Episode 5 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 5

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The nation's favourite antiques experts, one big challenge.

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they drive around the UK?

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Oh, you're such a temptress. How much can you sell it for?

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Is that your very best you can do?

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By the end of their trip they should have made some big money, but it's not as easy as it sounds.

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And only one will be crowned champion at the final auction in London.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Today we're on the road with two lions of the antiques trade - James Lewis and David Harper.

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James Lewis made his first auction bid aged six, on an antique bird cage for his budgie.

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Hello.

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He now works as an auctioneer in Derbyshire,

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and sadly the budgie is no longer with us, it is deceased.

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David Harper also began collecting antiques as a boy...

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It's a bit dangerous, thank goodness there's no-one around.

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..but now works as a serious, grown-up freelance dealer.

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Ooh. Quick, quick, quick.

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James and David began their journey with £200 each, and have taken this competition pretty seriously so far.

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On a previous show, there were a series of blunders, and some prize items broken in transit.

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No, he's had it, hasn't he?

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James has used his eye for a fine item to his best advantage, and made good, steady profits all the way.

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From his original £200, James now has a mammoth £628.42 to start today's show.

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The key, I've realised, is that you have to double your money.

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Meanwhile, David has used his cunning for sniffing out a bargain,

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and has also made an admirable series of profits.

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He got his money back on a very convincing fake.

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I don't think it's right.

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If you're right, James, then I've learnt, and I've learnt a big lesson.

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From his original £200, David now has a colossal £731.60 to start today's show.

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I really do need to find items that I'm pretty sure are going to make a profit,

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but, ideally, find something a bit quirky, something out of the ordinary that might just fly.

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James and David are travelling in David's classic car.

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They started off at the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland,

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and will finish in Market Harborough, in Leicestershire.

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On today's programme, they're leaving Liverpool,

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heading east, then south to auction in Nantwich, Cheshire.

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First stop of the day, they call it Knutsford.

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Knutsford in Cheshire takes its name from the ancient Danish king, Canute,

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and was originally called Cunetesford about 1,000 years ago.

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Shall we just have a hunt?

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I think there's three floors, what are you like at stairs?

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The Knutsford Antiques Centre has individual rented spaces for a group of local dealers,

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with varied and peculiar treasures.

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Paaaw! The smell of that!

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Where's that been? Dear me.

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-Suits you.

-I'm keeping it on.

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This is quite nice.

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18 carat gold mounted socle, Malacca shaft.

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Malacca is a close cousin of bamboo,

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it hails from Malaysia, and is often used for making sword sticks and canes, like this one, priced at £75.

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It has been reduced in height, though, sadly.

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The problem with these is they're put in umbrella stands,

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and when the umbrella gets put in, all the water drains off and pools at the bottom.

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The Malacca's like a straw, it soaks it all up.

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Then it becomes rotten at the ends, and they chop it off.

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"Chamber of Trades, presented to Mr T France, station master, Ossett,

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"1921-1926."

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So it looks like this cane was a gift from Ossett businessmen

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to their local, much appreciated station master, nice!

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Ossett station in Yorkshire is no more, following the Beeching railway closures of the 1960s,

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so this cane is not only a one-off,

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but a great piece of social history, and possibly more valuable for it.

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It's a nice quality cane.

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Meanwhile, David's getting rusty, with a Victorian can opener

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and a replica Bascinet knight's helmet, and a couple of vintage dealers.

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-What was this for, Ken?

-Opening cans.

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It's the shape of a bull, isn't it? What have you got on that, Ken?

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-A tenner.

-A tenner?

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-I kind of like him.

-Want to try it on for size?

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You know what, I do not actually, funnily enough. That's a...

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do you think, a 19th century copy?

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-Yeah, it is. It's not a 14th century.

-It'll be nice if it was.

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Yeah, it'd be worth about 12, 20 grand, wouldn't it?

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The original Bascinet, or "pig-face" helmets,

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were worn by French knights at the battle of Agincourt in 1410.

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These Victorian copies weren't used in combat, but David might have other plans.

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-What have we got on that?

-Err, 195.

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We'll do it for 150.

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-I'll go £100 for that and the tin opener.

-No. No.

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-He's thinking, though, aren't you?

-He's... I sense he's on the brink now.

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Whilst David does battle with the veterans of Knutsford,

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James is still wrestling with the ghosts of railways past.

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One thing I'm concerned about,

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is a lot of the auctioneers haven't got a clue where to market these.

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So with this, I'm going to phone the auction room and say,

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"This should be sold to one of the big London stick dealers,"

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and if they do, then, hopefully, this'll do quite well, but we'll see.

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Good plan, James, but you might want to speak to the dealer and buy it before you get carried away.

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Let David show you how it's done.

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I could... I think I could probably do 115 and I'm out.

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No, sorry.

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These guys have clearly been around the block a few times,

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so David's usual charms and tricks are not working their magic.

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120, that's it...

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that's it, I'm done. Take my money.

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He's going to do it, do you think he's going to do?

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I should think so, cash in hand.

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I might get a drink out of it.

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Might get a drink! You'll be drunk for a week!

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120?

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-Go on, then.

-Good man. Good man, thank you very much.

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Cor, finally. A pretty good deal on the rusty helmet and can opener.

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James needs to catch up, and get the railway cane down from £75.

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The dealer's absent today, so James gets on the phone.

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How about 38?

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Yes, in that case, if it's...

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If it's £38, we have a deal.

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Thank you for your time. Bye-bye.

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Well, fantastic last-minute deal.

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Err...so, the walking stick, it's got the end chopped off, but, you know, £38. Bargain.

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-Oh, what have you got, then?

-Never you mind.

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Is it a stick of rock?

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It's Macclesfield, I believe.

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I believe you're right, David.

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Moving on and heading southeast,

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the road trip makes its merry way to the Cheshire town of Macclesfield.

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Formerly known as the "Silk Town",

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Macclesfield was once the world's largest producer of this shimmery fabric.

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And about to slip into something more comfortable are James and David,

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as they arrive to impress the town.

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Have fun, see you in a bit.

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Best of luck, you know I don't mean it!

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And with his very best wishes,

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David gallantly lets second-placed James have an exclusive look in this shop.

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What's your name?

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His eyelids move, his eyes move, his lips move, his tongue moves.

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Hello.

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What are the pictures at the back?

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French Gamy, they're prints.

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-How much are they?

-Tenner a piece.

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-Can I have a look at those?

-Yeah.

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That's great, thank you.

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Yeah, they're a bit of fun, aren't they?

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That one's just slightly foxed and faded.

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-Gamy.

-Parisian Margaret, or Gamy Montaut,

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produced many popular early 20th century lithographic prints,

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often featuring the transport technological advancements of the day.

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These pictures were made using the laborious method of litho printing.

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Outlines were painted onto stone, then printed onto paper, with colours hand-stencilled,

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taking days to complete just one picture.

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These prints are not originals, so they're worth much less.

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They've got a look, haven't they?

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I'll give you a tenner for the pair of them.

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How about that? Will you throw the faded one in?

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£15 for three.

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A tenner's it, I think it might make £20, £25, and by the time the commission comes off...

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Can't remember how much I paid...

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-You've had them for a long time. Go on, give it a go.

-Yeah, go on, then.

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Tenner for the three? Deal done.

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James' low bid on the prints has met with very little French resistance.

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-What a day!

-I think it's time to go now, don't you?

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-Yeah.

-We've done enough work, James.

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But as the shops close for the day, our experts head to their beds.

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Separately.

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Wakey-wakey! Rise and shine.

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There's more shopping to be done.

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What are you going down here for?

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I thought we'd take detour. We were on the main road, I didn't like it.

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James and David leave Macclesfield behind them,

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heading for the Staffordshire town of Leek.

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So, have you been to Staffordshire before?

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I mean, what are we on? Our first date or something?

