03/06/2016 World News Today


03/06/2016

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The Headlines: Paris on high alert with the flood waters

:00:00.:00:15.

of the River Seine due to peak in the coming hours.

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The basements of two of Paris's world famous art galleries

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are cleared as the River Seine rises to dangerous levels.

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Nice work if you can get it - a Fifa investigation shows how

:00:24.:00:26.

former President Sepp Blatter and two other senior officials

:00:27.:00:28.

awarded themselves $80 million in bonuses over five years.

:00:29.:00:36.

With some migrant routes closed, other - more dangerous ones - open.

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The bodies of nearly 120 people are recovered

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And reunited - the codebreakers who changed the course of World War II.

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With the River Seine rising by the hour, Paris

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is in emergency mode - the river at its highest

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Fear of flooding has led to the closure of two of the city's

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most famous museums, the Louvre and the Musee D'Orsay.

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Staff are moving priceless artworks from basements to the safety

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Flooding has affected swathes of France and Germany with a dozen

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deaths reported and widespread disruption to transport and power.

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This statue measures the height of the Seine. Brazilians measure how

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high it has caused -- pregames measure how high it has risen. It

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usually reaches his toes, but now it has reached almost his face. It is

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crazy. It has started to be very dangerous in some places. The water

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is everywhere. The Government is declaring a state of natural

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disaster in flooded areas outside of Paris. Rescuers have moved more than

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20,000 people from their homes. This week, we found a town cut into. The

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only way across is by canoe. Or tractor. Floodwaters from some zones

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flood towards the capital. You can see why Paris is worried. The Seine

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has riven dramatically. The museum invited us to see its

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emergency measures. It has stopped tourist from coming and moved these

:03:20.:03:23.

boxes of antiquities from the basements to the ground floor, away

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from potential floodwater. The Mona Lisa herself lives safely on the

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first floor. The city now waits to see if the waters will receive. For

:03:36.:03:38.

years, France was concerned about its economy going under. Now it has

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the same worry about its capital. Well, joining me via Skype,

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from the banks of the Seine in Paris, is local resident Walid

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Haddad. I can see that you are indeed on the

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banks of a very flooded looking river San. Tell me what it's like.

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It is quite impressive, as you can see, because normally this space

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near the trees is one of the major roads, one of the major access which

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goes from the West to the east of Paris. Now it is completely flooded.

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Generally, it happens every year, sometimes the roads are closed. But

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I personally never saw this before and I guess an entire generation

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never saw that because you are actually almost reaching the panels,

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as you can see top for me, the principal attraction of Paris, those

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two last days is the Seine and is not the Eiffel Tower.

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We are reading reports that even at the centre, the water is getting

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into basements. Yes, exactly. As you can see, Paris has some parts which

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are... Many people live across the river, many people live in boats.

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Those guys are already quite in trouble. Many people, those

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buildings, they live across the Seine. They are starting to be

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worried about their basements. Lots of Parisi buildings have basements.

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Shame, we seem to have lost that picture. A local resident in Paris

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joining us from what was very obviously the banks of a very

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flooded Seine, just giving us his update of what he is experiencing in

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the city, saying he has never seen the water level quite so high.

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Iraqi troops are spacing heavy resistance from Islamic State

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fighters as they try to fight their way towards the Legion. More than

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1000 members of the Iraqi forces have been wounded since the start of

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the operation, and the military have become increasingly reliant on air

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power. The BBC has been given rare and exclusive access to the Iraqi

:06:24.:06:27.

army's aviation wings over the loser.

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This is what the war in Iraq looks like from above.

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We are over a village north of Fallujah.

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The Iraqi army have been told their target is

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a building where more than 20 fighters from the Islamic State

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If they were there, they aren't any more.

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For these pilots, the fight to retake Fallujah has been a

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24-hour-a-day full-time job and each day it is just getting harder.

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There are roughly 50,000 civilians trapped

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inside the city and many believe they are being used as human

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The pilot on this helicopter told us, from the sky,

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it's difficult now to know who is your enemy

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For some, this battle is incredibly personal.

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Mohammad was in London on

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a training course when he heard that IS had taken over his neighbourhood

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He couldn't get in touch with his family for four days.

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TRANSLATION: I asked my neighbour to sneak into my home,

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take our family photos and keep them safe.

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He said he couldn't because Isis had already

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been inside my house and had written on my walls that they would kill me.

