to France and Spain.

0:51:340:51:38

So, the locals have come up with an ingenious plan to up the profile

0:51:390:51:43

of what they believe is the best crab in the world,

0:51:430:51:47

the first South Devon Crab Festival.

0:51:470:51:50

Later, Matt and I will be going head to head with the locals

0:51:500:51:54

in a bit of a crabby contest.

0:51:540:51:56

So, I'm heading out with one of the local crab fisherman, Phil Cardew.

0:51:590:52:03

His family have been fishing these waters for generations.

0:52:030:52:07

Is there a theory, Phil, about why the crab is so good here?

0:52:090:52:13

There are big areas here which are dedicated solely to static gear -

0:52:130:52:17

crab pots - untouched by trawlers.

0:52:170:52:20

The crabs get a good chance to breed and rest.

0:52:200:52:24

Why do you think it is that you struggle to sell crab to people in this country,

0:52:240:52:28

that they don't prepare it themselves?

0:52:280:52:31

They might order it at a restaurant but rarely cook it at home.

0:52:310:52:34

I think a lot of people are fazed by the fact of cooking a crab.

0:52:340:52:38

They get it live, they need to have at live to cook it.

0:52:380:52:41

They have to kill it, prepare it themselves,

0:52:410:52:45

whereas on the continent, people are brought up with it and they love their shellfish.

0:52:450:52:50

Phil's checking on a string of crab pots laid on the seabed the day before.

0:52:520:52:57

While he assesses the night's bounty, I'm baiting the new pots.

0:52:570:53:00

-Any time today would be helpful.

-Yes, all right(!)

0:53:000:53:03

The pressure is on, he'll need about eight of these barrels to earn himself a decent day's wages.

0:53:030:53:08

But it's not just a numbers game.

0:53:080:53:10

The young crabs go straight back.

0:53:100:53:12

-Too small.

-Too small, yeah. Two small. Female.

0:53:120:53:16

Do you think you understand crab? Appreciate their characteristics?

0:53:160:53:21

Yeah, I'm very much like a crab.

0:53:210:53:23

You've got to think like a crab to catch a crab.

0:53:230:53:25

So, thanks to Phil, I've got my crab.

0:53:320:53:36

Time to head to the festival for the next step.

0:53:360:53:39

Matt's on his way to help me take on the locals in the inaugural McCrab Challenge.

0:53:390:53:44

I'm going to need some practice, so while my crab's boiling away for later,

0:53:440:53:49

I'm getting some tips from crab processor Trevor Bartlett on the art of crab-cracking.

0:53:490:53:56

So, Trevor, what are we doing?

0:53:560:53:59

I'm going to show you how easy it is to pick the crabmeat out of the crab.

0:53:590:54:03

Obviously, in the competition, we want to make sure you can do it as quickly as anybody else.

0:54:030:54:08

So pick up your crab, hold it in your left hand and take the claws away first of all.

0:54:080:54:14

So, just move the claw away from the mouth, and up.

0:54:140:54:17

-Nice and easy, there we go. Bang down and push. Push.

-Oh, look!

-There we go.

-That's magic.

0:54:170:54:22

So, we've got 12 dead men's fingers on each of the...

0:54:240:54:27

and all we've got to do is scrape all the dead men's fingers away.

0:54:270:54:31

And the real challenge is not just doing it fast,

0:54:310:54:35

it's getting as much meat as possible.

0:54:350:54:38

Oh!

0:54:380:54:40

Oh, I ruined it! I had that really nicely.

0:54:400:54:43

It's OK. Every crab's got two claws, so there's a second chance.

0:54:430:54:47

Doesn't exactly bode well. Let's hope Matt's on form today.

0:54:470:54:52

-Now, then.

-Oh, good.

-How are we doing? What's going on?

0:54:520:54:55

-What's going on here?

-We've thrown ourselves into a situation.

0:54:550:54:59

-I didn't realise it was fancy dress.

-No, this is Sue.

0:54:590:55:02

-She looks lovely, she looks great.

-I will shake your claw.

0:55:020:55:05

-Nice to see you.

-We've got to crack some crabs -

0:55:050:55:07

-they look a bit like this - against some people who are really good at it.

-OK.

0:55:070:55:12

-But I've heard you're good at everything.

-Have you been practising?

-Yeah, but...a bit.

0:55:120:55:18

You're really good at everything so I'm leaning on you.

0:55:180:55:21

This team is a one-man team, and it's you.

0:55:210:55:24

On your marks, get set...go!

0:55:240:55:29

-So what are we doing?

-Yeah, just pull those around.

0:55:290:55:32

-Look at the size of those!

-Well done.

0:55:320:55:34

We're up against locals Rob and Jeff.

0:55:340:55:37

Jeff's a crab fishermen and Rob is a crab processor

0:55:370:55:40

so it's fair to say they've got a head start.

0:55:400:55:43

-I wouldn't do it like that.

-Oh, shut up!

0:55:430:55:45

These things here are called devil's something-or-others. Fingers!

0:55:450:55:49

And take them off, because they're not good, they're bitter.

0:55:490:55:52

And just crack it... Ooh!

0:55:520:55:54

I wouldn't stand that close if I were you, sir.

0:55:590:56:01

Oh, great God! Let's get that one on there.

0:56:030:56:06

If you do it all in one, it's really...

0:56:080:56:11

and then it's like a cocktail thingy. My God, look at this.

0:56:110:56:14

-Oh, wow! Look at that.

-I don't think we're doing that badly.

0:56:140:56:18

-ALL: Five, four, three, two, one.

-This is so random!

0:56:180:56:23

THEY ALL CHEER

0:56:230:56:26

Brilliant, well...

0:56:260:56:28

All I've done is just smashed a crab up.

0:56:290:56:32

-Look at that!

-What's that shell doing in there? Extra weight.

0:56:320:56:36

'Speaking of which, moment of truth. First up, the local lads.'

0:56:360:56:40

We have...1744.

0:56:400:56:43

-Oh, 1744, that's good.

-Very good.

-1744.

0:56:430:56:47

And these guys...

0:56:470:56:49

..1756.

0:56:510:56:52

We've won! Did we win?!

0:56:520:56:56

-We won!

-It's a wonderful trophy, this.

0:56:560:56:59

It almost feels criminal to take it away from the village.

0:56:590:57:03

-You can have it for the first week.

-And then we'll swap. Wonderful.

0:57:030:57:07

What a wonderful note to finish the programme on.

0:57:070:57:10

Next week, Adam and his dad Joe are taking a trip up to North Ronaldsay

0:57:100:57:13

for a special edition of the programme looking back

0:57:130:57:16

at all the rare breeds that are such a feature of his farm.

0:57:160:57:19

Adam first went there as a lad so it's a trip down memory lane.

0:57:190:57:23

-Join them if you can.

-See you then, bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

0:57:230:57:26

-Crab salad to celebrate?

-Oh, yeah!

0:57:260:57:28

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:57:450:57:49

E-mail [email protected]

0:57:490:57:52

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