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So far, James has spent £48 on the railway walking cane and the Gamy motoring prints,

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and he has £580.42 left to burn.

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David has spent £120 on the knight's helmet and tin opener.

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He has £611.60 left to throw around.

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Good man, good man. Thank you very much.

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-What's he doing behind a hedge?

-Excuse me? Hi.

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Could you tell me, are there any decent antique shops in Leek?

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Yes, there's a couple in Leek, yes.

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Carry on to the main road, turn right, and you go into Leek.

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-Lovely.

-Brilliant.

-Thanks for your help.

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Ah, a bit of local knowledge there.

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Leek has a strong connection to the late 19th century Arts and Crafts movement.

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The great William Morris came here in 1873 to study dyeing and printing.

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Together with local industrialist and arts patron, Thomas Wardle,

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Morris developed his signature large floral prints, and pushed the envelope of textile design.

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David's current profits put him out in front,

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but he's not about to relax and take his foot off the pedal.

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There will be some real gems in here, the trick, though, of course, is to dig them out.

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David's eyes are soon drawn to a possible treasure,

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a Victorian lady's writing box.

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I see, so this is obviously a little pen tray, I think, isn't it?

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So that comes out.

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I think the tray lifts off too, from what I can remember.

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Any secret compartments? There's a drawer at the side.

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Oh, is there? Oh, this is so exciting. That's it, pull it.

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There you go, there's your pin.

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Nothing in it!

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I can't believe it! But that's nice.

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Letters to ones husband are one thing,

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but letters to a lover or admirer might have needed to be secreted away in the Victorian era.

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Such a box with hidden compartment would have been ideal for the discreet lady of letters.

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Have a look at the lid, we've got walnut, mother of pearl.

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Bit of fruit wood and satin wood going on there, bit of ebony.

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Nice quality thing. What would the absolute death be on that?

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For a dear friend.

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-A new-found mate.

-A new-found friend, it could be £45.

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It's not expensive, is it?

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-Could it be £30?

-Cheeky.

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-£30?

-Very cheeky.

-You go with that?

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-Yes.

-Marvellous, good man.

-Pleasure, good luck at the auction.

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-Yeah, cheers.

-I'm sure you'll do all right.

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I think I will. I'll see you in a little while... Ahhh, just in time.

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-Did you see anything, then?

-No. Get your beady eyes and...

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A walnut box.

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Well spotted.

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Eagle-eyed James is a full £100 behind David, so he needs to be a bit canny with his shopping today.

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Victorian, about 1840, 1850, in rosewood.

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Called rosewood because when the tree was cut, it smelled of roses.

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And a section there for letters again.

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Another writing box. James and David are clearly on the same wavelength,

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but could this box be worth more at auction than David's?

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So, nice little box, and at £28 not that expensive so that's a potential.

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I'm over, it's lunch time, and Lewis is still working. Who's the winner?

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Well, not you yet, David.

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However, our comfortable front-runner is on his way for an indulgent, opulent visit.

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-Roger.

-Hello.

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Hi there, you look surprised.

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-I've heard about you.

-Really?

-Yes.

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Roger is a local clock restorer, and has been pursuing

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his horological passion for over 40 years.

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He brings David into his wonderful world of elegant timepieces.

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I like French clocks in particular.

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The French call it furniture, they don't call it a clock first and foremost.

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So, furniture is always attractive.

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-This is a, you would agree, a Sevres panel clock?

-Yes.

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-It's French all the way, isn't it?

-We're referring to the porcelain here, aren't we?

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The Sevres suburb of Paris is conveniently close to the Palace of Versailles,

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so it became home to the Royal factory of porcelain in 1756, set up by Louis XV,

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a great lover of fine ceramics.

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The Royal factory later became the National Factory of Porcelain.

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If one has to look, say, "I want an expensive French clock,"

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then blue Sevres is usually the top of the list.

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What sort of price would you be selling that for?

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That'll be 1,500, something like that. Yes, yes.

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Every French clock tells a story. It's usually about love. This is a little marble base, spelter.

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It's a metal that's painted to look like gilded bronze.

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Exactly, this is a lovely little child,

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and the feeling is that it's about new life and love of life itself.

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The clocks get more and more extraordinary.

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Roger has over 250 pieces, but only room for about 40 in his shop.

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-This is a Dresden.

-Oh, right, OK.

-Cavalier clock.

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So, Dresden, known more for porcelain.

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Yes, indeed. Dresden's German, isn't it?

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-Yes, of course, so they've taken that and bunged a clock in it.

-And, what sort of clock, Dave?

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-A French clock?

-That's right, yeah.

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Because they match the quality and calibre...

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And the style.

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That's the kind of thing I think you could put into auction,

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and that's the sort of clock that could go through the roof.

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This timepiece was made to resemble an artist's palette,

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and could be yours, David, from Roger, for around £600. Gosh.

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-I mean, that's as good as gold, isn't it?

-Absolutely.

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Gold is only about money, isn't it? that's about beauty and possessing while you're around.

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-You're right, you're right.

-It lightens your day.

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They certainly are something, and also neatly keep the time.

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Still needing to beat the clock, though, is James Lewis,

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he's found a pair of candlesticks with Gallic flair.

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These are quite interesting.

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Lacquered brass, probably made around 1860, 1870, French.

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-(FRENCH ACCENT)

-Has anyone else noticed how much French stuff there is around here?

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Strange, non?

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In the UK we didn't tend to get what we call pricket candlesticks so often.

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The idea is, you get your candle and you stick it right on the spike there.

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What can you do those for?

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For you, they can be £30, the pair.

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£30. OK.

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I think they're going to make 20 to 30 at auction.

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That's what I think they'll make.

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So I'm thinking in terms of 15 quid.

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James leaves the words "15 quid" hanging in the air,

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and skilfully moves negotiations on to the writing box.

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-That can be £15.

-OK, 15.

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£30 the two, and you've got a deal.

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-Deal.

-Thank you, sir.

-Fantastic.

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-I'll go and get my sticks.

-And I'll grab your box.

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Wow, James and David really are the kings of knockdown bargaining,

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especially on writing boxes.

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Fantastic. Will you wrap them up so that Harper bloke doesn't see them?

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Thank you very much.

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Ooh. Confidently sauntering back from his indulgent clock visit,

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David finally arrives to face the big reveal with James.

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Oh, I say! Shall I pull it?

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-Go on, then.

-Oh, my gosh. Wow.

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-Now then, chopped-off end.

-Yeah.

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Station master. Ooh, it's of railway interest.

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18 carat gold, 1921.

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What did you pay for it?

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-£38.

-Well, it's cheap enough.

-It is, isn't it?

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It's a smelly helmet.

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It's a smelly, reproduction, 14th century-style

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Bascinet helmet.

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-Pig-face.

-It's great, isn't it?

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It's a copy, the Victorians made loads of them. I think it's funky.

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Yeah, I agree with you. How much?

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-Was it 120 or 110? 110.

-Was it? Oh, OK.

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Just don't even say a word.

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Oh, well, I must say I like cars, you know that.

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-So, these are copies of 1913 prints?

-Yes.

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-Three of them.

-How much did you pay?

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Well, that's the good point. I can't lose very much, I paid £10.

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-For all three?

-Yes.

-It's pathetic, isn't it?

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-Well...

-Pathetically cheap.

-Yeah.

0:19:050:19:07

Now, let me tell you, as a boy I used to dream, right,

0:19:070:19:10

of finding ancient artefacts,

0:19:100:19:12

and this is exactly the kind of thing that I would dream of finding,

0:19:120:19:17

so I saw it, and I knew I just had to have it.

0:19:170:19:20

It's a tin opener.

0:19:200:19:21

-I quite like that.

-I love it.

0:19:210:19:23

I've seen these at the antiques fairs, but they're always in really good order.

0:19:230:19:28

-Oh, thanks!

