15/10/2013 World News Today


15/10/2013

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This is BBC World News Today with me, Philippa Thomas. A state of

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emergency is declared on Sicily as the region struggles to cope with

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the arrival of hundreds of migrants. Italian authorities release pictures

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showing a mother ship carrying the migrants from Africa into the

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Mediterranean. We'll speak to a special rapporteaur from the UN

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about the problem. Turmoil on Capitol Hill - with two

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days to go, will there be a deal to avoid a US debt default and reopen

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government? Why are they doing this to the American people? Sabotaging a

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good faith, bipartisan effort coming out of the Senate? Wasting the

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public's time? In this case, time is money.

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Iran returns to the negotiating table over in Geneva over its

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nuclear programme - we'll speak to the EU's spokesman at the talks on

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how well they're going. Hello and welcome.

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Also coming up: Six books, six authors but only one winner - the

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prestigious Man Booker prize will be announced in the coming hours. We'll

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be live at the award ceremony. A state of emergency has been

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declared by the government of Sicily due to the large number of migrants

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arriving in southern Italy by boat. Sicily is, of course, responsible

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for the island of Lampedusa, which is really struggling to cope with

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the surge in arrivals from North Africa. Some 400 people have been

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rescued in the past 24 hours alone. As Italy ramps up its surveillance

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of the Mediterranean, it has discovered a huge human trafficker

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mothership. From Lampedusa, the BBC's Kassim Kayira reports.

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A migrant mothership is spotted by Italian border police alongside a

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smaller vessel. Italian authorities say the larger ships are used by

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smugglers to complete most of the journey across the sea, then

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migrants are put onto overcrowded smaller vessels. Hundreds of

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migrants, leave to be of Syrian and Egyptian nationalities, were part of

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the deck of the mothership. The mothership is believed to have left

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from Egypt. Over the past 24 hours alone, Italian authorities say they

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have rescued more than 400 people. The journey is hard enough, and once

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they arrive, the challenge is adapting to the new lives. Rituals

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and customs keep the communities together. Most of the migrants have

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been marking the key Festival in their religious calendar, Eid.

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Migrants at the Lampedusa Ritter -- reception centre tried to look for

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the... Look their best for the festival. They found their own way

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to celebrate. TRANSLATION: We prayed but it was a

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small ceremony, because there was no facilities, so the imam try to make

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it short. The atmosphere was good, thankfully. Even when the boats

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managed to dock or pulled to safety, like here on the Italian island of

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Lampedusa, faith or religion continues to play a key role. Away

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from home, unsure of their future, the migrant still marked one of the

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biggest festivals in the Muslim calendars, praying to their faith to

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keep their identities intact. Francois Crepeau is the United

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Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants. He joins

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me via webcam from Switzerland. Welcome. May I ask you first, what

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do you make of these motherships? It shows the scale of the industry in

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transporting illegal migrants, doesn't it? It does, and we should

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not be surprised about that. It is happening, it is going to happen

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again and will not stop as long as we keep our current policies. One of

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the policies you want to see is more legal channels for migrants to come

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through? One of the reasons there is this migration to Europe is that we

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have unrecognised labour needs, we have underground labour markets were

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migrants are employed, often in appalling conditions. As long as

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there are jobs for them, people will take them. Unless we recognise these

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markets and make them above ground, regulate them and then give access

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to people, even migrants, the pull factor will be great and we will

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continue to see migrants coming in regularly. You are saying there need

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to be more legal channels for migration of the low skilled into

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Europe? Yes, these underground labour markets exist in the

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construction, agricultural, caregiving, hospitality industries

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and in many others, cockle picking, for example, in the UK. We need

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migrants in these industries. We don't recognise or acknowledge

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this. We let employers create appalling underground labour markets

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where these people will be employed in appalling conditions, with the

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deaths on a regular basis. As long as we don't recognise this, make a

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tape of ground, acknowledge we need migrants. -- make it above ground.

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We need 150 million migrants in Europe by 2050, says one report We

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don't have any politicians with the courage to say so. You know the

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difficulty, especially in times of economic recession or austerity for

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any politician to stand up and say, we need to allow more foreigners to

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come in to take jobs. You say that you know the demand is there, but

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how do you persuade political leaders to take the stand with you?

