25/02/2016 World News Today


25/02/2016

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A French judge upholds a government plan

:00:00.:00:11.

to demolish parts of a makeshift migrant camp near Calais.

:00:12.:00:16.

As Europe warns its open border system is facing collapse

:00:17.:00:20.

the migrant trail across the continent is coming to a halt

:00:21.:00:28.

If this is the one gate that migrants came from Greece to

:00:29.:00:34.

Macedonia have to pass through. For much of the last three days, it has

:00:35.:00:36.

stayed shut. A final plea for support on the eve

:00:37.:00:38.

of Ireland's election - The country's on the up

:00:39.:00:41.

but where many voters have been one of the world's most

:00:42.:00:44.

famous locomotives - the Flying Scotsman -

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is back on the tracks. A French court has given the green

:00:49.:01:04.

light to government plans to clear part of the notorious

:01:05.:01:07.

Calais migrant camp, Hundreds of people

:01:08.:01:09.

from the Middle East and Africa have been living

:01:10.:01:16.

in the camp, in the hope of crossing Calais is a draw for many

:01:17.:01:19.

because of its location with a major ferry port

:01:20.:01:23.

and Eurotunnel rail terminal. But the camp's population has been

:01:24.:01:25.

growing in recent months, while new fences have been erected

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around the terminal. The authorities say around

:01:29.:01:32.

a thousand migrants will be affected by the eviction

:01:33.:01:34.

and force will be used if necessary Aid agencies say the number of those

:01:35.:01:37.

involved is much higher. But the French Interior

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Minister says a violent TRANSLATION: it has never been the

:01:46.:01:55.

government's intention to go ahead with a brutal evacuation of the area

:01:56.:02:00.

south of Calais using bulldozers, with computer reading the north of

:02:01.:02:05.

migrants. That approach is not a way of doing things. Our politics -- our

:02:06.:02:10.

politics is to take charge of the situation. To take care of the

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people, and to care of Glik for all those who are vulnerable with

:02:16.:02:20.

humanitarian objective. From tomorrow, the state will try and

:02:21.:02:25.

find humanitarian solution in tune with the ballot asthma values of our

:02:26.:02:27.

country. Our correspondent Tomos Morgan

:02:28.:02:31.

gave me the latest from the camp. Migrants living in the area which is

:02:32.:02:42.

half of the camp here have three choices. They can move into the

:02:43.:02:49.

containers that the government have set out for them, they can move to a

:02:50.:02:53.

different area of France, in search of other migrant asylum areas, or

:02:54.:03:01.

they can claim asylum in France, and that is their preferred option. The

:03:02.:03:08.

authorities have said that they the white force anyone to leave. -- they

:03:09.:03:16.

won't force anyone to leave. They are trying to close down the

:03:17.:03:19.

southern area, but they said that they will keep some of the community

:03:20.:03:24.

structures, the school, the church, the legal Centre, because they are

:03:25.:03:27.

paddlers Hazmat pillars of the community created here. However, aid

:03:28.:03:32.

charities have already criticised the decision. Theresa May said that

:03:33.:03:37.

even if you keep some of those community structures, the risks --

:03:38.:03:41.

segregating them. -- the charity said.

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Give us an idea of what the conditions are like this. The

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conditions are better in Calais than they are in the Dunkirk camp, which

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is around 30 miles down the road. Aid workers, and many different

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workers, have been here for several months helping people from around

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the world, from the Middle East and Africa. Many of them live in

:04:11.:04:14.

structures built out of wood and canvas, and the women and children

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particularly get extra help from charities, they get supplies, and

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today, they were allowed to pick out their clothes in a more dignified

:04:25.:04:29.

manner than other charities dishing out food. The situation is not good,

:04:30.:04:35.

but it is better than in Dunkirk, where everyone is living in tents,

:04:36.:04:39.

and the situation has been described by the Red Cross as some of the

:04:40.:04:42.

worst conditions they have ever seen.

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The EU migration Commissioner is warning that the border between

:04:50.:04:59.

Greece and Macedonia is risking collapse.

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Greece has recalled its ambassador to Austria amid growing divisions

:05:01.:05:02.

among EU states over the migrant crisis.

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Thousands of people are now stranded in Greece after other countries

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began to implement strict border controls.

