08/09/2016 World News Today


08/09/2016

The latest national and international news, exploring the day's events from a global perspective.


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This is BBC World News Today with me, Geeta Guru-Murthy.

:00:00.:00:07.

Why the EU's policy on migration is not working.

:00:08.:00:11.

We have a special report from the Greek island of Chios.

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Wear the number of refugees and migrants is on the rise again.

:00:21.:00:24.

One in ten of us will die from air pollution, according

:00:25.:00:27.

Donald Trump claims Russia's Vladimir Putin is more of a

:00:28.:00:32.

"He's unpatriotic," said Hillary Clinton.

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If he says great things about me, I will say great things about him. I

:00:42.:00:47.

have already said he is a great leader.

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saying there's not just one species but four.

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The number of refugees and migrants arriving on Greek islands

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is starting to go up again, despite a deal between the EU

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and Turkey earlier this year to reduce the flow of people

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As most of the people arriving in Greece travel

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through Turkey, the process of either returning them there,

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or moving them elsewhere in the EU, has virtually ground to a halt

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with some 60,000 now stuck in Greece.

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Our Europe correspondent, Damian Grammaticas, reports

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The tourists are here, indulging, enjoying their

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In the background, the refugees linger, trapped as

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Out at sea, the boats have slowed, Greek

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Europe's deal with Turkey is having an effect.

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Turkish patrols are deterring more crossings.

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Arrivals now around 100 a day, not in the thousands.

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So it is here on land where the crisis has shifted.

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This man arrived from Homs in Syria two months ago.

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We stayed in the gardens are 20 days and no one cared about us.

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He is now stuck in a temporary shelter hoping for

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refugee status but with no end to the process insight.

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There are people here for six months and they are still waiting.

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For me, I am two months so maybe we will wait two

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Adding to their frustration, the refugees cannot work.

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They are reliant on hand-outs and it is

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charities, not the EU, that is feeding them.

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For this lady, a Syrian Kurd, and her family

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degrading - and not what they expected in Europe.

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TRANSLATION: We escaped war, death, how can they reject us?

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We are in Europe, which always talks about

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Right in the heart of Chios, the refugees have made their own

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shanty and islanders believe the EU is deliberately slowing the asylum

:03:35.:03:37.

The EU would like to minimise the flow so they leave

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the procedure to take months for the refugees.

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The EU's policies have to an extent secured European borders

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here for now, limiting the influx but they have left Greece and the

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refugees already here in limbo, unclear when or to where they will

:03:59.:04:01.

Well, the vast majority of people who are stranded in Greece

:04:02.:04:12.

Five and a half years on and a political solution is still

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America and Russia, who back opposing sides in the conflict,

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have been discussing closer cooperation in the wider war,

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aiming for local truces - particularly in areas besieged

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One such community is the enclave of Muadhamiya,

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where, today, displaced civilians were able to evacuate.

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Our Middle East editor, Jeremy Bowen, watched them leave.

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Now, this group of displaced people are on the bus and they will be

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heading off pretty shortly to a camp and, by all accounts, that can is

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well run. By all accounts, that can is well run. Or maybe manage varying

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level, the fact that they are leaving their homes is not bad

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because they have been stopped in this enclave in Muadhamiya for 4-5

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years. On a strategic level, it is a good day for the regime because they

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are removing sources of opposition run around the very strategically

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important west side of the capital. If this is followed by another

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agreement to take fighters out, up to the north, then again, it is

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strategic gain for the regime. The buses going after now. Their

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possessions, their lives are boiled down now to some bundles of old

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clothes and they don't know what kind of future they are going into.

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It's just one bus leaving but, for those people, it is a huge moment in

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their lives. In just two months' time,

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Americans will cast their vote in an election the whole world

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is watching very closely. A Trump victory would

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have huge ramifications Last night, Hillary Clinton said

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Donald Trump was "not just unpatriotic" but also "scary"

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because he praised the Russian President Vladimir Putin

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over President Obama. Today, Mr Obama said Mr Trump

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isn't fit for office. The music came with a thumping

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marching. And aircraft carrier, the setting, with an ground zero.