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It is extremely difficult, because migrants don't vote, so they are

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invisible politically. They also don't protest or mobilise, because

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they fear being identified, arrested, detained, deported. They

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are the object of the discussions, not the subject of them. The only

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thing that has worked in the past few years was going to court, where

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court have told - the European Court of Human Rights, the court of

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justice, the Supreme Court in several countries - the governments

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of countries that they don't have the right to do this. If you can't

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do it for citizens, why can you do it for migrants? The courts can tell

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the government things because they do not have electoral pressure on

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them. We need to work more with national human rights institutions,

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courts and tribunal 's, to set the legal principles which should apply

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in order to protect the rights of these people. They have rights, just

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like we do, the same fundamental rights that we do except for the

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right to vote and be elected and the right to stay in the country. I m

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afraid we have to leave it there, but thank you. A pleasure.

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As the senior Democrat Nancy Pelosi put it in Washington today, time is

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money - and the US government is running out of both. America could

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default on its debts - that is start running out of money to pay its

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bills - in just two days. The atmosphere on Capitol Hill is

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frantic. The White House has just said that progress is being made,

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but negotiations, statements and accusations are still flying. Let's

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hear more from the two sides - first from Ms Pelosi, the Democrats'

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leader in the House of Representatives.

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Why are they doing this to the American people, sabotaging a good

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faith bipartisan effort coming out of the Senate? Wasting the public

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This morning when I got up it did look like there was going to be a

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deal on the Senate side. They were getting close to the deal

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to re-open the Government by January 15th, increase the debt ceiling and

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make minor tweaks to the President's signature health and insurance law,

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but House Republicans didn't like the sound of this deal. When they

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met this morning, to consider their own proposal that would have done

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those to consider their own proposal that would have done those two

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things - re-open the Government and extend the debt creerlings but

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include a change to the President's healthcare law, which Democrats were

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never going to like. It seems that when Republicans met, their own

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proposal didn't have the support of their own caucus full stop the house

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Democratic leadership is due to meet with the president in an hour.

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Tomorrow night the US will not be able to borrow any more money and

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it. To run out of money to pay its huge, gigantic billions of dollars

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of obligations. To try to find out what is happening, I have been

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talking to a Democratic congressman from Oregon and I asked whether

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there would be a deal? I believe we will at this point in time. If you'd

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asked me to Mac Pro days ago, I would say we would not. But the fact

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that there is a bipartisan framework coming out, as well as what others

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have been doing and as well as what the house of Republicans is

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considering, they are all in the same ballpark. It is about extending

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the debt ceiling until after the first year and working on the big

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problem, the budget. The long-term debt and deficit and getting the

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economic recovery going is the one thing nobody is talking about, but

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it is the real problem. But House Republicans seem to want major

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change to the health insurer into law. Will you budge? That will not

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happen. Then we might not get and agreement? I don't think they are

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suicidal. I do not believe that in their heart of hearts as legislators

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they will let the country default. You will have to leave some of the

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Tea Party radicals and reckless people behind. So all eyes are on

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House Republicans. Republicans control the House of

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Representatives. So far they have not come up with their own proposal

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but they have not commanded... We have a bipartisan deal in the

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making. The White House used to be able to throw its weight behind it,

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but it will be down to House Republicans and what they can or

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can't report. The Dow Jones is down very slightly, meanwhile, investors

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are concerned that the deal they thought was in the making is

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apparently slipping away and many Americans have their pension funds

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invested in the stock market, so as soon as they flip, people start to

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lose money. If there is a default, the stock market will plunge. Thank

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you, Laura Trevelyan on Capitol Hill.