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Our correspondent Danny Savage reports from a migrant

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At the main border, 3000 people living on a site built a half that

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number. Living on the migrant trail, it has slowed to a crawl. This is

:05:25.:05:30.

the spot where people have to pass through. But for much of the last

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three days, it has stayed shut. That is because the next border going

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north, between Macedonia and Serbia, is closed for much of the time as

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well. It the classic domino effect. We wait, six hours, seven hours,

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until the board is open. Sometimes, they closed the border, but people

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go to the camp. Just over the border, the train was stuck for

:06:01.:06:08.

hours, and frustrations grew. Just wait, just wait. What is the

:06:09.:06:13.

problem? So a backlog of coaches and clean it is is building up down the

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line. This is a service station just short of the border. Greece is is in

:06:18.:06:25.

danger of becoming a warehouse of souls, and interior minister said.

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There has been a sharp rise in number of children on the move.

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These Iraqi twins were born in Turkey, and had been travelling all

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life. We have an increasing unaccompanied children, and at Greek

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level, there is not capacity to shelter them, and to give them basic

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care. I also talked to these Afghans and Pakistani 's. They will not be

:06:49.:06:52.

allowed to cross the border because they are not Syrian or Iraqi. They

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will probably head for the hills. Organise and don't move! In the last

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three days, 8000 people have arrived in Greece like this. And they will

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try to push north by whatever means, despite all the pretty -- political

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rows. Joining me is Ian Bond,

:07:12.:07:14.

Foreign Policy Director How common is it for an ambassador

:07:15.:07:26.

to be recalled over a matter like this? Forte EU countries, it is very

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unusual indeed. I cannot think of a previous occasion. The problem is

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that the countries on the front line like Greece and Italy have their own

:07:36.:07:39.

agenda, but other countries like Austria and Hungary want to limit

:07:40.:07:42.

the number of migrants coming through, and there is a disconnect

:07:43.:07:47.

between the tee. There is, and what the Austrians are going to do if

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they carry on in this way is to bottle up ever larger numbers in

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Greece, and they cannot cope with the numbers. What do you think can

:07:57.:08:00.

be done now in terms of getting them to come together and find some sort

:08:01.:08:05.

of plan? The European Commission has been trying to do that today, and

:08:06.:08:09.

the Commissioner has been talking about that and talking about the

:08:10.:08:13.

need for coordinated action. But the most important thing is that the EU

:08:14.:08:18.

needs to start looking beyond the borders to see how it stops people

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beginning this perilous journey to Europe, because if it cannot stop

:08:24.:08:26.

that, then it cannot stop people coming from Syria. It is not going

:08:27.:08:31.

to be able to cope with the problem in these enormous numbers of

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migrants. So try and sort the problem at the source? By perfecting

:08:37.:08:42.

piece to Syria? That is not likely in the short term. We had a recent

:08:43.:08:48.

conference to raise money. How useful is that money going to be?

:08:49.:08:51.

The money is going to be useful, but it is not enough to try and provide

:08:52.:08:56.

sustainable livelihoods for people in the region. As well as trying to

:08:57.:09:01.

work for peace in Syria, which is going to be a long-term problem, you

:09:02.:09:08.

can try and keep the people going to Turkey and Jordan and Lebanon in

:09:09.:09:13.

better conditions, so they have less of an incentive to travel on. If

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they are living in tense, if the children cannot get educated, they

:09:18.:09:24.

can listen to the smugglers, and they will take several thousand

:09:25.:09:28.

dollars can get them into Europe. There has been a lot of tension with

:09:29.:09:34.

a whole British exit issue. Is that taking the attention away from... It

:09:35.:09:45.

has had two effects. It has meant that the EU has been talking about

:09:46.:09:48.

Britain's problems when it should have been talking about Syria's

:09:49.:09:54.

problems. British politicians have not felt able or brave enough to say

:09:55.:09:58.

that Britain needs to play a bigger role in accepting some of those

:09:59.:10:02.

refugees. Should they play a bigger role? Yes, they then Ie we should.

:10:03.:10:07.

The numbers involved are largely the enormous. They are facing most

:10:08.:10:12.

horrendous conditions in Syria, and they are increasingly facing

:10:13.:10:15.

difficulties in the countries that they are going to. Britain, so far,

:10:16.:10:21.

has made a tiny offer, in terms of 20,000 people over the next few

:10:22.:10:26.

years, whereas Germany, they have taken 3.5 million or more. Thank you

:10:27.:10:29.

for talking to us. And for all the latest

:10:30.:10:33.

on Europe's migration crisis, Along with full coverage

:10:34.:10:35.

of the latest developments, you'll find analysis, including

:10:36.:10:38.

comment by Damian Grammaticas, the BBC's Europe

:10:39.:10:40.

correspondent in Brussels. Let's have a look at some of the

:10:41.:10:41.

day's other news. A bitter battle over gay rights

:10:42.:10:54.

in Italy could be nearing an end after the Senate there voted

:10:55.:10:58.

to grant legal recognition Premier Matteo Renzi described

:10:59.:11:00.

the passage of the bill But gay and lesbian groups

:11:01.:11:03.

see the legislation as a betrayal because Mr Renzi's

:11:04.:11:06.

party sacrificed a provision to allow gay adoption

:11:07.:11:08.

in order to ensure passage. A study of people who survived

:11:09.:11:12.

the Ebola virus in west Africa has found that most of them will have

:11:13.:11:15.

long-lasting health problems. Analysis shows that in the 6 months

:11:16.:11:18.

after being discharged, about two-thirds of patients had

:11:19.:11:23.

body weakness, while regular headaches, depressive symptoms

:11:24.:11:25.

and memory loss were found in half. Harvard University in the US

:11:26.:11:30.

is going to remove the word "master" from academic titles,

:11:31.:11:33.

after protests from students who claimed the title

:11:34.:11:35.

had echoes of slavery - House masters, in charge

:11:36.:11:37.

of residential halls, This latest dispute is part

:11:38.:11:43.

of a series of protests about race and identity which have erupted

:11:44.:11:48.

across US campuses. A growing number of Christians

:11:49.:11:50.

are fleeing Pakistan - fearing a rise in extremist violence

:11:51.:11:52.

in their mainly Muslim homeland. Thousands are travelling

:11:53.:11:55.

to nearby Thailand - but because the country

:11:56.:11:57.

doesn't offer asylum, many - including children -

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are being interned. The BBC's Chris Rogers has been

:11:59.:12:00.

undercover in the Thai detention facilities and sent this

:12:01.:12:03.

report from the capital, If this Christian service was taking

:12:04.:12:23.

place in certain parts of their homeland, this pasta and his

:12:24.:12:28.

congregation could be risking their lives. Entire families have left

:12:29.:12:34.

Pakistan, ignoring the hostile neighbours, arriving in Thailand.

:12:35.:12:37.

Each has its own story of persecution and those that didn't

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make it. TRANSLATION: my sister was burned

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alive. Only because she said the word God. She was burned for this

:12:44.:12:47.

reason alone. But she said the reason -- she said the word God.

:12:48.:12:58.

Their trauma is far from over. Here in Bangkok, Pakistani family rely on

:12:59.:13:06.

hand-outs. Thailand is not signed up to you in international agreement to

:13:07.:13:12.

take on a silent secret -- seekers. The United Nations refugee agency

:13:13.:13:19.

has been allowed to step in. It investigates the asylum claims and

:13:20.:13:23.

relocate them to another country. The process is taking years. The

:13:24.:13:29.

tight immigration and police are growing impatient. Has this husband

:13:30.:13:34.

been taken away? Yes, he has been taken away. I have just come to this

:13:35.:13:41.

apartment block. I have seen dozens of women sobbing, and it became

:13:42.:13:45.

clear why. They have taken all of their husbands. In a series of

:13:46.:13:50.

raids, Pakistani women and children are also rounded up, charged with

:13:51.:13:54.

illegal immigration, find and imprisoned. This is where they are

:13:55.:14:04.

taking two. Bangkok's main detention centre for illegal immigrants.

:14:05.:14:07.

Journalists are not welcome. We have had to pose as charity volunteers.

:14:08.:14:14.

We see many Pakistani Christians. Including children. The noise is

:14:15.:14:18.

their cries for help to be freed. How long have you been here?

:14:19.:14:22.

Three months. All be charity volunteers can offer them is food

:14:23.:14:31.

and water. A lot of women are complaining the children are ill.

:14:32.:14:36.

They have diarrhoea because of the dirty water. Imprisoning a child

:14:37.:14:42.

with adults, even with their parents, is a breach of

:14:43.:14:49.

international law. They are taken back to these hot, overcrowded

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cells. The Thai government say that the strives to provide the best

:14:54.:14:57.

possible care. But those who cannot pay their fines for illegal

:14:58.:15:02.

immigration are sent to a Thai jail. Some are freed after charities pay

:15:03.:15:05.

for their release. TRANSLATION: late put us in

:15:06.:15:14.

shackles. We are in a lot of pain. With just eight staff to process

:15:15.:15:19.

11,500 Pakistani asylum requests, UNHCR say that limited resources

:15:20.:15:26.

have led to delays in Thailand. The type government say that it leaves

:15:27.:15:29.

and with no choice but to arrest illegal immigrant.

:15:30.:15:34.

Political campaigning is drawing to a close in Ireland ahead

:15:35.:15:37.

of tomorrow's election - a contest which pollsters

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are predicting could produce a hung parliament and weeks

:15:40.:15:41.

Our Ireland correspondent Chris Bucker has been looking

:15:42.:15:44.

at the main issues during the campaign.

:15:45.:15:45.

Just a warning there are flashing images from the start

:15:46.:15:48.

In the middle of an election, politicians are not usually keen to

:15:49.:16:01.

look like a used car salesman. But the Irish prime ministers seems

:16:02.:16:06.

happy to have this country's economy and his policies tested. A key part

:16:07.:16:15.

of end Kenny's sales pitch is about bailouts and economic sales prices.

:16:16.:16:20.

In the last five years, he has called his critics whinges. Dublin

:16:21.:16:29.

is benefiting from this recovery, other places aren't? I recalled the

:16:30.:16:35.

days of endless wealth in Ireland. The same comments were being made

:16:36.:16:42.

about the Celtic Tiger. That is why we look for a second term, so we can

:16:43.:16:47.

finish the job, and deal with that myth. But some have found it

:16:48.:16:51.

difficult keeping their faith in the politicians during Ireland's era of

:16:52.:16:58.

austerity. The imposition of new taxes and cuts have meant that still

:16:59.:17:04.

some people are waiting to see the improvements of themselves. I am

:17:05.:17:09.

finding it very hard. Certainly when you are on social welfare. You are

:17:10.:17:14.

trying to get by. All that is gaining, them. It is their own

:17:15.:17:20.

effort. There are people trying to take advantage of the anger directed

:17:21.:17:26.

against politician. Many independent, and anti-austerity

:17:27.:17:28.

candidates are standing. The opposition leader has been

:17:29.:17:43.

trying to win back voters who blame them when the Celtic Tiger

:17:44.:17:51.

collapsed. The politicians have a lot to do to overcome the public's

:17:52.:18:00.

sceptic a system of politics. That scepticism. There's been another

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leader who is being talked out about a lot. Gerry Adams, once seen as the

:18:06.:18:11.

political wing IRA north of the border. Sinn Fein has tried to

:18:12.:18:18.

reinvent itself as an antiestablishment party of the

:18:19.:18:24.

South. It is about the ordinary people. Whether it is fairness. The

:18:25.:18:30.

problem for Mr Adams is that the Republic's big two parties are not

:18:31.:18:35.

making advantage is that advances. They have ruled out formal coalition

:18:36.:18:39.

with Sinn Fein. The polls suggest that a deal will have to be done if

:18:40.:18:46.

a government has to be formed. If not, it could mean another election

:18:47.:18:49.

for Ireland. Here in Here in Britain a major report has

:18:50.:18:58.

found the BBC guilty of serious failings with regard to Jimmy Savile

:18:59.:19:01.

- the former television entertainer who committed dozens

:19:02.:19:04.

of sexual attacks. For several decades,

:19:05.:19:05.

he was one of Britain's biggest But, a year after Savile's death

:19:06.:19:07.

in 2011, allegations The report said there was a culture

:19:08.:19:11.

of "reverence and fear" Soweto in South Africa

:19:12.:19:14.

is a place rich in history, famous for its pivotal role

:19:15.:19:18.

in the anti-apartheid struggle. One local man's passion for bird

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watching is helping to put the township on the map

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for another reason - The BBC spent the day

:19:24.:19:25.

with Raymond Rampolokeng, Soweto's first bird guide,

:19:26.:19:28.

as he taught local youngsters the importance of birds

:19:29.:19:30.

and maintaining the green spaces the black headed Heron, right in our

:19:31.:19:32.

backyard. My nickname is the Birdman of

:19:33.:19:54.

Soweto. It is a catchy name, and I like it. As young boys growing up in

:19:55.:20:01.

Soweto, we would go out and hunt for birds. I did not know later in life

:20:02.:20:09.

that I would be met with the challenge of educating our community

:20:10.:20:15.

and the world about the importance of bird conservation. The birds we

:20:16.:20:23.

are hearing now are a mixture of Sparrow and house sparrow. I

:20:24.:20:31.

volunteered in a local conservation group, which was also looking at

:20:32.:20:40.

telling a problematic area with markings and robberies were taking

:20:41.:20:44.

place. We had programmes for young kids, which linked me up with the

:20:45.:20:50.

wetland area, which is teeming with birds. That is where my love for

:20:51.:20:57.

birding started. I didn't know that I would be the first bird guide to

:20:58.:21:04.

come from Soweto. That is history. I was hooked.

:21:05.:21:12.

We are at the park, and this is a very personal passion of mine.

:21:13.:21:20.

Working with young kids. We do walkabouts. We look at different

:21:21.:21:24.

bird species. Birds eat different things that they

:21:25.:21:38.

source either from the ground from here. Also, crumbs from outside our

:21:39.:21:44.

kitchens. It is beautiful working with the local kids who are also

:21:45.:21:55.

changing the perception of older people, particularly their parents.

:21:56.:22:07.

It is a wonderful feeling, that one is making, knowing that we are

:22:08.:22:16.

appreciating art buyer of diversity in Soweto. -- our biodiversity.

:22:17.:22:26.

For the benefit of future generations to come.

:22:27.:22:29.

The Flying Scotsman, one of the world's most famous steam

:22:30.:22:32.

locomotives, has made its historic return to the tracks.

:22:33.:22:34.

Thousands turned out to watch its journey

:22:35.:22:35.

from London's King's Cross station to York, following a decade-long,

:22:36.:22:38.

Our transport correspondent Richard Westcott was onboard.

:22:39.:22:47.

It's not a locomotive, it's a celebrity.

:22:48.:22:51.

Flying Scotsman, back centre-stage on its old stomping ground,

:22:52.:22:55.

For the crew, it's a tough, filthy, rewarding job.

:22:56.:23:02.

This very cramped passage is just one of the things that makes

:23:03.:23:06.

It meant that drivers could change over whilst the train

:23:07.:23:12.

That made this the first service that went from London

:23:13.:23:18.

This engine has had all the ups and downs

:23:19.:23:21.

Then shipped off to the United States, shipped off to Australia.

:23:22.:23:29.

It's caused heartache, heartbreaks, heart attacks and bankruptcies.

:23:30.:23:33.

I think many people believed it would never again,

:23:34.:23:38.

NEWSREEL: The beautiful engine eased out of platform 10.

:23:39.:23:44.

Flying Scotsman's always made headlines.

:23:45.:23:46.

It was the first train officially clocked at 100 mph.

:23:47.:23:50.

Today, the only delays were down to train-spotters on the line.

:23:51.:24:01.

At its birthplace in Doncaster, they can still pull the crowds.

:24:02.:24:05.

Journey's end in York and the crew are stars for the day.

:24:06.:24:09.

The enthusiasm, people coming out on to the tracks to see

:24:10.:24:14.

It's brilliant to see everyone lineside.

:24:15.:24:17.

Great to see everyone's supporting the engine.

:24:18.:24:21.

Flying Scotsman's going to be touring again.

:24:22.:24:25.

So thousands more can revel in this sight.

:24:26.:24:35.

Finally to the White House, where President Obama hosted

:24:36.:24:37.

a concert on Wednesday to pay tribute to the late Ray Charles.

:24:38.:24:40.

gospel singer Yolanda Adams and The Band Perry were among

:24:41.:24:54.

a group of contemporary artists who performed Charles' music

:24:55.:24:58.

Mr Obama even joined in with a bit of singing himself,

:24:59.:25:02.

I will not be singing. But for our last one, it is fitting, that we pay

:25:03.:25:17.

tribute to one of our favourites. One of the most brilliant and

:25:18.:25:23.

influential musicians of our times, the late, great genius himself, Mr

:25:24.:25:26.

Ray Charles. On that musical note, it is goodbye

:25:27.:25:52.

from me and the team. Thank you for watching. Goodbye.

:25:53.:26:09.

It may not be as cold as recent nights have been. Having said that,

:26:10.:26:15.

it gets off to a chilly start. There is

:26:16.:26:17.

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