06/04/2017 Points West


06/04/2017

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Welcome to BBC Points West with Alex Lovell and David Garmston.

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Our main story tonight: The death of a mentally ill

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She was able to walk out of hospital unchallenged by anybody -

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today professionals say improvements have been made.

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It's never possible to say it will never happen again. The service has

:00:22.:00:31.

been set up to identify woman with a particularly high risk to prevent

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future occurrences. The official report says it wasn't

:00:33.:00:35.

clear who was in charge of her care. Satisfaction or your money back -

:00:36.:00:39.

Bristol City players give the fans And whistle while you work -

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a factory siren in Stroud goes off And hundreds of volunteers help a

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team change one family's life forever.

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And whistle while you work - a factory siren in Stroud goes off

:01:02.:01:04.

Charlotte Bevan walked out of a maternity hospital in Bristol

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in just leggings and slippers on a freezing night carrying

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They were not stopped and were later found dead.

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Today a review into the tragedy exposed mistakes made

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And it said professionals found it difficult to identify risks

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because the patient was middle-class and articulate.

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The review made lots of points about Charlotte's case -

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It said the current practice does not identify a lead

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clinician across services, meaning there was confusion

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about exactly who should be helping to monitor Charlotte's mental health

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It said there wasn't definitive evidence about the safe use

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of medication, meaning Charlotte could have carried on taking

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the medication that stabilised her mental condition.

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And it said mental health services generally for mothers and children

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were widely acknowledged to be inconsistent across the country.

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Charlotte Bevan's walk out of her maternity ward was captured

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Wearing a gown and slippers and with her four-day-old baby

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wrapped in a blanket, the 30-year-old first-time

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mum made her way out into a cold December evening.

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Charlotte had attempted suicide before, after hearing

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During her pregnancy she'd stopped taking the medication that

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controlled her schizophrenia, believing it could harm her baby.

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In fact the review found there was no definitive

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answer about the safe use of medication in this case.

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What we will always do with patient is

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have an in-depth conversation to say

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your mental health needs need to be the priority

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because there is more risk to your

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transferred to your baby in the womb.

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Their bodies were found later after a search by police,

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the findings of today's review into her care followed closely

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This was a particularly difficult case to manage as

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long-term mental ill-health and

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Education in schools and a general increased

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awareness of all mental health issues

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will go some way to preventing what happened

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It also highlighted confusion

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about who was responsible for monitoring

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saying some professionals assumed the Mental Health Care Coordinator

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was the lead professional, while others assumed

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it was the Mother and Baby Unit doctor, and still others the GP.

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Charlotte had been gone for almost 40 minutes before

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At her inquest a coroner said there had been a series of failings

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in not recognising the symptoms of her relapse into psychosis.

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Today's review called for clearer rules about who was in charge

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for monitoring the mental health of patients like Charlotte,

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to stop anything similar ever happening again.

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Well, we've been told that changes have already been made to help

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mums-to-be who are suffering from severe psychiatric disorders.

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Within the last month a new service has been launched

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Our health correspondent Matthew Hill reports.

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With a history of self-harm and psychosis, Charlotte Bevan

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was always going to be at far greater risk to herself

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Yet she was able to easily let herself out of St Michaels Hospital.

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The serious case review said staff acted quickly to try and find her.

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But now, extra safeguards have been

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We have doing some work on awards and have changed the mechanism of

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families and mothers exiting the ward, so rather than pressing a

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button to get out they now need a member of staff to buzz them out of

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the ward area. The day before she gave birth,

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Charlotte told her midwife she wanted to go to a secure

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psychiatric unit for But there wasn't a bed available

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for Charlotte and she didn t But now funding has been agreed

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for another four-bedded unit in the South-West -

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where exactly has yet to be decided. At the time Charlotte and her baby

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died, there was also no specialist psychiatric team to help mums to be

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like her living in the community, Can you tell me about how you are

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feeling at the moment? This is a training session

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to demonstrate the type of support a new mental health service can give

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mothers in crisis. Bristol, South Gloucestershire

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and North Somerset have managed to get ?1.2 million of government

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funding for a team. This is looking at mothers in their

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home environment, so looking at interventions like massage to aim to

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promote that. The serious case review

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also raises questions about whether the professionals have

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enough time to share information about patients like Charlotte

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while they are working under increasing pressure