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I dropped the bomb that destroyed my house.

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Mohammad said he will never return to Falluja, but he will keep

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And IS are fighting back with everything they have.

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Including anti-aircraft weapons, but this time they missed.

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Unharmed, they are asked to help the injured.

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The military believes they are facing up to 3000

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IS fighters in Falluja, but right now, their biggest concern

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TRANSLATION: The most difficult thing is making the distinction

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We are taking our time to get it right.

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Even if they are family members of an IS fighter,

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Falluja cannot be retaken by air strikes alone, but it is an

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For now, the city remains riddled with fighting and terrified

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Lawyers for Fifa say three former high-ranking officials

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including Sepp Blatter, awarded themselves pay rises

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and bonuses totalling eighty million dollars between 2011 and 2015.

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The evidence will be given to American and Swiss prosecutors

:09:58.:09:59.

who are investigating corruption within Fifa.

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The announcement came on the back of yet another raid on Fifa

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Pitch Conway from BBC sport is with me. Fever have called this a

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co-ordinated attempt by these men to enrich themselves. Yes, staggering

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figures. $80 million over the course of five years. Bonuses paid for

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things like the success of a World Cup in South Africa in 2010 or

:10:32.:10:35.

Brazil in 2014. For the Confederations Cup, the tournament

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traditionally played the year before those, things like if all the teams

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and games were completed, a winner awarded at the end, basic trigger

:10:46.:10:48.

payments for these enormous sums of money. What fever's lawyers say,

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they have conducted an internal investigation into this, they have

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uncovered these secret contracts known to only a few people at the

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very top of the organisation. They say that these contracts will now be

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handed over to the US and Swiss authorities because some of the

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provisions in those contracts,, goes to show the staggering sums of money

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that were swilling around at the top end of fever between its leadership

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in that period of time. Staggering indeed and talking of lawyers, we

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have heard from the US lawyer of Sepp Blatter, the former president

:11:30.:11:32.

of fever, involved in this scandal. He said that these compensation

:11:33.:11:37.

payments received where, quote, proper, fair and in line with those

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of the heads of other major professional sports leagues. The key

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difference in us... He is trying to say on behalf of sent -- Sepp

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Blatter, he was not the head of sports organisation, he was head of

:11:54.:11:57.

fever. Their argument is of a proper levels of compensation for people in

:11:58.:12:01.

those positions. It is one of those arguments that will be ongoing.

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Fever's own lawyers are determined again to show that they are

:12:05.:12:10.

reformed, that the organisation is serious about cleaning up its act.

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Some of those amounts that Sepp Blatter signed off, perhaps are in

:12:15.:12:18.

breach of Swiss law. That is where it becomes a serious problem and

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where Sepp Blatter we will believe will have to answer questions. He is

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already the subject of one criminal investigation and it will be

:12:26.:12:28.

interesting to see how this was authorities view these latest

:12:29.:12:28.

development. Thank you. It has been a particularly deadly

:12:29.:12:31.

day for migrants attempting the dangerous crossing

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of the Mediterranean. The bodies of at least 100

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migrants have washed up Teams have been working to recover

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the bodies which are coming ashore in the western Libyan

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town of Zuwarah. We've been told that of the 117

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victims that were found - According to the Red Cross,

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little else is known For those that were washed ashore

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on the coast of Libya in the last days, we don't know their country

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of origin, although the majority of people that travel

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through the Libya route towards Italy do come

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from sub-Saharan Africa. But I think, in addition

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to the incident that we've on the coast of Libya,

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we're also seeing reports of further sinkings and further incidents

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off the coast of Crete. So at present we're witnessing

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the repeat of an unacceptable tragedy on a scale which we can't

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continue to ignore. When I saw indication from my

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colleagues of the Libyan Red Cross, having retrieved these bodies,

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I myself was quite surprised to see that the larger proportion of people

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in Libya were women. However, it's worth noting that

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in addition to the bodies that were retrieved from the beaches

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yesterday, as part of what Libyan Red Crescent do,

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over 100 more bodies were seen at sea today by the Libyan coast

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guard, according to reports. So I think at this early stage,

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it's not possible to tell whether or not this is some type

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of shift, but certainly, regardless, I think it's worth

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viewing that these are people who are coming to seek hope,

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coming to seek some safety, coming to seek dignity,

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and until a change in the factors that cause these people to move,

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we're going to continue to see people that are taking the difficult