-No, I like this, because as you say, it's been in the ground. I think that adds a lot to it.

0:19:280:19:34

-Well, I paid a tenner.

-Oh, that's all right, isn't it?

0:19:340:19:37

I can't lose much, and it might double or treble its money.

0:19:370:19:40

-It might do.

-Yeah. It might do. Big candlesticks.

0:19:400:19:43

-Quite churchy.

-French churchy.

0:19:430:19:45

-And that.

-That was very cheap.

0:19:450:19:47

It was marked up at 28, he said I could have it for 15,

0:19:470:19:51

and he said I could have those at 18.

0:19:510:19:54

Oh, for goodness' sake. You've spent no money.

0:19:540:19:56

So I said, "Well, I'll give you £30 the lot, then",

0:19:560:19:59

-which is what I did.

-And the rosewood mother of pearl.

0:19:590:20:02

-It's a standard thing.

-But a good old box.

0:20:020:20:05

Get rid of that box, let me show you a proper one.

0:20:050:20:07

Bought from the same place.

0:20:070:20:09

Oh, you got in there before me.

0:20:100:20:12

That is a very good-looking box.

0:20:120:20:15

A little bit of damage there.

0:20:150:20:17

1880, burr walnut.

0:20:170:20:19

That is Rolls-Royce quality, that.

0:20:190:20:21

-It is.

-Are you pleased for me, or not?

0:20:210:20:23

-Depends how much you paid for it.

-How much do you think?

0:20:230:20:26

I think you paid £30 for it.

0:20:260:20:28

I did. How did you guess £30?

0:20:280:20:31

-£30's fine, isn't it?

-It's cheap! It's got to be worth £60, it might be worth £90.

0:20:310:20:36

I agree with you.

0:20:360:20:37

Thank goodness, you're a very hard man to please.

0:20:370:20:40

I'm not, no, I'm not!

0:20:400:20:41

It could all come down to the battle of the boxes at the auction.

0:20:410:20:46

But what do James and David really think about each other's chances?

0:20:460:20:49

My box, compared to his, it's fantastic,

0:20:490:20:52

it could three or four times it's money, I think.

0:20:520:20:55

I love it, that lovely colour walnut,

0:20:550:20:57

it absolutely knocks spots off my box.

0:20:570:21:00

The racing pictures, I mean, they're a good theme, but they're in poor frames, they're a bit pitted.

0:21:000:21:06

If they made a lot of money, there'd be something really very, very wrong with this world.

0:21:060:21:11

The road trip has woven its way from Liverpool,

0:21:150:21:19

across the Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire borders.

0:21:190:21:22

Finally, it's auction day, and our experts arrive in Nantwich.

0:21:220:21:26

Here we are in Nantwich, I have great hopes for Nantwich.

0:21:260:21:30

Oh, and it's a floral market town as well, how lovely.

0:21:300:21:34

Peter Wilson Auctioneers specialises in fine art sales,

0:21:340:21:38

but on the day James and David arrive, it's a general sale.

0:21:380:21:41

George Stones is today's auctioneer, and has some thoughts about our experts' chances.

0:21:430:21:49

The one thing we really loved was the walking cane.

0:21:490:21:51

The fact it was for Ossett station that was closed by Dr Beeching,

0:21:510:21:55

so we felt that was quite a good thing.

0:21:550:21:57

The thing which we were most surprised about was definitely the can opener,

0:21:570:22:02

but, between us, it's going to sell.

0:22:020:22:04

Starting this leg with £628.42, James shrewdly spent a mere £143.

0:22:040:22:11

David started with £731.60 and also played safe, spending just £150.

0:22:140:22:22

The world turns steadily on its axis, the universe expands and contracts in equal measure,

0:22:230:22:30

the equilibrium of life holds true, and the auction is about to begin.

0:22:300:22:35

Opening proceedings is David's Victorian can opener.

0:22:350:22:39

Stand by for worms.

0:22:390:22:42

When I saw this, I didn't know what to say.

0:22:420:22:44

That's a cracking piece, that.

0:22:440:22:47

I have an opening bid of £5.

0:22:470:22:49

LAUGHTER

0:22:490:22:52

That's dreadful.

0:22:520:22:53

6 anywhere now, you can remain anonymous. £6 at the back,

0:22:530:22:56

thanks very much. At 6, 7, well done.

0:22:560:23:00

-Don't do that again!

-A lady of taste.

0:23:000:23:03

9, it's only money, you can't take it with you.

0:23:030:23:05

-9, 10.

-Go on, keep it going.

0:23:050:23:09

Go on!

0:23:090:23:11

11, 11.

0:23:110:23:13

Is that your sister?

0:23:130:23:15

LAUGHTER

0:23:150:23:17

£11 there, £11, sold, well done! £11.

0:23:210:23:24

Well done. Good purchase.

0:23:240:23:27

-I made £1 on paper.

-That's far too much.

0:23:290:23:32

OK, a hilarious profit, but a loss after commission.

0:23:320:23:36

Could the railway walking stick support James?

0:23:360:23:39

It's got a very favourable internet bid to get it going.

0:23:390:23:43

I've got £80 straight away.

0:23:430:23:44

-Straight profit.

-£80, £85, do I hear?

0:23:440:23:47

85, 85. Bid of 85, 90 I'll take.

0:23:470:23:48

At £85 only, it's going to be sold, make no mistake.

0:23:480:23:52

All quiet at £85, going away, then. 85.

0:23:520:23:55

-Well, it's still a good profit.

-Yeah.

0:23:550:23:58

An excellent result. And James can now do battle.

0:23:580:24:03

Once more into the breach,

0:24:030:24:05

visor down for victory, or defeat on David's replica pig-face helmet.

0:24:050:24:10

I've got four commissions on this.

0:24:100:24:12

There we are, excitement all round.

0:24:120:24:14

£100 bid straight away, £110 now, do I hear?

0:24:140:24:16

110 now, do I hear? 110,

0:24:160:24:19

120 with me, 120, 130, I have at 130,

0:24:190:24:23

at £130 only, 130 I'm bid, 130.

0:24:230:24:25

At £130, last chance. All out in front of me, £130 then.

0:24:250:24:30

130, sold, £130.

0:24:300:24:31

£20 profit, minus commission.

0:24:310:24:33

Oh, dear, that'll break even for David,

0:24:330:24:36

but not a great victory by any stretch.

0:24:360:24:39

It's amazing how I pay a mortgage, really, isn't it?

0:24:390:24:41

If we're honest.

0:24:410:24:44

Has James got a prayer with his ecclesiastical candlesticks?

0:24:440:24:48

And I've got £40 straight away for these, at £40 bid straight away,

0:24:480:24:52

at £40. Is it 42 now?

0:24:520:24:53

42 anywhere now? Do I hear £40 with me, 42, your bid,

0:24:530:24:57

45, 48 now, 50's on commission,

0:24:570:24:59

£55, now you're bidding. At £50 with me, at £50 on commission,

0:24:590:25:02

at £50, it's going to be sold.

0:25:020:25:04

At £50 only, then, if we're all finished and done, 50.

0:25:040:25:07

-That's great, £50.

-That's all right, what, they stamp you 15?

0:25:070:25:10

A good profit, but I think James was expecting more.

0:25:100:25:14

Now, it's the battle of the writing boxes.

0:25:150:25:17

James is first, with his rosewood jobby.

0:25:170:25:20

At £40, at £40, and there's a stunned silence in the room.

0:25:200:25:25

No use to any of us, is it?

0:25:250:25:27

At £40 now, £30 I'm bid.

0:25:270:25:29

At £30 I have, at £30,

0:25:290:25:31

at 32 now, 32 bid, at 35 with me, at 35,

0:25:310:25:34

-it's going to be sold, make no mistake, at £35.

-That is cheap.

0:25:340:25:36

-Cheap, isn't it, David?

