21/07/2011 World News Today


21/07/2011

The latest national and international news, exploring the day's events from a global perspective.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 21/07/2011. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

4th this ears BBC World News Today we need him Wilcox. Will there be a

:00:14.:00:20.

selective default for Greece? A bail-out could produce another

:00:20.:00:25.

bail-out for the country. Having fired the imagination of a

:00:25.:00:30.

generation, and its place in history secured, the space shuttle

:00:30.:00:36.

palls into port for the last time. Its voyage is at an end. My show

:00:36.:00:43.

and accomplished. Anand is lands safely bring in a the space shuttle

:00:43.:00:47.

programme to a close -- Atlantis. They can be no whitewash at the

:00:47.:00:57.

White House. Is the News Of The World phone hacking scandal Rupert

:00:57.:01:06.

Murdoch's what -- Watergate? And the BBC has the first unrestricted

:01:06.:01:16.
:01:16.:01:23.

access to the north of Sri Lanka. Welcome. Euros in the leaders are

:01:23.:01:27.

locked in discussion at an emergency summit to hammer out a

:01:27.:01:33.

rescue package for three Greek economy. It is not just Greece that

:01:33.:01:38.

is a concern, but the currency itself. Global markets and the

:01:38.:01:46.

value of the euro rose as a draft was lead.

:01:46.:01:51.

They arrived with warnings in their ears. Failure is not an option. The

:01:51.:01:58.

survival of the single currency is at stake. What is emerging is a

:01:58.:02:04.

series of measures to help countries before they get into

:02:04.:02:08.

trouble and to buy back debt at discount prices. It has been

:02:08.:02:13.

proposed that as part of a second bail-out for Greece, private

:02:13.:02:18.

institutions like banks will agreed to buy more Greek bonds when they

:02:18.:02:23.

expire or allow more time before they get their money back. There

:02:23.:02:27.

needs to be a solution everyone can live with. The biggest decisions

:02:27.:02:32.

will have to be made by the most powerful economy in the eurozone,

:02:32.:02:37.

Germany. It has done well out of the single currency and its exports

:02:37.:02:42.

have boomed. In one way or another, it will have to dig deep into its

:02:42.:02:48.

pockets. That means this process is fraught with political and economic

:02:48.:02:54.

Risk. It will be expensive and market reaction to any deal can

:02:54.:03:00.

change quickly. The interest rate they will pay you will extend

:03:00.:03:07.

maturity is but they need a cut on the value of greed that. It will go

:03:07.:03:12.

into a selective default. That is if there is a bond swaps.

:03:12.:03:17.

alternative is confusion leading to contagion. And economic troubles

:03:17.:03:21.

spreading to bigger economies like Spain and Italy. That would prove

:03:22.:03:27.

more expensive. The euro would be in mortal danger and instability

:03:27.:03:32.

would friend the entire global economy.

:03:32.:03:37.

-- it would threaten. We can go to art diplomatic correspondent. We

:03:37.:03:41.

have been expecting a press conference. What is holding things

:03:41.:03:50.

up? We have to accept this is a complex deal. It involves the

:03:50.:03:57.

governments of the eurozone and the banks and central banks. And the

:03:57.:04:05.

International Monetary Fund. The director of the IMF is here. It

:04:05.:04:09.

puts money into these rescue packages as well. There is no

:04:09.:04:16.

surprise we are going into the night. The markets seem reassured

:04:16.:04:23.

by what appears to be emerging as a potential deal. The feeling is that

:04:23.:04:27.

the eurozone has gone further than before to address those in the

:04:27.:04:30.

markets to think that previous rescue packages have not been

:04:30.:04:40.

adequate. We have not got a deal. But, it looks as if something

:04:40.:04:45.

definite will emerge that could buy a serious time for the eurozone,

:04:45.:04:50.

even if it does not resolve the doubt about long-term stability

:04:50.:04:56.

about the eurozone. We can speak to a member of the

:04:56.:05:01.

European Parliament. As you understand things, how much ground

:05:01.:05:09.

has Angela Merkel had to give? her it was important to win the

:05:09.:05:14.

battle. She has lost too many battles in the past to during the

:05:14.:05:21.

Euro crisis. If she would have said in 2009 we will rescue Greece,

:05:21.:05:25.

whatever happens, we would not have had that crisis. This is an

:05:25.:05:31.

important signal to the markets. I think she has won the most

:05:31.:05:38.

important point. How will German people react? It seems they are

:05:38.:05:43.

split down the middle about what should be done. In Germany, if it

:05:43.:05:48.

comes to the question of the euro rescue package, people are against.

:05:48.:05:55.

But, they vote for parties in favour of the euro rescue package.

:05:55.:06:01.

So, the Green Party and social democratic party wins, although

:06:01.:06:09.

they are in favour. It is like a paradox in Germany. People expect a

:06:09.:06:15.

leadership in Germany. That is what was missing in the past. It was not

:06:15.:06:22.

a straight line and people want a clear line. We think of

:06:22.:06:26.

institutions taking haircuts on this. What will it mean in terms of

:06:26.:06:32.

the German taxpayers putting into this and the losses among private

:06:32.:06:41.

institutions in Europe? To extend it is a myth that the German

:06:41.:06:48.

taxpayer has paid. Until now Germany has taken 200 million euros

:06:48.:06:53.

out of the crisis without paying one cent. It was an important issue

:06:53.:06:58.

for Germany that private investors take part in the crisis. It seems

:06:58.:07:03.

they are encouraged and will be encouraged on a volunteer basis to

:07:03.:07:12.

Exchange bombs and by this and also to paid their dues -- bonds. There

:07:12.:07:19.

will be a bank rescue fund with up to 30 billion at Euros in order to

:07:19.:07:27.

rescue especially the Greek banks that might suffer if the selective

:07:27.:07:34.

default prevails. Thank you. We can look at other

:07:34.:07:39.

news. The President of Malawi has rejected calls to step down despite

:07:39.:07:44.

the deaths of 18 people in anti- government riots. Protests in three

:07:44.:07:49.

cities turned up violent after the beating of human rights activists

:07:49.:07:54.

and journalists. The President promised to talk to the opposition.

:07:54.:08:00.

Four Kenyan veterans of the 1950s Mau Mau uprisings have won the

:08:00.:08:04.

right to sue the UK government relating to torture 50 years ago.

:08:04.:08:10.

They say they were subjected to brutality including sexual assault.

:08:10.:08:15.

TRANSLATION: I was castrated and humiliated and I have no family of

:08:15.:08:21.

my own. I am happy they have accepted our case. They must pay me.

:08:21.:08:26.

They have denied me a family that has tormented me all my life.

:08:26.:08:31.

Japanese man was sentenced to life for the rape and murder of British

:08:31.:08:37.

teacher Lindsay Ann Hawker whose body was found in a bath at Tatsuya

:08:37.:08:43.

Ichihashi's flat in 2007. He went on the run for over two years.

:08:43.:08:46.

The BBC understands that Prince Andrew is stepping down from his

:08:47.:08:53.

job as a special representative for trade and investment. He has been

:08:53.:08:56.

criticised for his association with an American businessman convicted

:08:56.:09:01.

of sex offences involving a girl under the age of consent.

:09:01.:09:07.

It is the end of an era. The US space shuttle has touched down for

:09:07.:09:13.

the final time, bringing to an end NASA's 30 year shuttle programme.

:09:13.:09:21.

The feet put satellites in orbit and launched the Hubble's telescope.

:09:21.:09:25.

Our correspondent looks at the age of space travel.

:09:25.:09:31.

Three-and-a-half minutes until touchdown. Two sonic booms as the

:09:31.:09:35.

shuttle appears in the night sky. This thermal image captures the

:09:35.:09:40.

nose cone in glowing white with extreme heat. Every landing is

:09:40.:09:46.

tense. One of those ended in disaster. This is the pilot's view.

:09:46.:09:53.