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and with limited resources. With a growing childbirth

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rate in Bristol, demands So it seems that professionals

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will have to come up with better ways of knowing who is in charge

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of a patient s care, so that women like Charlotte don't

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slip through the net. Joining us now is the chair

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of the Bristol Safeguarding Just to wind the clock back a bit,

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this lady had come off her medication so she could breast-feed

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her child, according to the report, and yet no one seemed to be on high

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alert to watch for anything strange or making sure she couldn't leave

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the hospital. You're right, this case has profound sadness across art

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community. Charlotte was receiving a lot of care from mental health

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services. She suffered from an enduring and serious mental health

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problems and it's quite a complicated point about her

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medication because she hadn't been given advice to withdraw from

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medication. It's not my area of expertise in terms of medication but

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I understand there is no conclusive evidence either way, she had made

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choices but not necessarily shared those choices with the people

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working with her. But wouldn't it have been sensible to have a special

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watch so if she behaved unusually she could be stopped? There was a

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great deal of effort from the workers with, and one of the reason

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there was an number of workers all working with interests at heart, I

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think the child protection issue got lost within this and as you heard,

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there was some confusion as to who was the lead worker. There was lots

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happening but it had to be better coordinated. The report said there

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was perhaps too much concern about the mum's requirements and not

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enough about the baby. With an adult there is normally a different

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approach, they have more control over what happens to them, where

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child protection comes in the framework is tighter and that wasn't

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happening. The report also says she was middle-class and articular and

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that made things more difficult. How so? Workers described Charlotte, she

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was a very intelligent woman who could stand her ground and had clear

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views about what she wanted to happen, and that's difficult for any

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worker. It was helpful that her family could say that is how they

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found her to be. The result was that the professionals backed off because

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they thought this person knows what she's talking about, even though she

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demanded a home water birth although they lived in a small third-floor

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flat. There was only a certain extent to which people can be forced

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to do something and people were trying to work with to get that

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engagement. It's natural if someone knows what they're talking about and

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makes arguments, you tend to back off. To be fair, the workers didn't

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just back off and leave it, they kept trying but it was difficult.

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Thank you for explaining. Well, this story raises

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many difficult issues. If you'd like details

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of organisations which offer advice and support, go online

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to bbc.co.uk/actionline or Thanks for being with us

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on this Thursday evening. Stay tuned, there's lots more

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still to come, including... Whistle you to work,

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the famous hooter that And we taught 16 Celsius in some

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spots today. We will nudge those values higher up the scale over the

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weekend. Details at the end of the programme.

:10:59.:10:59.

A lack of on-site support and poor police interaction exacerbated

:11:00.:11:06.

a situation in which a young man was stabbed to death,

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Robert Cox was killed by another resident

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in their supported accommodation back in 2013 in Bristol.

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Today a jury said he had been unlawfully killed and that a delay

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in the diagnosis and treatment of his killer had not helped.

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Sue Cox has spent years trying to get answers

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He had mental health problems and ended up in this supported

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accommodation in Egerton Road, Bristol.

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On the night he died he'd gone swimming with his stepsister,

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niece and nephew, his dad and the two children

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and when he was left at 7:30 that evening,

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That evening was the 9th August 2013.

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Robert Cox was stabbed to death by another resident, Derek Hancock.

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Hancock had a history of paranoia, delusional behaviour

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and making false allegations of sexual harassment.

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On the night, Derek Hancock phoned police, making false allegations

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The police came and spoke to Hancock, but after they'd gone,

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His third and final call became the subject of an investigation

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Call handler Susan Akerman does say police "will deal with it".

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But Derek Hancock goes on: "I will take the law

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into my own hands because the law is not doing anything."

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"Well, that's entirely up to you Derek, OK?"

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She doesn't say don't do that, which I would think a call handler

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would be saying to anybody, mental health patient

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I understand the police watchdog agreed, but didn t think

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Ms Akerman's actions contributed to Robert Cox's death.

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But the watchdog did say she may have gone on to give them false

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and misleading information, which she denied.

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Ms Akerman didn't want to do an interview but has told

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the coroner here she'd had no training about mental

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health and she didn't know Hancock had such problems.

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Speaking about that call, she said he hadn't given

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the impression he was going to go on to do what he did,

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and that she took three or four calls a day from people

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Police say they're committed to learning lessons.

