Episode 11 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 11

Antiques challenge. Charles Hanson takes on Mark Stacey. Their first stretch starts in Cawthorne in South Yorkshire and finishes at auction in Lincoln.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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What about that?

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With £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Can I buy everything here?

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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Feeling a little saw.

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This is going to be an epic battle.

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There'll be worthy winners

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and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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-The honeymoon is over.

-I'm sorry.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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What could be better

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than the start of a super-duper new road trip

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with a brand-new pairing?

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# It's raining men.

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-# Hallelujah

-# Hallelujah

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-# It's raining men

-# It's raining men

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# Amen! #

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Auctioneer Charles Hanson

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specialises in glass and ceramics,

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and when he spots something he likes,

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he's willing to beg to get it.

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Charles, how can I refuse you when you do that?

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With 25 years in the trade, auctioneer Mark Stacey

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will fight to the finish

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to get his hands on a good deal.

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Here we go.

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This is going to be an epic battle.

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The chaps each have £200

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to lavish as they please.

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Mark's first to captain

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the 1958 Austin Nash Metropolitan.

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It's seatbelt-free.

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Perfectly legal for a classic car

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which predates the law.

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The fact that Mark can't find the indicators

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is slightly more of an issue.

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That's right, that way.

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Yeah, not my side, Charles.

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-Do your side.

-Sorry.

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# We'll be coming round the corner

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# Coming round the corner. #

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Well, I'm going round the bend, Charles.

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With this car.

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Certainly are. Charles' singing

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probably isn't helping either.

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Our two experts have

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a gigantic jaunt to complete -

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from Yorkshire to Nottinghamshire,

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Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire,

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Leicestershire, Buckinghamshire,

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Herefordshire, the West Midlands,

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Hampshire, Warwickshire, Coventry,

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Gloucestershire, Shropshire, Staffordshire

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and ending at Flintshire, in Wales.

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Good Lord.

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The first stretch starts in Cawthorne,

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in South Yorkshire,

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and finishes at auction in Lincoln.

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The rural parish of Cawthorne

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lies just a few miles west of Barnsley.

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But to get here, they must first overcome

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one little obstacle - the Metropolitan.

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Do you know where the indicators are?

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Yes, left here.

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No, that's the gear stick, Charles.

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Sorry. Sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry.

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Sorry, sorry, sorry.

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Hoping they survive the journey,

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what's the plan?

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I think what we ought to do is put the A

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in Antique Road Trip.

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And let's go...let's go for

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objects over that period of being 100 years old.

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-Don't you agree?

-Really?

-Yeah.

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Well, I think we can try, but I think it's about

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what you see in the shops, Charles, isn't it?

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Quite right, Mark.

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So, let's see what you can find.

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First on the agenda

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is an antiques and collectors centre

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in Cawthorne.

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Enjoy yourself, OK? Never not believe.

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Charles, your pearls of wisdom are...

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-valueless.

-Thank you.

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With over 100 cabinets and booths,

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there should be something to tickle

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the twosome's fancy. Two of the dealers,

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Holly Dawson and Karen Rowe,

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are all set to help them part with their cash.

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-Hello.

-Morning.

-I'm Mark.

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Lovely to meet you, Mark.

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-Hello, I'm Karen.

-Karen.

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-Holly.

-And I can see you're Holly.

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Hi, Holly. Charles, nice to meet you.

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-Hi, Karen, good to see you.

-Hi, Charles.

-What a fine day, isn't it?

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-Lovely shop. Our first shop of this road trip, Charles.

-Yeah.

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I think you should go that way

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cos I've seen something in the window already

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-that I want to have a talk about.

-Are you being serious?

-Yes.

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-Already?

-Already. Oh, I'm on fire, Charles.

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It seems Mr Stacey's

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off to a flying start.

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What I just spotted in the window

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it's a sort of turquoise,

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glazed teapot stand.

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But it's commemorating, I think,

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the coronation of Edward the...

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VII, isn't it?

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And that's rather nice. Minton & Hollins.

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Patent tile works.

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Stoke-on-Trent.

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Minton, one of our oldest

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porcelain manufacturers, isn't it?

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It is, yes.

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Goes back to the 1790s, I think.

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Um, they also specialised,

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from the mid-19th century onwards, in tile making.

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But they've turned something here

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into a teapot, so I like that.

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Could you do a little something on it?

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-I could do ten on that for you.

-Ten?

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Strong start from Mark.

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First item in the bag with a five-pound discount.

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He's already negotiating.

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We've been here literally one minute.

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-Karen, I'll take it.

-Wonderful.

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Thank you.

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I think this is charming for ten quid.

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There are collectors there, but

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-there's also people who collect...

-Take your time, Mark.

-I will,

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-thanks, Charles.

-Don't rush into things.

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Could you stop heckling, Charles?

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-I'm in the middle of a major purchase here.

-Take your time.

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There we are, ten pound down.

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Meanwhile, Charles is taking his time.

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I find it also quite easy

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pointing at objects.

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Because the more you point, the more you don't miss.

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So I always, um...

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He really is one of a kind, isn't he?

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Now, will Mark add to his first purchase?

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He's enlisting the help of dealer Pauline Smith,

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the owner of this hefty lump.

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-I've spotted something in your window.

-Right.

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-Pauline.

-OK.

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I love that meat cleaver.

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The meat cleaver, that is really nice,

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-yes, it is.

-Don't talk it up, dear.

-That meat cleaver...

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-Don't talk it up.

-..is very good.

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Here we go.

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This is going to be an epic battle.

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-I want to be cheeky with you.

-Right.

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I want to pay you £20 for it.

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What about...25?

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What about 20?

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-And then I promise I'll go away. Forever.

-Oh, go on, then.

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-Are you sure you're happy though?

-£20 and it's yours.

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That's £20 for the late-19th-century meat cleaver.

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A bit of a gamble seeing as he

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hasn't even had a proper look yet.

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Oh, it is a weight.

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But I love these.

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Yes, that's lovely on it, isn't it?

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-It's very...

-Warranted Superior.

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..interested, isn't it?

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They are, they are really getting

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very collectable.

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Well, I think that's great.

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So, Mark seals the deals on his two antiques -

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a Minton teapot stand at ten pounds

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and a 19th-century meat cleaver for £20.

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Meanwhile, Charles has taken a shine

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to a pair of pooches outside.

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What you don't want to do is buy reproduction.

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But then sometimes,

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when you perhaps have two dogs

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to perhaps

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come to auction with you,

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they could do quite well.

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Large sitting dog.

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£79.

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Another one. £79.

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They haven't really weathered very much, they have a good...

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Good sort of Cotswolds colour about them. They're quite nice.

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I might find out what the best price is.

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I'm not sure those dogs are over 100 years old,

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but Charles is like a dog with a bone

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when he sees something he wants.

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There's two nice dogs over here.

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What would the best price be?

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-What about 100?

-Oh, you can't say that.

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That's, that's too near

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a good price for me because, again,

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from 158 down to £100,

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that's really very tempting. They are decorative, they...

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are not very old.

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80?

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What about 90?

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Really, Charles, behave yourself, boy.

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Charles, how can I refuse you when you do that?

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Here's my paw.

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-Yeah, I'll take them. Thanks a lot.

-Lovely.

-£80.

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Charles is off the mark with a pair of golden Labrador ornaments.

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Not exactly putting the A in antique like the plan,

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but let's let sleeping dogs lie, eh?

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Sit.

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Sit, stay where you are. CHARLES WHISTLES

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Doesn't move either, just stays where they are.

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Good doggies. Good dogs.

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Huh, barking.

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Come on, Charles,

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it's time to get back on the road.

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ENGINE FAILS TO START

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Car permitting, that is.

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-I don't think that helps, you know, Charles?

-No.

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It's not going very well this, is it?

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ENGINE REVS Oh, that's better.

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MARK LAUGHS

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Next stop is still in South Yorkshire,

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just 16 miles south of Rotherham.

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Charles is here to meet Philip Turnor,

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of the eponymously named

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Philip Turnor Antiques.

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-Hi.

-Hello, Charles.

-How are you? Charles.

-Nice to see you.

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-How are you doing?

-Very good, how are you?

-Good to see you.

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-Very well thanks. Yeah, not too bad.

-Good.

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Philip's been running the business

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in this former Sunday school chapel

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for 34 years.

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He mainly specialises in furniture.

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But there's always something a bit unusual

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if you look hard enough.

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Just get this out.

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The ball and chain device

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was used to physically restrain

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prisoners from the 17th century

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right up until the 20th century.

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And were usually made from iron.

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So, Phil, how old is this?

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I would think it's probably a Victorian one.

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Maybe about 1860 to 1880.

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Well, so, essentially, if you were,

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I suppose a prisoner, back in the Victorian times,

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this would go around your wrist

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or around your ankle.

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You just wonder what stories...

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-Oh, yeah.

-..it could tell of those poor people

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who it kept within one place.

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-If you're looking for something maybe a bit different.

-Yeah.

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I could even put this round Mark Stacey's leg, couldn't I?

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-Of course.

-I could do that. How much is it?

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-£50...

-Yeah, that's a good...

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-£40.

-Yeah.

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I mean, that's a solid iron,

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almost as heavy as a cannonball,

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if not heavier.

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You've got this wonderful iron shackle.

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-That's quite good.

-Hm.

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-And it is old as well.

-It is old.

-It's a good item.

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-I'll mental note it, OK?

-OK.

-Mental note.

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And with that, Charles is off again.

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But with nothing else jumping out at him,

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he soon comes back to the 19th-century shackles.

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-Good weight, isn't it?

-Well, you know, I'm a strong guy.

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-Yeah, yeah.

-I'm from Derby.

-Yeah, of course, yeah.

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-Best price?

-It's £40.

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35, it's a deal.

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-Oh, no. Yeah?

-Shake my hand.

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I feel like I'm shackled now, that's it.

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Thanks, mate, thanks a lot.

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You're chained to it.

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That's £35 for the 19th-century ball and chain

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and Charles's second purchase of the day.

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-See you, Philip.

-OK, thanks a lot.

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-Take care.

-Yeah, you take care as well.

-Bye, Philip, see you.

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Meanwhile, Mark has made his way

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to 2017's Capital Of Culture,

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Hull, in East Yorkshire.

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It was the birthplace of William Wilberforce in 1759,

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an MP and human rights activist,

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who helped pioneer

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the end of slavery.

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Mark is on his way to Wilberforce House,

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to find out more about the man who changed British history.

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I'm feeling quite relaxed, actually. I'm looking forward to my visit.

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I've got two items in the bag, which is always nice.

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From the mid-16th century,

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the British Empire played a major part

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in one of the worst acts

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in human history, the slave trade.

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By the time Wilberforce was born,

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the transportation of slaves

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from Africa to the Americas and Caribbean

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had become highly lucrative.

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Until one man made it his life's work to change all that.

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A lecturer in slavery studies,

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Dr Nick Evans, is here to tell Mark more.

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-Hello, I'm Mark.

-Pleased to meet you, I'm Nick.

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Nice to meet you, Nick.

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Wilberforce was a wealthy merchant's son,

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who made the most of his family's riches during his youth.

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Surely as a young man with all this wealth,

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-it was a very different life, wasn't it?

-Oh, certainly.

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He was a great man of great wealth. In his youth, at Cambridge,

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he had great fun, great party,

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gambling, all the things that men of his class would do.

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After university, Wilberforce found religion

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and abandoned his wild ways.

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He chose a path in politics

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and became a devout

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evangelical Christian.

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With a vehement belief in human rights

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and constantly driven by his strong faith,

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he began a campaign to end

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the transatlantic trade of slaves

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through British ports.

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And here we can see the actual family Bible,

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which the Wilberforces owned.

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A very precious

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artefact from the family.

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This, of course, shows

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the deep-rooted Christianity in the family.

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And by the time he entered Parliament, obviously, this was

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a religious message he wanted to get across

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as much as anything else.

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Yeah, his entire endeavour in Parliament

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was driven by his faith.

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Improving morals, improving wellbeing

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but particularly, eventually,

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and occupying most of his life, abolishing slavery.

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The campaign against the slave trade

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began in the late 1700s

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and faced great opposition

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from the British establishment.

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But a major turning point in the fight came

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when Wilberforce used a visual aid

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in his speeches to parliament -

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a model of a slave ship, known as the Brookes.

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Now, pitted against the abolitionists,

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there must have been a lot of people whose fundamental wealth

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was staked on this barbaric trade.

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What could such a simple object

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do to change their mind?

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It's a powerful image because on this boat,

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there was overcrowding.

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-How many people would have been on those boats?

-600 people.

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-600?

-Each person had

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six foot in length

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and one-foot width wide to actually be on

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-for up to three months...

-MARK GASPS

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-across the Atlantic.

-Oh, my God.

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So it's getting those simple facts across

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in a visual way,

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-which actually helped persuade MPs.

-It's horrendous, isn't it?

-Exactly.

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It's very horrendous,

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and you can see it here.

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Mortality was particularly high,

0:13:550:13:57

-up to one in four people would die...

-Gosh.

0:13:570:14:00

..before they reached the Caribbean, before they reached the Americas

0:14:000:14:03

and a life of enslavement

0:14:030:14:05

-in barbaric heat.

-Good Lord.

0:14:050:14:07

This simple but effective campaign

0:14:100:14:13

drove the message home,

0:14:130:14:15

and in 1807, Parliament voted to end

0:14:150:14:18

the trade of slaves throughout the British Empire.

0:14:180:14:21

But it didn't end slavery here altogether.

