28/05/2014 World News Today


28/05/2014

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This is BBC World News Today with me, Philippa Thomas.

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French riot police evict hundreds of migrants from makeshift camps

:00:10.:00:12.

Migrants from Asia, the Middle East and Africa were told to pack

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their bags and go before their temporary homes were bulldozed.

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President Obama makes the case for a different kind of foreign policy

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These people but the problem is there is here.

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President Obama makes the case for a different kind of foreign policy

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family described her as a warrior for equality.

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The American writer, poet and activist Maya Angelou,

:00:56.:00:57.

We'll be looking back at her extraordinary life.

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Look no hands - and no driver - is this the kind of car we'll all

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Police in Calais have spent the day evicting hundreds

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of migrants from makeshift camps in the port area of the French city.

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Many, from Africa, the Middle East and Asia, have spent months trying

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people have been surviving here, with little shelter or food.

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The local authorities say the conditions in three camps have

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become insanitary, and that there's been an outbreak of scabies.

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The BBC's Paul Adams was at one of the camps when the police moved in.

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Slowly the police herded the mode, inspecting every makeshift tent. We

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thought we would be safe in France because we run away from war and I'm

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from Syria but we see this. Tented by tent camp is being cleared. It is

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all very calm but hanging over the whole process is the question of

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where these people are supposed to go. At first there were no answers.

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The refugees wonder if we understand what they have been through. Of all

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the people in the world, just think about this. This man has been on the

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move for five years. We live alone and we cross the desert. Wait a

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minute, please. But for some year this moments could not come soon

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enough. This woman told me her city was under siege. The problem is for

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our town. Back near the port, tempers were afraid. Some of the

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migrants erected barricades and there were scuffles. There were

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insults. Backward it started, the bulldozers moved in and camp the

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camp to call Syria quickly reduced to a pile of debris. Finally there

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was a sort of ideal. They have one more night here before they have to

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find accommodation outside the city. He prepared for another night in the

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open and another leg of his long and exhausting journey. The daily

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movement of people searching for a better life continues in North

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Africa. Around the border between Around the Morocco

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and the Spanish enclave of Melilla dawn... and the Spanish authorities

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say 400 people managed to climb a fence and get across. They're now in

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an immigration centre there. Some may be transferred to the Spanish

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mainland, but most are likely to be sent back to their countries of

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origin in sub-Saharan Africa. With me is Claude Moraes, just

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re-elected as a Labour Member of the European Parliament, also former

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director of the UK's Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants.

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How many people here in Britain know about this? I have been

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following this since 2002 and most people have no place to go. The

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suspicion that I can say is that that is also a political element to

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the clearing of those camps. The justification given is medical that

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the sanitary conditions in these camps are always terrible. The

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terrible now and I visited them very many years ago and they were

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terrible then. That is always the politics. It is a political football

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and the seeming beings other detritus of this political game.

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Dash-mac in these human beings. We cannot make at direct connection but

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the timing is to need and I think the problem here is that today in

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France we have those problems but we have those problems over Europe. It

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is not a crime to be an illegal immigrant and I think we should look

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at burden sharing and responsibility as to how to deal with these people

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and not create a political football in a highly developed country like

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France and indeed in this country as well. We want to ask how many people

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in Britain would consider themselves to be racially prejudice?

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question asked each year in the British Social Attitudes Survey -

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and it's just been revealed that in the last survey, a third of people

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said they were - figures which seem to show the problem is as bad as it

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was 30 years ago. Jon Brain has more on the findings.

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Multicultural Britain, a society steadily becoming more

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at ease with its increased ethnic diversity - not according to

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the results of this survey. In fact, it reveals that, while

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racial prejudice fell to an all-time low at the start of the millennium,

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it's been rising since then. Back in 1983, 36% of people

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questioned described themselves as either "very" or "a

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little" prejudiced against people of other races.

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By 2000, the figure was 25%, one in four.

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But last year, 30% of those surveyed admitted to prejudice.

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There are wide variations across the country.