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choice to put themselves into boats It was a luckier outcome

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for 340 migrants who have been rescued

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off the coast of Crete. A large search operation is underway

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to find any other survivors after a boat with hundreds

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of migrants on board capsized. Four bodies have been

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recovered so far. Most of the survivors are on board

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a cargo vessel heading for Italy. It's unclear how many

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people were on the boat. Thomas Fessy is in Agias Galinis,

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a village in southern Crete. What more can you tell us? Just a

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moment ago, a vessel from the Greek coastguard actually adopted here and

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they are not allowed to speak to the media, so they couldn't tell us much

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more. What they did tell us is that the sea is getting rough and that

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the maritime weather forecast could hinder the effort. Just over 100

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kilometres off the coast behind me. It has been a huge operation all

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day, involving the Greek, the Italians, the Egyptian coast guards.

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We are talking about patrol boats, but also helicopters, planes, and

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what we know is that, crucial to this operation, has been the

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presence of commercial ships, in the vicinity of the sinking. We

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understand that a Norwegian gas tanker, a Norwegian owned gas tanker

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was the closest and therefore the fastest to get to the scene, rescued

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over 200 survivors and it is heading to Italy. Others are now on their

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way to Malta or Turkey and Egypt. Obviously, the main question tonight

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is, how many more? Is it dozens or hundreds or any at all that are

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still to be rescued out there in the sea? We still don't know exactly how

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many were on board and where they were headed to. Yes, exactly. We

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don't know where they were coming from for a start and we don't know

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where they were headed to. We don't know how many were on board. The

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International organisation for migration says that the kind of

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boats that were described as a large shipping boat could carry up to 700

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people, but obviously this is speculation. We don't know how many

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were on that boat. Hundreds for sure, but how many more have yet to

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be rescued, remains a question. Where were they going? That is

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another question. It is quite unusual to see migrant boats sinking

:17:13.:17:16.

off the coast of Crete, but just in the last week we have seen a group

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of a hundred Afghans landing. Whether it is more than flimsy

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boats, carried away in the currents as they were trying for a much

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longer journey and to the Italian coast, that is more likely. But we

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don't know. Good to talk to you. Despite the many obstacles put

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in their way, Europe's migrants are still travelling

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through the Balkans. The deal between Turkey

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and the EU was meant to close down the most popular -

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and one of the most dangerous - routes used

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by people-smugglers across the sea. But it's been quickly replaced

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by others across land borders. Our correspondent Nick Thorpe

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travelled to Bulgaria's capital Sofia and Vidin,

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in the north-west, to explain why the country's become significant

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for people trying Bulgaria's capital has become

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an important staging post on the migrant route to Western

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Europe. That's because the sea route

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between Turkey and Greece has been largely closed down

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and because the smugglers, who get people across even

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the most fortified border, The migrants gather around

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the Lions Bridge near the centre of Sofia, looking for the driver

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who will get them to Serbia, We jump out the car

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and walk in the jungle From there, you go back to Serbia

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and the Serbian police catch us From Sofia, we journeyed

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to northwest Bulgaria, to the city of Vidin,

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a region of high One man agreed to speak,

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but only on the phone. We have no way of verifying his

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claims, but he told me there are around seven gangs

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operating in Bulgaria. Last year, they smuggled

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more than 60,000 people, and that he alone made 200,000 euros

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in just three months. The magnificent Danube River in

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Vidin points the way up into Europe. Smugglers keep migrants in abandoned

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buildings, then direct them at night to others waiting

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on the Serbian side. You won't find any migrants here,

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the smuggler told me, In the Soviet era, borders

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like these were kept Nowadays, the watchtowers

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are abandoned. There are no border police around

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and it's a perfect place for migrants to just walk

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across the fields into Serbia. Back in Sofia, officials admit

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the way out is less policed It will be very difficult to bring

:20:23.:20:26.

the numbers any further down because organised crime over

:20:27.:20:32.

the past several years now has These borders are very

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long, there are forests, Like other transit routes, Bulgaria

:20:39.:20:47.

has its dangers for migrants. Only the fittest or the

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luckiest get through. The most vulnerable,

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those most in need of Six days after he went missing

:21:00.:21:01.

in a mountainous region of northern Japan, seven-year-old

:21:02.:21:17.

Yamato Tanooka has been reunited He was found in an army training

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base about four kilometres from the roadside in northern Japan

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where his parents had left him It was a manhunt which involved

:21:23.:21:25.

more than 200 soldiers, Seven-year-old Yamato Tanooka

:21:26.:21:37.

was abandoned by his parents last Saturday in a densely forested area

:21:38.:21:46.

on the northern island of Hokkaido. It was a punishment for throwing

:21:47.:21:51.

stones at people and cars. Nearly a week later, just as many

:21:52.:21:57.

people were starting to give up, He had managed to walk

:21:58.:22:01.

to a military training base, TRANSLATION: One of our soldiers

:22:02.:22:06.

was preparing for drills and unlocked the door

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of a building, and there he was. When he asked, "Are you

:22:14.:22:17.

Yamato?," the boy said yes. For Yamato's father, it had been

:22:18.:22:22.

an agonising week, worrying about his son while being criticised

:22:23.:22:26.

for what many saw as a punishment TRANSLATION: My excessive behaviour

:22:27.:22:29.

caused such pain to my son. I deeply apologise for the burden

:22:30.:22:39.

caused to the people involved in the search, and

:22:40.:22:42.

the school faculty. With many accusing the parents

:22:43.:22:47.

of neglect or even child abuse, the police may take

:22:48.:22:51.

action against them. But for now, it is a happy ending

:22:52.:22:55.

that not many had expected. The World War Two code

:22:56.:23:07.

breakers of Bletchley Park, just outside London,

:23:08.:23:10.

are rightly famous for But they also broke the Lorenz

:23:11.:23:11.

cypher, known as Today the surviving team members,

:23:12.:23:15.

many in their 90's have reunited -- Today the surviving team members,

:23:16.:23:25.

many in their 90s, have reunited at the National Museum of Computing

:23:26.:23:28.

for a re-enactment of how Hitler and his generals thought

:23:29.:23:32.

their codes were unbreakable. Top secret signals encrypted

:23:33.:23:34.

using Enigma machines were routinely deciphered at Bletchley Park,

:23:35.:23:38.

but there was another German code, even more secret, known as Lorenz,

:23:39.:23:42.

and that too was Today, wartime veterans reassembled

:23:43.:23:44.

at the National Museum of Computing, where, for the first time,

:23:45.:23:53.

all the equipment needed to encrypt and decrypt the signals has

:23:54.:23:56.

been brought together. There is a teleprinter used

:23:57.:24:00.

by the Germans for typing in the original message,

:24:01.:24:03.

picked up for a tenner on eBay. There is a Lorenz cypher machine,

:24:04.:24:07.

on loan from a museum in Norway, with its 12 wheels used

:24:08.:24:11.

for encrypting messages. And there is a reconstruction

:24:12.:24:14.

of the machine they built here, known as a tunny, which mimicked

:24:15.:24:17.

the working of the Lorenz, Much of the work was done by Wrens,

:24:18.:24:20.

who had little idea of the time of the significance

:24:21.:24:31.

of what they were doing. Well, we realise we were working

:24:32.:24:33.

codes, you had to be a fool not to realise,

:24:34.:24:35.

but we weren't told very much. We certainly didn't know

:24:36.:24:39.

we were working Hitler's codes Irene, like these Wrens,

:24:40.:24:43.

worked on Colossus, arguably Colossus machines worked out

:24:44.:24:48.

the Lorenz cypher's machine settings It took weeks by hand, but then

:24:49.:24:54.

there were 1.6 million billion It is fascinating to think that this

:24:55.:25:00.

is the world's first This building links the history

:25:01.:25:05.

of the code breaking work And the pioneers that built

:25:06.:25:11.

these machines weren't computer scientists -

:25:12.:25:19.

the term hadn't been invented, but Post Office telephone

:25:20.:25:22.

engineers, using standard The river Seine is that it has level

:25:23.:25:49.

for 35 years, and fear of flooding has led to the closure of two of the

:25:50.:25:54.

city's most famous museums, the Louvre and the new CD your say.

:25:55.:25:56.

But for now, from me and the rest of the team, goodbye.

:25:57.:26:08.

Hello. Friday was about a continuation of the themes we have

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seen played out across the British Isles so far this week in that

:26:13.:26:16.

western areas so the bulk of the sunshine and therefore the highest

:26:17.:26:19.

of the temperatures. It was pretty cloudy yet again across eastern and

:26:20.:26:23.

northern areas. Overnight, certainly England and Wales get

:26:24.:26:24.

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