04/10/2016 World News Today


04/10/2016

The latest national and international news, exploring the day's events from a global perspective.


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This is BBC World News Today with me, Tom Donkin.

:00:00.:00:07.

The headlines: The fiercest Caribbean storm in almost

:00:08.:00:09.

Wind, rain and a massive storm surge have flooded coastal towns.

:00:10.:00:16.

The US vows it won't give up on peace in Syria,

:00:17.:00:22.

We'll hear from a top American official.

:00:23.:00:27.

Also coming up - can you name these men?

:00:28.:00:33.

The two vice-presidential candidates debate -

:00:34.:00:35.

but how much does it really matter?

:00:36.:00:38.

And the biggest mystery in modern literature may have been solved -

:00:39.:00:41.

but was it right to unveil the author's real identity?

:00:42.:00:56.

The most powerful hurricane to hit the Caribbean in nearly

:00:57.:00:58.

a decade has struck Haiti, bringing winds of 145 miles

:00:59.:01:01.

per hour, heavy rain and severe flooding.

:01:02.:01:04.

This heat map shows the eye of the Hurricane

:01:05.:01:07.

Matthew has been classed as a Category Four hurricane -

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that's just one level below the most dangerous.

:01:13.:01:14.

Locals are being urged to "do anything they can

:01:15.:01:16.

Haiti's President has said a number of people have already been killed.

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The BBC's Christian Fraser has the latest.

:01:25.:01:29.

Hurricane Matthew is the most powerful storms across the Caribbean

:01:30.:01:39.

in almost ten years. It is barrelling across an island that is

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ill-prepared for what it will throw at them. Haiti is still recovering

:01:43.:01:48.

from the earthquake that struck in 2010, and a devastating outbreak of

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cholera. There are thousands of people living under corrugated iron

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roofs, in shantytowns that have no defence from sustained, an hundred

:01:58.:02:01.

and 40 mile an hour winds. The president has been urging people to

:02:02.:02:07.

move to safer shelter. We have already seen deaths. People

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who were out at sea. There are people who are missing. There are

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people who did not respect the alerts. They have lost their lives.

:02:16.:02:20.

The Red Cross has been out in those areas that will take the brunt. In

:02:21.:02:24.

districts where roads are already filled with mud. But many like this

:02:25.:02:29.

man have refused the offer of shelter. They came with a truck to

:02:30.:02:34.

move us, he said, but what about the stuff we have at home? If we lose

:02:35.:02:38.

our things, if they are stolen, we won't get them back.

:02:39.:02:43.

From the International Space Station, Matthew looks like a vortex

:02:44.:02:47.

of trouble. The forecasters predict it could dump up to 40 inches of

:02:48.:02:51.

rain in the more isolated areas of Haiti, raising fears of mudslides

:02:52.:02:56.

and floods in these heavily populated hillsides. Hurricane

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Matthew has slammed into Haiti, very power.

:03:00.:03:03.

And, it has been getting all its energy from the ocean waters.

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In the next few hours, it will move into Cuba, and then out into the

:03:08.:03:11.

Bahamas, where there are lots of very warm ocean tropical waters.

:03:12.:03:15.

That will fuel the Hurricane, so it will maintain some of its intensity,

:03:16.:03:19.

and then potentially moving very close to the Florida coastline as we

:03:20.:03:25.

go through this week. In the Bahamas, they are in a hurry. Wood

:03:26.:03:28.

and aluminium sheeting to protect what they own, and in Cuba, the

:03:29.:03:33.

government is buzzing thousands of people to shelters in six eastern

:03:34.:03:39.

provinces. In Jamaica, the outer bands of Matthew have now passed the

:03:40.:03:43.

capital Kingston. Heavy rains have left lots of damage behind, but this

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may be nothing compared with what awaits the impoverished island of

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Haiti. Our correspondent game this update

:03:58.:04:00.

in the last hour. From the early hours of this

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morning, Hurricane Matthew has been buffeting this country, with winds

:04:04.:04:10.

of up to 140 miles an hour. The fear is that it will dump rainfall of up

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to three feet. You can see already the problem of flooding. There is

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also a worry about mudslides in this very mountainous area that is

:04:22.:04:27.

denuded of trees, and as you can see here, there is some flash flooding

:04:28.:04:32.

happening already. Now, Haiti has already got so many problems. It is

:04:33.:04:36.

suffering still from the earthquake that hit it in 2010, which killed

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more than 200,000 people. It is suffering from a cholera outbreak

:04:41.:04:45.

too. Public health officials fear this will exacerbate that particular

:04:46.:04:49.

crisis. The conditions here are atrocious. To step outside is to be

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drenched within a matter of seconds. Nick Bryant there.