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More than 90 people have died after an earthquake struck the central

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Philippines, causing widespread destruction. The epicentre of the

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7.1 magnitude quake was beneath the island of Bohol. Jonathan Head

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reports. The earthquake brought down

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buildings in Cebu, more than 60 kilometres away from the percentage,

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leaving rescue teams with the grim task of lifting slabs of concrete to

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retrieve bodies. TRANSLATION: The earthquake stopped,

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but there was another tremor, so we rushed out. One of us try to get

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away but there was a big chunk of concrete which fell from the upper

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floors. The tremors caused damage over a wide area, affecting several

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islands in the central Philippines. Among the casualties were some of

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its most historic churches. They had stood for hundreds of years, since

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the beginning of Spanish colonial rule. It will take some time for the

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authorities to assess the number of casualties will stop they have

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declared what they call a state of calamity in several areas, allowing

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the central government to help restore order and basic services.

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With strong after-shocks still being felt, many buildings remain unsafe.

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This could have been worse. It was a public holidays of schools and

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government offices were largely empty, but it was bad enough. - so

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schools and government offices were largely empty.

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It's one of the most prestigious awards in literature and this year's

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Man Booker Prize winner will be revealed in just a few hours. Let's

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take a look at the short list of contenders. Jim Crace is the

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favourite to win with what may be his last book, Harvest. New

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Zealander Eleanor Catton is the youngest of this year's contenders

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with The Luminaries. Irish author Colm Toibin's The Testament of Mary

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is the shortest novel at just over 100 pages. Canadian-American writer

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Ruth Ozeki's A Tale for the Time Being is her fourth book. Pulitzer

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Prize winner Jhumpa Lahiri's novel is The Lowland. And Zimbabwean

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author NoViolet Bulawayo's We Need New Names is the only debut novel on

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the short list. Harvest Ruth Ozeki A Tale for the Time Being Jhumpa

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Lahiri The Lowland NoViolet Bulawayo We Need New Names Our arts

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correspondent Rebecca Jones is at London's Guildhall, where the winner

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will be announced soon. Over to you. It will be at this magnificent

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Guildhall in the City of London The 500 or so guests will be filing in

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to embark on their lavish three-course dinner. Among the guest

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as royal visitor this year, Her Royal Highness the Duchess of

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Cornwall will be here to present the six short-listed authors with

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specially bound copies of their books. It is a landmark moment for

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the Man Booker this year, after 45 years the rules are change. From

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next year anybody writing in English will be eligible to enter. That

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means the Americans are coming. To share their thoughts and insights

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I'm delighted to say I'm joined by by one of the world's leading

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literary agents and by the publishing managing director of

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Canon gate. You have a Booker in contention? Ruth Ozeki with her

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wonderful novel A Tale for the Time Being. Are you optimistic? I'm

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nervous. It's a great short-list this year, so there'll be a number

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of worthy winners on that list. I wanted to ask you, what is the

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impact of winning this prize on a writer's career? Well, it depends

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where the writer is in his or her career. I was the agent for John

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Banville when he won. It supercharges their career. Suddenly

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whoosh! All the back list books sell. You go back and you print all

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the earlier books. And the advances go up and all kind of good things

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happen. It has a huge impact. What about a writer at the beginning of

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their career. Career. You had Jan Matel, and this year for NoViolet

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Bulawayo, it is her first novel Might it distort a writer's career

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by winning so early? For any writer it has a significant impact on how

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many more readers will discover the books that they've written. I don't

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think it is necessarily going to distort what that writer then does

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in the future, but fame can do all sorts of strange things to anyone.

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The beerk is re, but fame can do all sorts of strange things to anyone.

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The beerk is the equivalent -- the Booker is the equivalent of our

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Oscars, and it thrusts a writer into the limelight in a way that they are

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not normally in. It has a big impact on any writer. What impact does it

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have on the publishing industry in general? The whole purpose of the

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Booker, and I was around when it was conceived, he was thinking and we

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were all thinking about the French prizes, the Concord, the Mmdici

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they sell books. They really do sell books. Jan Martell sold millions of

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copies. Night was meant to sell books, to stimulate reading and the

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public buying books. A quick word about the Americans entering this

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year. A good thing or is it going to be a shame? It is a very good thing.

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It is like having a beauty contest but not admitting redheads. American

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write in English last time I looked and they should be in this. Thank

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you both very much indeed. We will be revealing the winner in a couple

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of hours' time. Remember characters thank you.

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Cautious TRANSMIT Remember characters thank you.

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Cautious opt Mitch - that's how some are describing the mood after the

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first day of talks on Iran's nuclear programme in Geneva. These are the

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first formal negotiations since Hassan Rouhani became President

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Tehran has promised new proposals. The US is holding out the prospect

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that it could lift some of its tough economic sanctions.

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From a polite distance the chief negotiators said their he believes.

:18:56.:19:04.

Mohammed Zarif and Baroness Katherine Ashton met for two days of

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talks. Mohammed struggled to get out of his chair. His plaint on Facebook

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of serious back pain. Note the black laptop. He used it to give an

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hour-long PowerPoint presentation outlining Iran's ideas. The world

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powers say they are ready to listen. We've come here with a sense of

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cautious optimism and a great sense of determination, because we believe

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it is really time now for tangible results. We are very serious. We are

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not here to waste our time. We are serious for a real target-oriented

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negotiations between Iran and others. These talks follow last

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month's phone call between President Obama and Iran es new President

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Hassan Rouhani. Are it was the most important conversation between the

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US and Iran in three decades. But don't get carried away, warn those

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who've tried it before. It is right that we go into this with our eyes

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open, mindful of the history of it. In a situation where the Iranians

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are under no doubt that the sanctions and the threat remain on

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the table. Iran's promise of a new start with the West is now being

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tested the right here. But it will take more than two days of talks to

:20:29.:20:32.

sort out all their disagreement One official here has delivered a punchy

:20:33.:20:37.

warning. Don't expect any overnight breakthroughs.

:20:38.:20:47.

Michael Mann is spokesman for Katherine Ashton, the EU foreign

:20:48.:20:50.

policy representative. Thank you for being with us on World News Tonight.

:20:51.:20:57.

I want to ask, why are you feeling positive tonight? You talked about

:20:58.:21:04.

optimism. Well, we've been hearing lots of very positive noises coming

:21:05.:21:07.

from the new President in Iran, and from the new Foreign Minister. We

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really came to this meeting hope that they would follow through on

:21:12.:21:15.

those positive remarks with concrete and constructive proposals. We had a

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set of proposals on the table for a long time which they haven't yet

:21:20.:21:24.

responded to, the Iranians. We hoped that the new regime would be able to

:21:25.:21:29.

respond positively. We said at this morning's session that the proposals

:21:30.:21:33.

were useful. This afternoon our experts sat down with the Iranians

:21:34.:21:38.

and went for the first time in a detailed way through all the

:21:39.:21:41.

technicalities of this. There are positive signs, but as James said in

:21:42.:21:45.

his report, this is a long process and there is a long way to go. What

:21:46.:21:50.

we were aiming for at the end of the day is that the Iranians can prove

:21:51.:21:55.

unequivocally and verifiably to the international community that they

:21:56.:21:57.

are not building a military nuclear programme and that it is a peaceful

:21:58.:22:00.

programme. There's a lot of work still to do. Talks will continue

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hear, hear tomorrow and there'll be other rounds of talks as well. What

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practical moves could Iran make that would give you confidence? For

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example, they could pull back on enriching uranium to 20%. Is that

:22:15.:22:20.

the kind of shift you are looking for? We don't go into too much

:22:21.:22:24.

detail about our proposals publicly but everybody knows that the core

:22:25.:22:30.

issue here is that Iran is enriching uranium according to the

:22:31.:22:34.

International Atomic Energy Agency to levels that are not required for

:22:35.:22:40.

a peaceful programme. We talk about this 20% enrichment issue. The ball

:22:41.:22:44.

is in their court to take a confidence-building measure that can

:22:45.:22:48.

kick off a process of negotiations. We are willing to play our role

:22:49.:22:52.

because it takes two sides to negotiate, but the ball is in their

:22:53.:22:56.

court to make the first move, as Iran is in breach of its

:22:57.:23:01.

international obligations. We had so many positive signals from Mr Hassan

:23:02.:23:05.

Rouhani, are you confident that the regime is fully engaged behind him?

:23:06.:23:10.

Well, the Foreign Minister is very much behind this. He is the chief

:23:11.:23:16.

negotiator now. We've noticed a different tone in negotiations since

:23:17.:23:21.