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Hillary Clinton entered wanting to express our thoughts on a post-9

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1112 but instead found herself being interrogated. -- 9/11. It was a

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mistake you have a personal account. I would not have it again and I'm

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ignorant users for it. It is something that should not have been

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done. Secretary Clinton, thank you very much. This was not good enough

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for this battering in the audience who had handled classified material

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himself. You clearly corrupted classified material. I communicated

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a bad classified material on a separate system. I do get very

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seriously. So, now, please welcome new Republican nominee for

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president, President, -- Donald Trump. EBay questions about glad

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Putin. If he faces -- if he said good things about me, I will say

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good things about him. He has a very good, strong control over his

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country. It is a different system which I don't like, but he has been

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more of a leader than our president. He was also at about him or knowing

:07:54.:07:57.

more about Islamic State that America was 's general. Under

:07:58.:08:04.

President Obama and Hillary Clinton, they have been reduced to rubble. It

:08:05.:08:10.

isn't harassing for our country. Obama seems to echo widespread

:08:11.:08:22.

criticism over a journalist, he said this. You'll listen to what he said

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and follow up on what are either contradictory, uninformed or

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outright wanky ideas. And listen to this exchange with Gary Johnson.

:08:37.:08:40.

Hull what would you do if you were elected, about Aleppo? What is

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Aleppo? It is in Syria. It is the epicentre of the refugee crisis. OK,

:08:54.:09:00.

got it. That is a side show, it is the two main candidates are vying to

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become commander-in-chief. Hillary Clinton was land values of a private

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e-mail server. Donald Trump praised the Vladimir Putin criticised the

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generals he hopes to lead. A forum in which they are meant to state

:09:16.:09:20.

their strengths as an arrogant's next commander-in-chief but they

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highlighted their weaknesses. The first day of the Paralympic

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games has been getting under way today and,

:09:27.:09:35.

with 38 gold medals to be Julia Carneiro is there

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for us with the latest on the day's action -

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Julia Yes I am here where the day started

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with a seven A-side football match. The first was a Paralympics GB

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versus Brazil. Brazil did when in football. 2-1 against GB but there's

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still plenty of action going on with Ukraine playing Ireland. Ukraine is

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leading with at least six gals. The hearing screams from the inside cell

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they might have an even stronger lead. Earlier today, Netherlands

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there's the United States will also play. -- later today. We have had

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the first medals handed out in athletics. We are having the first

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final inswinging later on. More finals in athletics. -- in swimming.

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They won so let's hear from Andy Swiss on how things are going.

:10:36.:10:40.

After all the worries over ticket sales, thousands flocked

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to the Paralympic Park hoping for a dramatic day.

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Among the Opening Ceremony's highlights, Amy Purdie dancing the

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The booing of the Brazilian president a reminder of

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The torch bearer slipped on a rain-soaked

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floor, but the stadium rose in support.

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She picked herself up and

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A determination to succeed which Rio will hope these

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In the velodrome, Dame Sarah Storey in Christian history. Looking for a

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possible 12 Paralympic medal. Born without a left hand, she has

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excelled as a swimmer and a cyclist. It will take up as Baroness Grace

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Thomson's 11 medals. Something she said she can scarcely believe. Your

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mac I think the history is something to keep tabs on but it was unknown

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to me when I was suddenly told that I was just as good as Tanya. Tanya

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is my all-time hero. For the Brazilian fans

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the seven aside football

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proved a predictable draw. The competition for athletes

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with cerebral palsy or athletes who have experienced brain

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injuries pitted them against Great Despite David Porcher's goal, Brazil

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won 2-1. In the visually impaired

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long jump, Ricardo The result was Brazil's first goal

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of the game after a difficult build-up. Already plenty to

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celebrate. There will be plenty more to

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celebrate but, as we had there, the president of Brazil was booed during

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the opening ceremony. That is not the only political gesture in the

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opening ceremony with an episode where an official from Belarus

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waived the Russian flag during the parade of the delegation as the

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athletes from Belarus paraded inside the stadium. He has now had his

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accreditation withdrawn by the International Paralympic committee

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in reprimand to that gesture. It was a gesture in support of Russia that

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has been banned from the Taliban games because of the investigation

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into a state sponsored doping scheme in the country. -- the Olympic

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Games. He has been held as a hero from some officials in Russia but

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Belarus have been reminded that political demonstrations have been

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prohibited at the Olympics. Thank you.

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I was watching the opening ceremony last night and it was amazing.

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Let's take a quick look at the medal table.

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Brazil are riding high on the top of the table with one goal in the men's

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long jump and a silver in the men's 500 metres.

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And you can get the latest from Paralympics games

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For detailed analysis and a sport by sport guide just

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It is all there for you over the next few days.

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A new study by the World Bank shows that air pollution is now one

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of the world's biggest causes of premature death.

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the fourth biggest killer, and the vast majority of us

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the report says one in ten deaths are now related to air pollution.

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That's six times the number of people killed by malaria.

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It's four times bigger than the number of deaths

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the World Bank says it is 225 billion dollars each year.

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where air pollution levels exceed guidelines for air quality.

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The BBC's, Sanjoy Majumdar is in Delhi, where they've got

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Revolution is one of the worst causes other premature death in

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India. Nearly half a million people die every year because of it. There

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are many reasons for causing the air pollution. Cars on the road, fossil

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fuels but in particular, it is matter that is deadly. These tiny,

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toxic particles of dust that are caused by fossil fuels or other

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forms of pollution. You cannot even from the naked eye but they can have

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deadly effect. It can lead to rest breakthrough problems or it can

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cause heart disease. It can even lead to lung cancer. Now, it's not a

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pricing that urban centres, such as cities, are the worst affected. --

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surprising. The World Bank say six of the most polluted cities in the

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world. Delhi, the capital has a dubious distinction of being the

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worst of them all. That is why there is increasing pressure on the Dudek

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and drastic measures to try and curb this massive problem. -- Judaic --

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to take drastic measures. We can now speak to one of the lead

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authors of that report - Urvashi Narain is Senior

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Environmental Economist Where you shocked by the levels

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here? It is extraordinary to say one in ten of other is that the

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jewellery. How did you get that number? Yes, thank you for having

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me. This is a joint report of the World Bank and the Institute for

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health and evaluation. Our report shows that one in ten deaths is now

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attribute it to air pollution. It is the fourth leading risk factor.

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Almost as many people are dying from air pollution as from tobacco smoke.

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It shows that it is also a drag on development. Not just a health risk.

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Sorry sorry to interrupt, what exact conditions are caused by air

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pollution? Is it clear that they are only caused by pollution and not

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other factors? Now, so, revolution increases our exposure -- our

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exposure to air pollution increase the risk of contracting deadly

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diseases, like lung cancer, heart disease, chronic bronchitis. It is

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also being now... There is evidence to show that air pollution exposure

:17:27.:17:31.

is leading to premature births in developing countries as well. There

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is a number of diseases now that are linked to exposure. Obviously, the

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ads is this are complex. Realistically, do you think this

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report will have an impact and what would you like from governors around

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the world in both developing and developed nations? You'll agree --

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reboot economic course on premature mortality because of an allusion to

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be able to help resonate these numbers with policymakers. We want

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to see policymakers increased investment in clean air. We want to

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improve the air in those countries and cities. Countries are starting

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to act but they want to tell the investment in favour of clean air.

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Hill we want to see this being prioritised. What about people

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watching? Is anything we can do? For example, lots of us live in cities

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of food are gently mocking to schools because of the health

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benefits of being outside -- should our children be walking? It is very

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hard to escape from. We call it a silent killer because we don't know.

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It is not a solution to spend time indoors. This is really an agenda

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that the Government's actions are important on. It comes in very

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different sectors. In Boston in the transport sector. Even dust. --

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combustion. And you're going to say that the cost of not acting is

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greater because of the health care costs than if governments actually

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do something and be pressure on private companies, and so on.

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Exactly. There are various studies to show the costs and benefits in

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the US. Consider the estimates of the regulations are brought under

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the clean their facts are that the costs by four - one. Thank you very

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much joining us in Washington. Thank you. Thank you.

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It's an iconic building with some pretty heavyweight residents -

:19:58.:20:00.

the British Houses of Parliament though is crumbling

:20:01.:20:02.

It's more than 150 years old and is at risk from fire,

:20:03.:20:08.

collapsing roofs, crumbling walls, and leaking pipes.

:20:09.:20:10.

Rodents are often seen in the canteen and I don't mean

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But will the politicians agree to move out whilst

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Beautiful from the outside but not so inside.

:20:18.:20:25.

Parts of the palace of Westminster are dangerous to work

:20:26.:20:28.

The roofs are leaking, stonework is rotting, in effect.

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We need to do a great deal more in terms of fire

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The Victorians left us lots of drawings of statues

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and all the rest, but good plans so we know where the voids

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But all the facilities - electricity, IT, comms, sewage,

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fresh water, high pressure steam, central heating...

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All of that have been laid one over the other.

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I don't think I'm giving away any secrets.

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Lots of wires, nobody's sure where they go.

:21:09.:21:10.