-It is cheap, yeah.

0:25:360:25:38

38, fresh bidder, 38 in the corridor,

0:25:380:25:40

I think this is a giveaway, at £38 here, going to be sold at £38 then.

0:25:400:25:44

Will that small profit be enough

0:25:450:25:48

to beat David's possibly superior walnut one? Here it comes.

0:25:480:25:53

Now, I think your box is the best thing you bought by a long way.

0:25:530:25:57

Well, it's going to have to be!

0:25:570:25:58

So I've started, at £80 bid, 80. 85 now, this is a cracking box, at £80,

0:25:580:26:02

85 with us now, 85, 90 with me, 95 now, do I hear?

0:26:020:26:06

I have 95 bid, at 95, make it 100,

0:26:060:26:08

100 now with me on commission, at £100, going to be sold at 100.

0:26:080:26:13

-Well done.

-Bang on £100.

0:26:130:26:15

Brilliant, well done you.

0:26:150:26:16

Finally, a decent profit for David, thank God.

0:26:160:26:19

Now, James still needs some serious money to catch up, and only has the Gamy racing prints left to sell.

0:26:200:26:26

What do you really think of these racing prints?

0:26:260:26:29

Truly, I don't like them. What do you think?

0:26:290:26:33

I absolutely loath them.

0:26:330:26:35

Well, if they make a profit, who cares?

0:26:350:26:40

They look the business.

0:26:400:26:41

-40 bid straight away.

-40!

0:26:410:26:43

42, 45, 48 now,

0:26:430:26:44

48, 50 now, 55,

0:26:440:26:46

55, 60 now. 55, your bid at 55,

0:26:460:26:48

60, I have a fresh face,

0:26:480:26:50

65, you're going out, 65 your bid, at 65, the bid's over there at £65.

0:26:500:26:54

At £65, any more?

0:26:540:26:56

70, surely? At 65 then, going...

0:26:560:26:59

70, 75, 75, 80,

0:26:590:27:02

85, 85, 90 now.

0:27:020:27:05

90, come on. 85, the bid's there.

0:27:050:27:09

Go on, one more. Go on!

0:27:090:27:10

Don't put too much pressure on him, James. You'll embarrass him.

0:27:100:27:13

85, the bid's at the back there, at 85. Sold.

0:27:130:27:16

Well done. No, well done.

0:27:160:27:18

An excellent finish for James,

0:27:180:27:20

but has he made enough to catch up with David?

0:27:200:27:23

-That's it, we're done.

-Fantastic.

0:27:230:27:25

-Shall we go and collect our money?

-Let's go.

-Come on, then.

0:27:250:27:29

James started today's show with £628.42,

0:27:310:27:35

and made a great profit after commission, of £128.07.

0:27:350:27:40

James fights on, with a marvellous £756.49.

0:27:400:27:46

David started with £731.60, and made a profit of £42.50.

0:27:480:27:55

David also lives to fight another day, still just ahead of James, with £774.10.

0:27:550:28:02

Well, pockets full of money, James.

0:28:040:28:07

-Yes, absolutely.

-Burning a hole in our pockets, or what?

0:28:070:28:10

Now, the idea is, we've got to spend it.

0:28:100:28:13

You're just trying to make me spend all my dosh. I know you, Lewis.

0:28:130:28:18

We're off to Staffordshire.

0:28:180:28:20

In the next leg, it's the end of the road for James and David,

0:28:220:28:25

heading for their final auction in Market Harborough.

0:28:250:28:29

James struggles to keep hold of his money,

0:28:290:28:32

David struggles to get a bargain...

0:28:320:28:35

-You know you want my money.

-Not that much.

0:28:350:28:37

..and they both struggle for attention.

0:28:370:28:40

-I think he's stealing my woman.

-Sorry, do you want me to go away?

-Yes, if you don't mind.

0:28:400:28:43

It's been a long road trip for our two experts,

0:28:430:28:46

James Lewis and David Harper.

0:28:460:28:48

They're heading to their last auction.

0:28:480:28:50

But first, let's have a quick reminder of who's who.

0:28:500:28:53

James Lewis is an auctioneer and a fan of classic gentlemen's interiors.

0:28:530:28:59

-30 quid, the two, and you've got a deal. Deal.

-Thank you, sir.

0:28:590:29:03

David Harper is an antiques dealer with a passion for 19th-century Japanese pieces.

0:29:030:29:08

I'm happy if you're happy.

0:29:080:29:10

Exactly, making each other happy, that's what antiques dealers do best.

0:29:100:29:14

James and David began their journey with £200 each

0:29:140:29:18

and have taken competition to a new level.

0:29:180:29:22

-What it 120 or something?

-Ah, you're wrong, 110.

0:29:220:29:25

James has played it cool and steadily built up some great profits.

0:29:250:29:29

(Fantastic! Fantastic!)

0:29:290:29:32

From his original £200, James now has a mightily proud

0:29:320:29:39

£756.49 to start this leg.

0:29:390:29:43

Meanwhile, David has gone in all guns blazing

0:29:430:29:46

and has made even greater profits.

0:29:460:29:49

Brilliant!

0:29:490:29:50

He's turned his £200 into a whopping

0:29:500:29:55

£774.10. It's all very close.

0:29:550:29:59

I'm going to tell him that I'm going to spend

0:29:590:30:01

all of my money to encourage James to spend all his money

0:30:010:30:05

in the hope that he loses loads!

0:30:050:30:07

James and David started their road trip at the Giant's Causeway

0:30:090:30:13

in Northern Ireland and are heading southeast across England.

0:30:130:30:17

Now they're leaving Nantwich in Cheshire and heading

0:30:170:30:21

for their final auction

0:30:210:30:23

in Market Harborough, Leicestershire.

0:30:230:30:26

First stop of the day is Stoke-On-Trent.

0:30:260:30:28

Well, James, this is our last jaunt together.

0:30:280:30:32

The last... Are you going to miss me?

0:30:330:30:35

Sometimes.

0:30:350:30:37

THEY LAUGH

0:30:370:30:38

Stoke is the hallowed homeland of British ceramics and part of the world famous Potteries -

0:30:380:30:45

five interlinking towns which were the capital of pottery production

0:30:450:30:51

in the 18th and 19th centuries.

0:30:510:30:53

There were once over 300 individual manufacturing companies and over 2,000 chimneys.

0:30:530:30:59

I think I know a couple of the guys here.

0:30:590:31:01

Oh, that's always handy if you do.

0:31:010:31:03

The Potteries Antiques Centre is a vast emporium with plenty of space for our two experts,

0:31:030:31:09

but James is very well known to dealers in this part of the world,

0:31:090:31:14

so David is keeping a close eye on him.

0:31:140:31:16

Nice Minton fruit bowl.

0:31:160:31:17

You're not to see what I like, but as you are next to me!

0:31:170:31:20

-Typical Staffordshire dogs James and we had to see them, didn't we?

-Yeah.

0:31:200:31:25

While David's back is turned, James slips off to scout for good stuff.

0:31:250:31:30

-Bill, how are you?

-James, how are you?

0:31:300:31:32

How about some Carlton Ware? I've got a couple of nice pieces with green.

0:31:320:31:35

They're a bit plain, but you can have those for £40, the two.

0:31:350:31:40

-40. OK, what else have we got?

-What else are we looking at here?

0:31:400:31:44

-How about the silver?

-Silver?

-Yeah, how about that?

0:31:440:31:47

Nice little tea set, there.

0:31:470:31:49

It's hard to imagine, but tea was once so expensive in England

0:31:490:31:53

that it was only drunk by the very privileged few.

0:31:530:31:56

And the drinking of tea became both an event and an art, hence the solid-silver service.

0:31:560:32:02

What would be your best on it?

0:32:020:32:04

150. Does that help you?

0:32:040:32:08

-110 any good to you?

-No.

0:32:080:32:10

-No.

-It cost a bit more, I'm afraid.

0:32:100:32:12

Could you get any closer to it?

0:32:120:32:14

My absolute best would be 145, that's just...

0:32:140:32:18

-That's doing my best for you.

-Yeah.

0:32:180:32:20

JAMES SIGHS

0:32:220:32:24

I think it's just that bit too much for me.

0:32:240:32:27

James is clearly playing hardball, but I think he's tempted.

0:32:270:32:32

Meanwhile, David's spotted an ornamental glass piece.

0:32:320:32:36

That is described as Art Deco, but no date on it.

0:32:360:32:39

Now, Art Deco being 1925, it couldn't be any earlier because it was formed

0:32:390:32:43

at the Paris Exhibition of 1925, so does that mean it's Art Deco in style or Art Deco in period?

0:32:430:32:47

If it's period, I'll have it.

0:32:470:32:49

What I'm looking for here is 75, 85 years of, kind of, just moving around and scraping.

0:32:490:32:55

But there's no real... Little TINY faint marks, scrapes, scratches.

0:32:550:33:00

I think it's just probably too good, too fresh.

0:33:000:33:02

It's amazing that something being TOO good means it's NO good.

0:33:020:33:07

Well, that's antiques for you.

0:33:070:33:10

Just across town is Portmeirion Pottery.

0:33:100:33:12

Its name is taken

0:33:120:33:14

from the Italian-style Portmeirion village in Wales.

0:33:140:33:18

This pottery has been making English ceramics in Stoke since 1960.

0:33:180:33:23

James arrives to meet Julian Teed - creative director and once assistant

0:33:230:33:29

to founder and legendary designer Susan Williams-Ellis.

0:33:290:33:33

In my opinion she's one of the best designers, if not THE best, of the last century.

0:33:330:33:38

-Very sadly she passed away two years ago.

-Aw.

-And...

0:33:380:33:41

I feel as if she was like my mum.

0:33:410:33:43

She was... She was a wonderful person.

0:33:430:33:45

Her father, Sir Clough Williams-Ellis,

0:33:450:33:48

he started the Italianate village, Portmeirion in North Wales.

0:33:480:33:51

I didn't know that!

0:33:510:33:52

As a talented designer, Susan wanted a business

0:33:520:33:56

for the pots she was already selling in her father's Portmeirion village.

0:33:560:34:01

-Susan used to buy products from a company called Gray's Pottery.

-Yes.

0:34:010:34:05

She was fed up with the service she was getting,

0:34:050:34:07

so they bought Gray's - they bought a small company so they could have what they wanted.

0:34:070:34:12

The Gray's factory was where we're standing now on this site.

0:34:120:34:15

So, Portmeirion became the company name and now employs

0:34:150:34:20

hundreds of local people in its one and only factory...

0:34:200:34:23

We make stuff out of mud. Brilliant!

0:34:230:34:26

..producing 20,000 pieces of pottery per day, four million per year,

0:34:260:34:31

and you're not going to believe how they print the plates!

0:34:310:34:35

Yup, that simple.

0:34:350:34:38

-It's quite amazing.

-Yeah, brilliant.

0:34:380:34:40

Many of Susan Williams-Ellis' classic designs

0:34:400:34:43

are still in production today, including the world famous Botanic Garden and Magic Garden.

0:34:430:34:50

When she died we had to, obviously, tidy a lot of things up.

0:34:500:34:54

One of the fantastic things we found was this...

0:34:540:34:58

..coffee pot. This is a biscuit piece that Susan would have sat in

0:35:010:35:04

the garden at Bank House with her pencil and hand drawn that design.

0:35:040:35:09

She actually created Magic Garden...

0:35:090:35:11

-Magic garden.

-..on that pot that you're holding in 1962.

0:35:110:35:16

I always hate to bring value into this sort of thing,

0:35:160:35:19

-but what is THAT worth?

-I would say it's priceless.

0:35:190:35:21

-It's going to be thousands!

-I wouldn't be able to put a price on it.

0:35:210:35:25

Well, that could be the most expensive thing you've held this week, James. Better put it back!

0:35:250:35:31

The road trip's calling.

0:35:310:35:34

Moving on, our experts leave Stoke-On-Trent in the dust

0:35:350:35:39

and follow their destined path to Ashbourne, Derbyshire.

0:35:390:35:42

It's the heart of Ashbourne.

0:35:420:35:44

-Right.

-And it's a...

0:35:440:35:46

It's a lovely market town.

0:35:460:35:47

-It's very pretty.

-Yeah, it's great.

0:35:470:35:50

-It's got a great atmosphere and lots of antique shops, that's the key.

-Good.

0:35:500:35:54

What direction are they in, then?

0:35:540:35:55

They are all that way.

0:35:550:35:57

Now we're deep into the Peak District, David might need to up

0:35:570:36:00

his game because this is James Lewis' country.

0:36:000:36:05

Steve, what have you got really handy?

0:36:050:36:07

The idea here... I'm around with my friend James Lewis, he's a local boy.

0:36:070:36:11

-I know James.

-You know James.

0:36:110:36:13

Best if we talk don't about James.

0:36:130:36:15

Mind you, we could. Have you any information?

0:36:150:36:17

Well, I'm sure there's nothing to tell...much!

0:36:170:36:20

Brian, how are you? Good to see you.

0:36:200:36:22

How are things?

0:36:220:36:23

Unless using your local contacts makes good gossip.

0:36:230:36:27

I've got a nice little parcel by a man called James Orrock.

0:36:270:36:30

Oh, OK. Is he local?

0:36:300:36:32

He worked for a while in Nottingham as a dentist.

0:36:320:36:35

Oh, that's why I know the name.

0:36:350:36:37

-Very much in the style of Cox, Constable.

-Yeah.

0:36:370:36:41

Oh, that's a bit of fun.

0:36:410:36:42

-No, it's good colour on it.

-Yeah.

0:36:420:36:44

Born in 1829, James Orrock worked as a dentist before

0:36:440:36:49

becoming an art dealer, a famous champion of British painting and a prolific watercolourist himself.

0:36:490:36:56

-So how much is that?

-150, how's that?

0:36:560:36:58

-One... Oh. How about 60?

-90, but that's the death on it.

0:36:580:37:02

Do you know, at 90 quid, I think I'll take it.

0:37:020:37:06

80, 90.

0:37:060:37:07

James Orrock is a really good local artist.

0:37:080:37:11

When I started as an auctioneer in Nottingham we sold lots of works by him in

0:37:110:37:15

our saleroom and the best thing is that it's a Leicestershire subject and where's the auction room?

0:37:150:37:21

Slap bang in the middle of Leicestershire.

0:37:210:37:23

James' local knowledge could turn out to be quite profitable.

0:37:230:37:27

If David wants to stay ahead he'll have to have some bright ideas too.

0:37:270:37:31

-A French chandelier?

-Oh, I like French chandeliers.

-You've walked past one there.

0:37:310:37:35

Slight damage to it, as usual.

0:37:350:37:38

-What have you got on that?

-That could be yours for...

-Trade.

-£60.

0:37:380:37:42

£60 - well, fair price for a chandelier.

0:37:420:37:45

There's always a really good market for French...

0:37:450:37:48

They're flash, almost like mug's eyefuls.

0:37:480:37:50

They look like a million dollars, it looks like it's bronze.

0:37:500:37:53

Chandelier comes from the French word chandelle, meaning candle,

0:37:530:37:57

as the original medieval models were lit with candles.

0:37:570:38:01

Designs developed during the 18th century and as glass blowing grew

0:38:010:38:05

so glass was used more to embellish the fittings.

0:38:050:38:09

OK. So, date wise I would '30s? '40s? What would you say?

0:38:090:38:14

It does look very much in that period.

0:38:140:38:17

I think it's a good-looking thing.

0:38:170:38:19

I mean, would 20 quid buy it, just as a chancy number?

0:38:190:38:22

£20?! Will there be ANY dealers in this part of the world

0:38:220:38:26

wanting David or James back in their shops?

0:38:260:38:29

Can we do it at 40?

0:38:290:38:31

Oh, Steve, we can't. I can't see it. Do it for 25 and we're done.

0:38:310:38:35

-Go on, you know you want my money.

-I don't want it that bad.

0:38:350:38:38

You do, go on!

0:38:380:38:40

-£25.

-Good man. Thank you very much.

0:38:400:38:42

He's done it again!

0:38:420:38:44

The words "full price" just aren't in David's vocabulary.

0:38:440:38:48

Let's hope the next shop's been warned.

0:38:480:38:51

-You see, that is lovely, isn't it?

-Yeah. Could be...250.

0:38:510:38:55

So it couldn't be 100 quid or anything? Just out of interest.

0:38:550:38:58

-Sorry.

-No.

0:38:580:39:00

Finally, David meets some resistance to his low offers.

0:39:000:39:04

And then, to make things worse, the local boyo arrives.

0:39:040:39:08

I think he's stealing my woman!

0:39:080:39:10

-Sorry, do you want me to go away?

-Yes, if you don't mind!

0:39:100:39:13

I was doing really well with Barbara.

0:39:130:39:15

It looks that you've lost her, David,

0:39:150:39:18

and the shops are itching to close as the long day draws to an end.

0:39:180:39:23

Morning finds us back on the road.

0:39:250:39:27

I've never really spent any time...

0:39:270:39:29

And it's the final day of shopping for James and David before heading to auction in Market Harborough.

0:39:290:39:34

90, absolutely...

0:39:340:39:36

So far James has spent £90 on the James Orrock water colour.

0:39:360:39:40

He now has the mark of the beast, £666.49 left to be bad with.

0:39:400:39:47

David has spent a mere £25 on the chandelier.

0:39:470:39:50

He still has £749.10 left to show us he means business.

0:39:500:39:56

OK, good man. It's been a delight.

0:39:560:39:58

Ashbourne is but a distant memory

0:40:000:40:03

as our two experts saunter off down the road to Matlock.

0:40:030:40:08

Now this area has a fascinating manufacturing history chiefly due

0:40:080:40:12

to the Richard Arkwright Mills built at Cromford in the 18th century.

0:40:120:40:17

The reason why the windows are so high up here

0:40:170:40:19

is because Arkwright was a really early industrial revolutionist.

0:40:190:40:24

-It's almost fortified because he had machinery in here to take the place of the workers...

-Right.

0:40:240:40:30

..and the Luddites tried to attack and destroy all the machines.

0:40:300:40:33

So, did they believe that was against God?

0:40:330:40:35

No, they just didn't want to lose their jobs!

0:40:350:40:38

Similarly shunning the modern world, our antiques experts arrived

0:40:380:40:42

to scour Matlock for its beautiful treasures.

0:40:420:40:45

The dealer is across the park, here, and out on the other road.

0:40:450:40:49

Do you want me to do the dealer?

0:40:490:40:50

-Do the dealer.

-Do you want to do the centre,

0:40:500:40:53

then we do a crossover, meet in the park?

0:40:530:40:55

-See you later, good luck.

-I'll see you later, yeah.

0:40:550:40:58

Our experts are rolling in money from their mean tactics throughout their trip.

0:40:580:41:02

Will they spend big today or keep pushing for those killer bargains?

0:41:020:41:06

The difficulty is that everybody knows me here and I know them, so where I can normally be quite

0:41:060:41:11

ruthless and try and cut the prices, here I feel as if I'm robbing my granny if I do that.

0:41:110:41:17

Whilst James worries about the elderly, he finds something

0:41:170:41:21

from the young - a Victorian sampler for £225.

0:41:210:41:27

The idea was this would teach girls

0:41:270:41:30

needlework and it was various different forms of stitching.

0:41:300:41:35

And they started in the 17th century and worked

0:41:350:41:38

all the way through until...

0:41:380:41:40

I suppose they died out around 1870, 1880.

0:41:400:41:43

These samplers were standard projects for British schoolgirls,

0:41:430:41:47

begun in class and often finished at home by the firelight,

0:41:470:41:50

possibly as an evening's entertainment.

0:41:500:41:53

It doesn't have verse, religious extracts.

0:41:530:41:56

We have the name, Anne Williamson.

0:41:560:41:58

Against it is the fact that she hasn't dated it, but it's going to be around 1840, 1845.

0:41:580:42:05

James is still feeling SLIGHTLY mean and wants to get the price right down, so he calls the dealer.

0:42:050:42:11

The most it could be would be 120.

0:42:110:42:14

I can't buy it now without looking at the rest of the shop.

0:42:140:42:17

He's agreed to sell it at 120, but he wanted the deal there and then.

0:42:170:42:21

And that is one thing you must NEVER, ever get yourself into.

0:42:210:42:26

You've got to have space otherwise you'll make a mistake.

0:42:260:42:29

Let's hope David can make a more solid commitment.

0:42:290:42:32

Now that's a very, very interesting thing.

0:42:320:42:35

Obviously it's a candlestick, but with the maritime theme,

0:42:350:42:40

which is brilliant news.

0:42:400:42:41

Maritime items can be very popular at auction, especially when you're selling near the sea.

0:42:410:42:48

But, David, we're going to Leicestershire,

0:42:480:42:51

about as far from the British coast as you can get!

0:42:510:42:54

-It might be early 20th century, but it can't be later.

-Could be...

0:42:540:42:57

Give me a price on that. Give me a trade price, George.

0:42:570:43:00

-OK...55 quid.

-55 quid.

0:43:000:43:04

FINGER TAPPING

0:43:040:43:06

Would 35 quid buy it?

0:43:060:43:08

No, absolutely not.

0:43:080:43:10

David's haggling is all at sea, but back in the antique centre things are getting smoky.

0:43:120:43:18

That cigar cutter.

0:43:180:43:19

It was 565, but you can have it for £20.

0:43:190:43:24

£20!

0:43:240:43:25

THEY LAUGH

0:43:250:43:27

It's a bit of smoking memorabilia, but it's solid silver.

0:43:270:43:30

You've got the hallmark up at the top,

0:43:300:43:32

the anchor for Birmingham, the lion for sterling standard silver

0:43:320:43:36

and the H - Art Deco, about 1935 or so.

0:43:360:43:38

That's for cleaning out your pipes,

0:43:380:43:40

that's for chopping the end of the cigars off.

0:43:400:43:43

All in all, a useful thing.

0:43:430:43:45

How about the ashtray? How much is the ashtray?

0:43:450:43:48

-£12.

-Oh!

0:43:480:43:50

That's Birmingham and that's silver.

0:43:500:43:53

See, I'm thinking about these two, but the problem is...

0:43:530:43:56

it's smoking and not the most politically correct thing.

0:43:560:43:59

What would be your best on those two?

0:43:590:44:01

25 for the two...and that's it.

0:44:010:44:05

20 and we've got a deal.

0:44:050:44:08

20 and I take that handkerchief.

0:44:080:44:11

Let me wash it for you first.

0:44:110:44:13

-Well, I'm going to dab my forehead with it. A deal.

-Deal.

0:44:130:44:18

What about that article you were looking at?

0:44:180:44:20

-Yeah.

-It's really a nice size, it's got everything going for it.

0:44:200:44:24

Have a little look at it again.

0:44:240:44:25

I've looked, I know what it's like,

0:44:250:44:28

-120 for the sampler, £20 for those.

-Yes!

0:44:280:44:31

-Deal.

-OK, James.

-Fantastic.

-Thanks very much.

-OK.

0:44:310:44:34

-Thank you.

-Well done.

0:44:340:44:36

God, what have I done?

0:44:360:44:38

It looks like you've bought some antiques, James.

0:44:380:44:41

Meanwhile, David's thinking outside the box.

0:44:410:44:44

Oh, that's nice.

0:44:440:44:46

This is gorgeous and there's something very...

0:44:460:44:49

-Yeah, you've spotted it.

-Very good. Now, who...

0:44:490:44:51

-Who's coat of arms is that?

-Well, it's the English coat of arms.

0:44:510:44:54

Now, I presume this has been done for a captain or a general,

0:44:540:45:00

or maybe for somebody who's actually taking documents and so on and so forth.

0:45:000:45:06

So, this was once a rather elaborate military writing box from the days of the Raj.

0:45:060:45:11

-Look how exotic that is.

-Oh, it's just fantastic.

0:45:110:45:14

Elephants, we've got temples, we've got Asian animals that you'd never see in this country. That is...

0:45:140:45:20

-Different.

-..gorgeous, but how much is it, George?

0:45:200:45:22

-That's the thing, I've got no money, you KNOW that.

-Yeah.

0:45:220:45:26

Actually, you've got £749.10, David.

0:45:260:45:30

I'll let you have it at...

0:45:300:45:33

140.

0:45:330:45:35

-I tell you what I'll do, I'll spin a coin - if I lose, 100 quid...

-Yeah.

0:45:350:45:40

..if I win, 80 quid.

0:45:400:45:42

-OK.

-Are you up for it?

-Are you ready?

0:45:450:45:47

-OK.

-You call, heads or tails.

-Tails.

0:45:470:45:51

-You win.

-THAT is superb!

0:45:510:45:56

And because of that, I'm going to bid you 40 quid for that. How's that?

0:45:560:45:59

-I'll tell you what I'll do...

-OK.

0:45:590:46:03

-Give me 50 for it.

-I'll tell you what I'll do,

0:46:030:46:05

I'll spin you again, 40 or 50. Come on, George.

0:46:050:46:08

All right, you spin.

0:46:080:46:10

You can't help yourself, can you? OK.

0:46:100:46:12

40 quid - I win, 50 quid - I lose, yeah?

0:46:120:46:15

-All right.

-You call.

-Tails.

0:46:150:46:17

-Tails it is.

-50 quid.

0:46:180:46:20

-One each.

-50 quid.

-Good man.

0:46:200:46:21

Now, that's what I call doing business in the old-fashioned way!

0:46:210:46:26

Time for James and David to show each other what they've bought and say what they think.

0:46:260:46:32

-That's quite swish, isn't it?

-French...

0:46:320:46:35

quite obviously. It's got the glass shades, 25 quid.

0:46:350:46:38

That's a double your money.

0:46:380:46:39

-OK.

-Pass the parcel.

-Oh, James, it's like a birthday present.

0:46:390:46:43

Ashtray, silver...

0:46:430:46:45

-made in Birmingham.

-Yeah.

-What year's that?

-It's about 1930.

0:46:450:46:49

Oh, and a cigar cutter.

0:46:490:46:51

Hmm! Hallmarked as well, Birmingham.

0:46:510:46:54

I love the smell of it.

0:46:540:46:55

-What did you pay for the two?

-£20.

-Oh,

0:46:550:46:58

-absolute bargains. Ouch.

-Yeah. But I'll tell you the bad news.

0:46:580:47:03

-The ladies made me feel a little bit guilty in the shop.

-Why?

0:47:030:47:07

What, NOW you feel guilty?! Well, it's a bit late, James.

0:47:070:47:10

This is what I ended up buying.

0:47:100:47:12

These things can be incredibly good news.

0:47:120:47:15

They can be good, but this has got a few problems with it.

0:47:150:47:19

Well, the first problem - it's not dated.

0:47:190:47:22

Exactly. It cost £120.

0:47:220:47:25

You might have found a real rarity.

0:47:250:47:27

It's like a shoe shop that sells one shoe.

0:47:270:47:30

-It's rare!

-It's that sort of rarity!

0:47:300:47:33

Now this, I HOPE you're going to like.

0:47:330:47:35

Oh, I do! With the naval connection. It's great, isn't it?

0:47:350:47:39

I think it's very good quality and I think it's unusual.

0:47:390:47:42

-How much?

-50 quid.

0:47:420:47:44

-That's OK, I think.

-That's not the response I was looking for.

0:47:440:47:47

-You remember this?

-Oh, you went back for it?

0:47:470:47:51

Well, well, well! It's James'

0:47:510:47:53

"shall I, shan't I?" tea set from Stoke.

0:47:530:47:55

I guess he shall.

0:47:550:47:57

-What did you get in for in the end?

-145.

0:47:570:47:59

-Well, it's a Birmingham maker again. Date - is it 1910?

-About 1910.

0:47:590:48:03

-Yeah.

-It's a good George III boat shape, isn't it?

-It's a great shape.

0:48:030:48:07

-Yeah.

-Now then, this one.

0:48:070:48:09

-You either love Anglo-Indian stuff or you don't.

-Oh, I love it.

0:48:090:48:13

Personally I absolutely adore it.

0:48:130:48:15

Oh, that's FANTASTIC! This is 1850, isn't it?

0:48:150:48:18

It sends shivers up my spine.

0:48:180:48:19

-I love it. What did you pay?

-80 quid.

-That HAS to be a profit.

0:48:190:48:23

-I love it.

-Do you think so?

-I love it. But, there, James Orrock.

0:48:230:48:26

Is it a local scene?

0:48:260:48:28

-Well, if you turn it over.

-Newtown Linford, Leicestershire.

0:48:280:48:32

-Where's the auction room?

-Leicestershire... Oh, you clever boy.

0:48:320:48:35

-You clever boy!

-90 quid.

-90 quid.

0:48:350:48:38

It's not a bad buy, is it?

0:48:380:48:40

Now, feel free to say what you REALLY think.

0:48:400:48:44

The thing that I love about David's purchase strategy is he always tries

0:48:440:48:48

to buy something different, and whatever he buys always causes some sort of emotion.

0:48:480:48:53

His best buy has got to be the watercolour.

0:48:530:48:55

He's clever - he's bought a local scene, a well-known artist,

0:48:550:48:58

an RA artist - Royal Academy. So, you know,

0:48:580:49:01

that could be, for me, the big killer.

0:49:010:49:03

That box. Oh! From everything about it.

0:49:030:49:06

You know, if he doesn't get double money on that, there's an injustice in the world.

0:49:060:49:11

The road trip has taken the pretty route from Nantwich

0:49:120:49:16

through lovely Derbyshire.

0:49:160:49:18

At last it's auction day

0:49:180:49:19

and our two experts arrive in Market Harborough, Leicestershire.

0:49:190:49:24

Gilding's Auctioneers have regular sales in fine art,

0:49:270:49:31

collectables and Victoriana,

0:49:310:49:33

but on this day it's the general sale, so anything goes.

0:49:330:49:37

Hello!

0:49:370:49:38

Father and son team, John and Mark Gilding, are today's auctioneers.

0:49:380:49:43

Mark likes the look of David's writing box.

0:49:430:49:46

Interesting carved decoration and, if people actually like it

0:49:460:49:51

and really take to it, it could fetch a few hundred.

0:49:510:49:54

And how about James' sampler?

0:49:540:49:57

It's wool work as opposed to silk work and I couldn't actually spot a date on it, but we've had a lot

0:49:570:50:03

of presale interest and that one should sell really quite well.

0:50:030:50:06

Starting this leg with £756.49,

0:50:060:50:10

James impressed us all with a confident spend of £375.

0:50:100:50:16

David, meanwhile, started with £774.10

0:50:160:50:20

and stuck to his thrifty guns, spending just £155.

0:50:200:50:26

-Tails.

-You win.

0:50:260:50:29

Our auction gladiators have entered the arena. The crowd falls silent,

0:50:290:50:34

the weight of expectation hangs ominously in the air.

0:50:340:50:39

First up is James' silver smoking set.

0:50:390:50:41

Will there be a smouldering desire

0:50:410:50:43

for these fine items in Market Harborough?

0:50:430:50:46

30 I'm bid, then. 30 with me here.

0:50:460:50:48

At 30. Are you all out? So they will sell here at £30.

0:50:480:50:50

At 30, 5. 40, 5.

0:50:500:50:52

50.

0:50:520:50:54

And selling away now at £50.

0:50:540:50:57

A profit to start James off.

0:50:570:51:00

-Better than what we though.

-Yeah.

-Well done.

0:51:000:51:03

Now, can David set the room on fire with his Anglo-Indian box?

0:51:040:51:08

I've got £100 to start the bidding.

0:51:080:51:10

Thank you. £100, I'm bid.

0:51:100:51:11

£100, I'm bid. At 110. Bid 110.

0:51:110:51:14

-120. Bid 120?

-It's great!

-At £120.

0:51:140:51:16

At 130. I'm bid 130.

0:51:160:51:17

130, 140. 140, 150. 150, 160.

0:51:170:51:20

-Come on. Yes!

-In the middle at 160.

0:51:200:51:23

There's two of you out. At £160, I'm bid 160. Do I see 70 anywhere?

0:51:230:51:27

Go on! No!

0:51:270:51:29

In the middle and going at £160.

0:51:290:51:32

-That's good, you doubled your money!

-Get in there!

0:51:320:51:35

James' remaining items will need to fly to catch up with David.

0:51:350:51:39

James' watercolour sketch is next.

0:51:390:51:42

Bidding £40 with me.

0:51:420:51:44

5. 50, 5.

0:51:440:51:46

60, 5. 70, 5. 80, 5.

0:51:460:51:49

-90, 5. I'll take your 100.

-And 10.

0:51:490:51:53

110. You're out and you're out.

0:51:530:51:55

It's 110, 120. He's back in at 120.

0:51:550:51:57

130, 140. 140 bid.

0:51:570:51:59

Internet, it's yours at 150.

0:51:590:52:01

It's selling away at £150.

0:52:010:52:05

Local knowledge paid off well for James.

0:52:050:52:07

Now it's his mystery school needlework piece.

0:52:070:52:12

Lots of interest here on the book. 50, 100. £150 bid?

0:52:120:52:16

160, 180.

0:52:160:52:18

-200.

-200. 20?

-No, sir.

0:52:180:52:21

220 bid? You're all still out at 220? I'll take 40.

0:52:210:52:24

220 bid and we'll sell. 240, 260.

0:52:240:52:28

£260. I'll wait all day if you like.

0:52:280:52:30

At 260 here and selling away now at £260.

0:52:300:52:35

-You are terrible. Well done.

-Thank you.

0:52:350:52:37

James seems to have hit the nail on the head with his items on this leg.

0:52:370:52:41

However, here comes David's bargain maritime candlestick.

0:52:410:52:46

£40 bid, then. On commission at £40. £40, I'm bid. 40.

0:52:460:52:48

£40 is a loss! Don't you dare.

0:52:480:52:51

You're all out in the room. Sold...

0:52:510:52:53

-That's bad.

-At £40.

-Ow!

0:52:530:52:56

That's a BAD result at a very bad time for David.

0:52:560:52:59

His lead is slipping fast.

0:52:590:53:01

And now James' tea set.

0:53:010:53:03

Could this be adding insult to injury?

0:53:030:53:06

-You need... Anything over 180, you've been more than tickled.

-Yes.

0:53:060:53:10

And that's what you want...

0:53:100:53:12

I want a REALLY good massage!

0:53:120:53:15

All these bids - 160, 170, 180, 190.

0:53:150:53:19

-£200, I'm bid?

-You're in.

0:53:190:53:21

220, 240 now. 260 on the front.

0:53:210:53:23

At 260. 260 and selling.

0:53:230:53:25

She's keen, isn't she?

0:53:250:53:27

Well done.

0:53:270:53:28

It's all on David's chandelier now.

0:53:280:53:32

I need that chandelier to sell for £230 to beat you.

0:53:320:53:37

If it sells for less, you've beaten me.

0:53:370:53:39

So this is terribly exciting and I'm either going to be jumping for joy

0:53:390:53:44

or devastated in about 30 seconds.

0:53:440:53:46

On commission at £60 only.

0:53:460:53:48

-60?

-Yeah. Straight in, doubled your money.

0:53:480:53:51

80, 5. At 85. 90. £90.

0:53:510:53:53

I need £230.

0:53:530:53:55

£90. You're sure? Finished and away

0:53:550:53:57

at 95 on the net. At 95.

0:53:570:54:00

95. 100 in the room. £100, I'm bid.

0:54:000:54:03

-Come on! Come on!

-120, 120 bid.

0:54:030:54:06

120. 120. You're out on the net.

0:54:060:54:08

-(Come on.)

-At £120.

-(Come on!)

-All done?

0:54:080:54:10

-(No!)

-Quite sure? Finished and away then at £120. Sold.

0:54:100:54:15

Oh!

0:54:150:54:17

-(£110 down!)

-Well done, you.

0:54:190:54:22

Thanks, James. Fabulous.

0:54:220:54:24

-Five sales.

-God!

0:54:240:54:26

Five sales. That was great fun.

0:54:260:54:28

Right down to the last lot!

0:54:280:54:31

I'll take 5.

0:54:310:54:33

David started this leg with £774.10

0:54:340:54:38

and made a good profit after commission of £106.12.

0:54:380:54:43

David finishes his road trip with £880.22.

0:54:430:54:49

Five!

0:54:490:54:51

James started today's show with £756.49

0:54:510:54:56

and made an intimidating profit of £212.53.

0:54:560:55:01

James WINS this road trip

0:55:010:55:05

with an amazing £969.02. Congratulations.

0:55:050:55:09

Come on.

0:55:090:55:11

So, at the end of an exciting trip, James and David have literally soared ahead,

0:55:110:55:18

pushing Anita Manning and David Barby into third and fourth place.

0:55:180:55:22

Our new leader is James Lewis with a tough total to beat.

0:55:220:55:27

-Almost two grand between us.

-It's not bad.

0:55:270:55:30

It's not bad. Pockets full of cash! I love it, don't you?

0:55:300:55:33

MUSIC: Money (That's What I Want) by Barrett Strong

0:55:330:55:36

Brilliant!

0:55:400:55:41

From the beginning of the week, it's been a clash of the titans with James and David.

0:55:410:55:46

The pirate from Yorkshire, that's what we call him.

0:55:460:55:49

I love him, but I want to beat him!

0:55:490:55:51

They've enjoyed each other's company and tried, so hard, to enjoy each other's achievements.

0:55:510:55:57

Oh, really well done, James.

0:55:570:55:59

And they'll miss each other's kind, encouraging words.

0:55:590:56:03

-I don't like it.

-You love it.

0:56:030:56:04

-I don't like it.

-You don't?

-I don't like.

-You adore it.

0:56:040:56:08

James and David will use their profits to buy one big show-stopping item

0:56:080:56:13

for the grand finale auction in London with all eight Antiques Road Trip experts.

0:56:130:56:21

In the next programme, we meet our third pair of antiques experts, Philip Serrell...

0:56:210:56:25

There's only one idiot in the world going to deal with you on that

0:56:250:56:29

and he has just walked in.

0:56:290:56:31

..and Charles Hanson.

0:56:310:56:32

-Sold.

-Really?

0:56:320:56:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd?

0:56:420:56:45

Antiques experts James Lewis and David Harper travel from Liverpool to Market Harborough. James and David are both swimming in money and reluctant to part with it, but will James's local knowledge be enough to steal a win or is David too far ahead?


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