Episode 3 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 3

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The nation's favourite antiques experts. One big challenge.

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Who will make the most profit buying and selling antiques as they drive around the UK?

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-£6.

-£5.

-Done.

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Is that your very best you can do?

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By the end of their trip, they should have made some big money.

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But it's not as easy as it sounds. Only one will be crowned champion in the final auction in London.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Welcome to another road trip.

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We're still on the road with antiques experts Anita Manning and David Barby.

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Anita Manning is a Glaswegian auctioneer with a passion for decorative items and paintings.

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-That is a double deal.

-That's a double deal!

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That deserves another shake!

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David Barby has worked with antiques since he was 12-years-old and now works as a much-loved auctioneer.

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-Oh!

-It's sore.

-Christopher Columbus!

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Anita and David began their journey with £200 each

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and it's been a roller coaster of success and failure for them both.

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Anita nearly bankrupted herself early on and has been fighting back

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with a strict strategy of buying very, very cheap.

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So, after a week of punishingly modest shopping,

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Anita has turned her original £200

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into an admirable £338.01 to start today's show.

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How much do you think?

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David, meanwhile, launched into shopping mode with great passion, buying beautiful, expensive items

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that he personally loved, and it's been his undoing.

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From his £200,

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David now has a rather limp £190.10 to desperately fight back with.

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My ploy in this particular part of the journey is to buy safe objects

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that I can actually guarantee to make some money.

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# On the road again... #

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This week's road trip travels from Aberdeen in north-east Scotland

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to Leyburn in North Yorkshire.

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On today's show, they're leaving Carlisle

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and heading first to Brampton on their way to auction in Leyburn.

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Bonnie Brampton in Cumbria has been a popular market town

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since the 7th century

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and was once used by Oliver Cromwell to hold Cavalier prisoners from the civil war.

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Now our hostages to fortune arrive.

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Well, I'll start up here and then just wander down so we'll meet up somewhere in the middle.

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-OK, darling.

-Best of luck! Bye bye!

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Time for this antiques expert to come in from the cold.

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Will anyone notice she's the real Anita Manning beneath that inconspicuous rain mac?

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This is quite an interesting cup.

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It is English ironstone china.

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It's 19th century.

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Now, during the 19th century, there was this great interest in the East and all things exotic.

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In 1813, Charles James Mason patented ironstone china,

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marketed as an incredibly strong ceramic, containing iron.

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However, there was really very little iron in the mix.

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Mason capitalised on the popularity of Far Eastern designs,

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and these larger mugs were mainly ornamental unless you really fancied a quart of tea.

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I quite like this.

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I think I'll have a go.

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Let's see how strong Anita's going to be with her famously low offers.

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If I can maybe make you a wee offer...

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I would rather it to be a big offer them a wee offer.

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-I know, but this is a wee, wee, wee offer!

-A wee, wee, wee offer!

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-Come on, then.

-Can I buy this for £20?

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-As little as that?

-I know.

-Well, £25 would be much, much nicer.

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-I know.

-It's perfect.

-It's in good condition.

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There's no damage, it's named, so you can pin it down to a factory,

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you can pin it down to date and registration number.

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On this occasion, we will give you a huge discount

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-and sell you that for £20.

-Oh, that's wonderful.

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Anita's certainly no mug and has got herself a great deal straight away.

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It's in perfect condition, and condition is ALL in today's market.

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20 quid - we've got to make a profit on that.

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I'm happy.

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And David's on his way to a shop

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with a rather unfortunate sign

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when he's in town.

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-Hello? Anybody in?

-Hello, yes!

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Can I come and have a look round?

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I think you probably can, yes. Please.

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That's quite nice. How much is that?

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There are two of those.

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-Round about 400 for the pair.

-Oh!

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-Sorry.

-Sorry, I've just burnt my hand.

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How much is the little pin cushion, please?

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Round about 60?

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60?

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Is that the very best you can do?

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-I'll take 50 for it.

-Any less than £50?

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I can't, really, no, sorry.

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Well, 48.

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It's Birmingham, isn't it?

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-Yes, it is.

-I would think it's about 1910.

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I do know that sewing requisites and silver make a reasonable amount of money.

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-Yeah.

-And this is in the form of a little canoe...

-I know. It's sweet.

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..which I've never seen before.

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I think that's lovely. I'd like that at £48. Thank you.

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Thank you very much.

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David Barby, proving once again that if you don't ask, you don't get.

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Secret booty in the boot, please.

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-Right.

-OK, onwards.

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And away we go!

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Back on the road, Anita and David follow Hadrian's Wall to the next town, Hexham.

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Historic Hexham has England's oldest purpose-built jail

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and a great local manufacturing heritage.

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In 1823, it was recorded that the town made and exported

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23,504 dozen pairs of leather gloves.

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Now, not a lot of people know that.

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Today, Hexham is the monthly meeting point for a gathering of seasoned antiques traders.

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Come on!

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Ah, this is great. This is great, yeah.

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-You go that way and I'll go this way?

-I don't want you following me.

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Look, you get all the bargains.

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I want to know how you do it.

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-OK. I'll see you shortly.

-Best of luck.

-You too, David.

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Gorgeous. It's a wee bit rich for my blood at the moment, though.

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I'm really looking for something - and I keep saying this - wow factor, something that excites me.

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Amongst the antiques, Anita's found some interesting candle holders

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priced at £160, worlds apart from her strict cheap-buying strategy.

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I think that these are good design.

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We have two metals. We have the brass and this white metal.

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To me, it's got a wee Art Deco look about it.

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I can't see a maker's name, but I think that these are probably from the '80s.

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I like the quality and I like the fact that there are four of them.

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I think they're super.

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Could you do 120?

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What?! £120?!

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There's no maker's name, no date.

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We don't know where they're from!

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This looks dangerously like the bad old Anita who nearly bankrupted herself at the first auction.

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-Dear, oh, dear.

-120.

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-Yeah. Good luck with them.

-I know. I do love them.

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She loves them, all right.

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Too much, methinks, at 120.

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Where's the strict tactic to buy cheap and canny?

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Let's hope that Anita knows what she's doing, because I sure don't.

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Across the room, David's got time on his hands.

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And it's a brass clock face, rococo here.

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You've got Arabic numerals, Roman numerals, and it is period. Then it's signed "Bell, Uttoxeter,"

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so it's good to have a maker's name on it, as well.

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The Bell family of clock makers from Uttoxeter amazingly kept their horological business in the family

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for over 180 years, from the 1720s to around 1900.

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But one day, it was belonging to an eight-day movement,

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and the two holes have been filled in, so probably it was later adapted as a 30-hour clock.

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A pukka eight-day grandfather clock has two holes at the front,

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one for each train, and is wound once a week.

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The mechanism allows for an extra eighth day should you forget to wind it on the seventh.

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But at £95, it's just too, too much.

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I'll see if I can negotiate on that.

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-The clock face.

-Yes.

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Interesting, because it started off as an eight-day, didn't it, then converted to a 30-hour?

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Unless it was a 30-hour that was proposing to be an eight-day.

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That is quite an interesting proposition.