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But Sue Cox has had to fight for answers.

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A serious case review was critical about the agencies involved.

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But she forced an independent investigation which found the case

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review wasn't sufficiently in-depth or inquisitive or...

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"The process floundered, and it's not surprising"

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It makes you question whether there are other cases

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where the same questions, the same evidence, the same

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problems are arising with serious case reviews.

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The Bristol Adult Safeguarding Board has apologised

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The group which ran Egerton Road said it's carried out risk

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assessments and that Robert's death couldn't have been predicted.

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But for Sue and her family, the battle isn't over.

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We believe there is more work to be done to prevent future deaths.

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A coroner's today said that the death of an airline

:14:51.:14:53.

co-pilot from Marlborough was not due to poisoning by

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43-year-old Richard Westgate died believing he'd become seriously ill

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His family claimed he suffered from the condition before

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The air industry says there's no threat to passengers or crew.

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Police say they're extremely concerned for a missing

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Emily Henslowe from Highworth was last seen leaving

:15:18.:15:22.

for Warneford school this morning but she never arrived.

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Officers along with search and rescue crews and the helicopter

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People living in Minchinhampton in Gloucestershire

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have today joined the search for a missing 71-year-old woman.

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Hazel Denham was last seen walking her dog

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Police officers and several rescue organisations worked

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with the public to search the area, from the Common

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Her family say her disappearance is out of character.

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I hope we can bring you good news on both of those stories.

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A family in Bristol got to see just how the BBC's DIY SOS team have

:16:05.:16:08.

With the help of hundreds of volunteers the Pollard home

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in Hartcliffe was converted so 24-year-old Ryan, who has

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Today they put the heart into Hartcliffe.

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Hundreds lined Ryan's route to his new front door.

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Each of them has given - materials, time, expertise.

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Each wanting to build a home and rebuild a family.

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night, they sleep at their house but now it will all change, he'll be

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It's addictive, what we've done, you go away,

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you're absolutely exhausted but there's something,

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the drive to come back because of why we're doing it.

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To give something to somebody that we know

:16:55.:16:57.

and somebody said to me, has it been rewarding?

:16:58.:17:00.

I don't think I've ever done anything as rewarding in my

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Ryan starting getting headaches at the age of 19.

:17:04.:17:08.

They were signs of a much bigger problem.

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For five long years he's been cared for at a centre in Gloucester.

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And living away from loved ones has taken its toll - on everyone.

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We can't spoil the programme and show you inside,

:17:20.:17:24.

but here's what Ryan's parents made of it all.

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He said open your eyes and the first thing

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we saw was Rachel's fireplace that she wanted

:17:32.:17:36.

and all the skylights and cushions and everything

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and these new colour schemes and new flooring,

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All of these people have been in our house doing work

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for us and every one, I thank every single

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rallying together, what it's done,

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I can't believe how many people were there.

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And I looked around, the street was in tears,

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tears of love and joy and this is what it's about.

:17:59.:18:00.

It's about getting a family back together again

:18:01.:18:04.

Again the team have proved the saying true that many

:18:05.:18:13.

And one family will enjoy the results of it -

:18:14.:18:17.

Wonderful job. I'm looking forward to seeing inside but I know a lot of

:18:18.:18:36.

the volunteers are exhausted, so thank you for all that. And talking

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of human kindness... More than ?50,000 has been raised

:18:39.:18:40.

for a musician from Somerset who's Fellow musicians from across

:18:41.:18:43.

the West rallied round to try and help trombone player

:18:44.:18:48.

Stephen Sykes find So far unable to find a match,

:18:49.:18:50.

they're now trying to raise ?90,000 Hundreds of parents

:18:51.:18:54.

in South Gloucestershire are expected at a public meeting

:18:55.:19:00.

tonight to protest against Schools in the area have

:19:01.:19:02.

historically been some of The figures suggest

:19:03.:19:07.

the worst-hit school, King's Oak Academy in Kingswood,

:19:08.:19:11.

will lose over a million pounds Bristol City's defeat away

:19:12.:19:15.

to Preston earlier this week has proved more costly to the players

:19:16.:19:23.

than just the loss. Today the squad announced they'll

:19:24.:19:26.

refund the ticket price for every fan who travelled to see the team

:19:27.:19:30.

lose 5-0 on Tuesday. Let's do the maths -

:19:31.:19:36.