0:14:210:14:23

That would take another 26 years.

0:14:230:14:25

Wilberforce continued to fight for the cause

0:14:250:14:28

until his poor health could take it no more.

0:14:280:14:30

So, here we have letters revealing how Wilberforce

0:14:310:14:34

fought against slavery.

0:14:340:14:36

And just three days before he died,

0:14:360:14:38

Britain abolished slavery in the British Empire.

0:14:380:14:41

And then knowing that it had been abolished,

0:14:410:14:43

Wilberforce knew he could then die

0:14:430:14:44

peaceful, knowing his life's work

0:14:440:14:47

had been seen to fruition.

0:14:470:14:49

And this dedication to such a cause

0:14:490:14:51

earned him respect from far and wide.

0:14:510:14:55

One of the most moving, which we've got for you,

0:14:550:14:57

is this one written by his wife, Barbara Spooner,

0:14:570:15:00

just days before his death, describing how there were queues

0:15:000:15:04

of some of the most famous people of the age

0:15:040:15:06

wanting to see Wilberforce,

0:15:060:15:07

even for a few minutes,

0:15:070:15:09

-as he faced...

-Before he died.

-Before he died.

0:15:090:15:11

And she said there's such a long queue,

0:15:110:15:13

it would kill him if he saw everyone.

0:15:130:15:16

But he didn't want to turn people away.

0:15:160:15:18

Great testament to the man, actually, in his resilience.

0:15:180:15:21

Testament to the man

0:15:210:15:22

that decades after he'd begun this work

0:15:220:15:25

he was still fighting for human rights.

0:15:250:15:28

William Wilberforce died in July 1833,

0:15:280:15:31

after seeing Britain

0:15:310:15:32

through the end of its slave trade.

0:15:320:15:36

As one of the first countries to enforce abolition,

0:15:360:15:39

it helped create a domino effect across the world.

0:15:390:15:42

He was honoured with a state funeral at Westminster Abbey,

0:15:420:15:45

a fitting tribute to the remarkable man

0:15:450:15:47

that helped to change Britain for the better.

0:15:470:15:50

Back in Rotherham, Charles has popped next door

0:15:520:15:55

to his last shop, John Shaw Antiques.

0:15:550:15:58

They've been trading here for over 50 years

0:15:580:16:00

and have a huge collection.

0:16:000:16:01

There are some splendid antiques in this emporium.

0:16:030:16:06

Charles is in the very capable hands of Beverley Deakin.

0:16:060:16:10

Hi, Bev.

0:16:100:16:11

-Hi, Bev.

-Hi.

0:16:110:16:12

-What an office you've got here.

-Fantastic.

0:16:120:16:14

-Oh, my God, this is your office?

-Yeah.

0:16:140:16:16

And tell me, what I can see in here, are most things for sale?

0:16:160:16:18

-Yes.

-Wow.

0:16:180:16:20

Beverley, how much are these? These interesting carved dragon ornaments.

0:16:200:16:24

E261.

0:16:240:16:26

-I'll have a look for you.

-They're quite fun.

0:16:280:16:29

Well, the dragons would fit right in

0:16:290:16:32

with Charles' random purchases thus far.

0:16:320:16:34

They're priced at £70 for the pair,

0:16:340:16:36

but, if they're antique,

0:16:360:16:37

it would be by the skin of their teeth.

0:16:370:16:40

I love this green, scaly design, all probably hand-carved

0:16:400:16:43

and it's, I'm sure, a Chinese dragon.

0:16:430:16:46

This one here...

0:16:460:16:47

Sadly, you'll see his arm has split just here.

0:16:490:16:53

Is that the very best price, would you say, Bev?

0:16:530:16:55

60...

0:16:560:16:58

-Oh, crikey...

-..would be the best.

0:16:580:16:59

Crikey, let me keep looking.

0:16:590:17:01

And in this jam-packed office, there's plenty to pick from.

0:17:010:17:05

It's amazing, these are all horn-handled.

0:17:050:17:08

And if you were, maybe, a lady or gent back in the 18th century,

0:17:080:17:12

you may have served a punch,

0:17:120:17:13

which you would have served to your guests

0:17:130:17:15

using these punch ladles.

0:17:150:17:18

165.

0:17:180:17:19

We couldn't go down to 80, could we?

0:17:190:17:21

-For all five?

-I can ring the boss.

0:17:210:17:23

Yeah, yeah. I think he'll say no.

0:17:230:17:25

You can him a go, yeah, give him a call.

0:17:250:17:28

The recipe for punch was brought over from India

0:17:280:17:31

and became extremely popular in the 18th century.

0:17:310:17:33

Made from alcohol, sugar, fruit, water and spices,

0:17:330:17:36

it was served from a large communal bowl

0:17:360:17:39

with ladles like these.

0:17:390:17:40

-140.

-Oh, no.

0:17:430:17:46

-We couldn't twist his arm and go 80?

-No, I've tried.

-No, fine.

0:17:460:17:49

Thank you so much, Bev.

0:17:490:17:51

Back to the drawing board, or should I say, dragons.

0:17:510:17:54

If I said to you, "What's the very best on these dragons?"

0:17:540:17:57

-60.

-60.

0:17:570:17:58

-Do you want to take 40 for them?

-I wouldn't, I'm sorry, I can't.

0:17:580:18:01

-Would you meet me halfway?

-I will ask my boss.

0:18:010:18:05

-60.

-Will he take 50 for them?

0:18:050:18:07

"Would you take 50?" he's asking.

0:18:070:18:09

-60.

-What's his name?

-John.

-I'll have a word with him.

0:18:110:18:13

John, it's Charles Hanson.

0:18:150:18:17

I just wondered, to be cheeky, would you take 50 for them?

0:18:170:18:20

55?

0:18:210:18:22

Yeah, he'll do it, 55.

0:18:240:18:26

I'll pass you back to Bev. Thanks, John.

0:18:260:18:28

Again, not sticking to the plan,

0:18:280:18:31

but Charles's third purchase of the day

0:18:310:18:33

is a pair of dragons for £55.

0:18:330:18:35

Thanks a lot, give us a kiss, bye.

0:18:350:18:37

-That was really kind. Cheers. Thanks, Bev.

-Thank you.

0:18:370:18:39

-Thanks for your time. Bye.

-Bye.

0:18:390:18:41

With just £30 left, Charles is done

0:18:430:18:45

after shopping big and bold on day one.

0:18:450:18:48

The chaps are finished for the day

0:18:480:18:50

and all that's left to say is, "Night, night."

0:18:500:18:53

But, the next morning soon arrives

0:18:550:18:56

and Charles has taken over the wheel of

0:18:560:18:58

the 1958 Austin Nash Metropolitan,

0:18:580:19:02

much to Mark's fear.

0:19:020:19:03

# Riding along in my automobile. #

0:19:050:19:07

Charles, your driving is atrocious.

0:19:070:19:10

# My baby beside me at the wheel. #

0:19:100:19:12

The fellas covered three shops between them yesterday.

0:19:120:19:15

Mark picked up a Minton teapot stand

0:19:150:19:17

and a 19th-century meat cleaver for £30,

0:19:170:19:20

leaving him with £170 to do with as he pleases today.

0:19:200:19:26

Charles came away with a pair of stone Labradors,

0:19:260:19:29

a pair of hand-carved dragons

0:19:290:19:30

and a Victorian prisoner's ball and chain, as you do.

0:19:300:19:33

He spent a grand total of £170, giving him £30 still to play with.

0:19:330:19:38

Charles! How did you get on with...

0:19:390:19:43

..capital 'A' for antiques and qualities.

0:19:440:19:47

I put one A in antique on one item only.

0:19:470:19:50

-Charles, I'm disappointed.

-Sorry.

0:19:500:19:52

It was beginner's nerves.

0:19:520:19:54

Excuses, excuses, eh?

0:19:540:19:56

The chaps have already made some progress on their trip

0:19:560:19:59

after beginning in Cawthorne, in South Yorkshire,

0:19:590:20:02

they're now edging towards the town of Gainsborough, in Lincolnshire.

0:20:020:20:05

Charles, I'm so excited today.

0:20:070:20:09

I've got my two shops in Gainsborough...

0:20:090:20:11

..so I'm shopping all day,

0:20:120:20:14

and I've got loads and loads of money in my pocket.

0:20:140:20:17

Rub it in, why don't you?

0:20:170:20:19

In the heart of the town is Pilgrims Antique Centre,

0:20:190:20:23

run by Michael Wallis for over 28 years,

0:20:230:20:26

and proud of it.

0:20:260:20:27

Good morning, Mark.

0:20:270:20:28

-Hello, how are you?

-Nice to meet you.

0:20:280:20:31

-What's your name?

-Michael.

-Michael. Nice to meet you, Michael.

0:20:310:20:34

Now, this looks interesting. It looks very small from the outside.

0:20:340:20:37

Oh, it's deceptive. Bit like a TARDIS.

0:20:370:20:39

It's like a TARDIS, I like that.

0:20:390:20:42

With £170 in his pocket, let's hope this TARDIS

0:20:420:20:45

has something out of this world for Mark.

0:20:450:20:48

And like yesterday, Mike heads outside

0:20:480:20:50

to make sure he's not missing any gems.

0:20:500:20:52

There's so much choice in this window.

0:20:540:20:55

I feel like a kid in a sweet shop.

0:20:550:20:57

There's a rather pretty little Art Nouveau brooch.

0:20:570:21:00

Very much in that sort of German Jugendstil style.

0:21:000:21:04

It's quite stylish.

0:21:040:21:05

Let's go and find out what that is. It might be a buy.

0:21:050:21:08

The Art Nouveau movement took inspiration from the natural world

0:21:110:21:14

from the 1880s up to the First World War.

0:21:140:21:17

Jugendstil is an artistic style from Germany

0:21:170:21:20

which featured in many Art Nouveau designs.

0:21:200:21:24

I rather like that little Art Nouveau brooch.

0:21:240:21:26

Could I have a look at it? The little...

0:21:260:21:28

-Is it the opal and ruby one?

-Yes, the one...

0:21:280:21:30

Oh, he knows there's opal and rubies,

0:21:300:21:32

so that's not a good sign.

0:21:320:21:34

-Yes, that one.

-I also know it's Jugendstil.

-Oh!

0:21:340:21:38

Right, I'll just go home now, I think.

0:21:380:21:41

But, it is rather sweet, isn't it?

0:21:410:21:43

Now, unfortunately, I can't see a price on this.

0:21:430:21:46

No, no...

0:21:460:21:48

-I can tell you it.

-Erm, I'm...

0:21:480:21:50

Do I need to sit down?

0:21:500:21:52

-It's 75.

-Could I possibly buy that for £50?

0:21:520:21:55

I wouldn't say 50, no.

0:21:570:21:59

-60, I would say.

-Oh, I would like to buy it, Michael.

0:22:000:22:03

Well, I'll try and help you,

0:22:030:22:04

but just this once, just this once.

0:22:040:22:07

-55.

-I'm going to buy it. £55.

0:22:080:22:10

-You'll do well, I'm sure.

-Thank you so much. I don't mind,

0:22:100:22:13

I thought it was a charming object.

0:22:130:22:15

That's is a generous £20 off the Art Nouveau brooch.

0:22:150:22:18

I'm actually quite pleased with that.

0:22:180:22:20

-And there's your change.

-Thank you very much, Michael.

0:22:200:22:23

-You're welcome.

-Thank you so much.

-Good luck.

0:22:230:22:25

Meanwhile, Charles has taken the Metropolitan

0:22:280:22:30

for a spin south to Nottingham.

0:22:300:22:32

I've had a good first shop.

0:22:330:22:35

I've always kind of concerned,

0:22:350:22:36

and it's always been the same in the past,

0:22:360:22:38

that the first day in the first week of the first shopping

0:22:380:22:41

is always the hardest.

0:22:410:22:43

Well, with that out of the way, hopefully, he can relax today.

0:22:440:22:48

This morning, he's hitting Antiques And Collector's Corner

0:22:480:22:51

and is meeting Andrew Moss.

0:22:510:22:52

-Hello. How are you?

-All right, are you?

0:22:540:22:56

Nice to see you.

0:22:560:22:57

As Charles splashed the cash yesterday,

0:22:590:23:02

he's now on it bit of a budget,

0:23:020:23:04

so whatever catches his eye will have to be around £30.

0:23:040:23:07

Andy, this glassware here.

0:23:080:23:10

Is it old?

0:23:100:23:11

Yes. If you look, it's got a tinge of yellow in it.

0:23:110:23:15

How much is that, Andy?

0:23:150:23:16

To you, Charles...

0:23:180:23:20

-..140.

-Oh, what a shame.

0:23:210:23:23

What would you date this glass to?

0:23:230:23:26

I still think it's about 1800s.

0:23:260:23:29

-Do you?

-Yeah.

-And why's that?

0:23:290:23:31

Just the pattern of it, the style of it.

0:23:320:23:36

What's your best on that?

0:23:360:23:38

£100.

0:23:380:23:40

I like it...

0:23:400:23:41

..but I can't afford it.

0:23:420:23:44

But Charles has had an idea.

0:23:450:23:47

He wants to try and exchange his prisoner's ball and chain,

0:23:470:23:50

which he bought for £35,

0:23:500:23:52

plus his remaining £30 cash

0:23:520:23:54

for one Georgian wine glass.

0:23:540:23:56

Good luck with that, boy.

0:23:560:23:58

This is a ball and chain,

0:23:580:24:00

certainly mid-19th century, could be earlier.

0:24:000:24:03

It's novel and I suppose a ball and chain today...

0:24:030:24:06

Would it have any resonance in your shop,

0:24:060:24:08

would it have any real potential...?

0:24:080:24:09

It would do at the right price, Charles.

0:24:090:24:12

What is this worth to you?

0:24:120:24:13

I want £50 cash off you and that.

0:24:130:24:16

-Oh, dear.

-So I've got a chance.

0:24:160:24:17

Hand on heart,

0:24:170:24:19

what I've got in my kitty

0:24:190:24:21

-is £30.

-Not interested.

0:24:210:24:24

Thanks for trying. If we don't ask, we never know.

0:24:240:24:27

Huh, definitely worth a try, Charles,

0:24:270:24:29

but you'll just have to make do with your lot.

0:24:290:24:32

Back in Gainsborough, Mark has found his way to his final shop,

0:24:340:24:38

Astra Antiques, run by Barry Aucott.

0:24:380:24:42

-Hello, Barry, is it?

-It is. Are you Mark?

-I am.

0:24:420:24:45

Point me in the way of the bargains.

0:24:450:24:47

Head through and then left for cabinets and small stuff, mainly.

0:24:470:24:52

-Right, lovely.

-All right?

-Thanks, Barry. See you later.

0:24:520:24:55

The centre is home to over 170 dealers

0:24:570:25:00

displaying over 50,000 antiques.

0:25:000:25:02

It's one of the largest antique centres in Europe.

0:25:020:25:05

So, get stuck in, Mark.

0:25:050:25:08

Now, I spotted something here, which is a little horn beaker.

0:25:080:25:12

And it's got on there, I think,

0:25:120:25:14

PT 1858 JM.

0:25:140:25:16

Now, that could be...

0:25:180:25:19

..a marriage beaker.

0:25:200:25:22

So, PT could've married JM in 1858

0:25:220:25:25

and it's maybe the house they lived in.

0:25:250:25:27

But it's actually got quite a lovely feel about it.

0:25:290:25:31

And we are sticking with our capital A for Antiques.

0:25:310:25:36

Now, it's priced up at £88,

0:25:360:25:38

but I do rather like it.

0:25:380:25:40

As Mark's got £115 still to spend,

0:25:410:25:44

is there something else to go with the horn beaker?

0:25:440:25:47

It's quite an interesting object. It's...white metal,

0:25:480:25:52

or Indian silver.

0:25:520:25:53

The interesting bit is it's a double jug,

0:25:530:25:57

or a double measure,

0:25:570:25:58

cos when you look at the top, you've got a little lip

0:25:580:26:01

and on the bottom, you've also got a little lip.

0:26:010:26:04

In terms of the date, I think this fits very well

0:26:040:26:07

into the Raj period,

0:26:070:26:09

which is going to be around about 1880.

0:26:090:26:13

So, it's back to Barry to try and do a deal

0:26:130:26:15

on both the horn beaker and the jug.

0:26:150:26:17

I've got left £115.

0:26:170:26:20

Is there any chance we could persuade them to do that?

0:26:200:26:23

It's a big ask, I know, but...

0:26:230:26:25

That one I know I get down, cos that's mine.

0:26:250:26:28

-Pushing it, 100.

-Yeah.

0:26:280:26:30

That one, one of the of the dealers,

0:26:300:26:32

I would say standard trade...80.

0:26:320:26:36

Probably get a value of about 70.

0:26:360:26:38

-Yes, so, we're way off really, aren't we?

-Yeah.

0:26:380:26:41

-Which is fair enough, I thought it was a big ask to be honest.

-Yeah.

0:26:410:26:44

-Let me have a think, Barry.

-No problem at all.

0:26:440:26:46

-I will have one of them, I promise you.

-Yep, no problem.

0:26:460:26:48

While Mark ponders his problem,

0:26:480:26:50

back in Nottingham,

0:26:500:26:51

Charles is on a mission, headed for the city centre.

0:26:510:26:54

HE WHISTLES I'm looking for a man in green.

0:26:540:26:57

And not just any old man,

0:27:000:27:02

Nottingham's most famous and best-loved character, Robin Hood,

0:27:020:27:06

who's been kept alive through popular culture for 800 years.

0:27:060:27:10

Nine years ago, Nottingham declared Tim Pollard

0:27:100:27:13

as their official Robin Hood.

0:27:130:27:15

His duties include touring Nottingham Castle

0:27:150:27:18

and promoting tourism.

0:27:180:27:19

Charles is meeting him at the castle

0:27:190:27:22

to find out the truth behind the legend.

0:27:220:27:24

It must be!

0:27:240:27:25

-Good afternoon, sir.

-Robin Hood?

-Robin Hood, indeed.

0:27:250:27:28

-Charles Hanson.

-Very pleased to meet you.

-Good to see you.

0:27:280:27:31

As the home of his mortal enemy, the Sheriff of Nottingham,

0:27:310:27:34

Nottingham Castle plays a key role

0:27:340:27:36

in the story of this world-famous hero.

0:27:360:27:39

The original 11th-century fortress

0:27:390:27:42

was rebuilt after the English Civil War,

0:27:420:27:44

but there are still some parts which Robin Hood could have known

0:27:440:27:47

all too well in the 12th century.

0:27:470:27:49

In the castle, I can see, you've got two very differentials.

0:27:500:27:54

You've got a very early wall, haven't you?

0:27:540:27:56

The bottom part that you can see there

0:27:560:27:58

is part of the earliest stone build.

0:27:580:28:01

The later portions you can see going up

0:28:010:28:03

are part of an Edwardian rebuild.

0:28:030:28:06

The original castle would have gone up an extra storey in the gatehouse.

0:28:060:28:09

-And where's it gone?

-At the end of the English Civil War,

0:28:090:28:11

it was decided the castle had been so pivotal in that conflict,

0:28:110:28:14

it should be dismantled,

0:28:140:28:15

so almost every single stone is now in the foundations of

0:28:150:28:18

-the buildings we can see around us.

-It was magnificent.

0:28:180:28:21

But importantly, Robin,

0:28:210:28:22

Robin Hood, the real Robin Hood of yesterday,

0:28:220:28:25

could have touched those walls at that foundation level.

0:28:250:28:28

-Could have scaled those walls, yes.

-Wow, amazing.

0:28:280:28:31

And scaling he may well have done.

0:28:310:28:34

The legend of the heroic outlaw

0:28:340:28:36

sees him robbing from the rich to give to the poor,

0:28:360:28:39

so Robin's visits to the castle

0:28:390:28:41

would either have been uninvited

0:28:410:28:43

or he would have been heading for the dungeons.

0:28:430:28:45

What's the actual association Robin had with the castle and why?

0:28:450:28:49

Obviously, it was the home of the Sheriff of Nottingham

0:28:490:28:51

and, therefore, of course, with Sherwood Forest coming

0:28:510:28:54

very, very close to the edge of the castle itself,

0:28:540:28:57

it would be very easy for Robin Hood to come in here

0:28:570:29:00

and attempt to sneak in and steal the Sheriff's treasure.

0:29:000:29:04

So, it was almost the Sheriff in there, in that castle,

0:29:040:29:07

-against you...

-In Sherwood Forest.

-..Robin Hood...

-Absolutely.

0:29:070:29:10

..who was looking after the poorer class of society.

0:29:100:29:14

Robin Hood's main hang-out was said to be nearby Sherwood Forest.

0:29:140:29:18

It would have been much more of an open space than it is now,

0:29:180:29:22

stretching from just outside the castle's walls,

0:29:220:29:25

across Nottinghamshire, all the way up to Yorkshire,

0:29:250:29:28

providing Robin and his Merry Men with a vast area to hide out,

0:29:280:29:32

so the tales say.

0:29:320:29:33

How do we know he existed?

0:29:330:29:34

The great thing about the Robin Hood myth,

0:29:340:29:37

and it's grown up over the years,

0:29:370:29:38

is it started off with a few single lines of poetry.

0:29:380:29:41

It then turned up in other poems,

0:29:410:29:44

in other famous bits of British history poems.

0:29:440:29:47

The name Robin Hood starts to turn up

0:29:470:29:49

in court records in the 13th century,

0:29:490:29:52

but nobody knows if that's the same Robin Hood

0:29:520:29:54

or if people had heard the story of Robin Hood

0:29:540:29:56

and are just claiming to be him.

0:29:560:29:59

The first literary mention of Robin Hood was penned around 1377,

0:29:590:30:04

but the main body of tales come from the 15th century

0:30:040:30:06

in the form of narrative poems known as ballads.

0:30:060:30:09

Robin Hood in Sherwood stood Hooded and hatted, hosed and shod

0:30:100:30:15

Four and 20 arrows He bore in his hands.

0:30:150:30:18

And that whole swathe of an area over there was Robin Hood's territory?

0:30:180:30:21

So... Yeah, absolutely.

0:30:210:30:23

You can see out there, somewhere in the trees,

0:30:230:30:27

Robin Hood and his Merry Men in a glade somewhere.

0:30:270:30:30

The Robin Hood story has developed over the years.

0:30:340:30:37

The castle houses an 1839 canvas by artist Daniel Maclise

0:30:370:30:42

that puts Robin and co at the centre of a painting

0:30:420:30:46

also featuring characters from Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe.

0:30:460:30:49

All of the characters from the original Robin Hood stories

0:30:510:30:54

are there and some of the characters who came on later in the stories.

0:30:540:30:58

Robin, as you notice, is wearing red rather than green.

0:30:580:31:01

Lincoln green, obviously, is the colour that's associated

0:31:010:31:04

with Robin Hood.

0:31:040:31:05

Lincoln graine is a red cloth, which is actually more expensive.

0:31:050:31:09

Fascinating.

0:31:090:31:10

So in this, obviously, Robin is being a little but more of a dandy.

0:31:100:31:13

So I can see Little John who clearly is big John and quite dominant.

0:31:130:31:17

-Yes, indeed.

-But where's Maid Marian and Friar Tuck and...?

0:31:170:31:21

Friar Tuck, if you look just to the right where the tree is there,

0:31:210:31:24

Friar Tuck sitting down, enormous plate of food on his stomach there.

0:31:240:31:27

Yeah, quite right.

0:31:270:31:29

Marian you can see just also off to the side of Robin Hood.

0:31:290:31:32

The stories of Robin Hood have survived almost eight centuries

0:31:320:31:37

and with books and films reinventing this mythical figure,

0:31:370:31:40

the legend could live on for generations to come.

0:31:400:31:42

It's been amazing, Tim, to be given this tour

0:31:440:31:47

because Robin Hood is a name I know a lot about

0:31:470:31:49

-but now I know far more about.

-My great pleasure.

0:31:490:31:52

And on my doorstep in Derbyshire it's taught me a great deal.

0:31:520:31:54

Thank you so much.

0:31:540:31:56

Meanwhile, back in Gainsborough,

0:32:000:32:02

Mark's more modern search for treasure continues.

0:32:020:32:06

I just don't know where to look anymore.

0:32:060:32:09

This one has some really nice objects though,

0:32:090:32:11

but I'm focusing in on this little Victorian scent bottle.

0:32:110:32:17

This is probably Bohemian glass.

0:32:170:32:19

This is what we call a flush glass body.

0:32:190:32:21

And then the craftsman has cut away the blue glass

0:32:210:32:25

to reveal the clear glass underneath.

0:32:250:32:27

And you get this lovely, sort of,

0:32:270:32:29

faceted-type design.

0:32:290:32:30

Inside, it's got its original little stopper as well.

0:32:300:32:33

Those are often missing. I mean, that's a charming little thing.

0:32:330:32:38

What is more interesting to me is that the opening price is £65.

0:32:380:32:44

With the jug from earlier out of Mark's price range,

0:32:440:32:48

is there a deal to be done on the Victorian scent bottle

0:32:480:32:51

and the £70 horn beaker?

0:32:510:32:53

I would love to get that for 40 and then that's 110,

0:32:530:32:57

and it leaves me a fiver over.

0:32:570:32:58

Is there any chance?

0:32:580:33:00

-Yeah, I can do, yeah.

-Are you sure? I'm not pushing...

0:33:010:33:04

Yeah, no, that's one of mine so I know I can on that one.

0:33:040:33:06

-Well, let's shake on that, all right?

-No problem at all.

0:33:060:33:08

-I'm delighted with that, thank you so much.

-All right.

0:33:080:33:11

That's £110 for the mid-19th-century horn beaker

0:33:120:33:15

and the late-19th-century scent bottle.

0:33:150:33:18

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-I warn you, I will be back.

0:33:180:33:20

OK, all right then.

0:33:200:33:21

Uh-oh, and that's Mark's shopping complete

0:33:210:33:25

after snagging himself five lots.

0:33:250:33:27

Alongside his last two purchases,

0:33:270:33:29

he picked up the 19th-century meat cleaver, the Minton teapot stand

0:33:290:33:33

and the Art Nouveau brooch, all for £195.

0:33:330:33:36

Charles spent £170 on just three lots -

0:33:380:33:41

a pair of Labrador ornaments, a pair of carved dragons

0:33:410:33:45

and a mid-19th-century ball and chain.

0:33:450:33:48

Charles may not have totally fulfilled his plan

0:33:480:33:51

to put the A in antiques, but Mark surely did.

0:33:510:33:54

So, what do they think of each other's offerings?

0:33:540:33:57

That horn that's £70 is a real snip.

0:33:570:33:59

To me, in the right sale, it's worth 150 to 250.

0:33:590:34:04

I do like the Minton plaque, that's a really inspired buy.

0:34:040:34:07

The meat cleaver, it's a real snip at that.

0:34:070:34:11

So, if I'm a gambling man, Mark, I think it might be round one to you.

0:34:110:34:15

We had a long chat in the car about capital A for antiques.

0:34:150:34:20

He's gone to a garden centre

0:34:200:34:22

and bought a pair of dogs we can find anywhere up the country,

0:34:220:34:25

a ball and chain

0:34:250:34:27

and a pair of broken Chinese tigers of no great age.

0:34:270:34:32

Having said all that, maybe everybody else at the auction

0:34:320:34:36

will be as mad as a box of frogs like he is.

0:34:360:34:39

Ha! Time will tell.

0:34:410:34:42

Our two, new Road Trip buddies began their escapade in Cawthorne,

0:34:420:34:47

South Yorkshire, and 200 miles later, they're about to hit Lincoln.

0:34:470:34:51

Back in the 13th century,

0:34:510:34:52

Lincoln was England's third largest city due to its wool trade,

0:34:520:34:56

its most important product being the Lincoln cloth,

0:34:560:34:59

famously worn by Robin Hood.

0:34:590:35:01

Today, our Merry Men are heading into the city to sell their wares.

0:35:010:35:06

Where are we off to, Charlie?

0:35:060:35:08

If you look on the horizon now, there should be a big spire

0:35:080:35:10

-because Lincoln has a huge cathedral.

-Has a big cathedral.

-Yeah.

0:35:100:35:13

The last and final stop is Golding Young & Mawer auctioneers,

0:35:130:35:18

who've been in the business since 1864.

0:35:180:35:20

-Charles, our first auction. You excited?

-Yeah, it's...

0:35:220:35:27

-it's a very nervous one for me.

-No, it's not, come on.

-It is, Mark.

0:35:270:35:30

I've only got three items this time.

0:35:300:35:33

But look, Charles, look.

0:35:330:35:35

-Oh, yes.

-Pride of place, your dogs.

0:35:350:35:38

Oh my goodness me, the dogs await. CHARLES LAUGHS

0:35:380:35:40

With 800 lots to get through, auctioneer Kirsty Young

0:35:420:35:46

has a busy day ahead, so how does she think

0:35:460:35:49

our chaps' items will fare?

0:35:490:35:51

The scent bottle has a lot of presale interest,

0:35:510:35:56

the brooch has also had various interest,

0:35:560:35:58

the dragons, the giltwood dragons are very, very interesting,

0:35:580:36:04

the Labradors, they're very nice pieces.

0:36:040:36:06

The only thing that I think may struggle is the kettle stand.

0:36:060:36:10

So, Mark's teapot stand may not do as well as he thought,

0:36:100:36:14

but it looks as though he could have a couple of potential winners

0:36:140:36:17

and Charles' dogs might have been a good shout after all.

0:36:170:36:22

-Here we are, Mark.

-Here we are, Charlie, this is it.

0:36:220:36:25

The first auction.

0:36:260:36:28

To kick things off, Charles is first with his pair of Labrador ornaments.

0:36:300:36:34

We need a big woof, come on, Mark. Let's get on...

0:36:340:36:37

-Just calm down.

-Yeah, don't bark...

-We're at an auction, Charles.

0:36:370:36:40

..don't bark too much. Here they are.

0:36:400:36:42

Charles, stop it.

0:36:420:36:44

Starting out with me at £40 with me, 42 anywhere now?

0:36:440:36:47

-Let's go.

-Charles!

0:36:470:36:50

48 now? 48, bid 50, five, 60, five...

0:36:500:36:52

Let's go, come on.

0:36:520:36:53

70s bid, 75? 75, bid 80? 80 bid...

0:36:530:36:58

-Yes, one more.

-..at 85, bid 90? 90 bid...

0:36:580:37:00

-Come on, let's go.

-..95? 95, 100?

0:37:000:37:03

-Let's go , let's go, let's go Mark.

-..110, 120, 130...

0:37:030:37:08

150, 160. 170? No. 160 we have, 170 anywhere now?

0:37:080:37:14

-Give me a big bark.

-£170.

-Give me a bark.

-No, I won't.

-Woof.

0:37:140:37:17

-Are we selling then at £160?

-GAVEL BANGS

0:37:170:37:19

-CHARLES BARKS

-Woof, woof, yeah, it was ruf, ruf.

0:37:190:37:22

Thank you very much.

0:37:220:37:23

What a way to start, doubling his money on his first concrete item.

0:37:230:37:28

-Unbelievable, Charles.

-It made £160.

0:37:280:37:30

Amazing. Now it's Mark's turn to test the auction room

0:37:310:37:34

with his meat cleaver.

0:37:340:37:35

We're starting out with this one at ten pounds with me,

0:37:350:37:37

-and 12 anywhere now?

-Good, 12, is that a profit?

-No.

0:37:370:37:40

12 bid, 15, bid 18? 18's bid in the room...

0:37:400:37:43

-All the hands going up, Mark.

-No, they're not, unfortunately.

0:37:430:37:45

Are we selling then at 18? No, we're not. 20 we have, 22? No.

0:37:450:37:49

20 we have, 22 anywhere now?

0:37:490:37:51

Are we selling then at £20?

0:37:510:37:54

GAVEL BANGS

0:37:550:37:56

Mark may have put the A in antique,

0:37:560:37:58

but he's also put the L in loss after auction costs.

0:37:580:38:01

Next, it's Mark's Minton teapot stand,

0:38:020:38:04

and auctioneer Kirsty thinks it could struggle.

0:38:040:38:07

Is it quite rare?

0:38:070:38:08

I've never seen one. I've never handled one. Have you?

0:38:080:38:12

-This could do quite well.

-Interesting piece this one, £20 to start me, 20?

0:38:120:38:17

-Ten? Ten pounds is bid, 12 anywhere now?

-Well done, put it there, good?

0:38:170:38:22

-But I've not made a profit.

-15 bid, 18?

0:38:220:38:24

18 if we're coming back on the internet.

0:38:240:38:27

Are we selling then at £15?

0:38:270:38:30

-GAVEL BANGS

-Small profit.

-Don't know.

0:38:300:38:32

It's what I call a working profit, Charlie.

0:38:320:38:34

But it's still a fiver up.

0:38:340:38:36

Let's see if Charles is on a roll

0:38:360:38:39

with his Victorian prisoner's ball and chain.

0:38:390:38:41

Lots of interest in this lot, multiple bids on the book,

0:38:410:38:44

-and we're starting straight in at £40 with me...

-Yes!

0:38:440:38:47

-There we are, you've made a profit already.

-Let's go. Let's go.

0:38:470:38:50

..42, 45, 48, 45 is with me.

0:38:500:38:53

-Are we selling then...?

-Come on, come on.

-No, we're not.

0:38:530:38:55

48's bid, 50, five. 55 is in the room.

0:38:550:38:58

-Yes.

-60 anywhere now? At 55 it's in the room...

0:38:580:39:01

Thank you very much. MARK SIGHS

0:39:010:39:03

-Thanks a lot.

-We're selling then in the room at £55.

0:39:030:39:06

-GAVEL BANGS

-Well done, Charlie.

-Delighted.

0:39:060:39:08

That's two profits for two so far for Charles.

0:39:080:39:12

Why on earth did I go out looking for antiques? I don't know.

0:39:120:39:16

It's all about buying for the market.

0:39:160:39:19

Is it(?)

0:39:190:39:20

And Mark hasn't done too well with this market so far.

0:39:210:39:25

And now it's one of auctioneer Kirsty's picks,

0:39:250:39:27

the mid-19th-century horn beaker.

0:39:270:39:29

It deserves to do well because you put the A in antique.

0:39:290:39:32

Exactly A. Antique. A.

0:39:320:39:35

-And we're at ten pounds with me...

-How much?

-Ten pounds.

0:39:350:39:38

12, bid 15, 18, 20, two,

0:39:380:39:41

22's in the room. 25 at the back, 28, 28.

0:39:410:39:44

Bid 30, two? 30 we have at the very back.

0:39:440:39:47

32, 35, 38.

0:39:470:39:50

Bid 40, two, 45...

0:39:500:39:52

Come on.

0:39:520:39:53

48, bid 50, five. At £55 it's bid.

0:39:530:39:57

60 is the last call. We're selling then at £55.

0:39:570:40:02

-GAVEL BANGS

-Very disappointed.

0:40:020:40:04

Quite right, as it's a £15 loss on a real A for antique.

0:40:040:40:09

-How do you feel?

-Pretty miserable.

0:40:090:40:12

Cos to me, that was the best object in our sackful for Lincolnshire.

0:40:120:40:15

But never mind.

0:40:150:40:17

With Charles in the lead,

0:40:170:40:19

Mark needs his late-19th-century scent bottle to do well here.

0:40:190:40:22

If I, sort of, did that and read the auctioneer's mind...

0:40:220:40:25

Whoosh.

0:40:250:40:27

It will make...£75.

0:40:270:40:30

And we're starting at £25 with me,

0:40:300:40:33

28 anywhere now? 28, bid 30, two, 35, 38.

0:40:330:40:37

Bid 40, two, 42 is in the room...

0:40:370:40:39

-Is that a profit? It's a profit. Put it there.

-Yes, it is.

0:40:390:40:43

45, 48, bid 50? 50 bid, 55.

0:40:430:40:47

Bid...60's bid, 65, bid 70?

0:40:470:40:50

70 bid, 75, bid 80? No?

0:40:500:40:53

-75 we have, and 80 anywhere now?

-You said 75, actually.

-I did.

0:40:530:40:57

-You said 75?

-I did.

-We're selling then at £75.

0:40:570:40:59

GAVEL BANGS Whooosh. £70.

0:40:590:41:02

-You said 75 quid.

-I did, I did.

-Why didn't you say 95?

0:41:020:41:05

Great buy, though. Almost doubling Mark's money.

0:41:050:41:08

-That's really good.

-I'm feeling better now, Charlie.

0:41:080:41:10

Good, OK. Give me a smile.

0:41:100:41:12

Now it's Charles' third and final item, the carved dragons.

0:41:140:41:17

If he scores big here, it could be all over for Mark, arrr.

0:41:170:41:21

-They cost me £55.

-And I'm sure they're going to make about 400.

0:41:210:41:25

Fun items these ones, and we're at £20 straight away,

0:41:250:41:28

-20's with me, 22 anywhere now?

-Come on, let's go. Oh, no.

0:41:280:41:31

20's bid and 22? 22, 25, 28? 25 we have...

0:41:310:41:35

Uh-oh. Come on.

0:41:350:41:38

-28 anywhere now? Are we selling then at £25?

-Uh-oh, uh-oh.

0:41:380:41:42

GAVEL BANGS Anyway...

0:41:430:41:45

That could give Mark a chance to catch up with his final item,

0:41:450:41:49

the Art Nouveau brooch.

0:41:490:41:50

Beautiful piece, this one, and we're at £40 straight in with me.

0:41:500:41:53

40's bid, 42, 45, 48?

0:41:530:41:56

-48, bid 50, five, 60, five, 70, five, 75 is in the room.

-Brilliant.

0:41:560:42:01

Are we selling then at £75?

0:42:010:42:04

GAVEL BANGS

0:42:040:42:06

£20 profit for Mr Stacey. It could be close, this one.

0:42:060:42:11

-You go first.

-No, I'll let you go first.

-Get on with it.

0:42:110:42:13

-No, you go first.

-Hanson.

-OK, I'll go first.

-Get up.

0:42:130:42:16

Don't forget your hat, Charlie.

0:42:160:42:19

Mark started this trip with £200.

0:42:190:42:21

He's had a fairly tough day,

0:42:210:42:23

so after auction costs he's managed to scrape just £1.80 profit,

0:42:230:42:28

leaving him with £201.80 to spend next time.

0:42:280:42:31

GAVEL BANGS

0:42:310:42:33

Charles also began with £200.

0:42:330:42:35

His bold purchases did well on the whole,

0:42:350:42:38

making him a profit of £26.80 after auction costs.

0:42:380:42:41

So, Charles is today's winner, with £226.80 ready for the next leg.

0:42:410:42:47

Your bloody dogs.

0:42:470:42:49

CHARLES LAUGHS Well done, boys.

0:42:490:42:51

Well done, they did us proud.

0:42:510:42:53

-You're driving.

-Shall I drive?

-Yeah...

-Are you sure?

0:42:530:42:55

Well, I feel so devastated.

0:42:550:42:57

-There we go, hold on.

-Ohh, it starts first time.

0:42:580:43:00

Yeah, and remember that horn? HORN HOOTS

0:43:000:43:02

-It didn't do so well, did it?

-Go on, Charlie, take me home.

0:43:020:43:05

Wagons roll, off we go.

0:43:050:43:07

Next time, our road trip stutters and splutters on.

0:43:070:43:10

But...if we're...we're on brake.

0:43:100:43:11

-I'm not on the brake.

-Yeah, you did, you're on the brake.

0:43:110:43:14

While Charles Hanson lives and breathes his antiques.

0:43:140:43:16

You breathe the history of my business.

0:43:160:43:18

Mark Stacey is trying to sniff out the perfect purchase.

0:43:180:43:22

Is that the sweet scent of a profit, I wonder?

0:43:220:43:24

Charles Hanson takes on Mark Stacey in a quest for antique glory. Their first stretch starts in Cawthorne in South Yorkshire and finishes at auction in Lincoln.


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