Episode 12 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 12

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Transcript


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-What about that?

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With £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Can I buy everything here?

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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Feeling a little saw.

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This is going to be an epic battle.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-The honeymoon is over.

-I'm sorry.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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This week's road trip brings together

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two of antiques finest fellows.

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You're a man who's been about the antique arena for many years now.

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-Impress me.

-Oh...

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Please, impress me.

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With over two decades of experience in the antiques trade,

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Mark Stacey's a safe pair of hands.

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I don't think that's supposed to happen, is it?

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But cheeky Charles Hanson knows his stuff

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and hit Mark for six in the first leg.

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There we are.

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You know that's a paddle, don't you?

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Our two experts started with £200 each

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and on today's second leg there's exactly £25 between them.

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Mark barely broke even in the first auction,

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giving him just £201.80 to spend today.

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While Charles only took three items to the opening auction,

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but managed to scrape a slightly healthier profit,

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giving him the lead and £226.80 to spend

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as they hit the road again.

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After all my hard work, I'm just over a pound up, Charles.

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Just say you made 100 pence, which sounds better, doesn't it?

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Yes, it does. I'm 100 pence up.

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That won't even pay the petrol to your next shop, Mark.

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But onwards they travel in their classic,

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yet rather unreliable, 1950s Austin Metropolitan convertible.

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It isn't fitted with seat belts

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but that's perfectly legal for a car that predates the law.

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Our experts' epic expedition will take them

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from Yorkshire to Nottinghamshire,

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Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire,

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Leicestershire, Buckinghamshire,

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Herefordshire and West Midlands,

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Hampshire, Warwickshire, Coventry,

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Gloucestershire, Shropshire, Staffordshire

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and ending in Flintshire in Wales.

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Phew!

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The second stint is a scenic saunter from Ely in Cambridgeshire

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down to the auction in Bourne End in Buckinghamshire.

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Crikey.

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Do you know much about Ely?

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All I know is that Ely, many, many,

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probably thousands of years ago, was a swamp where eels used to swim.

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Not bad, Charles.

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While Ely is very proud of its connection with eels,

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this historic city is full of charm and beauty

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and is home to one of the most magnificent cathedrals in England.

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-Well, Charles, I've got shopping to do.

-Yeah, enjoy yourself.

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-Listen, enjoy your shopping.

-Good luck.

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Now, Mark, shop to drop and don't forget,

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-impress me.

-Bye.

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-Impress me.

-Oh, it's so difficult to impress you, Charles.

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Impress me. See you later.

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Nothing like a bit of a challenge to ramp up the competition.

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Owner, Barry, is standing by at Cloisters Art & Antiques

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to help you on your way.

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I'm chasing Charlie Hanson, who has bought absolute rubbish

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-and made a profit. I bought quality items and didn't.

-Right.

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So, I don't know what that's telling you.

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Well, I can sell you rubbish that will make money.

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That's one way to go, Barry.

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The shop has items from Georgian times to modern-day,

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but Mark is resisting the lure of anything contemporary.

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This is a little Victorian porcelain scent bottle.

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I think it's English, even though it has that sort of French look

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about it, with this sort of rather rococo cartouche on the front,

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hand-painted with a little exotic bird.

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The scent bottle and stopper is dated circa 1850.

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It's ticketed at £88, almost half of Mark's budget.

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But he may have found a way to knock some money off.

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Barry, I mean, I do, I think it's been restored, do you?

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Have you noticed?

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If you look, both on this side and the other side,

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it's got that quite heavy gilding...

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Yes, the gilding has been restored, I would have thought.

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I suspect what's happened is it was a treasured possession,

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somebody dropped it,

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maybe it came off and then they've re-gilded it.

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I could do two crisp £20 notes for that.

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I'm sure you could.

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Oh, is that the sweet scent of a profit, I wonder?

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Boom-boom.

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Huh, but before the deal is sealed,

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Barry's got another item to tempt Mark's fancy.

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Oh.

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Butter of Pitlochry, that's Scottish...

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Scottish, yeah, and it's actually got Pitlochry on the top, I think.

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Oh, the Black Watch.

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-Oh, gosh, yeah, the Black Watch.

-Yeah.

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So, I think that's rather fun.

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Marked at £55, this Shelley crested ware dog kennel

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with a black bulldog and the arms and motto of The Black Watch

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is of military interest.

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And of interest to our Mark, at the right price, of course.

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-Barry, I'm going to make you a very mean offer.

-OK.

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For the two, all right?

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-I'm glad you're sitting down.

-Yes, fine.

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I'm going to offer you £50 for the two.

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-OK.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah, deal.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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That's £30 for the scent bottle

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and £20 for the crested ware dog kennel.

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Here's hoping for some profit in them, Mark.

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Whoops! Mind your step.

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Meanwhile, Charles is kicking off his shopping 11 miles south

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in the small Cambridgeshire village of Landbeach.

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The village has three architectural sites with

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the remains of medieval manor houses,

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and Charles is here to dig up some artefacts of interest in Stantiques.

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-Good morning.

-Good morning.

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-How are you?

-Good.

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I'm Charles, your name is?

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-Hi, I'm Stan.

-Stan the man.

-Stan the man.

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Stan the man of Stan Antiques.

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Stantiques. Stan the man from Stantiques.

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Good man, I like your style.

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Charles's items didn't impress Mark at the last auction.

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So, is he going for a change of tactic?

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My tactics, now, as we're in Cambridgeshire

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and a really rich area for antique enthusiasts,

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is to really buy quality

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and to show Mark what can be achieved

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on a budget and stay away from, you know,

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the more quirky end of collectables.

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Buy quality, that's my plan.

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And, talking of quality, these chairs over here, Stan,

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-they're not old are they, these chairs?

-No, they're just French.

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-No age, Charles.

-No age? So, they're almost brand-new...

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-Yeah.

-..ie 1980s?

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-Yeah, they're just sort of...

-Decorative display pieces.

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-Definitely.

-Quite attractive, aren't they?

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But furniture is just in the doldrums.

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They need total renovation.

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Oh, crikey.

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I thought you were going for quality, Charles?

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It looks like these chairs have seen better days.

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-What's your best price on them?