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So it's one of these faux clocks to make it look more expensive than it actually was.

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Exactly.

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What's the best you can do on it? 95's too much.

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-I think 75 would have to be the best.

-Hm...

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It's got to come down to about 40 quid.

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-50?

-40.

-You're a hard man.

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Oh, don't say that. My wife says that.

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-OK. I'll do it for 40.

-£40.

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Thank you very much.

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-OK.

-Thank you.

-It's time for change.

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Anita's moving into politics with two prints at £26.50 each

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that she can't flip or claim on expenses. Hah.

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These are political prints from the late 1800s.

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They're obviously sending up the MPs at the time.

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These cartoons depict the two great feuding lions of 19th-century British politics,

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William Gladstone and Benjamin Disraeli.

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Disraeli once referred to his nemesis Gladstone as

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"a sophisticated rhetorician inebriated with the exuberance of his own verbosity".

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Well, it takes one to know one, doesn't it?

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We have the printer's mark here, JW Chatter, and he's from Newcastle.

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They're the type of odd thing which appeals to me me and I think will appeal to other people.

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Unfortunately, Dorothy here doesn't really want to negotiate, so she gets on the phone to 'im indoors.

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Hello, John! I wonder if you could sell me these, the two of them, for £10.

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That's simple and straightforward!

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Your wife's laughing here.

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Are you still there, John?

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He's gone!

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He's gone! He's gone!

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Oh! Looks like John's either hung up or fainted from Anita's low offer!

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Are you able to do a deal yourself, Dorothy?

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-Say 20 for the two.

-20 for the two?

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Yes.

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Let's go for them.

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Thank you very much, Dorothy.

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It's been lovely to deal with you.

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Oh, what have you bought?!

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This is only a small part of it, David.

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Really?

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Our poor, withered experts must now flee to their nests.

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The shops and markets are shutting.

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It's the final day of shopping for this week's road trip.

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Leaving Hexham and Cumbria far behind, Anita and David head south

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into deepest County Durham, towards the fine, historic town of Barnard Castle.

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This is a pretty wee town, David.

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What a lovely, lovely area!

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How beautiful! Look at the market cross.

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So far, David has spent £88 on two items - the pretty silver canoe pin cushion and the curious clock face.

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He has £100.10 left to spend.

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Anita has boldly spent £160 on three items - the bargain ironstone mug,

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the knock-down political prints and the risky, expensive candle holders.

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Anita has £178.01 left to finish her shopping.

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Anita and David have brashly decided to indulge themselves,

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so first stop of the day is the wonderful Bowes Museum in Barnard Castle.

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And waiting to meet our experts is Dr Howard Coutts, the keeper of ceramics at Bowes.

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Hello, Anita.

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-Hello.

-Lovely to be here.

-How lovely to see you.

-I'm Anita, and this is David.

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He's a porcelain man.

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-Ceramics. Ceramics.

-Yes.

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-She's the romantic.

-Yeah.

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The Bowes Museum is the product of a great romance between wealthy local businessman John Bowes

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and the passionate Parisian actress Josephine Coffin-Chevallier.

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Work on the building began in 1869.

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John had the money and Josephine had the passion to start collecting fine arts, furniture and porcelain

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for a new museum.

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These two very different people from very different backgrounds

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were brought together by their common love of beauty and art.

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Josephine decided to build this great museum and started buying objects

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for the museum at the rate of about 1,000 a year.

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-A very busy woman!

-Just like you, Anita.

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We have a very fine collection of European porcelain here.

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I love that little teapot. I think that's absolutely wonderful.

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That's an absolute gem, that.

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It's a very early piece with this rare pink ground that they developed in the 1750s, and that's dated 1758.

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Oh, my word!

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How many times have I seen these and they've been brought along to me - "We've got this sauce boat"?

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A dangerous assumption, I think.

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These were in fact female chamber pots.

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They are called Bourdaloue, and apparently there was a very handsome French preacher

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by the name of Pierre-Louis Bourdaloue.

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But his sermons went on for such a long, long time.

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And these little chamber pots were made

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so they could be concealed about one's person whilst they were...

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..urinating and they could be removed by a servant and then the contents distributed elsewhere.

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These are quite rare items, aren't they?

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-They occasionally come up in auction rooms. Have you ever had one?

-I haven't.

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-You haven't? Well, now you've seen it, you know what they are!

-Now I know.

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I have to say, thank you very much. This has been such a privilege.

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I've been delighted to take you both round today.

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Smiles all round. But hey, how about buying some antiques today?

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Hello?

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David still really needs to buy something really, really great and cheap

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to catch up with his cash-rich travelling companion.

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Come on, Barby!

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Now, that I like.

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It's Gray's pottery.

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Very reminiscent of the...

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Susie Cooper piece that I bought...

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-that bombed.

-Huh!

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Two shows ago, actually. David paid a full £80 for a Gray's pottery lamp which sold for just £60.

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Is he brave enough to try another one at £35?

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I might suggest 20 quid...

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then test their reaction.

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Or ten. Shall I do an Anita and say ten?

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Well, at ten smackers it probably would be worth a gamble.

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Better ask for Dale.

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-DALE!

-Politely!

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You've got 35 on that.

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But nobody's going to pay 35 at auction on that.

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Not at all. Erm...

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£20 it could be.

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Could you do it less than 20?

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I don't think I'd go lower than 20, no.

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David's playing it safe and was just about the leave the shop empty-handed when suddenly...

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Hello, David! What do you think of this?

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Bling-bling!

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-1900, 1910?

-I think it's a bit later.

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-Do you?

-I think it's '20s, '30s.

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-How much is it?

-£20.

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Will you throw the lamp in with it, as well?

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-If you make it 25, I'll throw the lamp in.

-Now, hang on. Stop a second.

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A Gray's pottery lamp AND a 1920s charger, the exact same items that David lost so heavily with before?

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Looks like he's trying to make amends with a couple of cheaper versions, to me.

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If you bung the lamp in with it, as well.

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-Well, I'll do it for 22.

-£22?

-Yeah. OK.

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What have I done?

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A stunning deal, the charger and the lamp for just £22.

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David's finally managed to curb his big, bad spending habit

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and could be on the road to auction redemption.

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Modesty must now be thrown to the wind.

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All back to the Bowes Museum for our experts to reveal their wares.

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What a big box you've got there!

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Yes! Well, maybe lots of goodies here. But you've got two bags.

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-What have you got?

-No!

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Well, my first buy...

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-Altar candlesticks!

-Uh-huh.

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I bought four of them. David, they could be anything up to 1980.

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It's halfway between the Arts and Crafts and spaceship!

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Whoosh!

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A bit extravagant at £120.

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-No.

-No?

-Speculative.

-"Speculative"!

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-Now, it's just...

-A clock face!

-..a clock face movement.

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It's brass chaptering with Arabic and Roman numerals.

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David, how much?

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Ah.

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-That's the rub.

-How much, David?

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-And I think it's going to bought by a clock restorer.

-How much, David?

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£40.

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That is cheap.

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These intrigued me. It refers to the politics of the day.

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In 1878, Disraeli was the Prime Minister.