Mr Zarif took over. There is a lot of work still to be done. Done. We

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hope they can follow through the positive noises from Iran with

:23:26.:23:29.

concrete negotiations. There has been a start today but we are going

:23:30.:23:34.

to continue to work hard. My boss Katherine Ashton has met with the

:23:35.:23:39.

Minister this evening. There'll be further meetings tomorrow and I

:23:40.:23:43.

imagine another set of talks before much longer. We'll keep watching.

:23:44.:23:45.

Thank you. Thank you.

:23:46.:23:49.

Another member of Greenpeace arrested in Russia for staging a

:23:50.:23:53.

protest against Arctic oil drilling has had his bail application

:23:54.:23:59.

rejected. Briton Frank Hewetson was the logistics co-ordinator on the

:24:00.:24:03.

Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise. Crew of 30 face piracy charge as. They

:24:04.:24:08.

carry a maximum prison sentence of 15 years.

:24:09.:24:15.

Dawn outside a jail in Murmansk Russia's biggest Arctic port. A

:24:16.:24:19.

Greenpeace volunteer is carrying in huge bags of supplies for the 3

:24:20.:24:24.

activists who are held here, six of them are British. This morning

:24:25.:24:30.

lifelong campaigner Frank Hewetson from London was in court asking to

:24:31.:24:38.

be bailed from the prison. Is it warm enough? With the extra two

:24:39.:24:43.

blankets I requested it is quite warm, otherwise it is very cold

:24:44.:24:48.

Frank Hewetson's lawyer argued that his detention in international

:24:49.:24:51.

waters was illegal and the charge of piracy was absurd. But the judge

:24:52.:24:57.

dismissed it all. One by one the activists have been brought to court

:24:58.:25:01.

to sit in knees cages while their lawyers ask for bail and they've

:25:02.:25:06.

been denied and sent back to prison, where they've already spent three

:25:07.:25:11.

weeks. She thin. We showed our pictures to he partner in London and

:25:12.:25:15.

asked what she thought of his Russian jail time. Not an

:25:16.:25:19.

occupational hazard but I think that this charge of piracy with a 15 year

:25:20.:25:24.

sentence is completely unprecedented. It seems a massive

:25:25.:25:30.

overreaction to peaceful protest and nobody could have anticipated that.

:25:31.:25:35.

The activists were all detained last month by armed officers when they

:25:36.:25:41.

tried to tie themselves on to a Russian Arctic oil rig 40 miles

:25:42.:25:45.

offshore. We are the only non-Russian TV news team to have

:25:46.:25:48.

been out to the rig, which is expected to start pumping oil later

:25:49.:25:51.

this year. Just down here is the spot where two of the Greenpeace

:25:52.:25:56.

activists tried to climb on to the platform before they were hosed

:25:57.:26:00.

down, pulled off and taken away by armed men in balaclavas. The

:26:01.:26:06.

Greenpeace ship has been toed to Murmansk and impound. Russia's

:26:07.:26:11.

strong action shows how important the massive reserve of Arctic

:26:12.:26:16.

offshore oil are to the country s future and how little tolerance

:26:17.:26:22.

Vladimir Putin has for protest. Just time to remind you of our main

:26:23.:26:27.

news. Italian authorities have released video showing a "mother

:26:28.:26:31.

ship" carrying migrants from Africa transferring passengers to a smaller

:26:32.:26:35.

boat. This comes as the region of Sicily their as state of emergency

:26:36.:26:39.

because of the large numbers of migrants being rescued. Next it is

:26:40.:26:43.

the weather but for now, from me Philippa Thomas and the rest of the

:26:44.:26:45.

team, goodbye. Good evening to you. I'm showing you

:26:46.:26:57.

a foggy sphere for the overnight period. With good reason. The

:26:58.:27:01.

eastern parts, particularly of England, could see extensive and

:27:02.:27:06.

dense fog for a time during the new day's morning. Towards the west a

:27:07.:27:10.

different story. Eventually the cloud will thicken and this area of

:27:11.:27:13.

cloud and rain associated with weather fronts in the Atlantic will

:27:14.:27:14.

push

:27:15.:27:15.

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