-£70 the pair, Charles.

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Do you know what? I think they're tired

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but they're alluring.

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I hope I hope you know what you're doing, Charles.

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If I say to you 60, are you happy with that?

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Charles, I'll do you 60 because you're such a top chap.

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Are you sure? Look at me.

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-You're a top chap, all right.

-Yeah? Shall we say going,

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going,

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gone? Sold! Good man.

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-Oh, they're great!

-Cheers, buddy.

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May I take one outside now for a quick look in the light...

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-Yeah, by all means.

-..and leave that one with you, here?

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-Great. Follow me.

-We've shaken hands, Charles, so yes.

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-The deal's done.

-Take it into the light.

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What's he up to now?

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I bought these chairs and I looked and thought, yeah,

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they're probably 1980s from the exterior.

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But when I turned them up,

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I had a little heartbeat

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because they are horse hair filled,

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strung as well.

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You can see this springing is probably,

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at the very latest, 1920s.

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I think they're worth, hopefully,

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on a really good day, between 150 and 250.

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I could be quids in here.

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Ah, good spot then, Charles.

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And to think I ever doubted you.

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But he's not finished there.

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Back inside, Charles has spotted something that reminded him

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of his treasure hunting days as a child.

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How sweet.

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So, Stan, tell me, if I bought this whole little tray hoard,

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which I could almost call a Hanson hoard of Roman

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and later bronze remnants

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and all sorts of curios...

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And what's a joy is just to handle

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these objects from a bygone time.

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And you grip tight, don't you,

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and you just think,

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who last held these objects? Don't you?

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-I do, Charles, yes.

-You've also got other little

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trays of finds in here and, erm,

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I think a tray that's drawn my eye,

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looking in this cabinet, is this one here as well, Stan.

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And you've got more coins in here,

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you've got bits of old flint.

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So, Stan, if I said to you...

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Two trays,

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there's an abundance of volume and description,

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but value maybe not so much.

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..if I said to you, what's the best on that whole horde together,

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what would you say?

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-40 quid, all in.

-Wow.

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Is it worth a gamble at 40?

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It probably is.

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So, I think I'm going to buy these for 40 because sometimes,

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with a passion from a childhood, you can't say no.

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Charles, I'm not gift-wrapping every item. OK.

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-Thanks a lot.

-Nice one.

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And, do you know, I just thrive on history.

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You breathe history in my business and that is one big breath, isn't it?

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Nothing like the smell of antiques in the morning, eh?

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Now, Mark's been making his way 32 miles south-west

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to the charming riverside town of St Neots.

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St Neots' Emporium may look small from the outside

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but inside there's over 1,400 square feet of floor space

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and 24 dealers offering items to suit all needs and pockets.

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And with £151.80 in his,

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Mark needs to start catching up.

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-Hello.

-I'm Mark.

-Welcome.

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-And you are?

-I'm Jacqueline.

-Jacqueline.

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Now, what's your role in this lovely emporium?

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-I own it.

-You own it?

-Yes.

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Well, I shall give you a cuddle.

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-Because that might mean bigger discounts.

-What an old smoothie.

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He knows all the tricks to get the owners on side.

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Right, best find something to get a discount on, then.

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Ha! Looks like more Victorian goodies have caught Mark's eye.

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This is very typical Victorian, isn't it?

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You see you've got this little decoration on the top here

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of a little child with a bouquet of flowers.

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This late 19th-century French parasol has a porcelain handle

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and mount in the Sevres style and would have been

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produced in a factory on the outskirts of gay Paris.

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You will notice, of course, that the actual parasol bit

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is completely lacking.

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-So, what do you do with that?

-Tell me.

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You can, of course, get a new silk put on it,

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which would be very expensive.

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Or you could try and turn it into a very elegant walking stick...

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Well, you need to turn it into a profit, Mark.

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-And with £80 on the ticket, let's get Jacqueline involved.

-Hello.

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Hello again. What would you let me have it for?

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-Would you consider £40?

-I'd CONSIDER it.

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I would LOVE to buy it for £30.

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-Thank you, Jacqueline.

-Deal.

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Come rain or shine, Mark, that's a nice little buy.

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Well, all I can say is...

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-..I'm singing in the rain, aren't I?

-Well, it won't keep you...

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No, it won't keep me dry.

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It won't keep you dry, no.

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Meanwhile, Charles has made his way to Cambridge to discover

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a story of rivalry between two exploring pioneers,

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whose search for planet Earth's coldest and deadliest place,

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the South Pole, ended in triumph and tragedy.

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Professor Julian Dowdeswell is going to show Charles

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around the Polar Museum at the Scott Polar Research Institute.

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-Charles.

-Professor Julian Dowdeswell.

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Welcome to the Scott Polar Research Institute

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in Cambridge University.

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Wonderful, and what a beautiful hallway.

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This impressive memorial hall depicts the Arctic and Antarctic as

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they were believed to have looked

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when the building was opened in 1934.

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It also commemorates famous expeditions and explorers.

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Charles has come to hear the story of the doomed

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1912 Polar expedition

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of Robert Falcon Scott and Roald Amundsen.

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This is the ship's bell of Scott's Terra Nova,

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which was the ship that transported them on Scott's second

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and fateful last expedition to Antarctica.

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Having already carried out significant scientific

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research in Antarctica, Scott returned a decade later,

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determined to be the first man to reach the South Pole.

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Whilst Scott made his plans public, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen

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quietly set off on his own quest to get there first

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and steal the glory, reaching the South Pole 33 days

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before his British rival.

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When Scott finally arrived,

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he was greeted with the flags left by the Norwegian team.

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This black flag was found by Scott

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and his companions as they approach the South Pole.

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We don't know whether it was the first thing that they saw that

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told them that they were preceded,

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but one of the black flags and ski tracks were certainly those things.

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It was the contrasting fates of the two teams'

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respective journeys back from the Pole that sets them apart.

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Exactly why Amundsen's team completed the return journey

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and Scott's trip ended in tragedy, with the loss of five men,

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including himself, has been the source of fierce debate ever since.

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Amundsen's team benefited from arguably more experienced

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personnel, better supplies and didn't hit bad weather.

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Scott's team included scientists and seamen.