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In 1880, Gladstone became the Prime Minister.

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-How much did you pay for them?

-£20.

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Oh, that's nothing.

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They have been framed at a later date, but it has...

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I've just broken the glass there.

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Ooh! Dear Anita!

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Careful, careful, careful.

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Thank goodness you're OK.

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That is a lovely little pin cushion.

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-It's Birmingham.

-Birmingham.

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-And I think the date is round about 1904.

-How much did you pay for that?

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Again, this was quite an expensive item, and I paid £48 for it.

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No, you're still fine on that, David.

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-Do you think so?

-Still absolutely fine.

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Now, for pity's sake, don't drop it!

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Do you like that type of thing?

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-Yeah. This is a wonderful tankard.

-Do you like it?

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A tankard! Now, a chap could take some ale in that, couldn't he?

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-How much did you pay for it?

-£20.

0:19:330:19:35

Oh, Anita, come on! You didn't?

0:19:350:19:38

Did you feel guilty?

0:19:380:19:40

-No.

-No.

0:19:400:19:41

-That's a very good buy.

-Uh-huh. Your third item?

0:19:410:19:44

Ah, now, this is where I think I'm heading for a downfall.

0:19:440:19:49

-I ended up with a piece of Gray's pottery.

-Oh, yes!

0:19:490:19:54

Do you know something, David?

0:19:540:19:55

I think I like this one better than the other one.

0:19:550:19:58

I knew it was deja vu!

0:19:580:20:00

That was thrown in...

0:20:000:20:02

-with this...

-Yes. That's lovely.

0:20:020:20:05

An Arts and Crafts plaque. It's got a good weight to it, and this was £22 with...

0:20:050:20:12

-the Gray's.

-Both for 22?

-What do you think?

0:20:120:20:14

I like that, but I can't believe you got these two things for 22 quid!

0:20:140:20:18

Look, I took a leaf from your book.

0:20:180:20:20

It's about time.

0:20:200:20:24

OK, OK, enough of that chumminess.

0:20:240:20:26

But what do you really think?

0:20:260:20:28

We had the brass plaque. It is quite a nice thing, but it's not decorative enough.

0:20:280:20:34

It hasn't got enough, in my opinion, to get a high price.

0:20:340:20:38

I think, basically, that I'm going to make a profit on all objects I've bought.

0:20:380:20:43

But I don't think it's going to be enough profit to beat Anita.

0:20:430:20:47

I think she'll be the star with those candlesticks.

0:20:470:20:49

# On the road again

0:20:490:20:52

-# I can't wait to get... #

-And now the end is near.

0:20:520:20:54

The road trip has taken the scenic route from Carlisle via Brampton,

0:20:540:20:59

Hexham and Barnard Castle.

0:20:590:21:01

It's auction day,

0:21:010:21:02

and our two experts arrive in Leyburn, North Yorkshire,

0:21:020:21:05

for their final sale together.

0:21:050:21:07

Here we are, David, our last sale.

0:21:110:21:13

How do you feel about it?

0:21:130:21:15

-Anxious.

-Let's go and have a look.

0:21:150:21:17

Tennants Auctioneers in Leyburn has been a family business for over 100 years, with many specialist sales,

0:21:170:21:24

including coins, books and stamps.

0:21:240:21:28

Fortunately, our experts have arrived for the general sale.

0:21:280:21:31

Auctioneer Jeremy Pattison has his own expert opinion on the likely outcome.

0:21:310:21:36

There's a good market for silver, anything decorative.

0:21:360:21:40

So your candlesticks and the silver pin cushion, those are lots which could do well today, yeah.

0:21:400:21:44

What about the clock face?

0:21:440:21:46

The problem is it hasn't got an actual body to it, David.

0:21:460:21:50

That's the problem. It's just the face!

0:21:500:21:52

I know, but if anybody had an enamel-faced clock

0:21:520:21:55

and they wanted to upmarket it, that's ideal, isn't it, for a clock restorer?

0:21:550:21:58

He's clutching at straws!

0:21:580:22:00

-We'll see, yes. Yes.

-Right.

0:22:010:22:03

Starting this leg with £338.01,

0:22:030:22:08

Anita spent just £160 and wisely called it a day early on.

0:22:080:22:13

David started with just £190.10 and confidently spent £110 of it,

0:22:130:22:19

playing his cards close to his chest

0:22:190:22:22

and shrewdly avoiding those dangerous, expensive items that he loves.

0:22:220:22:27

Nerves twitch, brows moisten and an eerie quiet descends on the room.

0:22:270:22:32

The auction is about to begin.

0:22:320:22:36

I'm really nervous.

0:22:360:22:39

Kicking off this week's final auction

0:22:390:22:41

are Anita's pair of political prints, one with brand-new glass.

0:22:410:22:45

Will they get the bidders' votes?

0:22:450:22:48

They'd look good in the loo.

0:22:480:22:49

It's a wonder it hasn't been DOWN the loo!

0:22:490:22:53

£20 for them. Put them in. 10 bid. £10 I'm bid. 20. At the back at 20.

0:22:530:22:58

Take another five anywhere. Last time this time, at 20 and selling.

0:22:580:23:02

They've wiped their face.

0:23:020:23:04

-Right.

-I'm happy.

0:23:040:23:05

A vote of no confidence from the auction.

0:23:050:23:07

That's a loss after commission.

0:23:070:23:10

Could David be second-time lucky with the Gray's pottery lamp?

0:23:100:23:15

This one only cost him £2 as part of a package,

0:23:150:23:19

but he lost big time last time.

0:23:190:23:22

£20 for it. Put it in. 10 bid.

0:23:220:23:24

£10 only, the Gray's pottery.

0:23:240:23:26

15 I am bid.

0:23:260:23:27

At £15, for the last time. Selling.

0:23:270:23:29

All finished? Thank you.

0:23:290:23:32

£15. Right.

0:23:320:23:35

Well, at £2 spent,

0:23:350:23:37

it'd be a crime against ceramics if that didn't turn a profit.

0:23:370:23:40

But well done, David.

0:23:400:23:42

Time for a cuppa.

0:23:430:23:45

Next up, it's Anita's decorative ironstone mug from Brampton.

0:23:450:23:49

20 to start me. 20 I'm bid for the mug. At £20.

0:23:490:23:52

-I'd buy it at that.

-At 20. 25.

0:23:520:23:56

-30.

-Oh!

-In the corner. Last time.

0:23:560:23:59

At 30, I'll sell.

0:23:590:24:01

Could have done a wee bit more, but quite satisfied at 30.

0:24:010:24:04

No great profit for Anita, but she won't be panicking just yet.

0:24:040:24:10

Stand fast. David needs a big, shiny profit

0:24:100:24:14

from his second-time-lucky 1920s charger.

0:24:140:24:17

At 10. 20. 30.

0:24:170:24:18

Come on, come on, come on. One more. It's worth more.

0:24:180:24:21

Squeeze another bid there. Take a 5, madam. Might regret it.

0:24:210:24:24

-It's worth more.

-No? £30. It's all finished now. Last time at 30.

0:24:240:24:28

Thank you.