Emotions are running high for the final touchdown. Having fired the

:09:53.:09:58.

imagination of a generation, a craft like no other, its place in

:09:58.:10:04.

history secured, the shuttle comes into port for the last time. Its

:10:04.:10:10.

voyages at an end. Dawn at Cape Canaveral and the shuttles are

:10:10.:10:15.

flown for 30 years but now there is no immediate replacement. The

:10:16.:10:19.

astronauts are welcomed home. The commander made a sentimental plea

:10:19.:10:25.

for America to keep its role in space. I want the picture of a six-

:10:25.:10:29.

year old boy looking at the space shuttle in the museum and saying,

:10:29.:10:36.

daddy, I want to do something like that when I grow up. What did the

:10:36.:10:42.

shuttles achieve? They built the International Space Station. They

:10:42.:10:46.

launched the Hubble telescope, providing extraordinary glimpses of

:10:46.:10:52.

distant black -- Alex's. What will America do next in space --

:10:52.:11:02.

galaxies. Commercial operators with new spacecraft will be paid to do

:11:02.:11:07.

the job of going into orbit. That should free up NASA to send

:11:07.:11:12.

missions deeper into space, maybe as far as asteroids or even Mars,

:11:12.:11:18.

but only if there is the money. This animation shows how NASA aims

:11:18.:11:23.

to land on an asteroid. Planning is under way. It may be well --

:11:23.:11:30.

wishful thinking on a sad day. Tonight, the slow journey to

:11:30.:11:36.

retirement, watched by crowns. Thousands will lose jobs. 50 years

:11:36.:11:41.

ago America launched its first astronaut. Now, nobody is sure what

:11:41.:11:47.

will come next. We can talk to a scientist from

:11:47.:11:51.

Mullard Space Science Laboratory at University College in London.

:11:51.:11:56.

Flight commanders do not cry, but there will be sadness at the

:11:56.:12:03.

development. Absolutely. The programme has dominated space

:12:03.:12:08.

flight for three decades. It is sad to see it coming to an end.

:12:08.:12:15.

practical implications are dire for skilled engineers, 3000 who are due

:12:15.:12:19.

to lose their jobs. They are dedicated and highly trained.

:12:19.:12:24.

Unfortunately, they will be losing their jobs. They have known this

:12:24.:12:33.

was happening. The private sector, is that able to take those jobs?

:12:33.:12:39.

I'm sure it will do eventually. Some companies, including one that

:12:39.:12:49.

was in the lead to provide a replacement to take astronauts to

:12:49.:12:54.

the International Space Station. But there will be a gap before

:12:54.:13:00.

their spacecraft comes into service. What does it mean psychologically?

:13:00.:13:04.

When America has ended space programmes, it has always had

:13:04.:13:09.

another one. This is the first time in 50 years it has not. They have

:13:09.:13:14.

not decided which programme will replace the shuttle. There was a

:13:14.:13:18.

gap between the end of the Apollo programme and the shuttle, but they

:13:18.:13:26.

knew the shuttle was coming. It is an uncertain time. There is focus

:13:26.:13:33.

on what? Tyne and India, for example, and presumably Russia --

:13:33.:13:38.

China and India. Russia is competent and stuck to the same

:13:38.:13:44.

design since the 1960s. That was a better design and the shuttle?

:13:44.:13:48.

retrospect, they saved many in the long run by having disposable

:13:48.:13:54.

spacecraft. It was a basic but proficient design. The space

:13:54.:13:58.

shuttle was sophisticated and capable, able to return to the

:13:58.:14:02.

Hubble space telescope and fix it, at which she cannot do with any

:14:02.:14:09.

other spacecraft at the moment. -- which you cannot. But the Russians

:14:09.:14:18.

have probably run a more efficient The UK inquiry into phone hacking

:14:18.:14:20.

by journalists may be widening beyond News International.

:14:20.:14:23.

Detectives have asked for records of a 2003 inquiry which looked into

:14:23.:14:28.

the use of private investigators by reporters. It found journalists

:14:28.:14:31.

across the industry - working for broadsheets as well as tabloids -

:14:31.:14:34.

had paid for illegally obtained information. Britain's Deputy Prime

:14:34.:14:37.

Minister says the scandal has shaken the public's faith in the

:14:37.:14:44.

police, press and politicians. think we have a once in a

:14:44.:14:51.

generation opportunity to really clean up the murky practices and

:14:51.:14:56.

dodgy relationships which have taken root at the very heart of the

:14:56.:15:00.

British Establishment between press, politicians and the police. Some

:15:00.:15:04.

are already calling the scandal Britain's very own Watergate. The

:15:04.:15:07.

story about a burglary at a Washington hotel in 1972 ended with

:15:07.:15:09.

the first resignation of an American President, most of the

:15:09.:15:16.

corruption exposed by two young journalists at the Washington Post.

:15:16.:15:19.

Watergate became a household word on the night of 17th June, when

:15:19.:15:25.

five men were caught with burglary tolls and bugging devices and

:15:25.:15:30.

$5,000 in new $100 notes in a set of sixth-floor offices rented as

:15:30.:15:40.
:15:40.:15:41.

its national headquarters by the Democratic Party. With the

:15:41.:15:43.

indictments completed, the government declared the

:15:43.:15:48.

investigation closed. That produced a cry of outrage from the Democrats.

:15:48.:15:55.

Well, they demanded, worthies seven men working for? -- who'll. We do

:15:55.:15:59.

not have hard evidence that the President had advance knowledge of

:15:59.:16:03.

the bugging. We've only seen the tip of the iceberg. They can be no

:16:03.:16:09.

whitewash at the White House. Watergate investigation has finally

:16:09.:16:12.

begun inside the caucus room here. It attracted the kind of attention

:16:12.:16:16.

that could only be given to a scandal of such magnitude. People

:16:16.:16:20.

have got to know whether or not their President is a crook. I'm not

:16:20.:16:28.

a crook. I shall resign the presidency effective at noon

:16:28.:16:38.
:16:38.:16:45.

Such iconic images. Together with Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein

:16:45.:16:48.

exposed the Watergate scandal in the Washington Post. He's just

:16:48.:16:50.

written a paper asking whether this is Murdoch's Watergate? Mr

:16:50.:16:59.

Bernstein joins us from our New York studio. Is it? We don't know

:16:59.:17:04.

yet. What we do know is there are a lot of similarities, in that what

:17:04.:17:08.

is happening in Britain is about a fast abuse of power and the

:17:08.:17:12.

corruption of an institution, which is to say the low end of Rupert

:17:13.:17:17.

Murdoch's newspapers, the News of the World, and others. In which an

:17:17.:17:22.

agenda that has almost nothing to do with real journalism and instead

:17:22.:17:30.

has to do with hacking and stories that have nothing to do with the

:17:30.:17:33.

best obtain a Buerhrle version of the truth, which is really what

:17:33.:17:38.

reporting and real journalism is about, have managed to take over a

:17:38.:17:44.

newspaper and an institution that follows the precepts of its owner.

:17:44.:17:49.

This is similar to what happened in Watergate in the White House, where

:17:49.:17:54.

the institution and the presidency was taken over by a President who

:17:54.:17:59.

corrupted it. In that sense, and they're also obviously has been an

:17:59.:18:03.

ongoing cover-up in which the principle of the institution, Mr

:18:03.:18:07.

Murdoch, says he knows nothing about the specific hacking that

:18:07.:18:11.

happened, just as Nixon said he didn't know anything about the

:18:11.:18:16.

specific burglary. And I think more important is the institutional

:18:16.:18:22.

corruption. As I said in that piece that I wrote, which was written for

:18:22.:18:25.

Newsweek and quoted some people that were close to Mr Murdoch in

:18:25.:18:32.

the past, this really is about Murdoch culture. The kind of do

:18:32.:18:38.

anything that it takes to get the story attitude. I wouldn't call it

:18:38.:18:43.

a real journalism, I'd call it masquerading as journalism.

:18:43.:18:46.