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Captain Lawrence Oates formed part of Scott's party

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and suffered terribly from frostbite.

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His sleeping bag can be seen on display in the Institute.

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Oates' very famously,

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and this is one of the archetypes of British heroism and sacrifice,

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walked out of the tent in a blizzard to sacrifice himself,

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in order that the three remaining in the party,

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Scott, Wilson and Bowers, could move forward.

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The reason he did that is

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because his leg was terribly badly frostbitten.

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He knew he couldn't go on.

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The reason that we have the sleeping bag and, indeed, you can

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see that the sleeping bag is slit down one side,

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reflecting the problems that Oates was having with his legs.

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So, it really is a study in tragedy in itself.

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Of course, the trip grew even more tragic when

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Scott, Wilson and Bowers perished in their tent,

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dehydrated and pinned down by blizzards,

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11 miles from the safety of their depot.

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The grim consequences of their return journey from the Pole

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had been blamed on their poor preparations.

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Eight months on from the explorers' demise, the relief party,

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led by Lieutenant Atkinson, a Royal Naval surgeon,

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discovered the three men inside their tent.

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The bodies of the other two members of the team were never recovered.

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They made the decision that they would actually...

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..leave the bodies of Scott, Wilson and Bowers in Antarctica.

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And they said a burial service over their bodies.

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They built a beautiful snow cairn with a cross over the top

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of the three bodies.

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And there they remain in Antarctica today.

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While the relief party could do little for the explorers,

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they did recover some important artefacts from the tent, including

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the last letters written by Scott to the wives and families of his party.

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All of those things expressed Scott's regret at what had happened,

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but also his pride in how much had been achieved during the expedition.

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The South Pole was achieved.

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Although he failed to be the first at the South Pole, Scott's

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legacy is in his contribution to science.

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He collected meteorological data and geological specimens

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and also samples of over 2,000 animals,

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of which almost 400 were new to science.

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Scott's polar achievements

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and the risks he took under the most extreme circumstances

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epitomise a spirit of daring scientific investigation that,

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arguably, has not been matched since.

0:16:470:16:50

It's the end of Charles's visit.

0:16:550:16:56

Time to rest up and dream of the antique discoveries that lie ahead.

0:16:560:17:00

Night-night.

0:17:000:17:01

Morning has broken and our intrepid duo are back on the road.

0:17:060:17:10

Well, they would be, if Mark could work out how to get a car moving.

0:17:110:17:15

Ignition, turn...

0:17:150:17:17

THE ENGINE TURNS OVER

0:17:170:17:18

Yeah, it starts perfectly. That's fine.

0:17:180:17:21

And now, just find the clutch bite.

0:17:210:17:23

Yeah, and now just let it go.

0:17:230:17:26

-Oops-a-daisy.

-I did. And it's gone.

0:17:260:17:28

Try it again.

0:17:280:17:30

Don't! If we... THE CAR SKIDS, GEARS GRIND

0:17:330:17:35

-I'm not on the brake!

-You're on the brake.

0:17:350:17:38

This is the accelerator, Charlie.

0:17:380:17:40

-The break is in the middle, I'm not near the brake.

-Oh, try it again.

0:17:400:17:44

-Charles, I'm not touching the brake.

-You are.

-I'm not.

-You were.

0:17:440:17:48

Charles, I'm not touching the brake.

0:17:480:17:50

They are struggling with that car, ha!

0:17:500:17:52

Charles has been liberal with his lolly so far,

0:17:520:17:54

forking out £100 on a pair of armchairs

0:17:540:17:57

and a horde of Roman booty.

0:17:570:17:59

That leaves him with £126.80 still to spend.

0:17:590:18:03

Mark, in contrast, is being more conservative, spending £80 on

0:18:030:18:07

three items, the scent bottle, a crested ware kennel and a parasol.

0:18:070:18:11

He's got some catching up to do, but still has £121.80 to do it with.

0:18:110:18:15

Hanson and Stacey are en route to Leicester,

0:18:210:18:23

the county town of Leicestershire, and Charles has his eyes peeled.

0:18:230:18:27

-Do you know, I keep looking, Mark, for a car park.

-Why?

0:18:270:18:32

Because, don't forget, Leicester, I suppose, rose to prominence in recent

0:18:320:18:36

times because Richard III was buried in Leicester car park.

0:18:360:18:41

Can you believe that?

0:18:410:18:42

The body of a king, to me, would be the ultimate Antiques Road Trip find.

0:18:420:18:47

Yep, it's good to dream big, but one of you will just have to

0:18:470:18:51

settle for being king of the road trip instead. Ha!

0:18:510:18:54

Charles's next stop is Hidden Treasures,

0:18:540:18:55

a small and friendly shop with lots of varied and interesting objects.

0:18:550:19:00

That's it.

0:19:000:19:02

Beautiful.

0:19:020:19:04

-Beautiful.

-There we are, Charles, how's that?

-Wonderful.

0:19:040:19:08

-Thank you so much, Mark.

-And inside is another Mark, owner Mark Knight.

0:19:080:19:12

-Good morning. I recognise your face.

-Good morning, Charles. How are you?

0:19:120:19:16

-I know you from my sale room.

-I do know you from there.

0:19:160:19:18

-Yeah, it's good to see you.

-And yourself.

-So good to see you.

0:19:180:19:22

Pleasantries out of the way, Charlie wastes no time in looking

0:19:220:19:25

for something to spend his remaining £126.80 on.

0:19:250:19:29

-That's quite interesting, isn't it?

-Yes, a little riding crop.

0:19:320:19:35

I think it's a Charles riding crop.

0:19:350:19:37

That's quite nice, because you've got here the bone, which is

0:19:370:19:41

novelty in the sense that, rather than being a fairly mundane handle,

0:19:410:19:45

it's been embellished with silver mounts.

0:19:450:19:48

And, more so, it's formed a whistle, which makes it quite novel...

0:19:480:19:53

-I think it's quite unique.

-..with a dual purpose.

0:19:530:19:56

-Yeah, the whistle for the blowing of the dogs.

-I almost need this

0:19:560:19:59

in the car with Mark Stacey you know, I say,

0:19:590:20:01

"Mark, come on. Push that car, come on."

0:20:010:20:04

It's ticketed at £50 and in the crack of the whip,

0:20:040:20:07

Charles gets straight down to business.

0:20:070:20:09

If I was asking you what your best price would be, you would

0:20:090:20:12

look at me and say...

0:20:120:20:14

-Make me an offer.

-Make you an offer. OK. Make you an offer. OK, Mark.

0:20:140:20:19

-OK, I will do. I probably will do in a short while.

-OK.

0:20:190:20:22

Not sure, eh?

0:20:220:20:24

How about something else to help sweeten the deal?

0:20:240:20:27

OK, here we are.

0:20:270:20:28

Goodness me, she is peculiar.

0:20:320:20:34

Mmm.

0:20:340:20:35

This girl has culture.

0:20:350:20:38

This lady, I suspect...

0:20:380:20:41

Charles, I'm not sure that's a girl, actually.

0:20:420:20:45

I didn't realise, I thought it had three legs for a second. Sorry.

0:20:450:20:48

I have to interrupt - he's a man.

0:20:480:20:50

Ha! I thought that might have been obvious, Charles.

0:20:500:20:53

I think, Mark, he represents...

0:20:540:20:57

-fertility.

-Fertility.

0:20:570:21:00

What I like about this tribal figure is the fact that -

0:21:000:21:03

look at the way you've got wear and tear here

0:21:030:21:06

on the extremities of the shoulder, you've got losses on the back.

0:21:060:21:11

It's carved in a softwood and -

0:21:110:21:14

look at the wrinkles on the forehead. That's caused by the shrinkage

0:21:140:21:19

of the timber going into different atmospheres within homes.

0:21:190:21:24

This fertility figure, possibly Cameroonian, could be quite a find.

0:21:250:21:29

There's an increased interest in ethnographic objects

0:21:290:21:32

that once upon a time inspired the Impressionists.

0:21:320:21:35

Interesting subject and further research could be quite spurious.

0:21:360:21:41

I'm going to ask the question to you, Mark, what's your best price?

0:21:410:21:45

45.

0:21:470:21:48

Hmmm, OK.

0:21:480:21:50

That's quite interesting.

0:21:500:21:52

I think what's key to its success is an online exposure...

0:21:520:21:58

-Yep.

-And if we can get this object on the internet and really

0:21:580:22:03

-worked up...

-Yep, with some research.

0:22:030:22:05

It's something which Canadian, American collectors might really go for.

0:22:050:22:12

You wouldn't take £30 for it, would you, Mark? Would £30 be...

0:22:120:22:15

Could you do £35?

0:22:150:22:17

Can I do £35? I'm going to say,

0:22:170:22:19

because he is so interesting,

0:22:210:22:23

he's telling me, "Don't be startled, get me bought."

0:22:230:22:25

I'll take him. Thanks a lot.

0:22:250:22:27

-OK, lovely, thanks very much.

-Thanks, Mark, I'll see you shortly.

0:22:270:22:30

So that's your third item bought, Charles.

0:22:300:22:32

Now, how about that riding crop? It has a ticket price of £50 -

0:22:320:22:35

are you going to make an offer? Go on, crack on.

0:22:350:22:37

If this came in to an auction, because it isn't hallmarked,

0:22:370:22:41

I would say to my vendor it's a hunting, rural,

0:22:410:22:45

country pursuit interest. It's probably worth between £30-£50.

0:22:450:22:50

-Uh-huh.

-What's your best price, Mark, on this?

0:22:500:22:53

-I could do it for 30.

-Could you really?

0:22:540:22:56

-Do you know - I think it's novel, it's neat...

-Yep.

0:22:560:22:59

-I'll take it for £30.

-OK, thanks very much, Charles, thank you.

-You're a good man. Thanks a lot, Mark.

0:22:590:23:03

That's £65 all-in for the fertility figure and the crop.

0:23:030:23:07

Meanwhile, Mark's made his way north of Leicester

0:23:100:23:13

to look back at the history of rocketry -

0:23:130:23:16

specifically how a British inventor developed the rocket

0:23:160:23:19

which eventually led to man's voyage into space

0:23:190:23:22

with a little help of some canine friends.

0:23:220:23:25

Mark's meeting communications officer Josh Barker

0:23:270:23:30

at the National Space Centre - one of the United Kingdom's

0:23:300:23:33

leading visitor attractions devoted to space, science and astronomy.

0:23:330:23:39

-Hello, Josh.

-Hello, Mark.

-Lovely to meet you.

-Nice to see you, too.

0:23:390:23:42

Thank you for inviting us to the Space Centre - is that what it's called?

0:23:420:23:45

-It is and you're very welcome, it's a pleasure having you here.

-Wonderful, tell me about it.

0:23:450:23:49

So we were set up in 2001 as part of one of the millennium commissioned projects across the UK.

0:23:490:23:53

We're a centre dedicated to educating and teaching people about space,

0:23:530:23:57

specifically the British contribution to it.

0:23:570:23:59

Well I know about the American and the Russian

0:23:590:24:01

and maybe the European contribution, but the UK contribution?

0:24:010:24:04

We are actually still world leaders in satellite technology

0:24:040:24:07

and British rocketry's been around for about 200 years.

0:24:070:24:09

200 years?

0:24:090:24:11

-I don't believe you, Josh.

-200 years is correct.

0:24:110:24:13

We've got some of the artefacts to prove that, which we'll show you today.

0:24:130:24:16

-I'd love to go and see it.

-Let's go and see them.

0:24:160:24:19

By the late 1700s, Indian forces had developed

0:24:200:24:24

iron rockets from Chinese-invented fireworks.

0:24:240:24:26

These were used against the British in the Mysore Wars.

0:24:260:24:30

This in turn inspired one English inventor, Sir William Congreve,

0:24:300:24:35

to develop the technology further to create the Congreve Rocket.

0:24:350:24:39

So, we have here some examples of some of Britain's earliest rockets.

0:24:400:24:44

It looks very Blue Peter to me.

0:24:440:24:46

They are very primitive compared to the rockets that would go up into space.

0:24:460:24:51

William Congreve refined his rockets at the Royal Laboratory in Kent.

0:24:530:24:58

In 1806, the rockets were used to great effect against the French at Boulogne,

0:24:580:25:02

firing over 2,000 missiles from British ships without reply.

0:25:020:25:08

So these were used a lot by the British Army and the British Navy.

0:25:080:25:11

They used them in the Napoleonic era against Napoleon.

0:25:110:25:15

The Congreve Rockets were also used by the British

0:25:150:25:18

in the bombardment of Fort McHenry in the United States in 1814 -

0:25:180:25:23

an event that inspired the line from the American national anthem,

0:25:230:25:26

"And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air."

0:25:260:25:30

For the next hundred years, rockets played an increasing part in warfare

0:25:340:25:38

and it was in the Second World War that Britain found itself

0:25:380:25:41

on the receiving end of the rocket's power.

0:25:410:25:44

The Germans deployed the world's first long-range missile -

0:25:440:25:47

the V-2 rocket.

0:25:470:25:49

It was used against Allied targets,

0:25:490:25:52

most devastatingly in its destruction of great parts of London.

0:25:520:25:56

Well, what's this mangled piece of old metal?

0:25:560:25:58

So this is actually a bomb-damaged part of a V-2 rocket.

0:25:580:26:02

The V-2's greatest impact, however, may have been after the War.

0:26:020:26:06

The teams behind developing the technology were then used to develop our own rocketry programme

0:26:060:26:10

to advance from the Congreve Rockets we saw earlier, primitive ones that could barely reach a kilometre,

0:26:100:26:15

to these ones which can actually get all the way up into a low Earth orbit.

0:26:150:26:18

This was the turning point in rocket technology

0:26:180:26:21

as the need for longer reaching missiles was replaced

0:26:210:26:25

with the dream of reaching outer space, thus kick-starting the Space Race

0:26:250:26:30

and a new age in which man would set foot on another planet.

0:26:300:26:34

So this is really the final chapter in the story of early rocketry

0:26:350:26:38

and this leads us to the 1950s and 1960s with the start of the Space Race -

0:26:380:26:42

the really big competition between Russia and America to get into space.

0:26:420:26:46

The Russians launched what was called the Vostok programme.

0:26:460:26:49

The Vostok programme was a project to put the first man into orbit.

0:26:490:26:54

Competing against the United States, the Russians won the race -

0:26:540:26:57

placing Yuri Gagarin into space in 1961.

0:26:570:27:01

But before Gagarin launched himself into the history books,

0:27:010:27:05

early test flights saw dogs blast off.

0:27:050:27:09

-We can see here an example of a dog high altitude suit.

-Oh, gosh!

0:27:090:27:12

So this was the preliminary tests to see

0:27:120:27:14

whether they could get the animals to survive in high altitudes,

0:27:140:27:17

in the area of fighter jets and things like that -

0:27:170:27:19

ready to then make the next step up into space.

0:27:190:27:21

I must admit, that looks rather excruciating.

0:27:210:27:23

The poor dog must have been terrified.

0:27:230:27:25

Yeah, unfortunately it's not one of the rosier chapters

0:27:250:27:28

of the Space Race. As with all things,

0:27:280:27:30

there has to be some sacrifice.

0:27:300:27:31

Laika, a stray dog from the streets of Moscow,

0:27:310:27:34

became the first animal to orbit the Earth and bravely paved the way

0:27:340:27:38

for Yuri Gagarin's seminal journey into space.

0:27:380:27:41

Well, the wonderful thing of course is they say,

0:27:420:27:45

"dog is a man's best friend", and I think, in this case,

0:27:450:27:48

-they really are, aren't they?

-I think they are, they really paved the way.

0:27:480:27:52

Ha. In just 210 years,

0:27:520:27:54

from one British man's major contribution to rocket technology,

0:27:540:27:58

through advancements first in warfare and then space exploration,

0:27:580:28:02

we're now heralding the latest generation of rockets

0:28:020:28:05

designed to carry astronauts to Earth's orbit and beyond.

0:28:050:28:09

Who knows -

0:28:090:28:10

without William Congreve, none of this would ever have been possible.

0:28:100:28:14

And with that our space odyssey is done.

0:28:140:28:17

Meanwhile, Mark's Road Trip rival is making his way

0:28:190:28:22

to the Leicester hamlet of Shenton, near Market Bosworth.

0:28:220:28:26

With £61.80 left to spend,

0:28:260:28:30

Charles is checking out the Whitemoors Antiques and Craft Centre.

0:28:300:28:34

-Afternoon. How are you?

-Hi, Charles. Good to have you here at Whitemoors.

0:28:340:28:37

-Now your name is?

-Robert.

-Robert, good to see you.

0:28:370:28:39

There are 45 dealers in this centre

0:28:390:28:41

but Robert Simpson is looking after Charles today.

0:28:410:28:44

Need to get finding.

0:28:480:28:49

OK, this is quite nice, this mirror.

0:28:570:29:00

I like this. All depends on the age.

0:29:000:29:03

From the exterior, it looks to be an attractive,

0:29:030:29:08

"come and get me, Hanson"

0:29:080:29:10

Georgian wall mirror with this wonderful pierced,

0:29:100:29:14

almost cut fret pediment.

0:29:140:29:18

I would say this mirror dates to probably 1790, 1820.

0:29:180:29:24

And the description on the label reads, "ornate mirror".

0:29:240:29:27

It's priced at 40.

0:29:270:29:30

I'm going to find Robert and ask him

0:29:310:29:34

what the very, very, very best price is on the mirror.

0:29:340:29:38

-Hi, Robert.

-Hi, Charles.

-You're still here.

-I'm still here.

-That's OK.

0:29:410:29:45

-In the container over there...

-Yep.

0:29:450:29:47

-there is a mirror...

-Right.

0:29:470:29:49

-on the wall...

-OK.

0:29:490:29:51

and it says you could be the fairest of them all,

0:29:510:29:54

-if you give me a good price for it.

-We'll see what we can do.

0:29:540:29:56

Robert gets on the phone to John, the dealer who owns the mirror.

0:29:560:30:00

Could you possible do 25, John?

0:30:010:30:04

-Get lost.

-28?

0:30:040:30:05

Get lost. I like your style.

0:30:050:30:07

-28, go on.

-Go on, he says.

0:30:070:30:09

We want him to win, John.

0:30:090:30:12

And with that ringing endorsement Robert strikes a deal for £28.

0:30:120:30:16

It's a nice thing.

0:30:160:30:17

It's traditional, it's a nice thing, it's quality

0:30:170:30:20

and for £28 it's a super lot and I commend you for that negotiation.

0:30:200:30:24

-You're very welcome.

-Look at me, you did well. Thanks a lot. See you.

0:30:240:30:28

With Charles all done shopping,

0:30:280:30:30

Mark's playing catch-up and is heading south to Kibworth.

0:30:300:30:34

The purpose of his visit is Kibworth Antiques Centre

0:30:340:30:37

but with only three items bought so far he's got his work cut out.

0:30:370:30:40

-Hello, I'm Mark.

-Hello, I'm Sharon.

-Nice to meet you, Sharon.

-And you.

0:30:420:30:45

This family-owned centre is one of South Leicestershire's largest antique retail outlets -

0:30:450:30:51

so there should be plenty here to tempt our Mark.

0:30:510:30:54

He's gone to check out the new den out the back.

0:30:540:30:57

Oh, look - red, amber and green. I hope it's green for profit.

0:30:570:31:00

Ha. Talking of greens, Mark's quick to spot a selection of fruit and veg

0:31:000:31:04

of the Italian vintage handmade variety, of course.

0:31:040:31:09

Wow, look at that.

0:31:090:31:10

I mean, they are ceramic - but they're a bit wacky, aren't they?

0:31:130:31:17

Look, there's even a little mushroom.

0:31:170:31:19

Don't ask me what type it is, but...

0:31:190:31:22

It's not edible, I know that.

0:31:220:31:25

Actually, I think those are quite fun.

0:31:250:31:28

I can't buy a load of fruit and veg, can I?

0:31:300:31:33

They don't say "antique" to me

0:31:330:31:35

but quirky items haven't done Charles any harm so far.

0:31:350:31:39

I mean, look - they're £1.99 each or five for £8,

0:31:390:31:41

but they've been reduced cos they were £2.50 each or five for £10

0:31:410:31:46

so maybe...

0:31:460:31:48

they'd accept a fruity offer.

0:31:480:31:50

Well, Sharon's the lady to ask.

0:31:500:31:52

Now I've fallen in love...

0:31:520:31:55

with those vegetables.

0:31:550:31:57

-And I love the fact that they're in an old box.

-OK.

0:31:590:32:02

-And one or two of them are chipped.

-Yes, yes.

0:32:020:32:05

-They're past their shop sell-by date, really.

-Right, OK.

0:32:050:32:08

-You see where I'm going with this?

-Yes, need to go in the reduced corner.

0:32:080:32:11

-I would love you to ask the dealer...

-OK.

0:32:110:32:16

-How much for the whole...

-..how much they would sell the whole lot for.

0:32:160:32:20

The whole lot comes to £48 but Mark is looking for nearer £30,

0:32:200:32:24

so Sharon makes a call and Mark waits nervously for the response.

0:32:240:32:27

So I'm left like...

0:32:300:32:32

an act in Eurovision, waiting for the results, waiting for the...

0:32:320:32:36

..Leicestershire jury to cast their votes.

0:32:380:32:41

Hmm. The suspense is killing me(!)

0:32:410:32:43

but will it be "nul points" for Mark?

0:32:430:32:46

Sharon, Sharon, Sharon.

0:32:460:32:48

-I've managed to speak to her.

-Oh, have you?

0:32:480:32:50

-Please tell me it's good news.

-It is good news.

0:32:500:32:52

She says you can have them...

0:32:520:32:54

but she really needs £34 for them.

0:32:540:32:58

-£34, 34...

-She needs £34.

-And I get the box as well?

0:32:580:33:02

You can have the box as well, but she does need 34.

0:33:020:33:05

-Well I can't not have them for £4, can I?

-No.

-Do you know what I mean?

0:33:050:33:08

-It'd be silly not to have them for £4.

-I'd be silly not to have them.

0:33:080:33:10

-Will you thank her very much for me?

-Of course I will.

0:33:100:33:13

-I really appreciate it.

-Yep, no problem.

0:33:130:33:15

So Mark's final purchase sets him back £34

0:33:150:33:19

and, with that, the shopping's all done.

0:33:190:33:21

But what did they buy?

0:33:210:33:23

Charles bought five lots, comprising

0:33:230:33:25

a pair of Louis XVI style armchairs,

0:33:250:33:28

a collection of Roman coins and curios

0:33:280:33:31

an African fertility statue,

0:33:310:33:33

a bone and silver riding crop

0:33:330:33:35

and a George III mirror.

0:33:350:33:37

He spent a total of £193.

0:33:380:33:41

Whilst Mark invested in a scent bottle,

0:33:450:33:47

a crested ware dog kennel,

0:33:470:33:49

a French parasol

0:33:490:33:51

and a collection of handmade ceramic fruit and veg.

0:33:510:33:54

That lot cost him just £114.

0:33:550:34:01

So what did the fellas make of each other's buys?

0:34:010:34:04

The scent bottle I quite like but I feel it's quite middle-rate.

0:34:040:34:09

The Shelley is very sweet and it's also got a great World War interest

0:34:090:34:13

so I think that at £20 and the scent bottle at 30 might do quite well.

0:34:130:34:17

The collection of coins is quite interesting and, you know,

0:34:170:34:20

you never know if there's one or two unusual in there -

0:34:200:34:23

paid £40 for them, there could be a good profit in there.

0:34:230:34:26

It's a wide-open game, still, but I think I've bought the

0:34:260:34:29

more spurious, the more speculative, which could really take off.

0:34:290:34:33

Charles, what can I say? Good luck, my friend.

0:34:330:34:36

It's time to get back on the road and head to auction.

0:34:360:34:39

It's been a jaunty journey for our chaps, kicking off in Ely in Cambridgeshire,

0:34:390:34:43

meandering in and around Leicester

0:34:430:34:45

and ending in Bourne End for their second auction.

0:34:450:34:49

Bourne End in Buckinghamshire is a thriving village outside London

0:34:500:34:54

where the Wye flows into the Thames.

0:34:540:34:56

Look, I think we both ought to go to this auction with great hope...

0:34:560:35:01

-Positive.

-With great expectation.

0:35:010:35:03

-Positivity.

-The journey is alive and firing.

0:35:030:35:05

Yeah, but will their positivity last at the auction at Bourne End Auction Rooms?

0:35:050:35:11

Established over 20 years ago, they offer general weekly auctions

0:35:110:35:14

and monthly antique and specialised sales.

0:35:140:35:17

They also auction on the internet.

0:35:170:35:19

Come on, Mark. It's competition time, OK?

0:35:210:35:25

It certainly is.

0:35:250:35:27

Putting our pair under the hammer at today's auction is Simon Phillip Brown.

0:35:270:35:31

The fruit and vegetable - that's a difficult one.

0:35:330:35:35

That's a real seat of the pants.

0:35:350:35:38

30, £40? Might do a little more than that but it's a nice piece.

0:35:380:35:43

Possibly the best item will be the tribal piece.

0:35:430:35:47

That will make the money.

0:35:470:35:49

We'll soon find out.

0:35:490:35:51

The boys are taking their seats and the auction's about to begin.

0:35:510:35:55

Round two.

0:35:550:35:57

First up is Hanson's Roman hoard, being sold as

0:35:570:36:00

"of metal-detecting interest."

0:36:000:36:02

Here they are. What are they worth?

0:36:020:36:04

I don't know because I haven't seen them!

0:36:040:36:06

-Who'll start me at £50?

-Come on, let's go.

0:36:060:36:08

They cost me 40. Come on, let's go. Come on.

0:36:080:36:11

-Yours at 50 on my left.

-Oh, £50, bid.

0:36:110:36:13

55, 60, 65...

0:36:130:36:15

70, 75, 80...

0:36:150:36:18

-85...

-Cost me £40!

0:36:180:36:19

-90, 95, 100.

-I'm happy now, Mark.

0:36:190:36:21

110...

0:36:210:36:22

£100, now selling at 100.

0:36:220:36:25

Are we all done at 100? On my left now at £100...

0:36:250:36:28

Great start - ooh, he'll be chuffed with that.

0:36:290:36:33

-Well done, Charles.

-So that's given me a £60 start...

-Profit.

0:36:330:36:36

I'm over the moon.

0:36:360:36:37

Now for Mark's scent bottle.

0:36:370:36:39

Can he get a whiff of a profit, too?

0:36:390:36:41

Start me at £20, please, for this lot.

0:36:410:36:44

10 to start, £10. 10 I'm bid...

0:36:440:36:46

12, 14, 16...

0:36:460:36:47

-We're rolling, Mark.

-18, 20, 22...

0:36:470:36:50

£20, now.

0:36:500:36:51

22, 25, 27...

0:36:510:36:54

30, 32, 35...

0:36:540:36:56

-Wow, Mark, you're flying.

-37, 40, 42...

0:36:560:36:59

45, 47, 50...

0:36:590:37:02

55. 60, sir?

0:37:020:37:04

65. 70, sir?

0:37:040:37:06

80, 85, 90...

0:37:060:37:09

95, 100...

0:37:090:37:11

-95 with the lady...

-Congratulations, that's amazing.

0:37:130:37:15

Selling at 95, all done at 95...

0:37:150:37:17

Yours at 95, madam, are we all done now?

0:37:170:37:20

Wow, another great profit.

0:37:200:37:22

They're certainly getting their bang in Bucks.

0:37:220:37:25

-That's really good. How do you feel?

-I feel quite good.

0:37:250:37:28

I think that's a good start. We're both having a good start today.

0:37:280:37:31

Can Charles keep up the good feeling?

0:37:310:37:33

It's his George III mirror next.

0:37:330:37:35

£20, please, for this lot. 20 to start.

0:37:350:37:37

Oh, it cost me £28.

0:37:370:37:38

-20, anybody interested?

-Come on.

0:37:380:37:40

Nobody interested. 20 with the lady.

0:37:400:37:42

Selling at 20, yours at 20... Oh, no.

0:37:420:37:44

-Have we all done at 20 on my left...

-That's cheap.

0:37:440:37:47

22, 25, 27...

0:37:470:37:49

30, sir. 30, 32, 35...

0:37:490:37:51

-Cost me 28.

-37. 37...

0:37:510:37:54

40, 42, 45...

0:37:540:37:56

47, 50, 55...

0:37:560:38:00

60, 65...

0:38:000:38:02

£60. Now selling at 60, with the lady at 60...

0:38:020:38:05

Have we all done at 60 on my left now, thank you.

0:38:050:38:09

Well, well. Doubled your outlay there, boy.

0:38:090:38:12

Mark's fruit and veg are up next. The auctioneer liked this lot.

0:38:120:38:16

Who'll start me at £50, please? For this lot, 50 I'm bid.

0:38:160:38:21

Yours at 50, are we all done?

0:38:210:38:22

55, 60, 65...

0:38:220:38:25

-£60 on my right.

-It's all right.

0:38:250:38:27

Selling at 65. 65, 70...

0:38:270:38:30

75, 80, 85...

0:38:300:38:34

-90, 95...

-Wonderful, Mark.

0:38:340:38:38

-£90 now. Selling at 90, on my right at 90...

-Bit more!

0:38:390:38:43

-Are we all done at 90...

-Hungry for more, Mark?

0:38:430:38:45

Are we all done now?

0:38:450:38:48

Yet another stonking profit - and that puts Mark in the lead.

0:38:480:38:51

-Mark, you're flying high.

-I'm happy with that.

0:38:510:38:54

Charles' riding crop is next. Will the profits keep coming?

0:38:540:38:58

Start me at £30, please. For this lot 30 I'm bid...

0:38:580:39:01

Yours at 30, 32, 35...

0:39:010:39:05

37, 40, 42...

0:39:050:39:06

45, 47, 50...

0:39:060:39:09

55...

0:39:090:39:12

(Go on!)

0:39:120:39:13

£50 now, 55, 60...

0:39:130:39:16

-This is going to go on, Charles.

-It's not.