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Just 16% of people in inner London admitted to prejudice.

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In the West Midlands, the figure was 35%.

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Older men in manual jobs were the most likely

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to say they were prejudiced, but the group recording the biggest rise

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was educated male professionals. The strongest message for

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politicians from the survey concerns immigration.

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Perhaps not surprisingly, more than 90% of those who admitted

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some level of racial prejudice want to see a reduction in the number

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of those entering the UK. But so do 72% of those who said they

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The MEP Claude Moraes is still with me - and Claude, you were also with

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the Commission for Racial Equality here in the UK.

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That's do you see evidence that which prejudices on the rise in the

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UK? There is some evidence that we have a new phase of racial prejudice

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but it is complex and people are unlikely to admit to it with the

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British element of not wanting to admit to racism. That is breaking

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away in this environment where we have political immigration in a

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debate going on which is quite negative. We also have a

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parochialism going on. In big cities we have a cosmopolitan population

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more likely to be at ease with other cultures and races but you have some

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elements, particularly categories of white men who are more likely to

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admit to prejudice. That is an indication of the austerity we have

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and the kind of statements people will now make. I think this is a

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fascinating survey. We're getting reports that there has been a

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shooting at Cape Town International airport. One person is thought to

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have been killed and several others injured an incident in a

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restaurant. Initial reports say that a man has shot a woman before

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turning the gun on himself. President Obama has been outlining

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his vision for a new chapter Speaking to graduates at the

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West Point Military Academy he said the US must always lead

:10:38.:10:41.

on the world stage but military action should not be the only

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element in such leadership. put it, 'Just because we

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have the biggest hammer, does not Mr Obama also said terrorism

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remained the most direct He announced the creation

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of a $5 billion fund to help countries

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across the world fight terrorism. Katty Kay is at the White House

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for us - what did you find most He said when the homeland is

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threatened, America has the right to take unilateral action and should

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not have to ask permission. But he also laid out the case for

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multilateralism and for America whose footprint would perhaps be

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smaller on the world stage. The counterterrorism fund he was talking

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about was part of that. This would help other countries be trained and

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equipped so they can do what America has been doing up until now. This

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fund will be up to $5 billion which will allow us to train and

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facilitate partner countries on the front lines. These resources will

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give this flexibility in different measures. They will help us with the

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training forces who have gone on the offensive against Al-Qaeda. They

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will keep peace in Somalia. We will mean taking a border patrol in Libya

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and facilitate French operations and in Mali. As frustrating as it is

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there are no easy answers in Syria and no military solution can

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eliminate this terrible suffering any time soon. The only problem with

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this fund is that the White House has no money for this and have got

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to go to Congress for the money. We will see whether he actually gets

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this new fund. He was accused by one journalist of the leading from

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behind on foreign policy. Do his critics still say that this is what

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he is doing? I think his whole speech was a reaction to this

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criticism. He has clearly been frustrated by people on the right

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and on the left in the United States who are saying that America has not

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done enough in Syria and in the Ukraine. He was trying to say that

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there are times for multilateralism and times for unilateralism do not

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mistake multilateralism for weakness. We can have successes when

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we lead the world. He pointed to Ukraine as an example of that.

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America put pressure on President Putin and came up with a good

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result. He used the Ukraine as a positive example of multilateralism

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at work. Given that relationships with Russia are frosty, it is

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particularly interesting? The other example he pointed to was Iran and I

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think he is trying to reflect an American public that is slightly

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confused. They have had years of war and do not want unilateral

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intervention. The opinion polls suggest the American public was

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opposed to America taking military action. The American public is

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slightly schizophrenic on this and also want to be seen to be the

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strong world leader. The speech was trying to marry the two ends of the

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spectrum. Now a look at some of the day's

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other news. A major faction of the

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Pakistani Taliban has announced it is splitting from

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the larger militant organisation. A spokesman for the Mehsud group

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said the decision is a result This is the first major rift in

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Pakistani Taliban ranks since 2007 and it's being seen as a significant

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blow to the organisation. 55 people have been found guilty

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in a mass trial in China's restive Some 7,000 people watched as

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a court sitting in a stadium handed out the verdicts on charges of

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terrorism, separatism and murder. Three people were

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sentenced to death. Egypt's presidential election has

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run to a third day after the military-backed interim

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authorities extended voting It comes after

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a last-minute decision to declare Tuesday a holiday failed to persuade

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people to cast their ballots. A low turnout threatens to undermine

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the legitimacy of former military chief Abdul

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Fattah al-Sisi, who is expected to In Thailand

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the army says it's now released 124 leading politicians, activists

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and academics who were taken into 76 people are still detained,

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most from the Red Shirt movement The American writer, poet,

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and academic, Maya Angelou, The first volume

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of her autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,

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reflected her traumatic childhood in an era defined by racial segregation

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and became a bestseller. Nick Higham looks back on

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a hugely creative, turbulent life. My life is not heaven but it sure is

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not held. FIM able to work and have the luck to be black on a Saturday

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night. Performing one of her own poems. She was charismatic and

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passionate, a role model who celebrated the experience of being

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black in America. She grew up in the deep South of America, raised by her

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grandmother admits to racial segregation and poverty. She was

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raped at the age of seven by the boyfriend of her mother. She did not

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speak for the next five years, but the bread voraciously. -- but she

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read voraciously. She became a dancer and appeared on Broadway.

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Then, in what became an extra to marry career, she became a

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journalist and academic, and spent worked with civil rights leaders in

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America. It was her autobiography that made her name, beginning with I

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Know Why The Caged Bird Sings. I remember thinking that white folks

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could not be people because their feet were too small, their skin to

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white and see-through. Bill Clinton acknowledged her status when he

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asked her to read a point at his inauguration. History, despite its

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patent, cannot be a if faced with courage, need not be lived again.

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Barack Obama awarded her a presidential medal of freedom.

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Martin Luther King told me that he expected a black president in 40

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years and I've said, I will be long dead before that happens. She made

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movies and documentaries about the black experience. Always warm and

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wise and encouraging. The encroachment is not to just survive,

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but to thrive. To thrive with some passion, some compassion for my some

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humour and some style. -- compassion, some humour and some

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style. Danielle Moodie-Mills is

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an adviser on racial justice to What did Maya Angelou mean it to

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you? She meant so much. She was an extraordinary light and an amazing

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figure and leader, an African-American woman who told all

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of us who are African-American that you can be great, you can be a

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monument for which people look to for guidance and for hope, and that

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is what she was, she was a living my name and of hope and light. It is

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interesting that she has been introduced, she had a best-selling

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autobiography, but she has the -- she has been reintroduced to younger

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generations as well. In 1993, I was only 13 years old, and it was the

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inaugural poem that she writes for president Bill Clinton, but it was

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also a move that came out as well that featured Janet Jackson and that

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was called poetic justice, and in that movie, her character read the

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programmes of Maya Angelou, particularly phenomenal woman, which

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gave license to sell many African American women to be phenomenal, to

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embrace their curves, their body, their beauty in all of its

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awkwardness and all throughout time, and it was just this time to rebel

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as a young person, being in 13 years old, being a young black girl in the

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United States and recognising that I was a special and beautiful, and

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that is powerful and an empowerment in a country that does not always

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see black as beautiful. Of course, she had terrible struggles, grew up

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in the deeply racist segregation South, but what you are saying is,

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the way she phrased her message, her poetry still speaks to young black

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women today. Her poetry speaks to the world today. She did not mince

:21:36.:21:41.

words in her poetry about the terrorism that black people faced in

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the United States throughout, from slavery through Jim Crow, and even

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up until today, there is a lot of injustice that African-Americans

:21:52.:21:54.

face, and Maya Angelou used the beauty of her words to really bring

:21:55.:22:02.

that picture to people all around the world. It was important and

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needed. She said that she would never see a black president in her

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lifetime. She would die, be long dead and gone, before that happened,

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so I can only imagine, in 2011, when President Barack Obama gives her the

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highest honour up -- Hunter in the land, I can only imagine what that

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meant to her, because I know what it meant to me to see that honour

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bestowed to her. It was just phenomenal. I was interested in one

:22:37.:22:42.

of her many memorable quotations where she said, courage is the most

:22:43.:22:46.

important of all of the virtues, because without that, you cannot

:22:47.:22:50.

practice any other virtue consistently. That could apply to

:22:51.:22:54.

many politicians, couldn't it? That could be a piece of advice to

:22:55.:22:58.

everyone. It takes courage to stand up for your convictions, and I've

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think she showed all of us that, that it takes courage to speak the

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truth, to open your truth, and to live in it. Thank you for joining

:23:09.:23:12.

us. Thank you for having me. Now, how safe would you feel

:23:13.:23:20.

in a car with no driver? Not only that, no option to drive,

:23:21.:23:23.

no steering wheel, no pedals, just The US tech giant Google has

:23:24.:23:27.

announced plans to build 100 self-driving vehicles,

:23:28.:23:31.

and has started trying them out Supporters claim they could reduce

:23:32.:23:33.

the number of traffic accidents, but some fear they'll just boost

:23:34.:23:37.

the amount of traffic on the roads. Here's our technology

:23:38.:23:40.

correspondent Rory Cellan Jones. No steering wheel, no accelerating

:23:41.:23:53.

pedal, not even a break, but this could be the future of motoring.

:23:54.:23:59.

Press a button and off you go. The maximum speed is 25 miles an hour.

:24:00.:24:04.

Software detects other vehicles, and a softer materials that should make

:24:05.:24:10.

it safer it did -- it hit a pedestrian. Google is to build 100

:24:11.:24:14.

of these vehicles in the next stage of a hugely ambitious project which

:24:15.:24:18.

has so far involved adapting existing cars the promises that --

:24:19.:24:26.

adapting existing cars. The premise is that this will cut road accidents

:24:27.:24:32.

caused by human error. But the big car makers are already bringing in

:24:33.:24:36.

some automation. This car helps you keep in your lane, and when it comes

:24:37.:24:40.

to reversing into a tight spot, the car can take over. I and not

:24:41.:24:46.

derail's best partner, said the level of automation where you take

:24:47.:24:51.

your story will and let it happen is a fine by me, but how happy would we

:24:52.:24:55.

be to let the car takeover in all circumstances? The key, of coarse,

:24:56.:25:03.

is safety. The existing self-driving car has driven hundreds of thousands

:25:04.:25:08.

of miles without an accident and can spot a cyclist pulling out. When the

:25:09.:25:15.

cyclist pulls out it's arm, the movement is predicted. This would

:25:16.:25:20.

involve big spending on the road system and a radical change in our

:25:21.:25:25.

attitudes towards mentoring. The major constraints are the costs to

:25:26.:25:29.

do the roads, the sensors come at you would have to have individual

:25:30.:25:35.

lanes for these cars. Are we as human beings ready for that moment

:25:36.:25:39.

where you take away all control whatsoever and fit in your little

:25:40.:25:43.

box and off you go? Google plans to run a pilot programme for its

:25:44.:25:47.

self-driving car near its Californian headquarters in the next

:25:48.:25:50.

couple of years, but it will be a long time before city streets are

:25:51.:25:54.

ready for motoring without the tourists.

:25:55.:26:03.

Here is some amateur video of a tornado in the United States. It

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ripped through a trailer park, injuring at least nine people, one

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of them critically. It is about to go right over us. It was filmed near

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Watford city by a resident from a neighboring camp, who got in his

:26:16.:26:20.

camp and drove away while witnessing this. The park is home to workers in

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North Dakota's oil trade. Just a reminder, our main headline, French

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police have been affecting around 800 migrants. The police moved

:26:34.:26:39.

through the camp, telling people to leave.

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But for now, from me and the rest of the team, goodbye.

:26:45.:26:57.

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