312 made the trip, at an average cost of ?20 per ticket,

:19:37.:19:41.

that's a bill of more And Magnusson can't cut it out,

:19:42.:19:48.

a chance to make it 4-0. No offside and their defence

:19:49.:20:00.

crumbling in the second half. McGeady deep into the six yard box,

:20:01.:20:04.

it's a chance to make it five. This is now getting humiliating

:20:05.:20:07.

and not what you need when you're Four goals conceded in 21

:20:08.:20:11.

second-half minutes, described as a capitulation by City

:20:12.:20:14.

head coach Lee Johnson. So the players have decided

:20:15.:20:18.

to do something about it. Our performance wasn't good enough

:20:19.:20:22.

so the players have come together and the club and decided the players

:20:23.:20:25.

will refund those 312 fans for their tickets,

:20:26.:20:31.

which obviously they deserve. But what those fans really

:20:32.:20:36.

wanted was some points from the game but the gesture

:20:37.:20:41.

is still appreciated. I'm gracious of the whole fact

:20:42.:20:46.

that they are willing to acknowledge that they were responsible

:20:47.:20:49.

for an utterly dismal I can't dress it up as much

:20:50.:20:53.

as I want to because I always like to find the positive out

:20:54.:20:58.

of anything but Tuesday night, that first 20 minutes of the second

:20:59.:21:01.

half was utterly dismal. The manner of the defeat once

:21:02.:21:04.

again raised questions I think when you have a bad loss

:21:05.:21:06.

like that, naturally there's going to be media speculation given

:21:07.:21:12.

the position we're in, but it's positive now,

:21:13.:21:16.

of course everybody wants to know what went wrong and a lot went wrong

:21:17.:21:21.

but we have to move forward. And that involves repaying

:21:22.:21:26.

the fans - not financially but with a much-needed win

:21:27.:21:29.

here against Wolves on Saturday. I think we were both there. ?20

:21:30.:21:45.

each? Definitely! A very expensive cab.

:21:46.:21:49.

Now, you might remember the sound of factory whistles and hooters

:21:50.:21:51.

sounding every day to signal clocking on and clocking off times.

:21:52.:21:54.

Well, today the sound of the Holloway Brothers factory

:21:55.:21:56.

whistle in Stroud returned 40 years after it fell the silent.

:21:57.:21:59.

It was all down to our colleagues at BBC Gloucestershire.

:22:00.:22:01.

The Holloway's whistle blows again and sounded by Fay,

:22:02.:22:09.

who as a schoolgirl would help her dad, whose job

:22:10.:22:12.

I used to come down and he'd let me blow the hooter at 5pm,

:22:13.:22:18.

then I'd stand outside the door watching all the workers go home.

:22:19.:22:20.

Some of them just said they remember me as a little girl stood there.

:22:21.:22:26.

It took a bit of testing to revive the whistle.

:22:27.:22:28.

Compressed air at the Nailsworth repair caf , then a huge steam rig

:22:29.:22:32.

But today it was a traditional steam traction engine that literally

:22:33.:22:38.

It was a vital warning for Sheila and Margaret in the 1950s.

:22:39.:22:51.

We used to have to run from Stroud, from the post office right

:22:52.:23:03.

through to Brickwell, up stairs to check in, and that

:23:04.:23:05.

whistle was blowing while we were running through stroke.

:23:06.:23:07.

Holloway's came to Stroud in 1849 and at its peak

:23:08.:23:15.

It was the first to use steam to manufacture clothes.

:23:16.:23:22.

George Holloway was a pioneer - the only person with a statue

:23:23.:23:25.

in Stroud and one of the first British employers to properly

:23:26.:23:27.

Benefits like the friendly society, which paid a pension and sick pay, I

:23:28.:23:38.

think they paid tuppence a week into a fund and that gave them the

:23:39.:23:42.

security. They got up lump sum when they retired.

:23:43.:23:44.

And now his whistle is sounding again, all the brainchild of Radio

:23:45.:23:47.

Gloucestershire's Mark Cummings, but it seems this could be the start

:23:48.:23:49.

of a whistle and hooter revival across the country.

:23:50.:23:51.

Really iconic Gloucester aircraft company, Whittle and the Jet,

:23:52.:23:54.

they have the hooter and the museum team are working that up

:23:55.:23:57.