0:39:160:39:18

-65, 70...

-Yes, it is.

0:39:180:39:19

65 on my right. Selling at 65...

0:39:190:39:22

Are we all done at 65? Selling at 65 on my right...

0:39:220:39:24

Got you at 65 now...

0:39:240:39:27

Whip-crack-away, eh!

0:39:270:39:29

There's no calamity here - another tidy profit.

0:39:290:39:32

-Well done, you made a £35 profit on that.

-I'm delighted, Mark, you know.

0:39:320:39:35

-That's a good profit.

-I'm delighted.

-But I think that might have...

0:39:350:39:38

-I think that was quite a reasonable buy for someone.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:39:380:39:41

Next under the gavel is

0:39:410:39:42

Mark's Shelley dog kennel,

0:39:420:39:44

"of military interest."

0:39:440:39:46

Start me at £20, please. For this lot, 20...

0:39:460:39:49

-10 to start. £10, anybody interested?

-Oh, come on.

0:39:490:39:52

10, 10 I'm bid. Yours at 10, sir.

0:39:520:39:54

Have we all done at 10? 12, 14...

0:39:540:39:56

16, 18. 18 on my right...

0:39:560:39:59

-Oh, come on, it could get a bit more.

-Selling at 18.

0:39:590:40:01

-Have we all done at 18 on my right...

-Oh, no.

-£18 now...

0:40:010:40:03

CHARLES WHINES LIKE A DOG

0:40:030:40:06

Oh. First loss of the day.

0:40:060:40:07

Has that left Mark in the doghouse, I wonder?

0:40:070:40:10

-Never buy knobby knick-knacks...

-OK, I won't buy knobby knick-knacks.

0:40:100:40:13

-because when you buy, you know...

-It wasn't...

0:40:130:40:16

yet it makes a profit in your case.

0:40:160:40:19

Now it's the fertility statue that the auctioneer thinks

0:40:190:40:22

could do very well indeed.

0:40:220:40:25

-50, 50 I'm bid.

-Come on, let's go.

0:40:250:40:26

Got you at 50, yours at 50. Are we all done on my right?

0:40:260:40:29

-Come on.

-50, 55, 60...

0:40:290:40:31

65, 70, 75...

0:40:310:40:34

£70 now. 75, 80...

0:40:350:40:38

-Let's go.

-85, 90, 95...

0:40:380:40:41

-100.

-There we go, Mark, off we go.

-110, 120...

0:40:410:40:43

-Think antique and let's roll on.

-130. At 120 on my right,

0:40:430:40:46

Selling at 120. Are we all done at 120? Yours at 120 now...

0:40:460:40:50

That profit's driven Charles into a huge lead.

0:40:520:40:55

-We're steering our way to a profit.

-Well, you are.

-Look at me.

0:40:550:40:59

Unbelievable.

0:40:590:41:00

Let's see if your parasol can put a smile back on your face, Mark.

0:41:000:41:04

£50, please, for this lot. 50, anybody interested?

0:41:040:41:07

-We're rolling, Mark.

-30, then, to start...

0:41:070:41:10

-30 I'm bid, yours at 30.

-Watch it go now, 35, 40...

0:41:100:41:12

Are we all done? 32, 35, 37...

0:41:120:41:14

40, 42...

0:41:140:41:16

-£40. Got you at 40, yours at 40...

-It's going to roll.

0:41:160:41:19

That's it, your profit.

0:41:190:41:20

Are we all done at 40? Selling at 40,

0:41:200:41:22

yours at 40 now... Are we all done?

0:41:220:41:24

Back making a profit, Mark -

0:41:240:41:26

but it won't be much of one

0:41:260:41:27

after auction costs.

0:41:270:41:29

Good work, profit.

0:41:290:41:31

-What do I have to do?

-Put it there.

-No, I'm not, Charles.

0:41:310:41:34

-It was £10, Charles.

-Profit!

0:41:340:41:38

Charles thinks he's got a real find with these chairs

0:41:380:41:41

but will the bidders see past their tattered state?

0:41:410:41:45

Who'll start me at £50, please, for this lot?

0:41:450:41:47

50 I'm bid, yours at 50,

0:41:470:41:49

-Have we all done at 50...

-Should go on from there.

0:41:490:41:51

55, 60, 60 with William.

0:41:510:41:53

Yours at 60, have we all done at 60?

0:41:530:41:56

65, 70, 75...

0:41:560:41:58

80, 85...

0:41:580:42:00

£80 now with William, selling at 80. Have we all done at 80?

0:42:000:42:04

Yours at 80 now...

0:42:040:42:06

That's a clean sweep for Charles, profits all the way.

0:42:070:42:11

Charles, well done. Second auction to you.

0:42:110:42:14

Listen, but at least for the two of us it's onwards and upwards.

0:42:140:42:17

Come on...

0:42:170:42:18

After paying auction costs,

0:42:200:42:22

Mark Stacey has made a very respectable profit of £85.26.

0:42:220:42:26

As a result, Mark has £287.06 to carry forward.

0:42:260:42:30

It hasn't stopped Charles storming further ahead though,

0:42:320:42:35

making another fantastic profit of £155.50 after costs.

0:42:350:42:40

Mr Hanson has claimed today's victory

0:42:400:42:42

and has £382.30 to start the next leg.

0:42:420:42:47

The boys head for Hereford

0:42:470:42:49

and it's probably best Charles is back behind the wheel.

0:42:490:42:53

So, Mark - Hereford, here we come. MARK LAUGHS

0:42:530:42:56

Charles, I thought you were going to say heaven.

0:42:560:42:58

But, of course, which Hereford is.

0:42:580:43:02

Next time, our experts can't wait to get back on the road again.

0:43:070:43:11

# Just the two of us... #

0:43:110:43:12

Mark Stacey is begging for a bargain.

0:43:120:43:14

Please, please, please...

0:43:140:43:16

Charles Hanson pushes the boat out...

0:43:160:43:18

Would you take three hundred...

0:43:180:43:21

pence?

0:43:210:43:22

Charles Hanson and Mark Stacey seek out hidden gems. The second stint is a scenic saunter from Ely in Cambridgeshire down to the auction in Bourne End, Buckinghamshire.


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