0:24:280:24:30

-You're doing not too badly.

-But they're not mounting up, those figures.

0:24:300:24:35

Financially speaking, David's still up a certain creek without a paddle

0:24:350:24:38

and needs a big profit from his tiny silver canoe.

0:24:380:24:43

40. Very little pin cushion. 40.

0:24:430:24:45

-50. 60. 70.

-Oh, well done!

-80.

0:24:450:24:48

Looks like David's getting pins and needles.

0:24:480:24:52

-£80 I am bid.

-Come on, one more go. It's worth more than that.

0:24:520:24:55

All finished. At 80 and selling.

0:24:550:24:58

Oh, well done, darling, well done!

0:24:580:25:01

Well, that is a huge relief for Mr Barby,

0:25:010:25:03

a good profit from a wisely-purchased item.

0:25:030:25:06

Here's your candlesticks.

0:25:060:25:08

Ah, this is the lot I'm interested in.

0:25:080:25:11

Anita's unusually rash purchase next.

0:25:110:25:13

We still don't know where these candle holders are from

0:25:130:25:16

or quite what Anita was thinking about when she bought them.

0:25:160:25:19

Is she about to have her solid lead snuffed out?

0:25:190:25:23

£100. I do like them. 50, then.

0:25:230:25:26

-Ohh...

-£20. There's no reserve. 20.

0:25:260:25:28

-30. 40.

-Come on. Coming up, coming up, coming up.

0:25:280:25:31

60 at the back. 70. 80.

0:25:310:25:33

80 at the moment. All finished at 80?

0:25:330:25:37

-Thank you. 776.

-Oh, no! Ohh...

0:25:370:25:41

Oh, dear, Anita, you've certainly not learned

0:25:410:25:44

from your previous risk taking.

0:25:440:25:46

Time is running out for David to turn a profit.

0:25:470:25:50

The brass clock face is the last item to be sold on this leg of the road trip.

0:25:500:25:55

Put the big hand on the little hand and cross those little fingers.

0:25:550:25:59

-Here goes.

-Bid 40. 40 on the clock face.

0:25:590:26:01

50. 60. 60 I am bid.

0:26:010:26:04

-I want more.

-60.

-I need more.

0:26:040:26:06

Interesting lot, there.

0:26:060:26:08

-More!

-I need more.

0:26:080:26:10

70. 80. One more? £80 at the moment.

0:26:100:26:13

-At 80.

-Come on, one more!

0:26:130:26:15

-Another one, sir?

-Come on!

0:26:150:26:17

Last time this time. It's going at 80. Thank you.

0:26:170:26:21

David, you do really well with broken old bits of things!

0:26:210:26:27

A happy end to a difficult journey for David.

0:26:270:26:29

Who'd have thought he'd double his money on an old brass clock dial?

0:26:290:26:33

So, David, after five journeys, five auctions, here we are with a total.

0:26:330:26:41

Huh! David started today's show with £190.10

0:26:410:26:46

and made a pretty decent profit, after commission, of £63.78.

0:26:460:26:51

So David finishes this week's Antiques Road Trip with...

0:26:510:26:54

400. 20. 250.

0:26:570:27:00

Anita started with £338.01 and made a bad loss of £52.42,

0:27:000:27:08

but she still finishes her road trip ahead with a handsome...

0:27:080:27:11

Yep, it was close at the end, but the lady wins the week.

0:27:150:27:20

So for now, the Antiques Road Trip leader board stands

0:27:200:27:24

with the triumphant Anita Manning in first place and poor old Barby in second.

0:27:240:27:30

When you think how far we went down in some auctions and then leapt back again...

0:27:300:27:36

We were up there and then down.

0:27:360:27:39

It's like this helter-skelter.

0:27:390:27:41

Oh, aye!

0:27:410:27:43

David and Anita have been rubbing shoulders, sharing the travel suites

0:27:430:27:47

and heading right off the beaten track.

0:27:470:27:50

# Just let your love flow Like a mountain stream

0:27:500:27:53

# And let your love go... #

0:27:530:27:55

After leaving Aberdeen, finding the right towns

0:27:550:27:59

and finding some great antiques, they also found their true selves.

0:27:590:28:04

Want a wee tune?

0:28:050:28:08

This could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

0:28:080:28:11

We'll be seeing them again, as they'll each use their winnings

0:28:110:28:15

to buy a final show-stopping antique for the grand finale auction in London.

0:28:150:28:19

But for now, this week's champion, Anita, hits the road with David in the driving seat.

0:28:190:28:25

Forward, MacDuff!

0:28:250:28:26

We're off to London!

0:28:260:28:29

The road trip continues in Northern Ireland,

0:28:290:28:33

with two new, eager antiques experts, James Lewis...

0:28:330:28:37

-If it was a guarantee, I'd snap your hand off!

-..and David Harper.

0:28:370:28:41

You've got a silver tongue, madam, you have!

0:28:410:28:44

'They're both keen to get shopping and James kicks off first.

0:28:440:28:50

'He's an auctioneer in Derby, so he's used to selling, not buying.

0:28:500:28:54

'How will he cope on the other side of the rostrum?'

0:28:540:28:57

It is speculative. If it was a guarantee, I'd snap your hand off!

0:28:570:29:02

'David Harper is based in County Durham,

0:29:020:29:05

'a seasoned antiques trader who's passionate about old stuff, and knows how to strike a bargain.'

0:29:050:29:12

I've got to be cruel. I've got to be mercenary.

0:29:120:29:16

'Each expert starts with £200

0:29:180:29:20

'and they've got to bargain hard to make as much money as they can.

0:29:200:29:25

'James and David's road trip will take them from the Giant's Causeway

0:29:250:29:30

'in County Antrim, via the ferry to Stranraer,

0:29:300:29:34

'to Market Harborough in Leicestershire.

0:29:340:29:37

'Heading first to Portrush, hunting for bargains to sell at an auction

0:29:370:29:42

'in Belfast.

0:29:420:29:45

'David's brought his own car, a perfect model

0:29:450:29:48

'for touring the open roads of Northern Ireland.

0:29:480:29:52

'Someone isn't so keen.'

0:29:520:29:54

-You're not a great passenger, James.

-No. I'm holding on. Quite tight.

0:29:540:29:59

Perfect roads for driving a classic car James, or what?

0:29:590:30:03

-Rolling hills, beautiful sun...

-Sweeping roads.

-Ah!

0:30:030:30:08

Oh, gosh! Look at this!

0:30:100:30:13

'The jewel in the crown of this stunning coastline

0:30:130:30:17

'is the Giant's Causeway,

0:30:170:30:19

'a series of rock "stepping stones" formed from volcanic eruptions.

0:30:190:30:24

'The boys drag themselves away from sightseeing

0:30:240:30:28

'to crack on with the job in hand, finding some antiques to buy.

0:30:280:30:33

'David's dropping James off before he heads into Portrush.

0:30:330:30:37

'Once a fishing village, the arrival of the railway

0:30:370:30:42

'brought a boom in visitors.

0:30:420:30:44

'It's still a popular holiday destination, and a great place to look for antiques.

0:30:440:30:50

'James is keen to investigate Irish Belleek porcelain,

0:30:520:30:56

'so he's gone to meet Clare Ross.

0:30:560:30:58

'As well as dealing in antiques, Claire repairs customers' Belleek.'

0:30:580:31:04

Well, James, this is my studio.

0:31:040:31:07

Ah! The nerve centre of where it all happens.

0:31:070:31:11

These are a few pieces of work

0:31:110:31:13

that I've just finished.

0:31:130:31:16

'The pottery comes from the village of Belleek in County Fermanagh.

0:31:160:31:21

'In 1857, a landowner, John Caldwell Bloomfield, founded a pottery

0:31:210:31:28

'after discovering his land was rich in minerals.'

0:31:280:31:32

-What's happened here?

-It was broken in two around here.

0:31:320:31:37

How long does it take you to restore a piece of Belleek?

0:31:370:31:41

Things are cleaned and surfaces prepared. From there, they're glued.

0:31:410:31:45

Any missing chips or pieces like that are filled.

0:31:450:31:49

I have a compressor and airbrush that give me a lovely smooth finish.

0:31:490:31:54

One thing I associate with Belleek are wonderful yellows and greens.

0:31:540:31:59

-Not on these pieces.

-No, but I do have one piece I'm working on.

0:31:590:32:05

That influence from the sea with those giant shells

0:32:050:32:09

and the coral.

0:32:090:32:11

I've almost finished, but I have to give it that opalescent effect.

0:32:110:32:18

-Wonderful.

-You take a clear glaze and have a tiny hint of colour.

0:32:180:32:24

In perfect condition, what would that be worth?

0:32:240:32:28

It's got to be £1,000, £1,500, hasn't it? Fantastic.

0:32:280:32:32

'No shelling out on Belleek for you, James!

0:32:320:32:36

'David's keen to shop.

0:32:360:32:38

'Lo and behold, the first thing he hears is the B word, B for Belleek.'

0:32:380:32:44

Belleek is big in Northern Ireland but is renowned throughout the world

0:32:440:32:49

has a lot of collectors and they did make beautiful stuff.

0:32:490:32:53

This item is even rarer.

0:32:530:32:55

This is Coal Island Pottery,

0:32:550:32:58

which was in existence for a few years.

0:32:580:33:02

Some people left the Belleek company in the late 19th century

0:33:020:33:06

and started at Coal Island.

0:33:060:33:08

It has a very distinctive marking with the red hand of Ulster.

0:33:080:33:13

Does that have any significance, other than that it was made here?

0:33:130:33:19

-Yes. It would be used in political emblems.

-That's what I'm thinking.

0:33:190:33:24

-So it's got a Loyalist feel?

-Yes. It would.

-That's very interesting.

0:33:240:33:29

'David looks tempted, but he's not committing yet.

0:33:290:33:33

'James has moved on from Belleek,

0:33:330:33:35

'but he's still focusing on ceramics.'

0:33:350:33:41

-How much is the Mason's dinnerware?

-£40.

0:33:410:33:44

What's the condition like? Many chips or cracks?

0:33:440:33:48

-Not too many.

-I love this. They call it the Regency pattern.

0:33:480:33:52

The long-necked grasshopper! Completely wacky!

0:33:520:33:57

-PLATE RINGS

-OK, £40. Let's go through these.

0:33:570:34:00

That's one that's OK.

0:34:000:34:03

This might be boring for you guys. I'm going to be quite some time.

0:34:030:34:08

'Better leave it to you, then.

0:34:080:34:10

'Meanwhile, David's eyes are bigger than his £200 budget,

0:34:100:34:14

'but he's spellbound

0:34:140:34:16

'by the porcelain in Eleanor Wolfenden's shop.'

0:34:160:34:20

Royal Worcester shouts at you.

0:34:200:34:22

-It's got a look of its own.

-It does. It's always big money.

-Always.

0:34:220:34:28

This is by...James Stinton. It's all hand-painted.

0:34:280:34:35

'The Stinton family worked for Royal Worcester for over 100 years.

0:34:350:34:40

'James is one of the best known.'

0:34:400:34:42

That would date from about 1920.

0:34:420:34:45

That is a piece of art on porcelain.

0:34:450:34:48

-What's the best on that one?

-£600.

0:34:480:34:51

-Which is just out of your budget(!)

-You're a tease, Eleanor!

0:34:510:34:56

'It takes one to know one!

0:34:560:34:59

'James is still tapping plates!'

0:34:590:35:01

-PLATE RINGS

-A really good ring, then it's fine.

0:35:010:35:06

PLATE CLUNKS Hear the difference!

0:35:060:35:09

'The lovely ring is proof that it's in good order.

0:35:090:35:13

'A dull sound means, "Beware, internal cracks."

0:35:130:35:17

'He's going to be there all day.

0:35:170:35:19

'Can David find anything he can afford?'

0:35:190:35:22

Clarice Cliff, the Harvest pattern. I can sell you that really cheaply.

0:35:220:35:27

'Clarice Cliff who, in 1912,

0:35:270:35:30

'started work aged 13, is regarded

0:35:300:35:32

'as one of the most influential ceramicists of the 20th century.'

0:35:320:35:38

-I think this is probably 1950s.

-Yes.

0:35:380:35:41

I've got examples of much earlier, but..

0:35:410:35:44

-Just so weird.

-Completely ahead of her time.

0:35:440:35:49

Probably 40 or 50 years out of her time. That's very '60s, '70s.

0:35:490:35:54

You wouldn't have got those oranges if it wasn't for Clarice Cliff.

0:35:540:35:59

'David knows a bit about porcelain, but furniture is his strength.'

0:35:590:36:04

What would that sell for? I'm a fish out of water.

0:36:040:36:09

I think you'd make profit.

0:36:090:36:11

How much can you sell it for?

0:36:110:36:13

I'm going to do you a good deal and charge you £40.

0:36:130:36:18

It must be the only piece of Clarice Cliff in perfect condition

0:36:180:36:22

in Northern Ireland at £40.

0:36:220:36:25

You've got a silver tongue, madam!

0:36:250:36:27

I like the piece but I've got to be hard.

0:36:270:36:31

I've got to be cruel. I've got to be mercenary. Do it for 20.

0:36:310:36:35

No, I can't do it for 20.

0:36:350:36:37

I'll do it for £30.

0:36:370:36:39

-£30 and that's it.

-Make it 25.

0:36:390:36:43

No. I can't. £30.

0:36:430:36:45

All right. Go on. 25. You can buy me a drink when you make this profit.

0:36:450:36:51

-I'll take you to dinner if I make a big profit.

-Lovely. Thank you.

0:36:510:36:57

'Interesting techniques. David's flirting his way to a bargain.

0:36:570:37:02

'James is grinding him down with the plates.'

0:37:020:37:06

-Can you do it a bit less?

-A fiver.

0:37:060:37:09

-35.

-Is that it?

-35.

0:37:090:37:11

-I'm thinking 25.

-DEALER CHUCKLES

0:37:110:37:15

-That's cheap.

-I need it to be!

0:37:150:37:17

-I've got to make a profit out of these!

-30.

0:37:170:37:22

-I'll meet you in between.

-I'll help you pack them if you do 25.

0:37:220:37:26

I'll pack them for you if you give me 30!

0:37:260:37:30

-I'll split the difference.

-I've done that once!

0:37:300:37:33

-27.50. Yeah?

-OK.

0:37:330:37:36

Fantastic! Deal done. And I'll still help you pack them.

0:37:360:37:40

You're packing them yourself!

0:37:400:37:42

'Hang on!

0:37:420:37:44

'It was part of the deal that James packed the dinner service!

0:37:440:37:49

'David thinks he can charm another bargain out of Eleanor.'

0:37:500:37:54

This is an Irish silver butter knife made in Dublin in 1871.

0:37:540:37:59

-Irish silver is highly desirable.

-We're in the right place.

0:37:590:38:03

There's a mark on the back.

0:38:030:38:06

"Henry...?" "JAB...

0:38:060:38:09

"to...Henry..."

0:38:090:38:11

I can't make it out. That's nice.

0:38:110:38:13

A heck of a butter knife. Imagine that on your crumpet.

0:38:130:38:17

Eleanor, tempt me. You know I've got no money. Tempt me.

0:38:170:38:21

-You're very hard to extract money from.

-People say I'm easy.

-£45.

0:38:210:38:26

Oh, Eleanor. I do like it.

0:38:260:38:28

You know boxes make all the difference!

0:38:280:38:31

Well, I've got to say, that helps it, doesn't it?

0:38:310:38:36

< My member of staff, Alice, says that's another fiver.

0:38:360:38:39

Your member of staff should make a cup of tea!

0:38:390:38:43

Never mind get involved in negotiations! Make it 25.

0:38:430:38:47

I can't do it, David!

0:38:470:38:49

I can't. £30 and that's it.

0:38:490:38:53

-Have we got a deal?

-Yes. Go on, then.

0:38:530:38:56

-If you make a lot of money...?

-I'm going to take you two out.

0:38:560:39:01

'Of course you will, David(!)

0:39:010:39:03

'He seduced his way to some promising investments. Unhand her!

0:39:030:39:08

'Our experts are back together again and head off for their night stop.

0:39:080:39:14

'They reflect on a part of the world that's new to both of them.'

0:39:140:39:19

For 20 years, we've heard "Northern Ireland this and that. Troubles, troubles."

0:39:190:39:25

-But look at it!

-I know.

-Wonderful! Wonderful scenery!

0:39:250:39:30

If the weather is as wonderful tomorrow

0:39:300:39:33

and we come across scenery like we've seen today, then blimey!

0:39:330:39:37

-This has been a trip and a half. Something to eat?

-Absolutely!

0:39:370:39:42

'Rested and eager to get on their way...'

0:39:500:39:53

-Are you ready?

-Let's go.

0:39:530:39:55

'..our bearded wonders are on the road again.

0:39:550:39:59

'So far, out of their £200 budgets,

0:39:590:40:03

'David has spent £55 on two items in Portrush.

0:40:030:40:07

'James spent £27.50 on his dinner service,

0:40:070:40:11

'although it did take him most of the day to do the deal.'

0:40:110:40:15

Yeah? Fantastic! Deal done!

0:40:150:40:18

'Let's hope he picks up the pace a bit!

0:40:180:40:23

'After their stopover in Ballymena,

0:40:230:40:26

'they're off to Dromore in County Down

0:40:260:40:29

'to hunt for some more treasures

0:40:290:40:32

'to take to Belfast.

0:40:320:40:34

'Given this is a road trip, it would help if the map was bigger.'

0:40:340:40:38

Have you got a better map? If it's four miles that way...

0:40:380:40:43

No, it's four miles THIS way! We've just been down here.

0:40:430:40:47

-I'm pointing in the...

-We've been four miles in this direction.

-No.

0:40:470:40:52

We couldn't have done. We could do with finding a human being.

0:40:520:40:57

-We're looking for the town of Dromore.

-Yeah.

0:40:570:41:01

-Is it that way?

-Yeah.

0:41:010:41:04

Let's go. Thank you. Bye bye.

0:41:040:41:06

'When they get to Dromore, things look promising.'

0:41:080:41:11

I like a bit of salvage.

0:41:110:41:14

I'm going to see if I can find one of the antique shops.

0:41:140:41:20

You like antique hunting on your own!

0:41:200:41:23

'And I don't blame him, so James checks out another place in Dromore,

0:41:230:41:28

'while David heads inside what promises to be

0:41:280:41:33

'a wonderful salvage treasure trove run by PJ McAllister.'

0:41:330:41:37

I love places like this. It's all dumped in.

0:41:370:41:42

There's a smell of damp, but that makes it more exciting.

0:41:420:41:46

What are you going to come across?

0:41:460:41:48

These are the places you might find that real wunderbar thing.

0:41:480:41:53

My first love, I've got to say. Furniture. Look at that!

0:41:530:41:57

It's a Regency wash stand.

0:41:570:41:59

Very finely made. Mahogany. You can tell it's been restored.

0:41:590:42:04

It looks too fresh.

0:42:040:42:07

-PJ, what about this wash stand? 1820, 1830?

-Around that.

0:42:070:42:11

-I'll not argue over a few years.

-What's the absolute best on that?

0:42:110:42:16

Hang on a minute!

0:42:160:42:18

What's it going to make at auction? It might make 50 quid. It might.

0:42:180:42:23

I think it might make a bit more.

0:42:230:42:26

It could. But it could also sell for 50 quid. There's no reserve.

0:42:260:42:31

I'm going to be very cruel. It couldn't be 20 quid, could it?

0:42:310:42:36

-OK.

-You'd go with that?

-Yes.

0:42:380:42:41

-£20...for you.

-Robbed!

0:42:410:42:45

-It's all about turnover, PJ.

-I wish you luck with it.

0:42:450:42:50

'Meanwhile, a shiny green deer is winking at James.

0:42:500:42:55

'It's by Charles Lemanceau, a French ceramic artist,

0:42:550:42:59

'who's best known for his 1930s Art Deco figurines.

0:42:590:43:03

'By an amazing coincidence, the dealer who owns it is French, too.

0:43:030:43:08

'Jean Dalbon keeps his stock in his shed, having not quite got round to opening a shop.'

0:43:080:43:15

SPEAKS WITH FRENCH ACCENT

0:43:150:43:19

It's got some style about it. How much is that?

0:43:210:43:24

-£45.

-How about 35?

0:43:240:43:27

38? I might regret it, but I think you've got a deal.

0:43:300:43:35

Looking better already!

0:43:350:43:38

-£38.

-Thank you, James.

-Thank you.

0:43:380:43:42

-Here's your change. £2.

-Super.

0:43:420:43:44

Plus Irish tradition, luck penny.

0:43:440:43:48

'Ooh! An extra 50p off!'

0:43:480:43:50

Fantastic. Thank you very much. Have a great day.

0:43:500:43:54

'They're heading for Lisburn.

0:43:540:43:58

'James has £135, so he's desperate to hit town before the shops close.'

0:43:580:44:03

The pressure is now on.

0:44:030:44:06

-Well, it's four o'clock.

-It's not? It's an hour, basically.

0:44:060:44:10

-Yeah.

-Put that foot down!

0:44:100:44:13

'It's the final dash to find a last-minute winning item.'

0:44:130:44:18

I'm going to keep looking and hopefully find my star buy

0:44:180:44:23

in the last five minutes.

0:44:230:44:26

'A dark-haired handsome stranger has caught James's eye.'

0:44:260:44:31

I've found a nice image, MA Heath.

0:44:310:44:33

I think this is Margaret Anne Heath, who was a water colourist

0:44:330:44:39

who specialised in portraits.

0:44:390:44:41

'But James can't be certain about what he's found.'

0:44:410:44:45

If it is Margaret Anne Heath, I sell them between £300 and £500.

0:44:450:44:50

So... That might just do quite well. It's got a little bit of foxing.

0:44:500:44:56

'Foxing, they're the brown spots you get on old paper caused by damp.

0:44:560:45:03

'Although it's common, it can affect the price at auction.

0:45:030:45:07

'The painting's labelled M.A. Heath 1911.

0:45:070:45:10

'Margaret Ann Heath died in 1914, when she was only 28.'

0:45:100:45:15

-What would be your best price on it?

-£80 would.

-80?

-Yeah.

0:45:150:45:21

-Speculative lot!

-That's the problem!

0:45:210:45:24

If it was a guarantee I'd snap your hand off, but it wouldn't be that.

0:45:240:45:29

'It's a gamble, sure enough.

0:45:290:45:31

'James is hoping this is by THE M.A. Heath.'

0:45:310:45:35

I like that it's untouched.

0:45:350:45:37

I like that it's never been messed about with.

0:45:370:45:41

His eyes are really nicely done.

0:45:410:45:43

-And a great head of hair.

-Yeah. I feel quite envious!

0:45:430:45:47

When I was younger, I had a head of hair like that.

0:45:470:45:51

-65?

-No. Honestly, no.

-No?

-Won't happen.

0:45:510:45:55

We'll call it 70 and have a deal.

0:45:550:45:58

'Jammy James wangles a lucky pound off and pays 69.

0:45:580:46:02

'David and James must call it a day,

0:46:020:46:05

'though not before revealing what they've bought.

0:46:050:46:09

'David kicks off with his bargain wash stand.'

0:46:090:46:13

-A giant Zimmer frame!

-We're going to need one!

0:46:130:46:17

-Are you ready?

-Gosh.

-Three, two...

0:46:170:46:20

-one...

-Oh, my goodness!

0:46:200:46:23

-Georgian wash stand.

-Regency, 1820?

0:46:230:46:25

-At auction, you would put an estimate of £60 to £100 on it.

-Yes.

0:46:250:46:30

-What did you pay?

-20 quid.

-20 quid?

0:46:300:46:33

-There's profit there, is there not? Show me something of yours.

-OK.

0:46:330:46:38

-What's this? Continental, obviously.

-French.

-Yeah.

0:46:380:46:42

He's a good name, born in 1905, specialised in Art Deco groups.

0:46:420:46:47

-It's that wonderful malachite green?

-Pretty. Not bad. Tell me, how much?

0:46:470:46:54

-£37.50.

-Bargain. Can't be expensive.

-No, I shouldn't think so.

0:46:540:46:59

-What will that do?

-£70 to £100.

-Got to be profit.

0:46:590:47:02

-My second item.

-Oh, that's lovely.

-Nice, isn't it?

0:47:020:47:06

-Oh, it's an Irish one!

-It is.

-Oh, well done. Dublin.

0:47:060:47:11

-What do you reckon at auction?

-40 to 60.

0:47:110:47:14

-It's got to be.

-So 30 quid is cheap.

-Profit there.

0:47:140:47:18

This isn't an antique in its true form, but it's a dinner service.

0:47:180:47:23

Mason's Ironstone, long-necked grasshopper pattern.

0:47:230:47:27

It's fun and I'm hoping, if it's displayed well,

0:47:270:47:31

it should do OK.

0:47:310:47:33

Will it make 50 to 70 quid?

0:47:330:47:35

-I thought 60 to 100, but it was £27.50.

-Absolute bargain.

0:47:350:47:39

-This one's got a very good name! You know it!

-Clarice Cliff!

0:47:390:47:44

You haven't spotted damage?

0:47:440:47:46

My concern is this foot that's been restored and glued back.

0:47:460:47:50

Where do you get your eyes from?

0:47:500:47:53

-LAUGHING:

-Got you for a moment!

0:47:530:47:56

If that doesn't make profit, I'll wear it as a hat.

0:47:560:47:59

-How much?

-£25.

-Oh, no! Really?

0:47:590:48:03

-That's got to double, if not treble, your money.

-It should do.

-50 to 70.

0:48:030:48:08

-Good man. Show me your third.

-This is my best buy, I reckon.

0:48:080:48:12

'It's the watercolour James hopes is by Margaret Heath.

0:48:120:48:16

'David's gone rather quiet!'

0:48:160:48:19

-She was an artist that almost solely painted portraits.

-Right.

0:48:190:48:25

Almost always in watercolour.

0:48:250:48:27

That is a very good picture. What kind of money does she make?

0:48:270:48:32

Between 300 and 500.

0:48:320:48:35

Oh, no! You only had £200! I can't believe it!

0:48:350:48:40

-Go on.

-69 quid.

0:48:400:48:42

Oh, my gosh! Right.

0:48:420:48:45

On the positive for me, it's lacking some glass.

0:48:450:48:48

It's got a bit of foxing.

0:48:480:48:51

I've got an appointment at a framer's. £5 to replace the glass.

0:48:510:48:56

I'm pleased for you. I wish you the best of luck.

0:48:560:48:59

-Thank you.

-I don't mean it.

0:48:590:49:01

'Now, what do our experts really think of each other's chances?'

0:49:010:49:06

He's had a good day at bartering. That's what a trained dealer does.

0:49:060:49:11

For me, as an auctioneer, I've got a few lessons to learn from David.

0:49:110:49:17

The picture's going to kick my butt, if anything.

0:49:170:49:20

That could sell for hundreds of pounds.

0:49:200:49:23

I think he was quite jealous of that one!

0:49:230:49:27

He thinks it's great. I think it's great.

0:49:270:49:30

On the positive side, there's foxing and that frame is very ropey.

0:49:300:49:34

I don't think it's a good idea to reglaze it.

0:49:340:49:38

It's far better to let someone else decide on glazing and a new frame.

0:49:380:49:43

That's where I might just win.

0:49:430:49:45

'Auction day has arrived, and our experts drive into Belfast.

0:49:450:49:51

'It's the birthplace of the world's most famous and tragic ship,

0:49:510:49:56

'the Titanic.

0:49:560:49:58

'As they say in Belfast, "She was all right when she left here."

0:49:580:50:04

Look at this!

0:50:040:50:06

"New life." That's more like it.

0:50:060:50:09

-They have removed the old political murals.

-This is more fun.

0:50:090:50:13

I think they're encouraging people to practise their art on this "peace wall".

0:50:130:50:19

'The peace wall and shipyards contrast with

0:50:190:50:23

'the grandeur of Stormont, where the Northern Ireland Assembly sits.

0:50:230:50:28

'The spirit of hope is rubbing off on James and David.'

0:50:280:50:31

-Fantastic building.

-It's great. It's up the stairs.

0:50:310:50:35

-Oh, no.

-Afraid so. Have you been before?

-No.

0:50:350:50:38

Let's see if it's a fantastic auction as well.

0:50:380:50:42

'Ross's Auctioneers and Valuers has been on May Street since the 1930s.

0:50:440:50:50

'It's the main selling house for Northern Ireland, and an opportunity to make big money.

0:50:500:50:57

'James is naturally desperate to know how auctioneer Daniel Clark rates his painting.'

0:50:570:51:04

This is my favourite lot. It's what I'm gambling on today.

0:51:040:51:08

-What do you think to it?

-It's very decorative.

0:51:080:51:12

I had the glass put in yesterday.

0:51:120:51:15

I'd love to have seen it without.

0:51:150:51:18

The only thing which worries me is has this signature been highlighted?

0:51:180:51:23

If that was the case, it might have a depreciating effect

0:51:230:51:27

on the picture.

0:51:270:51:29

But, very decorative. £100 to £150?

0:51:290:51:32

-I'm disappointed with that.

-Let's see.

0:51:320:51:35

'Not what James wanted to hear. Both experts bought three objects.

0:51:350:51:41

'David has only spent £75.

0:51:410:51:45

'James has spent £134. Whose tactics will be more successful?'

0:51:450:51:51

-All finished at 25...

-'The auction is under way.'

0:51:510:51:54

-What this makes will form our future on this trip.

-Our future!

0:51:540:51:59

-If it bombs and makes nothing, we have no money to take on.

-I know.

0:51:590:52:05

-That's what...

-I know.

0:52:050:52:08

'First is James's dinner service.'

0:52:080:52:11

40 anywhere? Back of the room £40.

0:52:110:52:14

40 I'm bid. At 50. At 60.

0:52:140:52:18

At 70 beside you. At £70 here.

0:52:180:52:20

All done at £70...?

0:52:200:52:24

-Wow.

-That's a very good start!

0:52:240:52:28

Really. Well done, James.

0:52:280:52:31

'Actually, a terrific start!

0:52:310:52:33

'David is worried. Next it's that Clarice Cliff bowl.'

0:52:330:52:38

40 to you, madam.

0:52:380:52:40

45? Thank you. At £45. It's here at £45. For the Clarice Cliff.

0:52:400:52:45

-Bit more. Bit more.

-50, new bidder. And five. And 60.

0:52:450:52:49

And five. At 70. At £70 all done?

0:52:490:52:53

At 70. And the number is 134. Thank you.

0:52:530:52:58

I was always very confident, you realise.

0:53:000:53:03

'Don't get cocky, kid.

0:53:030:53:05

'Is James's deer going to be dear?'

0:53:050:53:07

Antelope group there. Slight chip on the ear.

0:53:070:53:13

He had to mention the chip!

0:53:130:53:15

£50 for it? 50 I'm bid.

0:53:150:53:18

60. 70. 80.

0:53:180:53:20

90. 100.

0:53:200:53:23

120. 140.

0:53:230:53:27

At £140.

0:53:270:53:29

I'm selling at £140.

0:53:290:53:32

I can't believe that!

0:53:340:53:37

'A cracking profit. James flies into the lead.

0:53:370:53:40

'Will David's butter knife do that well?'

0:53:400:53:44

40? £30 anywhere?

0:53:440:53:47

At five. At 60 behind you.

0:53:470:53:50

-At 60. And five. At 90.

-Come on.

0:53:500:53:53

And five. £100 I'm bid for the Dublin knife. At 110.

0:53:530:53:58

-Come on!

-At £110.

0:53:580:54:00

Selling at £110...

0:54:000:54:04

-Brilliant.

-We are quite close, but you're leading.

0:54:040:54:08

'A great result, and David's back in the game.

0:54:080:54:13

'Now, it's his bargain wash stand.'

0:54:130:54:16

Number 90, Regency mahogany double drawer wash stand.

0:54:160:54:21

Some restoration. Rather nice piece.

0:54:210:54:24

'Did you think he wouldn't mention it?'

0:54:240:54:27

50 I'm bid. 60. 70.

0:54:270:54:29

At 75. At 80.

0:54:290:54:31

At £85. The bid's here at 85...

0:54:310:54:34

-It's not good.

-I'm selling at £85...

0:54:340:54:37

It's profit. I shouldn't be moaning.

0:54:370:54:39

It's not what you think the profit's going to be.

0:54:390:54:43

It's what you think it's worth.

0:54:430:54:45

'And that buyer thought it was worth £65 more than David paid for it.

0:54:450:54:50

'Finally, James's picture.

0:54:500:54:52

'If someone pays what he thinks it's worth, he's in for a windfall.'

0:54:520:54:57

-Here we are.

-£100 I'm bid.

0:54:570:55:01

120. 140.

0:55:010:55:03

160. The bid's with the porter at £160. 180...

0:55:030:55:09

170, thank you. At £170.

0:55:090:55:12

-Oh, come on!

-At 175.

0:55:120:55:15

At £175. 180.

0:55:150:55:18

At £180. All done at 180...?

0:55:180:55:22

What do you think?

0:55:240:55:26

It's a good profit, but I'm sad for the picture.

0:55:260:55:30

I think it's worth twice as much.

0:55:300:55:32

'Nevertheless, an excellent result for them both.

0:55:320:55:37

'Out of his original pot of £200, after paying auction costs,

0:55:370:55:42

'David's made a profit of £141.25

0:55:420:55:45

'so now he's up to a stunning total of £341.25.

0:55:450:55:50

'But James has pipped him to the post.

0:55:510:55:55

'After paying that commission, he still managed a fantastic profit

0:55:560:56:01

'of £184.24,

0:56:010:56:03

'so he's got a massive £384.24 for the next leg.

0:56:030:56:08

'It's a moment to feel chuffed - as you can see.'

0:56:120:56:17

It's quite a lot of money. It puts the pressure on. We've got no excuse not to buy expensive items.

0:56:170:56:23

Off to the ferry, eh?

0:56:250:56:28

'In tomorrow's show...'

0:56:280:56:30

I've never really, genuinely ever, seen anything quite like this.

0:56:300:56:34

'Flushed with success, David's thinking big.'

0:56:340:56:39

It's too much!

0:56:390:56:41

'And James is hard to please.'

0:56:410:56:43

I don't like her. I don't like them.

0:56:430:56:46

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:56:500:56:55

Antiques experts David Barby and Anita Manning are on their last shopping trip of the week: from Carlisle, through Cumbria and County Durham, to their next auction in Leyburn, North Yorkshire.

And it's the start of James Lewis and David Harper's road trip, which kicks off in Giant Causeway with an auction in Belfast.


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