24/02/2014 Look East - West


24/02/2014

Latest news for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, Milton Keynes and Northants.


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Hello and welcome to Look East as we begin a week's worth of programmes

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looking at the impact World War One had in this region. And we're

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starting in the trenches. This is a film set on the outskirts of

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Ipswich. And these trenches have been used in countless dramas `

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everything from The Last Tommy to Downton Abbey. Our theme

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Tonight, our themed is the war at home. We will be looki I talkin

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Tonight, our themed is the war at talking to a modern`day soldier All

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of that later in the programme but first a round`up of the news from

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your part of the region. Thousands of jobs promised to

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Peterborough has a ?130 million business plan gets the go`ahead

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Fighting to save jobs in Corby, 900 at risk at Solway Foods, with cuts

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described as inevitable. And rail passengers give their verdict on the

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new trains heading their way. Hello. First to Peterborough, and a

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plan to bring ?130 million worth of business investment to the city It

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comes with the promise of hundreds of jobs and growth. Peterborough

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already has one of the fastest growing private sectors in country

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with almost 4,000 jobs created in one year thanks to new business

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Just today a new distribution park opened which could lead to a further

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8,000 jobs. Mike Cartwright reports. Finished and ready for the first

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company to move on. A parcel delivery business. When its conveyor

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belt is up and running, more than 50 people will work here stop it is a

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hotspot. We run a model that tells us where growth will be. It is

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double`digit growth as a company. Peterborough is a hotspot that we

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recognise. That is why we have decided to invest here. This is the

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first warehouse on a 240 acre distribution park. Peterborough is

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home to one of the fastest`growing private sectors in the country, a

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city soon to see more private investment. ?130 million worth.

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Money held in an account overseas, opened by the council. They are a

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mix of investors, sovereign funds and high wealth individuals. And

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will be pension funds. It is a different way of doing things. In

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reality, the council historically relied on government funding to

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unlock development and that is no longer there so we have to work in a

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different way. Money from the overseas fund will be used to buy

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council property dotted around the city. On it will be built houses and

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businesses which the council say will generate wealth. But some are

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concerned about who may invest in the city. It is about being able to

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see where the investment is coming from the gods as a local authority,

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we must bear in mind that we need to be principled and we need to have

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ethics. We need to make sure that we get money from sources that are

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sound. They say that Peterborough is open for business. A city attracting

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big investment from home and abroad. And with that, the promise of many

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many more jobs. Meanwhile in Corby, 900 jobs are at

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risk at Solway Foods with losses now described as 'inevitable'. The

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company is one of the town's biggest employers, with a large factory

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making salad products for supermarkets. A few weeks ago it

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announced it was considering closing the site because it would be too

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expensive to update it. Plans to sell it are also being considered. A

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task force to save jobs has been set up and earlier I spoke to the

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chairman and asked if all 900 jobs can be saved.

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New trains for the region's busiest commuter routes have been unveiled

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to passengers. I do not believe that they can be

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saved. Because the company are losing money and they are having a

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lot of difficulties. In the thing that would love to see is Solway

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running a different premises, for more efficiently, and making profits

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so that they are therefore they are there for the long term. How many

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jobs that involves, I do not know. Certainly a substantial number. What

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are the financial incentives that the task force is giving to Solway

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two we hope that by the end of the week we will have had a chance to

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see the options that they are considering. And we will have had a

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chance to see what we can possibly offer, so that by next week, we can

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be talking to them again. As you say, even if Solway are persuaded to

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stay, some jobs are going to go How much of a blow will that be for a

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town like Corby? It is enormous It is easy to be clever about it but

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for anyone, if they lose their job, it is a major thing. Sadly, there is

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no way of avoiding job losses. I don't Excel and should not be

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pre`empting. I'd think it would be unfair to say that there was. `` I

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don't think so. New trains for the region's busiest commuter routes

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have been unveiled today. The promise less crowding, faster

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journey times and more destinations. But we will have to wait a few years

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until they are in service. Travelling by train can be a tight

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squeeze. There are more passengers than ever before. But help could be

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at hand. In Cambridge, they recently had a revamp to accommodate trains

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with 12 carriages. And in three years time, the majority of fast and

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semi`fast services to King's Cross will be made up of a dozen

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carriages. And that is not all. More than 100 of these new electric

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trains are being built, with more space, Clomid control, digital

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displays and baby changing areas. There is more space at floor level.

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2017, they are coming in. A bit of a wait. But it is worth waiting for,

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it looks like. What is the timetable? The new trains will run

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on the Bedford to Brighton line in 2016. The following year, they will

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be on the Peterborough to King's Cross route and in 2018, we will see

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direct services across London. That means you could travel straight

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through with your luggage to Heathrow, and perhaps even Gatwick.

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It will do an enormous amount to decrease overcrowding. The programme

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is geared up to address the levels of crowding on the route. That

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capacity is much needed. But if you are heading to King's Cross, the new

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trains will run alongside the existing stock, so you are not

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guaranteed to catch one. Major roadworks are due to start as

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part of a ?30 million scheme. The roundabout at junction ten is being

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replaced by a three lane carriageway, linking the motorway to

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the airport. It means the junction will be closed overnight for several

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nights from March fourth. But lane restrictions will be in place for a

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further 18 months. A pioneering project in

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Cambridgeshire is helping doctors to save more lives in emergencies. The

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scheme means patients can be given specialist treatment at the scene of

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an accident before they reach hospital. It's been so successful,

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similar training is now being rolled out in other parts of the country.

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And you can see what happened when David Whitely joined the doctors on

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tonight's Inside Out. That's at 7.30pm on BBC One.

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Onto sport, and Cambridge United are the latest team from Cambridgeshire

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to book their place in a Wembley final. The U's will face Gosport

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Borough in the FA trophy. It follows Peterborough's road to Wembley in

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the final of the Johnstones Paint Trophy. Here's Jonathan Park.

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Cambridge United? They will be on sale on Friday. Cup finals are few

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and far between at Cambridge United so fans were keen to get orders in

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for Wembley tickets. For the supporters, this is why you do it.

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It is financially a little boost, but to me, it is about the players

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and supporters. And this is what we strive for. It has been 45 years

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since Cambridge United won a cup final. Saturday's semifinal win

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means that they are 90 minutes away from updating the board. It means a

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lot to the fans of Cambridge United. Obviously, 1969 was the last time we

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won a cup. Cambridge will earn ?50,000 if they beat Gosforth aura

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next month. `` Gosport Borough. Victory will create one problem

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where to put the silverware. The club sold the trophy cabinet on

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eBay. It might have been a joke but it went up to ?1.5 million. In the

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end, Luton bolted for the youth academy for ?750. There is no no

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trophy cabinet but there will be one in the next month to put the trophy

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in. The month of March is all about Wembley. Joining the are

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Peterborough. And it might be for more than once with play`offs a

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strong possibility for blue and yellow hearts of Kim Butcher.

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In rugby union, Northampton's incredible run continues with their

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eleventh straight win. Saints beat Newcastle 22`16 in the Premiership

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yesterday to remain top of the table. They scored three first half

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tries including this spectacular effort from Tom Stephenson.

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A competition to design a flag for Northamptonshire is down to its

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final four designs as chosen by a panel of judges. A public vote for

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the final winner has now begun. latest pictures from under the North

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Sea, of Europe's longest chalk reef. Now it's time to go back to Stewart

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who's on a World War One film set on the outskirts of Ipswich.

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Welcome back to the Trench Farm film set in Suffolk. We're here to mark

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100 years since the War. There is a periscope here. Water in a petrol

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can... Corned beef! Bullets as well, for the rifles. It was very cold

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down here. They would spend virtually the whole day here. But

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there was a new kind of warfare. And a new word too. The Zeppelin. On a

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foggy night in January 1915, people in Great Yarmouth were transfixed by

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an eerie noise above. A terrifying, new style of attack was about to be

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unleashed by aerial invaders. People would stupidly come out of their

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houses and say 'look, it's the Zeppelin!' All of those people would

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be standing in their doorways when they threw the bombs out of the side

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of the gondola. Three bomb were released, doing little damage, but

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then a fourth one exploded, killing two people ` Martha Taylor and

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Samuel Smith. Gladys and Katherine were young girls at the time. ``

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Kathleen. The window was coming in. My mother was thrown onto the couch.

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Mr Smith was killed. Ms Taylor too. They were killed, yes. This plaque

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marks the spot of the first aerial bombardment on Britain. They may not

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have done much physical damage but the Zeppelins were very effective

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weapons of terror. Local press called them aerial babykillers, sent

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over by blood`mad fiends. At a high altitude, the Zeppelins were safely

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out of range but British pilots soon had shells which could bring down

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the giant airships. In Autumn 1916, L33 was shot down in Essex. The

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German crew scrambled free and were soon made to surrender. This man saw

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it all. They passed the gate. There was a Special Constable who met them

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in the next village. He took them in hand. In St. Peter's Church in

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Suffolk, another souvenir of another downed Zeppelin ` L48. This woman

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helped maintain the memories of those who witnessed the event and

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the 16 Germans who perished. It burnt up quickly. There was just the

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skeleton left. People for miles around saw it burning. Lots of

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souvenir hunters! I think they tried to keep a lot of that away. The

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local militia sorted it out, to keep people away! In four long years, as

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a weapon of war the Zeppelin had failed, but as a weapon of terror it

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made a lasting, local impression. I told you this was a film set. It's

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a big place! Earlier today, when the sun was up, I looked at the other

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parts. As you can see, they've got everything here for the modern film

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set, looking back at the First World War ` about 200 metres of trenches.

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This is what it would have been like in the early years, with water in

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the bottom. Some of the soldiers got something called 'trench foot',

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caused by standing in damp water. They'd been here for about ten

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years. This is one of the trenches. Where we are tonight... You can see

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people getting ready. You will have seen these in shows like Downtown

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Abbey and many other programmes. There's everything here but it shows

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you what life was like for the soldiers working in the trenches day

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in, day out. These trenches are the brainchild of

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one man ` Taff Gillingham. An expert on World War One. You're an expert.

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How long did they spend here? They were all ages. People who were too

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old as well as young lads. It depended on where you were. In some

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places, only for a day. In other areas... Maybe a week or ten days.

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It depended on the situation. In the other trench it was wet! The

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soldiers were suffering? Trench foot was a real problem. They were

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waterlogged. There were problems with drainage. They found a way to

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fight nature. They also, about trench foot, made it the officer's

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problem! This is very much a built trench. Some felt dug, in contrast.

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Yes. They were built in different ways. German ones were built for

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permanence. To the Allies, it was temporary. Thank you for having us.

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It's been fascinating! Away from the trenches we're going

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to be looking at how life changed for ordinary people during the First

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World War. Tonight we're going to set the scene. What did the East

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look like 100 years ago? This report is from our chief reporter Kim

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Riley. In the picture files he doesn't have a name ` billed as a

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typical Norfolk labourer. The year is 1912. He was one of over 200,000

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farm workers across the region. At the Gressenhall farm and workhouse,

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they've turned back the clock to those tough times. Male life

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expectancy was 52 and wages for farm workers were around ?50 a year. Work

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was seasonal and employment was casual. For some it was a life of

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grinding poverty and eventually the stigma of becoming an inmate at the

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local workhouse. The years of childhood were brief. Going to

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school had only been made compulsory in the 1880s. There could be up to

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60 children in a class. This is a typical classroom of the time. It

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was compulsory for children to go to school up to the age of 12, but

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there were many ten`year`olds who actually had jobs. It was very

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unusual for many children to go on to secondary school. Few homes had

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electricity and many had no piped water or fixed bath. Even going

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through the motions of doing the laundry... Lighting a fire to heat

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the water, using a washing dolly to agitate the clothes... Putting them

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through a mangle and pegging on the line... It's a world away from

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today's wash and spin cycles. In 1911, the world was just beginning

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to become really petrol`fuelled. It's true cars were becoming common

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in London, but in eastern England the bicycle held sway. With 4% of

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the population owning 90% of the wealth, only 7% of people paid

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income tax. Protestors from this region joined the suffragettes `

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militants burned down the Bath Hotel in Felixstowe in April 1914.

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Professor Jane Chapman, research associate at Wolfson College in

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Cambridge, says there was still a clearly defined class structure.

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Domestic service was the main employment for women but so much was

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about to change. The First World War has a tremendous legacy. It really

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was a turning point. Legacies we don't think about... Not just women,

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but the beginning of the modern world ` the 21st century as we know

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and understand it now. `` 20th. Women played a vital role in the war

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effort. Children, too. Here they are, lining up to help out on the

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land. Patriotism, and a belief the war would soon be won, brought men

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rushing to join our county regiments. But for many, the reality

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was terrible losses amidst the horror of life in the trenches.

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Major Dave Walker is a soldier with Seven Para RHA. He's served in both

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Iraq and Afghanistan. Trench warfare ` it's traditional. How much

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relevance is there now? You'd be surprised. An awful lot has changed

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but the human experience... You could transplant a soldier from 1916

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and it's not that different. Trenches are still used in training.

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It's not something we've experienced in Afghanistan. But in 2003, in

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Iraq, I was sat in a bunker. I saw Marines stood in trenches. I think

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the effects are the same. Knowing the lifeline is there, with friends

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at home is a good coping mechanism. The opposite side is that that can

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bring anxieties of its own. Technology has improved, and

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improved those links. Afghanistan has good infrastructure. My soldiers

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still discovered the art of letter writing. The big difference is they

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virtually knew the people they were fighting. You rarely get up close

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and personal. Rarely. But you are in and among the people. The proximity

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is there, in a different context. Thank you. And tomorrow on Look East

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we'll be reporting on how the shoemaking industry of

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Northamptonshire rallied to help. That's World War One At Home,

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tomorrow night on Look East. And there are many more stories

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online.And tomorrow on Look Time for the weather now. Over to

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Julie, back in the studio. Temperatures have

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