To allow for extensive renovations, a parliamentary committee

:21:11.:21:12.

is recommending all MPs and peers should vacate parliament

:21:13.:21:15.

for at least six years in the early 2020s.

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650 MPs would all pack their bags from the House of Commons

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and move 350 yards across the road to Whitehall.

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A temporary Commons would be based here.

:21:28.:21:33.

At the moment this is the HQ for the Department of Health.

:21:34.:21:36.

At the back of this building is a courtyard which could be used

:21:37.:21:41.

as a temporary chamber, for debates, statements and Prime Minister's

:21:42.:21:44.

It's on the parliamentary estate, which makes it safer,

:21:45.:21:49.

and it's also within walking distance of many MP offices.

:21:50.:21:52.

At the same time, all members of the House of Lords

:21:53.:21:56.

would also be rehoused, down the road to the QE2

:21:57.:21:58.

Right now, this is a commercial venue, with an abundance of large

:21:59.:22:04.

rooms, but as it's owned by the Government, it wouldn't be

:22:05.:22:07.

difficult to turn it into a second chamber,

:22:08.:22:09.

to scrutinise laws and challenge the executive.

:22:10.:22:16.

The PM spokeswoman says she'll respond in due course.

:22:17.:22:20.

It's then up to both Houses to scrutinise and vote

:22:21.:22:22.

It's not just convenience, it's important this world heritage

:22:23.:22:30.

site is refurbished for modern working purposes.

:22:31.:22:35.

After years of study, a concrete proposal that could lead

:22:36.:22:37.

to MPs and Lords vacating parliament for the first time

:22:38.:22:39.

Now, a high altitude rescue is underway in Frankfurt the moment

:22:40.:23:00.

where 110 people are capped at a cable car in the Alps broke down. --

:23:01.:23:13.

in France's. Helicopters are being used to evacuate passengers who are

:23:14.:23:17.

capped. The cable runs between the two peaks in France and Italy. A lot

:23:18.:23:28.

of cable cars up there. We were there early in the year and people

:23:29.:23:31.

will be alarmed because of the safety of those cable cars being

:23:32.:23:35.

absent be paramount for the real hope that rescue goes well.

:23:36.:23:38.

Now - to most people a giraffe is a giraffe -

:23:39.:23:40.

but scientists have discovered that in fact there are four

:23:41.:23:43.

In genetic terms, it means the differences between some

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African giraffes are as big as between a Polar

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They're Africa's gentlest giants but these animals

:23:50.:24:02.

are in decline as their natural habitat is shrinking.

:24:03.:24:06.

That threat was the trigger for an investigation.

:24:07.:24:08.

Geneticists and conservationists worked together to sample giraffe

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DNA to find out more about these increasingly fragmented populations.

:24:11.:24:13.

And this revealed a genetic surprise.

:24:14.:24:15.

What these new results show is that there are actually four

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All very tall and they look very similar.

:24:18.:24:25.

But they are actually as genetically distinct from one another as a polar

:24:26.:24:29.

here and the zoo just one of the four species.

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The others are northern giraffes, southern giraffes

:24:36.:24:40.

This might look like a very tricky game of spot the difference

:24:41.:24:49.

but to conservationists, it's crucial information.

:24:50.:24:51.

Understanding that they look different is just the start,

:24:52.:24:57.

now understanding the real genetic differences helps us perhaps

:24:58.:24:59.

to understand that there may be big differences in mating

:25:00.:25:01.

Those, of course, are critical to conserving a species

:25:02.:25:06.

and important understanding how threats might impact upon it

:25:07.:25:08.

and how we can reduce them and save species from extinction.

:25:09.:25:11.

The wild population of giraffes has declined by 40%

:25:12.:25:15.

So, looking deep into their DNA could help conservationists work out

:25:16.:25:21.

exactly what these animals need from their environment,

:25:22.:25:23.

to protect the habitat that the world's tallest

:25:24.:25:25.

consolidating his hold on the areas around the Syrian capital.

:25:26.:25:48.

A suburb of Damascus which was a rebel stonghold

:25:49.:25:50.

is currently being evacuated by Syrian government troops.

:25:51.:25:54.

I am back to mark at the same time. Get in touch with me on Twitter as

:25:55.:26:00.

Hello once again. I do think there is anything particularly settled

:26:01.:26:11.

happily ever to have beset across the full British Isles. It is not a

:26:12.:26:15.

right off by any means whatsoever but you can see a succession of

:26:16.:26:17.

weather systems across

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