Presumably you are talking about celebrity journalism, gossip and

:18:46.:18:50.

tittle-tattle. Mobile phones went around during the Watergate era

:18:50.:18:53.

when you were working on that particular story, but would you

:18:53.:18:57.

have phone hacked to actually bring about the result of the

:18:57.:19:01.

investigation if you'd been able to do that, or would you have drawn a

:19:01.:19:05.

line there, even if it was going to provide that essential plank of

:19:05.:19:10.

information you needed? First of all, it's really wire-tapping. I

:19:10.:19:14.

think wire-tapping is so far on the other side of the line that it's

:19:14.:19:20.

unthinkable. How far would you go? Let me interrupt you for a minute.

:19:20.:19:27.

I think that by concentrating on this one aspect as opposed to the

:19:27.:19:32.

fact of what we have here and what we have seen in Britain, it's the

:19:32.:19:36.

capture of basically the three most important institutions outside the

:19:36.:19:41.

monarchy in Great Britain by a powerful individual. Which is to

:19:41.:19:46.

say the political system, the media and the police. It is a remarkable

:19:46.:19:50.

story. We don't know where it's going yet. I also think that it's

:19:50.:19:54.

important that they're not be a witch hunt against Rupert Murdoch

:19:54.:20:01.

carried out by the other tabloids, who also have some standards that

:20:01.:20:06.

are in the sewer. You mentioned the colliding worlds of the police,

:20:06.:20:10.

political establishment and the media. I wonder what you felt about

:20:10.:20:13.

the Telegraph group, for example, who produced all those stories

:20:13.:20:23.

about MPs' expenses. That came from a stolen computer disk. I think we

:20:23.:20:28.

can go all the way through the sins of every newspaper from the top to

:20:28.:20:32.

the bottom in the United States and in Great Britain. I think that what

:20:32.:20:37.

we really need to be looking at here, you made an analogy a moment

:20:37.:20:43.

ago, this is just about celebrities and this or that. There is no just

:20:43.:20:47.

about this or that. What real reporting is about is the best

:20:47.:20:53.

obtainable version of the truth. That is really about context. If

:20:53.:20:59.

you -- your agenda becomes really about getting into the private

:20:59.:21:06.

lives of people who really are of not particular importance or they

:21:06.:21:11.

are celebrities, then that's pretty much all you do. Or if your agenda

:21:11.:21:20.

is one that has little to do with the overall context of your country,

:21:20.:21:28.

your city, your culture. And rather dwells on this lowest descending a

:21:28.:21:34.

common denominator. Then you have a kind of culture that Murdoch has

:21:34.:21:41.

specialised in at the bottom of his empire, very much like Mafia Dons,

:21:41.:21:47.

he's got the legitimate parts of his empire at the top - Sky News,

:21:47.:21:51.

Fox News, the TV entertainment network, Paramount. Other

:21:52.:21:57.

institutions, the Wall Street Journal. Yet it's all been built on

:21:57.:22:01.

this thing that a moment ago you kind of look that as a bit of

:22:01.:22:08.

harmless fun. It's not harmless fun. It's indicative of culture. Thank

:22:08.:22:13.

you for joining us. Two years after the civil war in Sri Lanka,

:22:13.:22:15.

hundreds of thousands of displaced Tamil civilians are returning home

:22:15.:22:19.

to their villages in the north. Access to the region for outsiders

:22:19.:22:23.

has been heavily restricted by the military for years. But the rules

:22:23.:22:27.

have recently been relaxed. Our correspondent, Charles Haviland, is

:22:27.:22:30.

the first journalist to travel to Kilinochchi - the place that was

:22:30.:22:37.

once the headquarters of the Tamil Tigers. For years, few outsiders

:22:37.:22:41.

have come to these northern jungles. Waugh had driven out every person,

:22:41.:22:47.

every animal, every building was flattened. Now people are returning,

:22:47.:22:54.

rebuilding, trying to start afresh. This little boy is helping his

:22:54.:22:57.

parents build a home. They were forced from this village then

:22:57.:23:01.

displaced time and again before suffering bombardment in the final

:23:01.:23:08.

war-zone. They got a small UN ground when they came out of their

:23:08.:23:15.

refugee camp, but they've had to pawn their possessions to get by.

:23:15.:23:19.

TRANSLATION: We are glad that we've come from the camp to our own

:23:19.:23:22.

village, but I lost my mother, my little brother and my elder sister

:23:22.:23:26.

and brother in the war. We've come here without our family, so we are

:23:26.:23:34.

not really living happily. There is at least community spirit here.

:23:34.:23:39.

Helping him build his house are his two friends, all our lucky to be

:23:39.:23:44.

alive. Many of the men perished. Most of the civilians who were

:23:44.:23:47.

confined in government-run camps at the end of the war have at last

:23:47.:23:50.

returned to villages like this one. But all of them have had a

:23:50.:23:56.

difficult homecoming, haunted by their traumas and their losses.

:23:56.:24:00.

This widow lost a brother in the war. She and her mother are sick,

:24:00.:24:06.

too ill to work. Nor can they afford transport to the hospital.

:24:06.:24:09.

The government insists it's doing all it can to help people like her.

:24:09.:24:17.

She disagrees. TRANSLATION: We've been here almost

:24:17.:24:21.

three months. Since then, we have got nothing. We get less than a

:24:22.:24:26.

dollar a month each in aid money. The government is not helping us. I

:24:26.:24:35.

have sent a lot of letters but there's no reply. Just a few miles

:24:35.:24:40.

away in Kilinochchi town, soldiers lovingly tended government war

:24:40.:24:45.

victory monument. They are here 24 hours a day. The bullet represents

:24:45.:24:53.

the army's triumph over the Tamil Tigers. The flower represents peace.

:24:53.:25:03.
:25:03.:25:06.

Let's return to those iconic images We have main engine start.

:25:06.:25:16.
:25:16.:25:25.

America's first space shuttle. The Lift off! Lift off of the 25th

:25:25.:25:35.
:25:35.:25:38.

We are looking very carefully at the situation. We have Buster

:25:38.:25:48.
:25:48.:26:00.

ignition and lift off of that space Colombia Houston. For me, the space

:26:00.:26:03.

programme has always captured an essential part of what it means to

:26:03.:26:07.

be an American. The question for us now is whether that was the

:26:07.:26:12.

beginning of something or the end of something. I choose to believe

:26:12.:26:18.

it was only the beginning. I believe we can send humans to orbit,

:26:18.:26:25.

Mars and return them safely to work. -- to earth. I expect to be around

:26:25.:26:33.

to see it. Having fired the imagination of a generation, a ship

:26:33.:26:37.

like no other, its place in history should cured, the space shuttle

:26:37.:26:46.

polls in support for the last time. It's voyage at Downend. -- its

:26:46.:26:56.
:26:56.:27:02.

It was yet again pretty cloudy today and there were a lot of

:27:02.:27:06.

showers around as well. A similar forecast for tomorrow. There will

:27:06.:27:09.

be further showers but a better chance of seeing things brighten up

:27:09.:27:14.

a bit through tomorrow. We've got high pressure trying to nudge in

:27:15.:27:18.

from the West. But a weak weather front sitting through southern

:27:18.:27:22.

areas yet again on Friday brings the risk of showers. A call start

:27:22.:27:26.

for some first thing with clear spells of a night, but at least a

:27:26.:27:31.

dry, bright start. It won't last for long. The clouds will gather,

:27:31.:27:35.

particularly through the South of England. Showers developing with

:27:35.:27:40.

light winds. Probably not quite as heavy as the ones we saw today. In

:27:40.:27:44.

between there is a glimmer of some brightness. A wetter day across the

:27:44.:27:47.

south-west of England tomorrow. In between the sunny spells we could

:27:48.:27:53.

get up to 17 degrees. For seven areas of Wales it is pretty cloudy

:27:53.:27:57.

with a few showers. In the north- west it is looking dryer and

:27:57.:28:00.

brighter. For Northern Ireland it is pretty hit and miss. Patchy

:28:00.:28:04.

cloud, some sunny spells but always the risk of one or two showers,

:28:04.:28:08.

though they should be pretty light and isolated. A gentle northerly

:28:08.:28:12.

wind across Scotland brings the risk of a few scattered showers. On

:28:12.:28:16.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS