30/09/2016 World News Today


30/09/2016

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This is BBC World News Today with me, Tim Willcox.

:00:00.:00:07.

The headlines - Russia accuses the US of protecting Syrian rebels

:00:08.:00:10.

Russia's Foreign Minister tells the BBC that America is failing

:00:11.:00:17.

to separate their moderate rebel allies from Islamist fighters.

:00:18.:00:25.

They either are driven by Al Nusra, or they tacitly support this

:00:26.:00:30.

Mission accomplished - the space probe Rosetta ends its 12

:00:31.:00:37.

year voyage in a planned crash-landing on the comet

:00:38.:00:39.

Former Israeli president Shimon Peres is buried in Jerusalem -

:00:40.:00:50.

with dozens of world leaders paying tribute to his seven-decade

:00:51.:00:53.

And we'll have more later on how the mystery of two missing

:00:54.:01:03.

Italian police recover two priceless Van Goghs stolen from a museum

:01:04.:01:07.

A year to the day since Russia's bombing in Syria began,

:01:08.:01:34.

the Russian foreign minister has defended his country's actions

:01:35.:01:36.

Sergei Lavrov accused America of trying to protect the Islamist

:01:37.:01:40.

group formerly known as Al-Nusra Front in the battle

:01:41.:01:42.

Monitoring groups say more than 9,000 civilians have been

:01:43.:01:45.

killed in Syria since Russia started bombing - but Mr Lavrov said

:01:46.:01:48.

Violence in Syria claimed more lives on Friday,

:01:49.:01:54.

with 12 people killed in the city of Aleppo.

:01:55.:01:57.

Here's what Sergei Lavrov said to the BBC's Stephen Sackur.

:01:58.:02:03.

We take all necessary cautions not to hit civilians. The term

:02:04.:02:12.

collateral damage was invented not by us. You know by whom. We are

:02:13.:02:18.

taking, as I said, most strict precautions to make sure that we

:02:19.:02:24.

don't hit civilians by any chance. If this happens, well, we are very

:02:25.:02:30.

sorry but we need to investigate each and every accusation. So far,

:02:31.:02:34.

we haven't been given any meaningful proof of what is being said about

:02:35.:02:40.

the convoy which was bombed or attacked on the 19th of September,

:02:41.:02:44.

which we have good reasons to believe was a provocation.

:02:45.:02:53.

Earlier this week, the Americans threatened to break off talks

:02:54.:03:09.

because of what is happening. The entire problem is that the United

:03:10.:03:13.

States refuses basically to separate the opposition from Al-Nusra and the

:03:14.:03:18.

terrorist groups who joined Al-Nusra. Instead of separation, we

:03:19.:03:24.

see more people in alliance with them. When ever we hit Al-Nusra, we

:03:25.:03:31.

are told, you shouldn't do it because there are good people in the

:03:32.:03:36.

middle of this position. We cannot fight terrorists and less we agree

:03:37.:03:41.

that those of us who want to be part of the cessation of hostilities get

:03:42.:03:43.

out of the parts occupied by them. Let's speak to our correspondent

:03:44.:03:54.

Gary O'Donoghue in Washington. Later in that interview he said the

:03:55.:04:02.

US were not able to separate out the terrorists. What are they saying

:04:03.:04:07.

now? What we have heard in the last few minutes is an interview with one

:04:08.:04:13.

of their officials who is now saying, and has been saying for the

:04:14.:04:17.

last couple of days, but it is difficult to believe that the

:04:18.:04:20.

continuation of the democratic process can happen given the reality

:04:21.:04:23.

of what is happening on the ground in Syria. It is a very gloomy

:04:24.:04:29.

atmosphere about the prospect for continuing talks and getting that a

:04:30.:04:35.

ceasefire re-established under any kind of coordination. The war of

:04:36.:04:41.

words has escalated yet further with this BBC interview and these two

:04:42.:04:45.

powers are now as far apart as they've ever been. And yet both men

:04:46.:04:50.

are talking on a daily basis according to Sergey Lavrov. Yes,

:04:51.:04:57.

they are, and both men are under different bridges from their own

:04:58.:04:59.

governments, their own domestic audiences. Here in the United

:05:00.:05:06.

States, John Kerry has faced internal difficulty, I suppose you

:05:07.:05:11.

could call it, in proposing to cooperate with Russia in targeting

:05:12.:05:14.

some of the jihadist groups. That was on the table, the Pentagon

:05:15.:05:20.

didn't like that very much. A lot of people in those circles believed

:05:21.:05:24.

John Kerry was spun a line by Russia, was taken along really by

:05:25.:05:31.

them. Particularly Republican senators have said similar things,

:05:32.:05:34.

that he has been strung along by Moscow, and they have also called

:05:35.:05:40.

for other actions to be taken. The administration has been talking

:05:41.:05:42.

about other things being considered in the last few days but we don't

:05:43.:05:47.

know what they are. It's very vague talk and it's difficult to see what

:05:48.:05:51.

their options could be at this stage because they don't want to get into

:05:52.:05:56.

a conflict with Russia, certainly, and their options for movement on

:05:57.:05:58.

the ground given they don't want to put troops in either very limited.

:05:59.:06:00.

Thank you very much. For 12 years, the Rosetta probe

:06:01.:06:05.

travelled deep into space. But this afternoon, it's mission

:06:06.:06:07.

came to an end, crash landing deliberately on the comet it's been

:06:08.:06:16.

circling, more than four billion The valuable scientific data

:06:17.:06:18.

Rosetta has gathered, will be studied long

:06:19.:06:21.

into the future. The project's been seen as a major

:06:22.:06:23.

success for the European Space It's been an emotional day at

:06:24.:06:34.

Mission control. Our science editor was there.

:06:35.:06:38.

In one of the greatest ventures in space exploration, the strange

:06:39.:06:41.

landscapes of a comet are revealed in more detail than ever before.

:06:42.:06:44.

Cliffs and rocks, nearly 500 million miles away, photographed this

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morning and beamed back to us during the day,

:06:47.:06:50.

as the Rosetta spacecraft inched towards the surface.

:06:51.:06:54.

An animation shows how the touchdown was planned.

:06:55.:06:57.

Rosetta drifting down at walking pace.

:06:58.:07:00.

The end of a 12-year journey, a last chance to

:07:01.:07:03.

Rosetta has achieved more than anyone expected.

:07:04.:07:14.

We will be listening for the signal...

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Many here have devoted decades to this project, so all eyes

:07:19.:07:21.

were on a signal from a spacecraft which suddenly switched off.

:07:22.:07:25.

This is the end of the Rosetta mission.

:07:26.:07:27.

You know that when you do these things it comes to an end.

:07:28.:07:47.

But, you know, it is the end of a long, long mission.

:07:48.:07:51.

Emotions were so different two years ago.

:07:52.:07:54.

Monica Grady was leaping for joy back then.

:07:55.:08:02.

A tiny lander launched by Rosetta had made it down onto the comet.

:08:03.:08:05.

It did not anchor itself but it did deliver

:08:06.:08:09.

What's remarkable is that all of these manoeuvres in deep

:08:10.:08:13.

space were run from this control centre, and the mission has proved

:08:14.:08:16.

so successful that the volume of data flooding back will keep

:08:17.:08:23.

In fact, what they have seen already has left them amazed.

:08:24.:08:27.

They found that dust blasting off the comet

:08:28.:08:29.

contains many of the chemical ingredients needed for life.

:08:30.:08:31.

And this really matters, because one theory is that comets

:08:32.:08:34.

crashing into the early Earth helped to kick-start life here.

:08:35.:08:40.

It seems a bit crazy to fly hundreds of millions of

:08:41.:08:43.

kilometres through space to what looks

:08:44.:08:44.

like a cold, dead body, but

:08:45.:08:47.

it's actually full of complex molecules that we know if you were

:08:48.:08:50.

to bring them to the planet Earth when it was young, add water and

:08:51.:08:53.

sunlight, you could make life out of.

:08:54.:08:55.

That's a huge discovery for us from Rosetta.

:08:56.:08:57.

We have all of the ingredients in place.

:08:58.:09:00.

So for understanding our own origins, this

:09:01.:09:07.

mission is turning up some key evidence.

:09:08.:09:08.

It's caught the imagination of people

:09:09.:09:11.

The funeral has taken place in Jerusalem of

:09:12.:09:22.

the former Israeli President, and Nobel Peace Prize

:09:23.:09:24.

Dozens of current and former world leaders attended the open-air

:09:25.:09:30.

service, including Mahmoud Abbas, President

:09:31.:09:32.

of the Palestinian National Authority, who exchanged

:09:33.:09:35.

a rare handshake with the Israeli Prime Minister,

:09:36.:09:37.

Our correspondent Orla Guerin watched the ceremony.

:09:38.:09:51.

A poignant final prayer for Shimon Peres.

:09:52.:09:56.

Mourned today by his family and by world leaders who viewed him

:09:57.:10:01.

We gather here in the knowledge that Shimon never saw his dream

:10:02.:10:08.

The region is going through a chaotic time.

:10:09.:10:14.

And yet he did not stop dreaming and he did not stop working.

:10:15.:10:30.

In death, he brought Palestinian and Israeli leaders

:10:31.:10:32.

Mahmoud Abbas was warmly welcomed to the funeral, though the peace

:10:33.:10:39.

Israel's hawkish Prime Minister said Shimon Peres spent every minute

:10:40.:10:47.

But we find hope in his legacy, as does the world.

:10:48.:11:15.

As the tributes are being paid here now there is a real sense

:11:16.:11:18.

Shimon Peres was part of the fabric of Israel right from its birth.

:11:19.:11:26.

He is the last of the generation that helped to build the state,

:11:27.:11:29.

he occupied virtually every major post.

:11:30.:11:32.

Israelis are saying goodbye today, not just to an elder

:11:33.:11:35.

statesman but to a key part of their own history.

:11:36.:11:42.

Decades ago, it was Peres who helped buy weapons for the Israeli

:11:43.:11:45.

army and who founded the countries's nuclear programme.

:11:46.:11:50.

In the 1970s, he supported the building of Jewish settlements

:11:51.:11:52.

Many Palestinians will remember him as a man of war, not peace.

:11:53.:12:02.

Shimon Peres was taken for burial in the soil

:12:03.:12:08.

Orla Guerin, BBC News, Mount Herzl Cemetery, Jerusalem.

:12:09.:12:23.

Deutsche Bank's shares have rebounded in the US after reassuring

:12:24.:12:26.

words from the German lender's CEO and reports of a possible deal

:12:27.:12:30.

There had been fears over the bank's ability to pay the record

:12:31.:12:36.

$14 billion fine for selling toxic mortgage bonds,

:12:37.:12:39.

but it's reported it could settle for closer to $5 billion.

:12:40.:12:44.

The Philippines president, Rodrigo Duterte, has said he's

:12:45.:12:46.

willing to slaughter his country's three million drug addicts

:12:47.:12:49.

The controversial leader compared his war on drugs

:12:50.:12:55.

to Adolf Hitler's genocide of the Jews in Nazi Germany.

:12:56.:12:57.

The remarks have been condemned by Jewish groups.

:12:58.:13:01.

Three Chinese fisherman have died in a fire

:13:02.:13:04.

after their boat was boarded by the South Korean coastguard.

:13:05.:13:07.

The men, who were suspected of illegal fishing, were caught

:13:08.:13:10.

in the blaze after the coastguard officers threw a stun grenade

:13:11.:13:13.

into part of their boat where they were hiding.

:13:14.:13:16.

The incident began when a coastguard vessel identified the fishing boat

:13:17.:13:19.

in South Korean waters and ordered it to

:13:20.:13:21.

It's been tried before - by both invading German troops

:13:22.:13:34.

and the Russian government during the Second World War -

:13:35.:13:37.

but now President Putin is hoping he'll succeed where others have

:13:38.:13:39.

The multi-billion dollar project got under way two years ago

:13:40.:13:43.

after Russia seized control of Crimea from Ukraine.

:13:44.:13:45.

It's scheduled to open in 2019, providing a land and rail

:13:46.:13:51.

link across the Black Sea from the town of Taman

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on the Russian mainland to the Crimean port of Kerch.

:14:00.:14:01.

The BBC's Oleg Boldyrev has been down to take a look.

:14:02.:14:06.

On the shores of the Black Sea, an enormous construction project is

:14:07.:14:14.

under way. Russia is building a 19 kilometre bridge to Crimea, in fact

:14:15.:14:20.

to bridges, one each for cars and trains. It will provide a road link

:14:21.:14:27.

to Crimea wrap which has been all but cut off since it was annexed by

:14:28.:14:32.

Russia last year. This is the most expensive bridge ever built by a

:14:33.:14:36.

Russian company. They discussed building a bridge here for almost 20

:14:37.:14:41.

years but only after Russia annexed Crimea, the political will is now

:14:42.:14:46.

pushing the project forward. This project is being given top priority

:14:47.:14:54.

in Russia. The main project was given to a company owned by a close

:14:55.:15:00.

friend of President Putin. Both the businessman and his company are

:15:01.:15:04.

subject to international sanctions put in place after the annexation of

:15:05.:15:13.

Crimea. I cannot say this seriously limits our company. It is more

:15:14.:15:17.

difficult to get spare parts for our machines but in general, our

:15:18.:15:21.

contractors from Russia have enough expertise to deliver on time. One of

:15:22.:15:26.

Russia's leading experts on transport says the country is not

:15:27.:15:29.

building enough roads for the size of its economy and this year alone,

:15:30.:15:35.

the bridge alone is taking half of Russia's road-building budget for

:15:36.:15:41.

2016. Does the project really make sense? With this project so big and

:15:42.:15:50.

expensive -- with this project are big and expensive hold-up to usual

:15:51.:15:55.

economic assessment? Probably not or it would have been built some time

:15:56.:16:00.

ago. But I take a more philosophical approach and say that in two

:16:01.:16:04.

generations time, everyone will forget the economic problems and we

:16:05.:16:08.

will simply have a good bridge. A century from now, will be bridge be

:16:09.:16:12.

seen as beneficial for the region or will it remain a concrete symbol of

:16:13.:16:17.

Vladimir Putin biggest geopolitical gamble?

:16:18.:16:23.

Donald Trump has used Twitter to attack a former beauty queen

:16:24.:16:26.

who accused him of making sexist remarks and who is supporting his

:16:27.:16:29.

In a series of tweets, Mr Trump urged his followers

:16:30.:16:32.

to check out an alleged sex tape of Alicia Machado -

:16:33.:16:36.

Ms Machado's case was raised by Mrs Clinton in the first

:16:37.:16:41.

Presidential debate earlier this week as an example of

:16:42.:16:43.

One of the worst things he said was about a woman in a beauty contest.

:16:44.:16:59.

He loves beauty contests, supporting them and hanging around them, and he

:17:00.:17:05.

called this woman Miss piggy. Then he called her Miss housekeeping

:17:06.:17:10.

because she was glad to know. Donald, she has a name. Her name is

:17:11.:17:16.

Alicia Machado -- Machado and she has become a US citizen and she is

:17:17.:17:19.

going to vote this November. Laura Bicker is our Washington

:17:20.:17:23.

reporter - she joins me now. There was a flurry of tweets before

:17:24.:17:35.

6am. What does it say, do you think? It is either trying to distract

:17:36.:17:40.

voters from a series of negative newspaper headlines that he has had.

:17:41.:17:45.

It could also be to distract from his performance in the debate but

:17:46.:17:49.

his campaign team have urged him to try to stick if he is going to make

:17:50.:17:55.

any attacks, to stick to Hillary Clinton, her e-mails, the fact she

:17:56.:18:00.

is an established politician, stick to her past, and now he has decided

:18:01.:18:03.

to bring up this beauty contest winner. You saw how the case was

:18:04.:18:09.

made by Hillary Clinton. It's turned out to be a masterstroke by her. He

:18:10.:18:14.

couldn't let it lie just after the debate. He called Fox News the next

:18:15.:18:19.

morning and he said she had admitted the whole thing -- and he admitted

:18:20.:18:23.

the whole thing had got under his skin. He then said she was the worst

:18:24.:18:27.

contestant ever because she had put on a massive amount of weight and it

:18:28.:18:33.

was a real problem, not only that, attitude. Then, days later, he is

:18:34.:18:39.

with this tirade of tweets suggesting that she has a sex tape.

:18:40.:18:44.

The contestant in question has now issued a statement accusing him of

:18:45.:18:50.

making a hate campaign, saying, generating attacks, insults and

:18:51.:18:55.

trying to resurrect false allegations in my life, he insists

:18:56.:18:59.

on discrediting and demoralising women, his worst characteristics.

:19:00.:19:06.

Certainly he has a number of cases of picking a subject and then going

:19:07.:19:10.

after them and many of them have been women. Briefly, in his defence

:19:11.:19:17.

perhaps, she has in the past said she ain't no saint, but that is a

:19:18.:19:26.

slightly better -- that is a slightly different thing. You

:19:27.:19:30.

actually make these tweets? Is he lying in bed doing them himself or

:19:31.:19:35.

does an aid do them for him? During his speeches, an aide may do them

:19:36.:19:39.

for him but most of the told Donald Trump -- many of the time, Donald

:19:40.:19:45.

Trump is in charge of his own Twitter account. These were sent

:19:46.:19:48.

very early on. He fills the need to defend himself on this one, feeling

:19:49.:19:53.

he is entirely right, but when it comes to the voting public, he

:19:54.:19:57.

really needs to win women owe that and perhaps this isn't the way to do

:19:58.:19:59.

it. Thank you very much. They were missing for 14 years,

:20:00.:20:03.

but now two stolen paintings by Vincent Van Gogh -

:20:04.:20:06.

pictured here - have been The pictures were taken

:20:07.:20:08.

from a museum in Amsterdam in 2002 They are the 1882 work, Seascape

:20:09.:20:12.

at Scheveningen, and a later work, Congregation leaving

:20:13.:20:17.

the Reformed Church in Nuenen. The discovery was made by anti-Mafia

:20:18.:20:20.

police in the city of Naples. Alex Ruger, Director

:20:21.:20:27.

of the Van Gogh Museum, has been giving his reaction

:20:28.:20:31.

to the discovery of the paintings. Needless to say, it is a great day

:20:32.:20:42.

for us today, to see the works and to know that they are safe and in

:20:43.:20:46.

safe hands. Of course, we hope that they will be able to return to our

:20:47.:20:51.

museum as soon as possible. That is our great hope but, of course, we

:20:52.:20:56.

respect the procedures of the Italian authorities and since this

:20:57.:21:00.

is part of and larger investigation, we may have to be a bit patient. We

:21:01.:21:04.

hope that we will soon have them back where they belong.

:21:05.:21:07.

Joining us from Rome is Lynda Albertson, who's

:21:08.:21:09.

Chief Executive of the Association for Research into Crimes

:21:10.:21:11.

Against Art, which looks into trends related to art crime.

:21:12.:21:14.

You have followed this case really quite closely. You must be relieved.

:21:15.:21:21.

Argue also surprised about what appears to be the background of his

:21:22.:21:27.

paintings for the past 20 years? I am very -- the past 14 years? I am

:21:28.:21:36.

very pleased. A lot of people have worked on this for so many years.

:21:37.:21:42.

Surprised? No, not necessarily. Often times, a high value painting

:21:43.:21:46.

will be held by an organised crime unit. I wasn't surprised at all.

:21:47.:21:50.

They weren't actually on the walls either from what I have read. They

:21:51.:21:54.

were wrapped up in plastic sheeting and put in some room somewhere. Is

:21:55.:22:00.

that because art now is used to love rich money? To get ransoms? Not

:22:01.:22:07.

because people are stealing it to hang on their walls. Ransoms are not

:22:08.:22:14.

used so much as they were in the late 1980s but they are used for

:22:15.:22:19.

collateral. Organised crime unit like this particular one, like this

:22:20.:22:23.

splinter group from the Mafia, was probably using this art as a

:22:24.:22:29.

possible collateral peaceful negotiations. If someone was

:22:30.:22:32.

arrested, they needed to plea bargain the case down, turning state

:22:33.:22:36.

's evidence would give them something to bargain with. One of

:22:37.:22:41.

these had been stolen before. Are there at any one time lots of stolen

:22:42.:22:46.

Vincent Van Gogh paintings in existence, do you think? Three

:22:47.:22:51.

Vincent van Gogh paintings have been stolen, each two times separately

:22:52.:22:55.

and yes, there have been quite a few paintings over the years. I think

:22:56.:23:00.

the current list is something like 36 paintings overall. 36 of his that

:23:01.:23:07.

have been stolen but only two are apparently still missing. 36 were

:23:08.:23:13.

stolen in 17 different thefts in total. The museums around the world

:23:14.:23:19.

need to take more care? This was an audacious heist before the museum

:23:20.:23:22.

opened. Do we need better protection for these arts -- artworks which are

:23:23.:23:28.

valued at hundreds of millions of dollars or beyond that? I think the

:23:29.:23:33.

museum directors of security have come a long way since 2002, since

:23:34.:23:38.

some of the earlier great big thefts we have had in museums. Risk

:23:39.:23:44.

analysis trends now are on proactive ways of securing museums, so not

:23:45.:23:48.

just waiting until something happens with an alarm system, but looking at

:23:49.:23:51.

ways to prevent out from being stolen in the first place in a more

:23:52.:23:57.

proactive profiling scenario. Sometimes it is considered in a

:23:58.:24:02.

positive or negative light, but in the case of New Zealand worth

:24:03.:24:06.

innumerable amounts of money -- in the case of a museum with pieces

:24:07.:24:11.

worth so much money, it is a good idea. In this case, the thieves who

:24:12.:24:19.

had stolen it didn't let on whom they had stolen it for and this came

:24:20.:24:25.

from a gang member telling the police who were probing the Mafia.

:24:26.:24:34.

This came from an investigation into organised crime, specifically

:24:35.:24:37.

trafficking drugs, so the fact this painting came up was not something

:24:38.:24:41.

most people were thinking was going to come up, but the conversations

:24:42.:24:46.

arose after search and seizure at multiple properties from different

:24:47.:24:51.

gangland members who are currently over -- under investigation. OK,

:24:52.:24:56.

thank you very much indeed for joining us. Let's just show you some

:24:57.:25:01.

pictures before we go. Mexico's Colima or Fire

:25:02.:25:07.

Volcano continued to spew gas, ash and incandescent

:25:08.:25:10.

fragments into a cloudy Activity over the past week has

:25:11.:25:25.

increased as the dome, which was discovered

:25:26.:25:36.

in February this year. To tell you about our Sergey Lavrov

:25:37.:25:48.

story, the State Department have just said that the rushing bombing

:25:49.:25:53.

of -- the Russian bombing of civilian targets was inexplicable.

:25:54.:25:58.

More on that I am sure, but for now, from me and the team in London,

:25:59.:26:00.

goodbye. Good evening. We will all get at

:26:01.:26:11.

least one fine day this weekend but it will not be Sunday -- Saturday

:26:12.:26:16.

for the southern half of the UK thanks to this area of low pressure

:26:17.:26:19.

which is going to move in. It

:26:20.:26:20.

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