24/01/2017 Look North (Yorkshire)


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24/01/2017

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Good evening you're watching Tuesday's Look North.

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On the programme tonight, making their voices heard -

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The mother whose two boys were deliberately killed

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by their father takes her campaign to Downing Street, to put children

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and there's always hope because without hope we have nothing. And if

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you have nothing, nothing can change. And were not going to just

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sit by and let that happen. We'll also hear from the charity

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Women's Aid, which says there's still work to be done to make family

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courts safer for children. Also tonight, driven

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to distraction - We're on patrol with

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South Yorkshire Police who're clamping down on motorists

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using their mobiles at the wheel Fighting Yorkshire's biggest cause

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of premature deaths - more than ?5 million is to be spent

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on a new lung cancer And the polar with the molar -

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what happens when this big bear has And we started today on a foggy

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note. Less overnight tonight but after a fine start we will see more

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cloud tomorrow. I'll be back later. First tonight, one's mother's

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campaign to protect children Claire Throssell's two sons

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were killed in a fire at their home It was started deliberately by their

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father, as an act of revenge. Claire had warned the authorities

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that their father posed a danger, but he was still allowed

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unsupervised access to them. Today, she delivered a petition

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to Downing Street urging the Government to change the way

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courts handle cases like hers. A simple but urgent message, laid on

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the Prime Minister's doorstep, delivered by someone who never

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wanted to make this journey. Her two sons were killed when her father, --

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their father, her ex-husband, set fire to their home. It is a powerful

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image. When you think that each of those is a child and their lives

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have been taken. The boys were lured into the attic. One's body was found

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there. The other died in hospital. A serious case review found Paul had

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told social workers he fears his father, describing him as, pure

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nicety. Today, with the charity Women's Eight, she asked for a

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change in the law. No one would ever choose to follow the path that she

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has been forced on for the last few years. But her absolute belief in

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the cause that children's voices should be at the heart of the family

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court process has seen her campaign with dignity and poison the most

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horrendous circumstances. My two children were not listen to, I was

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not listen to, we need to stop that happening. No other parent should

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have two holds that child in their arms as they die, knowing is it at

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the hands of someone who should cherish and protect them the most.

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Family courts are not run the same way as Crown Court. It's just the

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last straw that people have to go through. We are not giving up on all

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the parents out there. There is or was hope, because without hope we

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have nothing, and if we have nothing, nothing can change. We're

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not going to just sit by and let that happen. If anyone is out there,

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in despair, don't. There is hope and change on the web. The Government

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has already said it will review and revise policy in family courts.

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Claire says she will not stop campaigning until it delivers.

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The charity Women's Aid campaigns on issues around domestic violence.

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I asked their chief executive whether they'd already had some

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success in getting the Government to change its policy.

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Definitely, we have had some success.

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The Government have promised have already put best that they are to

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ensure that perpetrators of domestic abuse can no longer cross-examine

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their victims in the family court, and that's a major victory for

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survivors of domestic abuse, but also for their

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children who depend ontheir mothers being able to give

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who depend on their mothers being able to give

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evidence in full and not being silenced.

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So what more could you actually achieve them, if you've got

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What would you like to actually achieve

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Well, perhaps the biggest issue that we face is the

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lack of understanding of domestic abuse on the part of judges.

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So what we need is comprehensive training -

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ideally judges should have to meet with survivors of domestic abuse so

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that they understand what domestic abuse actually is and what it does

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And that training should be regularly refreshed.

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It's no good having kind of just an hour on

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domestic abuse when you first become a judge.

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And yet there is a really difficult balancing act in this as well,

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because many fathers, if it is fathers we're

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mainly talking about, will defend their right to see their

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First of all, parents don't have rights.

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And so yes, it's very important for a child to see both

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their parents if neither of those parents poses a danger.

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The issue with perpetrators of domestic abuse

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is that they may well pose a danger to their child.

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And at the moment, in fact, perpetrators are getting

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contact with children when that is putting children at risk.

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Would it help at all if family courts were

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We don't think that public family courts is

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When children and young people have ever been surveyed

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about this issue, which they have repeatedly, they've always said that

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they really do not want their family's private business to be made

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public and I think we have to respect that.

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So I'm not sure that making the family courts public is

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I think what's really important is that judges have a

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proper understanding of what they are dealing with.

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Thank you very much indeed. Thank you.

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The UK's largest lung cancer screening trial is to be

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The ?5 million project hopes to increase early diagnosis

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Nationally, breast cancer and prostate cancer are more

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common, but in Yorkshire it's lung cancer which affects most

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people, with around 4,500 people diagnosed annually.

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Survival chances are low, and the disease claims 3,500 lives

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Now funding from Yorkshire Cancer Research is to be used

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to target parts of Leeds, where most people are at risk.

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I go for another checkup tomorrow, I have another CT scan tomorrow.

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68-year-old Val Sykes from Leeds found out she had

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lung cancer last year, and that was quite by accident.

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A former smoker who hadn't had a cigarette in 20 years,

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she actually went to the GP after straining her chest helping to move

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As a precaution, she was sent to hospital for an x-ray.

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It was there doctors saw a nodule on her lung.

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Val then had an operation to remove it.

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So it was quite a shock when they did find it and the

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No breathlessness, we go for long walks.

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Val is very lucky, but her case is unusual.

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Lung cancer is so common and serious because there

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are usually no signs or symptoms in the early stages of the disease.

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In fact, you could have a large tumour

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But now, here in Leeds, they are launching a

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multi-million pound investment in screening, which they hope will

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At the moment, you are screened using a CT

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scanner in hospital, but this ?5 million project

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will take the scanner out into the community.

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Similar to the ones used to detect breast cancer,

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the lung cancer vans will be about the size of a single-decker

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The project is being led by Doctor Matt Callister.

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The target age for our study will be people between the

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ages of 55 and 80 who have ever smoked - either current smokers

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or smokers who have given up in the past.

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That's because 86% of lung cancers are caused by smoking, and

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Yorkshire has one of the highest rates in England.

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If doctors can get to people before the disease is too advanced,

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The problem with lung cancer is that, by the

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time most patients present to us, they have advanced disease and

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We know that by screening patients we

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can pick up cancer at a much earlier stage, when it is hopefully suitable

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for curative treatment, either with surgery

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If it is successful it could become a

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national screening programme, and more people like Val will be

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We'll have more on this story on our late programme,

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as part of the BBC News at Ten - join us then.

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The Paralympic gold medallist from Skipton who's launched

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a project to help disabled children compete alongside

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Police in South Yorkshire say they're growing increasingly

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concerned about the number of people using mobile phones while driving.

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The law gets tougher in a few weeks time -

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offenders will get six points and a bigger fine.

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Over 900 people were caught in South Yorkshire last year.

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Today we were invited out with officers

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to see how they're tackling the problem.

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Hello, mate. Hello, mate.

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Hang on, Danny - I'll ring you back in two minutes.

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That'll be ?100 fine and three points, then.

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We've been invited out with South Yorkshire Police.

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They're driving around Barnsley, spotting

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people on the mobile phones while they're also driving.

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They are out all week, to try to convince the

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public not to call or text or post when they are in charge of a heavy

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People think it will never happen to them.

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When you've been and had to pick up the pieces, both

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physically at the scene and then deal with the families that have

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been left behind after, you have very little sympathy for people

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It's not just calling, this driver says he was connecting

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his phone to his car's Bluetooth - a fine and points for him as well.

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I don't know if you've heard, but points and the fine go up

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So, in a way, he's lucky - if he was stopped later this

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year those penalties would have been double.

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New rules are coming in - if you are stopped with your mobile

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phone while driving you'd get six points on your licence.

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There will be a ?200 fine, and if you are caught

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twice you could be banned for six months.

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You are four times more likely to be involved in a crash if you are

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using your mobile phone when driving.

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Especially if you are a novice, inexperienced driver.

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The thing is that even if you present

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this information to people, they might think these risks apply

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to the average driver and they are just

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Back in Barnsley, Sergeant Jones has spotted another.

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He still on it - he's not even seen me come up the road, look.

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Some people are so distracted by their phones they

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don't even spot flashing lights and sirens behind them.

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Yeah, this gentleman in front of us was on his

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I've followed him for maybe 200 metres or so now, and he's only just

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A fine and three points for this chap as well.

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Do us a favour, mate - just come round the corner

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So the law is toughening up and, if you

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know somebody about to pass their driving test, the new rules mean

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teenagers caught once go straight back to being a learner.

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The trial has begun of a Bradford taxi driver, who fled to Pakistan

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after the alleged murders of two men in May five years ago.

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Mohammed Zubair, who's 36, denies the killings.

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The prosecution allege that the bodies of Ahmedin Khyel

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and Imran Khan were dumped in a secluded country lane

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after they'd been murdered in Mr Zubair's house, in Bradford.

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Mr Zubair was said to have beaten Mr Khyel, who he accused of having

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Mr Khan was said to have probably been in the wrong

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A former dental lecturer at the University of Leeds

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has been struck off by the General Dental Council,

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A disciplinary tribunal was told that Doctor Alec High had been

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overheard by fellow staff - and warned on several

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occasions about his conduct - but a stream of women were seen

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Doctor High's name will now be erased from the register.

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The trust which runs Dewsbury Hospital has written

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an open letter to two MPs asking them to clear up confusion

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about the future of it's A department.

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The Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust contacted Tracey Brabin

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and Paula Sherrif - over concerns the community

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The letter says the A department is not closing and it

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will continue to run 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

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Two police officers have been praised for their bravery

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after rescuing a mother and child from freezing water this morning.

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The woman's car left the road and ended up on its side in a water

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filled ditch in South Milford near Selby.

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The officers jumped into the icy water to free the woman and child,

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who were taken to hospital as a precaution.

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The Police and Crime Commissioner Mark Burns Williamson has applauded

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Double paralympic gold medallist Danielle Brown has launched

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a project that helps disabled children compete alongside

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Danielle - who's an archer from Lothersdale near Skipton -

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became the first disabled person to represent England

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in an able-bodied event at the Commonwealth Games.

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She's now backing the 4 All Games, as Mark Ansell explains.

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Billy has learning difficulties and is on the autistic spectrum.

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He rarely gets the chance to play sports, even though he enjoys it and

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It's just good to see children doing sports and getting fit.

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The inaugural 4 All Games is just that - for all.

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Whether the child is disabled, able-bodied or

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has special educational needs, everyone can take part in

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James Swallow came up with the idea after struggling to find

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sporting opportunities for his son, who is autistic.

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Unfortunately, he went to some sports clubs and some

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games, and some coaching businesses kind of struggle to work with

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So, through Liam's point of view, he'd tried his

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football, the rugby, the cricket, and kind of didn't quite fit

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in which then obviously knocked his self-confidence a bit.

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So we had to find different sports to get

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involved with and fencing was one of the ones he kind of took to.

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And there's no-one better to support the

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event than Yorkshire's Danielle Brown - the double Paralympic

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At the Commonwealth Games in 2010 she won team gold and became

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the first disabled athlete to represent England in an

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Danielle is determined for children to have the opportunities

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I was excluded from PE at school - I spent two hours a week

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And I didn't know what sports to do, so

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the reason I ended up doing archery was because

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I wanted to take part in

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sport and I didn't know about Paralympic sport.

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And so many people, at that time in my life, could have

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told me about all the different inclusive sports there were, but I

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So, for me, it's something that I'm really passionate about, and it's

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great working with all these young kids, trying to teach them about

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inclusivity and get them to take part in sport.

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The challenge in the afternoon session was

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playing goal ball, which is blindfolded, seated football.

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And it's not just about having a go at

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new sports, they are also taught to be sportsmanlike - sport for

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A man from Yorkshire is celebrating victory in one of the world's

:17:22.:17:34.

Tom Hollins - who is an anaesthetist at Airedale Hospital raced almost

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nonstop for 99 hours along the Pennine Way.

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With the support of his wife Sara, Tom ran through snow, ice, mud,

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At the finish, he fell asleep almost as soon as a blanket was around him.

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with what possessed you to do this? I've been asked that so many times

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and the only answer is it was there. I've done shorter events leading up

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to this and then just keep going for the next level. Haven't found

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anything to stop me yet. What was the hardest point? Definitely the

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finish. Very hilly, foggy, bleak, and I just past the front runners

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just before that. I was absolutely exhausted. I didn't stop to sleep.

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The pictures we are seeing now, you're going like a train. How long

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did you actually run? About 90 hours a think. What were you doing with

:18:44.:18:52.

all this? How you support? I was haring round the Pennine Way in a

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friend's camper van. Meeting at checkpoints and places in between.

:18:59.:19:04.

Did you get any sleep at all? Nine hours. It must be difficult. Yeah,

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but I just did. Partly you want to keep progressing, and partly pain.

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Takers through what you could see at night. The navigation at night time

:19:22.:19:28.

is interesting. Part of the reason why they have some footage here is

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because it was clear. Most nights it was incredibly foggy. I had a

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electronic navigation with GPS and a map and compass if that fails.

:19:38.:19:41.

Fortunately I did not have to use them. We should mention a lady who

:19:42.:19:48.

also did this. Carol. We used to work with her. We tried to get in

:19:49.:19:54.

touch with her but she was a bit shy. Can I show you pictures of the

:19:55.:19:59.

finish now? This must have been a moment! Yeah, I loved that wall!

:20:00.:20:09.

What were you feeling at this point? I was already bent double so it was

:20:10.:20:14.

easy for him to put the medal on! Literally all I wanted to do was go

:20:15.:20:19.

to sleep. Were there any point or you thought he wouldn't face? I knew

:20:20.:20:24.

he would finish, without a doubt. At a second to last checkpoint I could

:20:25.:20:31.

tell you was in its to win it. It's funny, he was saying the person who

:20:32.:20:34.

won last year did not actually finish this time around. Is that a

:20:35.:20:40.

warning to you next year? I've got a free place for next year. As the

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champ? And it's quite expensive to enter because there's a lot of

:20:49.:20:53.

organisation and safety support. Well, best of luck. Let us know how

:20:54.:20:54.

you get on with the next one. The Yorkshire Sculpture park -

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it's renowned for showcasing the work of artist and sculptors

:20:58.:20:59.

from all over the world but their latest exhibition

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is accessing art in a different way. Breaking boundaries: Art by email

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exhibits the work of artists from the Middle East

:21:07.:21:13.

and North Africa who are unable to travel to UK due to political

:21:14.:21:16.

unrest and immigrations conditions. It thought to be the first display

:21:17.:21:18.

of it's kind and I've This is beautiful. The colours are

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incredible. Tell me about it. I love the fact that this girl could be any

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girl in any country. The look on her face is so natural. We were keen

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with this show that we would see inside lives that were not just on

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the news in war zones. The real positivity and creativity and

:21:59.:22:03.

hopefulness. Responding to an open call, artists from across the world

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submitted work via e-mail. They cannot travel to the UK due to

:22:09.:22:12.

political unrest and immigration conditions but their work can. We

:22:13.:22:17.

can work with partners all over the world in a way that we had not been

:22:18.:22:23.

able to. This piece is clever. It is by an Iranian artist. He's admitted

:22:24.:22:28.

the instructions for the sculpture to be printed, via e-mail, and here

:22:29.:22:32.

I can see it being created from the other side of the world. People

:22:33.:22:41.

wrote down their thoughts on their environment and their culture.

:22:42.:22:43.

Visitors here are asked to do the same and the notes are displayed. It

:22:44.:22:49.

is an idea by an artist. How does it feel to have your work displayed in

:22:50.:22:52.

the UK even though you cannot be here? It is great feeling. If you're

:22:53.:23:02.

artwork is in a different country, you've heard about, there is artwork

:23:03.:23:10.

from Henry Moore, it will be a great feeling. And that feeling history at

:23:11.:23:17.

3000 miles away in Yorkshire. It's fantastic, is showing art where we

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can't access it. These pieces here, you have the contrast of the

:23:25.:23:29.

conflict and European Western culture. I think those two pieces

:23:30.:23:33.

are quite symbolic. It is hoped this will be the first of many

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exhibitions where ideas and art can travel even if people cannot.

:23:38.:23:43.

And it is open until the 5th of March.

:23:44.:23:45.

What do you do when your polar bear needs his teeth checked?

:23:46.:23:49.

Yes, it was a big operation for the Yorkshire Wildlife Park

:23:50.:23:53.

when Victor had a visit from the dentist.

:23:54.:23:56.

They needed five vets, 11 rangers, and 11 Fire Service staff

:23:57.:24:55.

And if you enjoy video like that, there's plenty more every day

:24:56.:25:00.

on our Facebook page - just search for BBC Look North

:25:01.:25:03.

You'll see more video on our best stories and you can join

:25:04.:25:07.

the conversation with other Look North viewers.

:25:08.:25:11.

Very foggy this morning. In the first picture you can see a bit of

:25:12.:25:32.

Mr Ness. A pretty nice morning. Then you can see a bit of missed in the

:25:33.:25:38.

field. It has been very foggy and in some places it has not lifted all

:25:39.:25:43.

day. We'll so had a widespread frost. I don't think there will be

:25:44.:25:47.

as much fog or frost as we go into tomorrow. Keep the pictures coming

:25:48.:25:56.

in. Not as many problems with frost or fog this coming night.

:25:57.:26:03.

Brightening up with some sunshine after a bit of a grey start

:26:04.:26:07.

tomorrow. Through the afternoon we will see cloud increasing. It will

:26:08.:26:12.

get chilly over the next few days. On Thursday the breeze off the

:26:13.:26:16.

continent will make it very cold. Temperatures in some places will

:26:17.:26:20.

struggle to get above two or three degrees. This afternoon we seen some

:26:21.:26:27.

misty nurse and foggy lingering. Elsewhere more cloud has spread

:26:28.:26:31.

across and we could get more misty nurse in the short time but apart

:26:32.:26:35.

from the Vale of York there will be too much breeze that any problems

:26:36.:26:39.

like that. Perhaps even a little drizzle across the Dales. Otherwise

:26:40.:26:43.

dry night to come. Temperatures to freezing. A little cooler than this

:26:44.:26:50.

as we go through the next few hours. The sun will rise in the morning

:26:51.:26:59.

just after eight o'clock. Will start the day with a mixture, a bit of

:27:00.:27:06.

cloud but some brighter spells developing for a time at least,

:27:07.:27:11.

across north and west Yorkshire, before this thick cloud spreads

:27:12.:27:17.

across. First into South and East Yorkshire before spreading westwards

:27:18.:27:21.

across the rest of the region. The West and North will hang on to the

:27:22.:27:25.

best of the brightness. Temperatures will get up to four or 5 degrees

:27:26.:27:27.

under the cloud. Don't forget, Our Dancing Town -

:27:28.:27:29.

based in Huddersfield this week - That's it from us. We'll be back as

:27:30.:27:43.

part of the ten o'clock News. Hope you can join us then. By both an

:27:44.:27:44.

hour.

:27:45.:27:48.