Lister Petter in Dursley, a world-famous company,

:23:58.:24:03.

we have that, I use it on my show, between the person who has it,

:24:04.:24:06.

we could get that working again and in Northern United Colliery

:24:07.:24:09.

near Cinderford, that could be worked up.

:24:10.:24:12.

It may have just been a humble whistle but today this was the sound

:24:13.:24:15.

of nostalgia for many whose working lives were ruled by

:24:16.:24:19.

Our going home whistle will be sending soon.

:24:20.:24:31.

Now as you know, polling cards are now dropping on doormats

:24:32.:24:34.

for the election of the West's first elected mayor.

:24:35.:24:36.

If you're wondering what it's all about

:24:37.:24:38.

you might want to come along to our debate.

:24:39.:24:43.

Bristolians already have a Lord Mayor and an elected mayor, now a

:24:44.:24:52.

third mayor is under way. On May the 4th, voters here in Bath and North

:24:53.:24:56.

East Somerset, South Gloucestershire and Bristol go to the polls for a

:24:57.:25:02.

new role called the Metro Mayor. They will have powers over housing

:25:03.:25:08.

and transport as well as ?30 million a year to spend on infrastructure.

:25:09.:25:13.

If you would like to attend the debate on the 19th of April board

:25:14.:25:14.

but the question, let us know... I'm looking forward to that. Let's

:25:15.:25:35.

go up to Ian, who is on the roof. I mentioned yesterday forecast health

:25:36.:25:39.

warning about the amount of cloud, and with good reason although the

:25:40.:25:46.

net result most will be happy with, tomorrow brings the same situation

:25:47.:25:50.

in terms of forecast, struggling with this balance but it looks like

:25:51.:25:55.

a fine day, in many respects replicating today. High pressure

:25:56.:26:00.

dominates and will continue to do so through the weekend and it will be

:26:01.:26:06.

this fine balance between cloud cover which may look quite

:26:07.:26:11.

extensive, but in reality might be fairly thin or nonexistent, so it

:26:12.:26:16.

will be quite a difficult once through the next 12, 24 hours, but

:26:17.:26:21.

as we head into the weekend cloud will become less of an issue. The

:26:22.:26:27.

night after amount of clear sky, some invasion of cloud cover as the

:26:28.:26:31.

night wears on and so temperatures will very. They could get low enough

:26:32.:26:36.

in Somerset to give a touch of frost, unlike the elsewhere, then

:26:37.:26:42.

tomorrow similar to today, some areas of cloud but either side of

:26:43.:26:46.

that a good deal of sunshine and with light winds there will be very

:26:47.:26:52.

little change, no chance of rain. Temperatures tomorrow will be on a

:26:53.:26:57.

path to today, we saw 16 Celsius in parts of Wiltshire and should match

:26:58.:27:01.

that tomorrow. The pollen count will be high, the UV levels are getting

:27:02.:27:08.

high as well because the amount of ozone is reaching a minimal amount.

:27:09.:27:14.

As we go through the weekend, we will have less cloud with a

:27:15.:27:18.

southerly continental flow, Saturday and Sunday should see a good deal of

:27:19.:27:24.

sunshine, temperatures will climb at least into the high teens on

:27:25.:27:28.

Saturday. We could get 20 Celsius on Sunday.

:27:29.:27:34.

That looks nice. Today was nice, it was trying to be warm. I think we

:27:35.:27:38.

are getting away with it. Enough weather. We will see you

:27:39.:27:44.

again tomorrow. Thank you for watching.

:27:45.:27:52.

Stacey and Chris are preparing for marriage by spending

:27:53.:27:55.

a few days living alone with their in-laws to be,

:27:56.:27:58.

and asking them all kinds of questions.

:27:59.:28:00.

Did you get a kiss on the first date? No.

:28:01.:28:02.

What does their in-laws' marriage tell them about each other's

:28:03.:28:05.

I expect you'll want to become a schoolmaster, sir.

:28:06.:28:14.

That's what most of the gentlemen does that get sent down

:28:15.:28:16.

for indecent behaviour. Evelyn Waugh's classic novel.

:28:17.:28:19.

Have you ever been in love, Mr Pennyfeather? No, not yet.

:28:20.:28:22.

The fire escape is very dangerous and never to be used.

:28:23.:28:32.

I've got spit on them now, haven't I?

:28:33.:28:33.

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