:04:56.:05:00.

Charities and NGOs in Haiti have been scouting the damage and handing

:05:01.:05:04.

out supplies, and I'm happy to say, we can speak to Plan International

:05:05.:05:15.

bat director. What do people need the most, and are they getting it?

:05:16.:05:21.

Thank you for up offering me the opportunity to share with the wider

:05:22.:05:29.

world about Haiti. The country now is suffering. All

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our staff are mobilised to support the population especially as they

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are coming out, because we have three officials in the south-east

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and in the West. Hurricane Matthew, the situation is virtually more

:05:58.:06:00.

critical in the south and in the south-east. We now have heavy rain

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and some violent winds, and we have the river, that we explained, is at

:06:18.:06:25.

a high risk of flooding. This is the situation now in Port-au-Prince, and

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the population are very afraid and scared of the situation. But all the

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NGOs are mobilised, both at central government and local level. They are

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already mobilised, but we are waiting after the Hurricane to make

:06:44.:06:50.

an assessment to support all the population are different levels.

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Thank you very much for that update. I'm sure our viewers will join me in

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wishing you all the best in Haiti. And now, some of the day's other

:07:00.:07:01.

news. Fighting has continued

:07:02.:07:02.

around the city of Kunduz Government forces have been trying

:07:03.:07:04.

to repel Taliban militants who entered several areas

:07:05.:07:07.

of the city on Monday. An Afghan government spokesman says

:07:08.:07:09.

the security forces are now in control of large

:07:10.:07:12.

parts of the city. Kunduz fell briefly to the Taliban

:07:13.:07:14.

last year, but was recaptured The International Monetary Fund has

:07:15.:07:16.

delivered its latest Police in South Africa have used

:07:17.:07:21.

stun grenades to move on student protesters

:07:22.:07:23.

at Wits University in Johannesburg. Their protests over the high cost

:07:24.:07:25.

of education have forced the closure of some of the country's most

:07:26.:07:28.

prominent universities The Court of Arbitration in Sport

:07:29.:07:30.

has cut the ban given to the tennis player Maria Sharapova from

:07:31.:07:35.

two years to 15 months. The Russian tested

:07:36.:07:38.

positive for meldonium It means the five-time

:07:39.:07:41.

Grand Slam champion CAN return The US Secretary of State,

:07:42.:07:45.

John Kerry, says Washington is not abandoning the search for peace

:07:46.:07:53.

in Syria, that's despite The US blames Russia AND the Syrian

:07:54.:07:55.

government for fresh More than 400 people have been

:07:56.:08:00.

killed in the city of Aleppo since Russia in turn has blamed

:08:01.:08:05.

the Americans for the collapse So, if there are no talks with

:08:06.:08:23.

Russia, what happens from here? Our chief international correspondent is

:08:24.:08:26.

in Brussels with more. Over to you. Yes, what happens and what is left,

:08:27.:08:33.

four months, if not for years, the main thread in a very tangled and

:08:34.:08:36.

not a very optimistic process of trying to move the Syrian conflict

:08:37.:08:42.

towards some kind of resolution, has been the talks between John Kerry

:08:43.:08:48.

and Sergei Lavrov. Last week at the UN General Assembly. John Kerry said

:08:49.:08:51.

the situation in Syria was hanging by a thread. The only thing keeping

:08:52.:08:54.

that thread alive were the talks with Sergei Lavrov, so what happens

:08:55.:08:59.

now that they have broken down? I am joined here in Brussels by the State

:09:00.:09:02.

Department spokesman, John Kirby. I know you said in your statement that

:09:03.:09:07.

it was a not a decision you took lightly, that you are to continue to

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work for peace. How can you, when your main interleukin-2 is no longer

:09:12.:09:15.

talking with you? Well certainly, we don't like being in the position

:09:16.:09:18.

we're in right now, having to suspend those talks, because Russia

:09:19.:09:22.

does have considerable influence over Assad, and it made sense for us

:09:23.:09:26.

to try to workouts and sort of arrangement with the Russian

:09:27.:09:28.

government, but obviously, that didn't happen, because they won't

:09:29.:09:31.

stop supporting the Assad regime. They won't stop with the bombing,

:09:32.:09:35.

they weren't stopped the siege of Aleppo, so we were left with little

:09:36.:09:41.

choice. That said, there are still multilateral forums we can work

:09:42.:09:44.

inside. The UN led process that is trying to get the political talks

:09:45.:09:50.

back on track still exists, and of course, the UN Security Council is

:09:51.:09:53.

still there. So there are plenty of opportunities for us to try and

:09:54.:09:56.

attack is from a multilateral perspective. The other thing is, we

:09:57.:09:59.

suspended the stored. It doesn't mean that if Russia is willing to

:10:00.:10:03.

commit to a significant step, like putting Assad on the ground, that we

:10:04.:10:08.

would restart it. It is not like it is over for ever.

:10:09.:10:11.

As you know, many critics in the State Department and the pens again

:10:12.:10:16.

said that John Kerry was on a fool 's errand. You would not be able to

:10:17.:10:19.

make a deal with Russia. Have they been proven right?

:10:20.:10:22.

I don't think so. Nobody is happy about where we are right now, what

:10:23.:10:27.

is the alternative? If you don't keep trying a diplomatic solution,

:10:28.:10:30.

the alternative is just more war, more bloodshed, more violence, so I

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don't think the secretary would have one bit to apologise for in terms of

:10:36.:10:39.

the effort that he went to to try to get some kind of an accord, an

:10:40.:10:44.

arrangement, that would get the cessation of hostilities enforceable

:10:45.:10:47.

and sustainable. So again, we did not take this decision lightly. We

:10:48.:10:52.

would prefer not to have had to make the suspension, but if Russia is

:10:53.:10:57.

willing to prove in some form of fashion that they are willing to

:10:58.:11:02.

make a significant step, stop this bombing, we will certainly be

:11:03.:11:04.

willing to listen to those ideas and to restart some kind of dialogue.

:11:05.:11:08.

And it is also what is called Plan B. We understand talks have been

:11:09.:11:13.

stepped up about a possible military option. We know from that audio tape

:11:14.:11:17.

that was released of John Kerry's own feelings about the war. He said

:11:18.:11:21.

he had argued for a military option. Is it time to look for another way

:11:22.:11:23.

forward? I would tell you this, and that is

:11:24.:11:27.

for months now, the US government has remained open to having

:11:28.:11:31.

discussions about other options available to us, options outside

:11:32.:11:36.

diplomacy. This is not a new idea. This is something that our agency

:11:37.:11:43.

and the president himself has welcomed.

:11:44.:11:45.

The president hasn't welcomed it all? He doesn't want to get

:11:46.:11:50.

involved, necessarily, and he has come under criticism about that.

:11:51.:11:54.

He has welcomed a robust discussion inside the US government about all

:11:55.:11:58.

our options, and to stay open to all options, but he has also said that

:11:59.:12:02.

no other option is better than a diplomatic one. All the other

:12:03.:12:06.

options we have looked at, be they military and non-military, don't end

:12:07.:12:10.

up in a better place in terms of a more peaceful Syria than a

:12:11.:12:13.

diplomatic approach. So we continue to believe that the right solution

:12:14.:12:17.

is a political one, not a military one, but we would be irresponsible

:12:18.:12:21.

as the government and we did not continue to have these discussions.

:12:22.:12:24.

You talked about ramping it up. I would actually say that discussions

:12:25.:12:27.

about options, the whole panoply of options, has been something on the

:12:28.:12:31.

table now for many months. The BBC spoke to Sergei Lavrov

:12:32.:12:35.

recently, and he blamed the United States that this breakdown, saying

:12:36.:12:39.

you refuse to separate yourself from backing Al-Qaeda linked group, and

:12:40.:12:42.

he said that the main problem in Aleppo.

:12:43.:12:45.

Well, any suggestion we are backing Al-Qaeda or Al-Qaeda linked groups

:12:46.:12:48.

is absolutely false. It flies in the face of the facts. We recognise that

:12:49.:12:53.

there has been a co-mingling of some of the groups with al-Nusra, which

:12:54.:12:56.

is Al-Qaeda in Syria, and we have been working hard to get that

:12:57.:13:03.

separation to take place, but the fault here for the breakdown, the

:13:04.:13:08.

fault for the suspension, lies squarely in Moscow. The secretary

:13:09.:13:11.

was clear about that today, and at the UN. The fault lies with Russia,

:13:12.:13:15.

and the fact that they continue to bolster and support the Assad regime

:13:16.:13:18.

as that regime continues to attack its own people.

:13:19.:13:23.

Do you think Sergei Lavrov and John Kerry will find a moment to speak

:13:24.:13:25.

here? I did the granny plans for them to

:13:26.:13:29.

have a conversation in Brussels. John Kirby, here in Brussels, where

:13:30.:13:33.

leaders are gathering to talk about the situation in Afghanistan,

:13:34.:13:37.

another conflict where on some issues they don't see eye to eye,

:13:38.:13:40.

but many will be asking if John Kerry, the quintessential double,

:13:41.:13:43.

will look for some way to try to get this process back on track.

:13:44.:13:47.

That is all from Brussels. Thank you bring much indeed. Thank

:13:48.:13:53.

you for joining us, our chief international correspondent.

:13:54.:13:54.

In little more than a month's time, either Tim Kaine or Mike Pence

:13:55.:13:58.

will be, as they say, one heartbeat away

:13:59.:13:59.

The role of American Vice-President is famously a low-key one

:14:00.:14:03.

But in a few hours' time, the running mates to Hillary Clinton

:14:04.:14:07.

and Donald Trump will be the centre of attention

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as they hold their first and only TV debate.

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When it comes to the debates between those who will be

:14:12.:14:18.

second-in-command, perhaps James Stockdale put it best

:14:19.:14:19.

Who am I? Why am I here?

:14:20.:14:27.

So, let's start with Hillary Clinton's pick, Tim Kaine.

:14:28.:14:29.

Even Republicans have struggled to find fault with

:14:30.:14:31.

His first speech as a Democratic vice-presidential candidate

:14:32.:14:41.

was aimed at Donald Trump, no doubt skills he will have been

:14:42.:14:44.

We've seen again and again that when Donald Trump says

:14:45.:14:47.

he has your back, you'd better watch out.

:14:48.:14:49.

Donald Trump chose Indiana Governor Mike Pence, although their initial

:14:50.:14:52.

He is an experienced Washington hand and a favourite of social

:14:53.:14:59.

conservatives, and as the politician in this relationship,

:15:00.:15:02.

he often finds himself translating the views of businessman Trump.

:15:03.:15:08.

It seems like just about every day, the national media latches onto some

:15:09.:15:11.

Turn on your Twitter account, turn on your cable TV,

:15:12.:15:14.

The vice-presidential debates can often draw huge audiences.

:15:15.:15:23.

This 2008 contest between Joe Biden and Sarah Palin

:15:24.:15:28.

70 million viewers tuned in, and this year's vice-president's

:15:29.:15:35.

We've got two presidential candidates who are seen deeply

:15:36.:15:40.

unfavourably by the vast majority of Americans, and two vice

:15:41.:15:43.

presidents candidates who are largely unknownby the vast

:15:44.:15:46.

majority of Americans, but those vice-presidential

:15:47.:15:48.

candidates have a level of credibility talking

:15:49.:15:50.

about their presidential running mate that the presidential candidate

:15:51.:15:52.

can't really have talking about themselves.

:15:53.:15:57.

Candidates do get a chance to distinguish themselves.

:15:58.:16:00.

In 1988, Dan Quayle compared himself to President Kennedy.

:16:01.:16:04.

His opponent, Lloyd Benson, had this scathing reply.

:16:05.:16:08.

Senator, I served with Jack Kennedy. I knew Jack Kennedy.

:16:09.:16:12.

There has been nothing conventional about the 2016 election

:16:13.:16:24.

year, apart from perhaps the two vice-presidential picks.

:16:25.:16:28.

And yet, as the past has shown us, when you take to the stage,

:16:29.:16:34.

And don't forget, all you need to know about the US

:16:35.:16:46.

We also have this piece on why the Vice-Presidential debate

:16:47.:16:50.

matters, plus Katty Kay on Bill Clinton's women, and much more.

:16:51.:16:53.

bbc.com/news is where you need to head.

:16:54.:16:58.

Pope Francis has made an unannounced visit to Amatriche,

:16:59.:17:00.

the Italian town devastated by an earthquake

:17:01.:17:02.

Crowds of photographers and onlookers surrounded the Pope

:17:03.:17:06.

as he emerged from his car at the local school where he met

:17:07.:17:09.

children, survivors and relatives of the victims.

:17:10.:17:12.

Here's our Rome correspondent James Reynolds.

:17:13.:17:15.

The Pope described this as a private visit, so he made the two-hour drive

:17:16.:17:19.

from Rome in a regular car, notable only for its tinted windows

:17:20.:17:25.

In Amatriche, Francis was taken to see earthquake survivors.

:17:26.:17:32.

Many are still living in temporary shelters.

:17:33.:17:41.

From the first moment, I thought I should come here,

:17:42.:17:44.

Pope Francis met firefighters who showed him the extent

:17:45.:17:53.

The Vatican itself sent relief teams here in the hours

:17:54.:17:59.

The Italian government has promised to rebuild this entire region.

:18:00.:18:06.

The Pope, the Bishop of Rome, normally surveys the grand works

:18:07.:18:11.

This morning, by contrast, the view in front

:18:12.:18:15.

Three British-born scientists have been awarded

:18:16.:18:28.

David Thouless, Duncan Haldane and Michael Kosterlitz were

:18:29.:18:32.

recognised for their discoveries about unusual forms of matter.

:18:33.:18:34.

The Nobel Committee said their work has

:18:35.:18:36.

"opened the door on an unknown world".

:18:37.:18:38.

Our Science Editor David Shukman has more.

:18:39.:18:47.

From steel strong enough to hold up bridges to the intricate robot on a

:18:48.:18:53.

production line, to the myriad devices in our everyday lives we

:18:54.:18:57.

depend on materials that have qualities that make them useful for

:18:58.:19:01.

particular tasks, but there is another unseen world of materials

:19:02.:19:04.

that don't behave in ways you would expect. Research into that world was

:19:05.:19:09.

awarded the Nobel Prize for physics today. To the logical phase

:19:10.:19:13.

transitions... Three scientists, born in Britain,

:19:14.:19:17.

recognised for making some strange and conjugated discoveries.

:19:18.:19:23.

New kind of phase transition. One of the judges resorted using

:19:24.:19:26.

pastries to explain their work. The bagel has one hole.

:19:27.:19:31.

How materials change their characteristics of the smallest

:19:32.:19:37.

scales. One of the winners was Duncan Haldane, awarded by his

:19:38.:19:41.

students at Boston University. Time to double down and learn! He told is

:19:42.:19:47.

that fundamental research could lead to unpredictable benefits.

:19:48.:19:51.

Science goes by people exploring where they want to go, and sometimes

:19:52.:19:55.

they find something good, and sometimes that actually leads to

:19:56.:19:58.

technologies, so we don't know where it is going to go, so it is very

:19:59.:20:01.

important that people should follow their dream, basically, and not be

:20:02.:20:05.

constrained to work on something that the funding agency thinks is

:20:06.:20:09.

going to be in the national interest.

:20:10.:20:11.

So what is this Nobel Prize for physics been awarded for? Well, it

:20:12.:20:16.

is all about revealing the materials -- that materials can exist in

:20:17.:20:19.

states that we never even thought of. So, take water. When it is

:20:20.:20:24.

heated, it is in the form of steam. A little cooler, and it becomes a

:20:25.:20:27.

liquid that you can drink. Colder still, and it freezes into ice. But

:20:28.:20:31.

it turns out that when the temperature is even lower, materials

:20:32.:20:38.

can exist in a whole range of different states in which they

:20:39.:20:41.

behave in ways that just as expected. For example, allowing

:20:42.:20:44.

electricity to flow without resistance. If this can be

:20:45.:20:48.

controlled, new, much faster computers might be on the cards, so

:20:49.:20:52.

this research is seen as having huge potential.

:20:53.:20:56.

It is a theoretical results, but if you want to apply materials to

:20:57.:21:00.

modern technology, for example, future generations of smartphones,

:21:01.:21:04.

you can't do it without having an understanding of what these

:21:05.:21:06.

materials will do. Duncan Haldane and is to ballot

:21:07.:21:11.

prizewinners were at one stage seen as out on a limb with their

:21:12.:21:14.

research. Now it has become in stream, and they are looking for the

:21:15.:21:18.

next challenge. -- his two fellow prizewinners.

:21:19.:21:19.

It's a literary storm worthy of a bestseller.

:21:20.:21:21.

A journalist in Italy says he has solved one of modern

:21:22.:21:24.

Gent-macro two claims to have revealed the real identity of the

:21:25.:21:41.

writer known as Elena Ferrante, who has sold more than 2 million copies

:21:42.:21:45.

worldwide. Very little is known about the author, who writes under a

:21:46.:21:48.

pseudonym, but the Italian journalist has published a story

:21:49.:21:51.

naming errors enabled professional translator.

:21:52.:21:52.

A number of high profile literary figures have slammed

:21:53.:21:54.

Bestselling British novelist Matt Haig wrote on social media:

:21:55.:21:57.

"The pursuit to discover the 'real' Elena Ferrante is a disgrace

:21:58.:22:00.

"A writer's truest self is the books they write."

:22:01.:22:03.

Author and journalist Jojo Moyes tweeted: "Only criminals

:22:04.:22:05.

"deserve to be unmasked, if they have consciously

:22:06.:22:07.

"sought privacy. Badly done, @nybooks."

:22:08.:22:10.

And Marlon James, last year's winner of the Man Booker prize for fiction,

:22:11.:22:13.

wrote: "What kind of person supports this...

:22:14.:22:15.

"And no, I have not and will never read the article."

:22:16.:22:26.

Well, I'm joined now from Rome by the journalist

:22:27.:22:31.

at the centre of the story, Claudio Gatti.

:22:32.:22:33.

Very good of you to join us. I first want to ask you, what annoyed you so

:22:34.:22:39.

much about ton-macro that made you dedicate so much time to uncovering

:22:40.:22:43.

who she really was? Nothing annoyed me. Actually, I was a fan of hers. I

:22:44.:22:50.

started this as a reader. I read the four books and I loved them all.

:22:51.:22:54.

Then I read the autobiography, the same autobiography that is being

:22:55.:23:01.

published in the US in November. Just to know more, like many, many

:23:02.:23:05.

other readers. I was interested in knowing who was the author behind

:23:06.:23:11.

the pseudonym, and I was interested in that, and then, I noticed that

:23:12.:23:17.

there was a lots of details in that autobiography, and I realised that

:23:18.:23:22.

it should be established, it should be clear from those details, who the

:23:23.:23:28.

person was, and the more I looked, the more things didn't quite turn

:23:29.:23:33.

out to be right, and then I decided as an investigative journalist to

:23:34.:23:37.

use the typical technique of investigative journalism, which is

:23:38.:23:40.

following the money, seeing who was paid for the huge commercial

:23:41.:23:48.

success, and I've found the evidence that led to the person identified as

:23:49.:23:53.

the real Elena Ferrante. Of course the author has said many times that

:23:54.:23:56.

she does not want to be outed in this way, she liked to privacy.

:23:57.:24:01.

I wonder, as many others have, would you have gone after this author if

:24:02.:24:05.

it was a man? The Bronte sisters and Jane Austen had to hide their

:24:06.:24:08.

identity. Are you just punishing this because of her success as a

:24:09.:24:12.

woman, some calling it sexist bullying?

:24:13.:24:15.

Well, I was accused of being a misogynist, except that the people

:24:16.:24:18.

who do that do know how investigative journalism works. In

:24:19.:24:23.

writing, the writing starts as a subject and then develops into a

:24:24.:24:28.

story. In investigative journalism, you start with the mystery and want

:24:29.:24:31.

to find out what the mystery is. In Italy, the number one suspect, or

:24:32.:24:39.

candidate, for Elena Ferrante was a man. In fact, it was the husband of

:24:40.:24:45.

the person I identified. So, when I started, I had no clue if the real

:24:46.:24:51.

Elena Ferrante would be turn out to be a man or woman.

:24:52.:24:54.

It does sound like you have the some kind of public service, but many of

:24:55.:24:58.

her readers would argue that they enjoy this intimate contract, if you

:24:59.:25:02.

like, with her. The reader doesn't know the author's background, the

:25:03.:25:05.

author does not know the reader's. You seem to have railroaded that

:25:06.:25:09.

sacred contact and denied a lot of readers they enjoy ability of

:25:10.:25:11.

reading their work? Well, in the history of art, I am

:25:12.:25:16.

not aware of any situation, any work of art, that has been ruined by the

:25:17.:25:22.

fact that people would know who the author is, or the artist is. As far

:25:23.:25:28.

as I am concerned, knowing the cultural millionaire, the

:25:29.:25:32.

background, the history of an artist, only enhances the art, so I

:25:33.:25:38.

don't see how that would work. Thank you very much for joining us.

:25:39.:25:42.

An interesting topic, we will no doubt discuss online.

:25:43.:25:45.

You can more detail and analysis on our website, bbc.com/news.

:25:46.:25:48.

From all the team here, goodbye.

:25:49.:26:06.

Good evening. Temperatures won't drop as much tonight, because there

:26:07.:26:10.

is a bit

:26:11.:26:11.

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