05/09/2016 World News Today


05/09/2016

The latest national and international news, exploring the day's events from a global perspective.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 05/09/2016. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Welcome to BBC World News Today, I'm Karin Giannone.

:00:00.:00:07.

The British Prime Minister says no to an Australian-style

:00:08.:00:09.

As British politicians return to parliament 10 weeks

:00:10.:00:17.

after the vote that caused a summer of disarray,

:00:18.:00:19.

there's still no clear detail about what the Brexit deal

:00:20.:00:22.

No attempt to frustrate, delay or thwart the will of the British

:00:23.:00:32.

people. No attempt to engineer a second referendum because some

:00:33.:00:35.

people didn't like the first answer. It's a wrap at the G20,

:00:36.:00:38.

fighting protectionism and pumping fresh life into the world economy

:00:39.:00:41.

the main agreements to come out Also coming up: Returning

:00:42.:00:44.

from the G20 to election defeat. Angela Merkel takes responsibility

:00:45.:00:47.

as her CDU party is beaten And preserving the history frozen

:00:48.:00:50.

inside Alpine glaciers - the scientists who are taking

:00:51.:00:58.

samples to store for future study. The desire to reduce immigration

:00:59.:01:16.

was a key driving force behind Britain voting to leave

:01:17.:01:19.

the European Union. But two and half months

:01:20.:01:21.

on from the vote, it's still unclear how that objective

:01:22.:01:23.

is going to be achieved. We do know what the Government

:01:24.:01:26.

won't be doing, however. At the G20 summit,

:01:27.:01:29.

the Prime Minister, Theresa May, ruled out adopting

:01:30.:01:30.

an Australian-style points-based She said it would be difficult

:01:31.:01:34.

to manage and wouldn't be That's caused some disquiet among

:01:35.:01:39.

Leave campaigners who championed this method under the slogan

:01:40.:01:43.

"Take back control". There's also been disagreement

:01:44.:01:47.

within the Cabinet over the fine details of Britain's

:01:48.:01:50.

Brexit strategy. But David Davis, the minister

:01:51.:01:52.

in charge of the process, insisted in parliament

:01:53.:01:54.

that there was no attempt They arrived back from their summer

:01:55.:01:57.

break by car, with bags, on foot. The recently sacked

:01:58.:02:04.

and the freshly promoted. Are we going to get more details

:02:05.:02:11.

today about what Brexit will really I'm sure you'll hear

:02:12.:02:15.

a great deal of interest. That's Liam Fox, the new Secretary

:02:16.:02:18.

of State for International Trade, heading to the Commons

:02:19.:02:20.

to hear a statement MPs were not expecting it

:02:21.:02:22.

to be a very long one. Secretary of State for Exiting

:02:23.:02:28.

the European Union. David Davis set out

:02:29.:02:32.

what would not happen. There will be no attempt to stay

:02:33.:02:37.

in the EU by the back door, frustrate or thwart the will

:02:38.:02:41.

of the British people, no attempt to engineer a second

:02:42.:02:44.

referendum because some people

:02:45.:02:48.

didn't like the first answer. Mr Davis said the Government

:02:49.:02:54.

would build a consensus We will decide on our borders,

:02:55.:02:56.

our laws and the taxpayers' money. It means getting the best deal

:02:57.:03:06.

for Britain, and not

:03:07.:03:08.

an off-the-shelf solution. But MPs on the opposite side

:03:09.:03:13.

of the Commons asked... You've had all summer,

:03:14.:03:15.

Secretary of State. It has to be said, it is a mark

:03:16.:03:19.

of an irresponsible government, just as it was a mark

:03:20.:03:23.

of an irresponsible Leave campaign, that we know nothing

:03:24.:03:27.

more about the phrase from a government that just

:03:28.:03:29.

continues to make it up And a leading Tory campaigner

:03:30.:03:37.

for Brexit wanted some guarantees. ..That this United Kingdom

:03:38.:03:43.

will take control of its borders and the laws that

:03:44.:03:48.

are relevant to that and that is not

:03:49.:03:50.

negotiable for any other deal. But at the moment, all the

:03:51.:03:53.

Government has is vague rhetoric. The details about exactly

:03:54.:03:57.

when divorce talks and what a new relationship

:03:58.:03:59.

will look like - that could take months, even years,

:04:00.:04:03.

to become clear. As MPs argued, a demand outside

:04:04.:04:07.

Parliament for the start For the millions who voted

:04:08.:04:13.

for Brexit, impatience with the pace

:04:14.:04:18.

of leaving might grow. Ben Wright, BBC News,

:04:19.:04:21.

Westminster. With me is Richard Cockett, who is

:04:22.:04:34.

British business editor for the Economist magazine. Isn't this

:04:35.:04:40.

Australian immigration system what the British voted for when they

:04:41.:04:44.

wanted to leave the European Union? Well, some of the Brexiteer

:04:45.:04:47.

politicians argued for an Australian style points system, and you could

:04:48.:04:55.

argue that since the vote went their way, we should get it. But it is

:04:56.:05:01.

plain to many who have looked at this that this is only one option.

:05:02.:05:07.

Strangely enough, they have met more people into Australia per head of

:05:08.:05:13.

population than with any other system. So as a device to stop

:05:14.:05:17.

immigration, a points-based system doesn't serve their purpose. Is

:05:18.:05:23.

there another system that could keep everybody happy? It is interesting

:05:24.:05:28.

that you ask that. That is what we are all asking. Having rejected the

:05:29.:05:31.

points based system today, the government is not offering another

:05:32.:05:36.

option at the moment. Of course, there are other options. One of them

:05:37.:05:39.

might be to go back to a much more visa based system, where we have

:05:40.:05:46.

categories of entrance of immigrants to apply for four people from the

:05:47.:05:52.

EU. That was the system we had before Romania and Bulgaria etc

:05:53.:05:56.

joined the EU. We might go back to that, but so far, we don't know what

:05:57.:06:00.

the government alternative is. You don't think the government is

:06:01.:06:04.

softening and may end up trying to push forward some remainder of free

:06:05.:06:11.

movement? They may because even some of the Brexiteers are trying to have

:06:12.:06:14.

their cake and eat it. They are saying, we want to stay in the EU

:06:15.:06:18.

single market, but we don't want to be bound by the free movement of

:06:19.:06:22.

labour. This has been an issue all the way along. So if they can get

:06:23.:06:28.

some fudge whereby they get most of the continued access to the single

:06:29.:06:33.

market, and also maybe have to let in some uses dozens a bit more than

:06:34.:06:38.

they would like, they may take that. That will be unpalatable for many.

:06:39.:06:43.

It will be unpalatable for some who voted to leave the EU. 17 million

:06:44.:06:54.

people voted to leave. But not all of those people wanted complete

:06:55.:06:58.

restrictions on immigration. Some people accept that in the real

:06:59.:07:03.

world, these fudges are important. Let's touch on where we are, ten

:07:04.:07:08.

weeks on. I surprised that the lack of detail, or did you expect

:07:09.:07:12.

something like this after the frenetic June and July that we saw,

:07:13.:07:17.

and now we have pause for thought, with detail at some point in the

:07:18.:07:21.

future? I think everyone is surprised that we have had no detail

:07:22.:07:25.

at all. The Government still seems to have no idea about how move

:07:26.:07:31.

forward even in the broadest sense. All that is happening now is that

:07:32.:07:34.

Theresa May is gradually ruling out lots of things, but we still have

:07:35.:07:38.

little idea about how to move forward. The minister for leaving

:07:39.:07:41.

today called for a national consensus on this, which is all very

:07:42.:07:45.

well, but the implication of that is that we just want more debate and

:07:46.:07:51.

more ideas until they come up with some concrete proposals. We will

:07:52.:07:56.

have to leave that for another time. Thank you.

:07:57.:07:57.

And you can get much more analysis on Britain's vote

:07:58.:07:59.

to leave the European Union by visiting our website.

:08:00.:08:02.

You can find out how the vote is affecting other countries

:08:03.:08:05.

and what impacts it's having on everything from jobs

:08:06.:08:07.

and the economy to fishing and the property market.

:08:08.:08:10.

You can also download the BBC News app.

:08:11.:08:13.

As we've heard, one of the main concerns of British voters which led

:08:14.:08:17.

And many people try to reach the UK via the French port of Calais,

:08:18.:08:21.

often staying in the makeshift refugee camp known as The Jungle

:08:22.:08:24.

as they try to cross the English Channel.

:08:25.:08:27.

Today, there have been protests and blockades by people who live

:08:28.:08:30.

in Calais and want the French government to close the camp.

:08:31.:08:33.

Our correspondent Lucy Williamson spent the day there.

:08:34.:08:39.

Drive too slowly after midnight here, and you're an open target.

:08:40.:08:43.

Today, it was tractor pace

:08:44.:08:45.

on Calais's most notorious stretch of road,

:08:46.:08:48.

a go-slow protest by lorry drivers

:08:49.:08:49.

waging a nightly battle with migrant gangs.

:08:50.:08:54.

Joining them, several hundred residents living and working

:08:55.:08:56.

This is a coalition of grievances against the migrants.

:08:57.:09:06.

There are lorry drivers here, local farmers,

:09:07.:09:08.

And despite the recent security measures and government assurances,

:09:09.:09:13.

they say the migrants are waging a guerrilla war,

:09:14.:09:17.

They protest because it's getting worse and worse.

:09:18.:09:24.

Every night, or nearly every night on the motorway,

:09:25.:09:28.

there are some traffic jams etc because of some smugglers who have

:09:29.:09:41.

got their business in Calais, and they want to make business

:09:42.:09:44.

One attack filmed by the BBC last month shows the road blocked by logs

:09:45.:09:49.

and people smugglers threatening drivers as they direct

:09:50.:09:51.

Local wine merchant Jerome says British customers have shrunk

:09:52.:09:57.

to a trickle, because many are now too scared to stop in Calais.

:09:58.:10:01.

and the first step is to solve the problem in Calais,

:10:02.:10:22.

to distribute all the migrants maybe all over France or all over

:10:23.:10:25.

and being more strict in the fact that they can't stay in Calais.

:10:26.:10:31.

France's interior minister has said the Jungle camp will be clear,

:10:32.:10:35.

but Calais's migrants have been dispersed before,

:10:36.:10:38.

And however the obstacles change, the lure of crossing

:10:39.:10:49.

Now a look at some of the day's other news.

:10:50.:10:53.

A state prosecutor in France is recommending that former

:10:54.:10:55.

president Nicolas Sarkozy stand trial over allegations

:10:56.:10:57.

that he illegally funded his unsuccessful 2012 campaign.

:10:58.:10:58.

An investigating magistrate will now decide whether to order a trial.

:10:59.:11:01.

The development comes just two weeks after Sarkozy launched

:11:02.:11:03.

At least a thousand people have been evacuated as a forest fire fuelled

:11:04.:11:08.

by strong winds and high temperatures threatened

:11:09.:11:10.

popular resort areas on the Spanish coast.

:11:11.:11:11.

Firefighters, supported by water-dropping aircraft,

:11:12.:11:12.

are struggling to control the blaze near Benidorm.

:11:13.:11:14.

The authorities believe the fire was deliberately started.

:11:15.:11:16.

Remember Europe's missing robot lander that disappeared

:11:17.:11:18.

Now the robot called Philae has been spotted wedged into a crack

:11:19.:11:22.

on the surface of a comet known as 67P.

:11:23.:11:26.

The photographs were taken by the Rosetta probe,

:11:27.:11:28.

The G20 forum of the world's major economies has agreed to fight

:11:29.:11:38.

protectionism and try to pump fresh life into the world economy.

:11:39.:11:42.

Speaking at the close of the summit in Hangzhou,

:11:43.:11:44.

its host, China's president, Xi Jinping, said member

:11:45.:11:47.

countries had agreed to encourage global trade.

:11:48.:11:51.

The one notable success was the agreement between China

:11:52.:11:53.

and US to curb carbon emissions, as John Sudworth reports.

:11:54.:11:59.

Not a talking shop, but a triumph of international diplomacy.

:12:00.:12:04.

At least, that's how it's always spun.

:12:05.:12:13.

even more so at the end of this particular G20 summit,

:12:14.:12:16.

perhaps, with the host, China, keen to use it

:12:17.:12:18.

to show it's both a rising and a responsible power.

:12:19.:12:23.

In his closing press statement, President Xi Jinping spoke

:12:24.:12:28.

on financial governance and international trade.

:12:29.:12:46.

TRANSLATION: Amid great global challenges and uncertainty,

:12:47.:12:48.

this summit attracted much international attention.

:12:49.:12:49.

With joint efforts, we have achieved fruitful outcomes.

:12:50.:12:51.

As always, though, behind the carefully choreographed picture

:12:52.:12:53.

of cooperation, there are plenty of challenges lurking offset.

:12:54.:13:00.

President Xi met the British Prime Minister, Theresa May,

:13:01.:13:05.

with the deep uncertainty over the effects of the UK's decision

:13:06.:13:08.

to leave the European Union casting a shadow over proceedings.

:13:09.:13:13.

Mr Xi also held a rare meeting with the Japanese Prime Minister,

:13:14.:13:19.

expected to touch on the thorny issue

:13:20.:13:26.

And the US and Russia had sideline meetings

:13:27.:13:29.

about the war in Syria, without, apparently,

:13:30.:13:31.

much progress on a way forward to stem the violence.

:13:32.:13:42.

If you want a symbol of the tension and mistrust lurking below

:13:43.:13:45.

the surface of this summit, you need look no further

:13:46.:13:49.

than the bizarre protocol spat that's become a major talking point,

:13:50.:13:53.

at least among the international journalists gathered here

:13:54.:13:55.

It's not gone unnoticed that China rolled out the red carpet

:13:56.:13:59.

for leader after leader, except for one notable exception.

:14:00.:14:07.

It's being interpreted by some as a deliberate snub

:14:08.:14:10.

to the Americans, although Chinese sources are briefing, plausibly,

:14:11.:14:14.

perhaps, that it was down to miscommunication, not mischief.

:14:15.:14:21.

for which this summit will be best remembered is the announcement

:14:22.:14:26.

that they are ratifying the Paris climate agreement, bringing

:14:27.:14:33.

the moment it comes into force that much closer, proof,

:14:34.:14:36.

most would agree, that China's extravagant and tightly managed

:14:37.:14:38.

summit has been about more than just hot air.

:14:39.:14:46.

A new generation of pro-democracy activists has won seats

:14:47.:14:49.

on Hong Kong's Legislative Council in an election with

:14:50.:14:52.

The loose coalition of pro-democracy candidates have taken enough seats

:14:53.:14:58.

to block any legislation which might affect Hong Kong's autonomy

:14:59.:15:02.

Several of the young candidates were leaders during in the 2014

:15:03.:15:08.

"umbrella" protests for self-determination.

:15:09.:15:11.

It shows how Hong Kong people wanted a change.

:15:12.:15:18.

Actually, we were stuck in a democratic movement and people

:15:19.:15:22.

are voting for a new future of our democratic movement.

:15:23.:15:24.

Well, I believe that every single person who voted

:15:25.:15:30.

for me made that history, and I am willing to share

:15:31.:15:46.

in the following four years and in the future.

:15:47.:15:48.

Ohio is a state that has picked the winner in every US presidential

:15:49.:15:51.

So it can be little surprise that both Hillary Clinton

:15:52.:15:54.

and Donald Trump are there on the Labour Day public holiday -

:15:55.:16:02.

We can show you live pictures from the Hillary Clinton campaign.

:16:03.:16:09.

It is a day which is regarded as crucial to picking up

:16:10.:16:12.

stretch of their campaigns for the White House.

:16:13.:16:15.

Our correspondent Gary O'Donoghue is following it all from Washington.

:16:16.:16:19.

How are things looking for each of the candidates? As you said, they

:16:20.:16:30.

are spending the first blows of the autumn final push for the general

:16:31.:16:34.

election in Ohio, a key state. It has the best record of predicting

:16:35.:16:38.

the presidential outcome of any state. Something like 93% of the

:16:39.:16:45.

time, it has got it right since 1900, so it has a good record. It is

:16:46.:16:50.

a swing state, one of the key states that each side will want to grasp.

:16:51.:16:54.

As we go into this final push before the election, Hillary Clinton will

:16:55.:16:58.

feel that she is now the frontrunner. She is up in the

:16:59.:17:03.

national polls, to the extent to which they are useful. She is up in

:17:04.:17:07.

the polls in the swing states as well. She raised a lot of money. She

:17:08.:17:13.

has also got a new plane, so she will be feeling good. Donald Trump,

:17:14.:17:17.

however, will feel he has lament on some the issues. Clearly, things

:17:18.:17:25.

like immigration have played well -- he will feel he has the momentum.

:17:26.:17:31.

And he is the change candidate. He is the thing that is different, and

:17:32.:17:34.

that goes a long way when it comes to elections like this. So there is

:17:35.:17:42.

still a lot to play for 64 days out from polling day. After the

:17:43.:17:46.

conventions, when the candidates were confirmed, we were told that

:17:47.:17:50.

the Trump campaign would be changing course and he would be raining

:17:51.:17:54.

himself in and sticking to script. Has anything happened to the way he

:17:55.:18:02.

put himself forward? Well, we have seen a few more Teleprompter

:18:03.:18:08.

speeches, scripted, policy driven speeches, but not really. We have

:18:09.:18:13.

been promised a few resets. They have happen for a few days and then

:18:14.:18:16.

Don has gone back to the Donald Trump that he believes is what got

:18:17.:18:22.

him to where he is in this race. So there is clearly a tension, and that

:18:23.:18:36.

continues within the Trump campaign. Thank you very much.

:18:37.:18:39.

And there's plenty of background on the US presidential election

:18:40.:18:41.

at bbc.com/us2016 or you can add it as a topic on the BBC News app,

:18:42.:18:45.

which you can download from your app store now.

:18:46.:18:51.

The German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, has accepted

:18:52.:18:53.

responsibility for her party's defeat in the regional

:18:54.:18:55.

Mrs Merkel's party finished third in the poll, with the anti-immigrant

:18:56.:19:01.

AfD party overtaking it to second place.

:19:02.:19:07.

Chancellor Merkel acknowledged that the outcome was linked

:19:08.:19:11.

to her liberal immigration policies, as Germany accepted a record number

:19:12.:19:14.

TRANSLATION: The result of the elections is connected

:19:15.:19:24.

I am the head of the party and the Chancellor.

:19:25.:19:29.

You cannot divide, so I am responsible.

:19:30.:19:33.

But I think that our decisions were correct,

:19:34.:19:35.

and we have to keep on working.

:19:36.:19:37.

Thomas Kielinger is the long-time London correspondent

:19:38.:19:40.

for the German newspaper Die Welt, and he joins me in the studio now.

:19:41.:19:48.

How would you read this defeat in her home state into third place? How

:19:49.:19:58.

significant is it? It is only a small state, but it is her home

:19:59.:20:01.

state and to have been outperformed by the protest party, alternative

:20:02.:20:10.

for Germany, is quite a shock. To be pushed into third place takes some

:20:11.:20:16.

living down. It is a warning, a shot across the bow. We have national

:20:17.:20:20.

elections in a year from now, and it adds to the uncertainty about the

:20:21.:20:24.

fate of the current government and about Angela Merkel personally. We

:20:25.:20:33.

heard Angela Merkel saying this was to do with her attitude June

:20:34.:20:38.

refugees. Well, it is not rocket science to link this event to the

:20:39.:20:45.

refugee policy. What is amazing is that this was the first time she

:20:46.:20:47.

recognised that it may have something to do with her decision

:20:48.:20:53.

last year to open the door to 1 million immigrants overnight. But

:20:54.:20:55.

whether she will change course, I don't know. It is difficult to say

:20:56.:21:01.

she should change course, because the people have already arrived. And

:21:02.:21:07.

they are still arriving. Some are still arriving, and you are pushing

:21:08.:21:12.

the problem to local level for the local councils to take care of it.

:21:13.:21:16.

That is where the problem is brewing. I hope this will not turn

:21:17.:21:25.

Germany into a xenophobic populace. But it takes some absorbing, such a

:21:26.:21:29.

number of refugees suddenly arriving, when we are not

:21:30.:21:32.

traditionally an immigrant country like written. So the challenges are

:21:33.:21:40.

there, and she should be careful not to repeat her mantra, we can cope

:21:41.:21:46.

with it. Has she said that recently? She said it in the run-up to the

:21:47.:21:51.

election, amazingly, as a sign of defiance that she will not be moved

:21:52.:21:55.

from her belief. But she may think twice before she uses it again. Do

:21:56.:22:00.

we know about who is voting for the Alternative for Germany? Is it

:22:01.:22:03.

former CDU supporters or new voters who have not voted before, or even

:22:04.:22:09.

from other parties from the left? There are two strands in the protest

:22:10.:22:18.

that you find. One is the immigration protest, coming from all

:22:19.:22:22.

quarters, not just the right. It is a general concern and a genuine one.

:22:23.:22:28.

But there is also an aversion towards the euro and policies from

:22:29.:22:33.

the European Central Bank and Frankfurt, which is still in a phase

:22:34.:22:39.

of easy money, making it easier for the southern countries. So there is

:22:40.:22:46.

Euroscepticism. A huge amount of Euroscepticism. The AfD runs on two

:22:47.:22:51.

platforms, Euroscepticism and anti-immigration. Angela Merkel has

:22:52.:22:58.

got through her troubles before. For 11 years, but no one has got beyond

:22:59.:23:05.

the ominous 12th year yet. So there is a question mark over her fate.

:23:06.:23:11.

And there is a general perception of unease in Europe, which may help the

:23:12.:23:18.

British position in negotiating with its European partners. We must leave

:23:19.:23:19.

it there. Scientists working in

:23:20.:23:21.

the French Alps have just completed the first phase of a mission

:23:22.:23:24.

to extract ice from some of the world's most rapidly

:23:25.:23:26.

shrinking glaciers. Temperatures in some parts

:23:27.:23:28.

of the Alps have risen by 1.5 So scientists are drilling deep

:23:29.:23:30.

into the ice near Europe's highest mountain, Mont Blanc,

:23:31.:23:35.

to preserve samples so they can be studied for clues about the history

:23:36.:23:38.

of the earth's climate, Approaching a very high

:23:39.:23:40.

altitude laboratory. This team of scientists

:23:41.:23:46.

is living and working on the glacier here in the Alps,

:23:47.:23:48.

because climate change is heating and changing the ice

:23:49.:23:56.

that they are camped on. So the team wants to rescue

:23:57.:23:58.

the information locked deep Snowfalls will collect

:23:59.:24:01.

all the impurities in the atmosphere and this will be deposited

:24:02.:24:07.

on the glacier. So all this information

:24:08.:24:09.

is stored in the glacier, So when you look through this book,

:24:10.:24:11.

you can read all this information. Tiny air bubbles locked

:24:12.:24:22.

inside the layers of this glacial ice are a record of our past

:24:23.:24:30.

atmosphere and climate. That is an icicle now coming up

:24:31.:24:32.

from about 30 metres depth. The team will cut it

:24:33.:24:35.

and they will move it into this tent and then they will store it

:24:36.:24:38.

in their ice cave, So precious are these samples

:24:39.:24:40.

that the team have dug into the solid ice to build a store

:24:41.:24:50.

room that will keep them cold. Six per box and then

:24:51.:24:53.

they are ready to go? This is the beginning of a very long

:24:54.:24:59.

journey for these ice cores. They will be stored here

:25:00.:25:05.

in France for two years, but their ultimate destination

:25:06.:25:08.

is the world's most reliable The idea of getting ice

:25:09.:25:10.

from the Alps transported to Antarctica could sound very silly

:25:11.:25:14.

to people, but it makes Our main will is to be able to store

:25:15.:25:16.

these icicles for We put the icicles there,

:25:17.:25:24.

they are in the safest position Many glaciers here in the Alps

:25:25.:25:28.

and all over the world are changing, This ambitious archive aims

:25:29.:25:32.

to preserve particles, bubbles, even bacteria

:25:33.:25:40.

trapped in the deepest, oldest ice, allowing future

:25:41.:25:42.

scientists to track our planet's past atmosphere and climate,

:25:43.:25:45.

and help predict its future. Victoria Gill, BBC

:25:46.:25:47.

News, the French Alps. But for now, from me and the rest

:25:48.:25:59.

of the team, goodbye.

:26:00.:26:05.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS