Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 7

Antiques experts Charlie Ross and Natasha Raskin make for an auction in the Hampshire village of Swanmore, but start out in the naval city of Portsmouth.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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What about that?

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..with £200 each, a classic car,

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and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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Can I buy everything here?

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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-Feeling a little sore.

-This is going to be an epic battle.

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-The honeymoon is over.

-Sorry.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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There's an undeniably salty tang to today's adventure

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featuring the Road Trip's oldest hand

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and its newest recruit.

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-Look at that. Portsmouth.

-Oh, wow!

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Can you see Portsmouth?

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-That's amazing.

-There is a wonderful building there, the Spinnaker Tower.

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-Can you see it?

-I see it. I see it.

-Isn't that absolutely wonderful?

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That's beautiful. What a beautiful view, what a vista.

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A lot of naval history down there.

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Yes, "naval-gazing" in a 1970s Triumph TR6 are auctioneers

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Natasha Raskin and Charlie Ross.

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-Look at that cannon.

-Wow.

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Do you know, that's what I want to buy today.

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-I knew you were going to say that.

-Not that size,

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but I'd like to buy a cannon.

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Well, why not?

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Because Charlie from Oxfordshire, a veteran Road Trip campaigner...

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Long way up, short way down. That's what they say, isn't it?

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..certainly bagged victory through militaria at yesterday's auction...

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Yes. Come on!

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..while Glaswegian newbie

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and style icon Natasha got off to a mixed start on her Road Trip debut.

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Oh!

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Very mountain style. I love it.

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In fact, our fine art specialist did well on almost everything.

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But there were a few losses.

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That should have made £100.

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Not that that'll dim Natasha's sunny disposition for long.

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SHE LAUGHS

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What are you giggling at? You giggle all the time.

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Just before the auction that lady said to you yesterday,

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"You're such a gentleman".

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Then she said, "And you're a giggler!"

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THEY LAUGH

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They both set out with £200,

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but Natasha has already gone backwards to £185.78.

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Whilst Charlie has forged ahead to a healthy total of £293.06.

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# We sail the ocean blue

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-# And our saucy ship's a BOTH:

-Beauty

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CHARLIE: # When at anchor we ride

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-# On the Portsmouth BOTH:

-Tide

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# We've plenty of time for play Ahoy

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-BOTH: #

-Ahoy!

-#

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Steady on.

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Our voyage begins in Cornwall at Falmouth and heads east,

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virtually circumnavigating southern England before dropping

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anchor over 900 miles later at

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Stansted Mountfitchet, Essex.

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Today we're making for an auction in the Hampshire village

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of Swanmore, but starting out in the famous naval city of Portsmouth.

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# I am the ruler of the Queen's Navy

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# The Pass Examination did well for he

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# That now he is the ruler of the Queen's Navy. #

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That's superb! We'll have you in the next production!

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SHE LAUGHS

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Portsmouth's been the home of the Royal Navy for over 500 years.

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It was from here that Nelson set sail for the Battle of Trafalgar

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and in 1944 Portsmouth was the D-Day embarkation point

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for many Allied troops.

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Now, time for the crew of the good ship TR6 to sally forth. Go for it.

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-In you go.

-Thank you so much. Hello.

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Hello, there.

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-And here's the boss. Hello.

-Hello.

-Andrew, isn't it?

-That's right.

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-Hi, I'm Tasha.

-Hi, Tasha.

-Lovely to meet you.

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Located in a Grade I listed building that once stored

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supplies for the Navy, this shop almost feels like a museum.

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Look at that.

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South Wales Borderers. Isn't that fabulous?

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And this, a flying helmet and goggles.

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But Andrew's fine collection of militaria with a nautical bent

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is a little too specialised for some.

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I'm a bit scared of this shop. I don't know anything about it.

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Relax, Natasha.

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Just enjoy yourself, kid.

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Charlie certainly is.

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A bit of history.

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"HW Edwards, Middlesex Yeomanry."

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And he kept his hat in that.

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I don't know what to do. They've got so much stuff.

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They've got everything.

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They've got militaria maritime, Asian bronzes,

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ceramics, Royal Doulton...

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Deep breaths.

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What am I going to find? What am I going to find?

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Well, in Charlie's case, the tried and trusted, it seems.

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Swedish Fire Brigade. That must be rare, mustn't it?

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They can't have many firemen in Sweden.

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Lots of trees, Charlie.

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That's...

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What about that? That's sensational. That's pretty swish, isn't it?

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It's got a badge on it, too. What's this? Is this the Russian VC?

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Oh, yes, absolutely(!)

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HE LAUGHS

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-For somebody to dress up in.

-Yes, and if you like Adam Ant!

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A metal badge here. Would that signify rank?

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-Is that a Russian sergeant there?

-I guess it is a sergeant, yes.

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I'll tell you what.

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If I manage to buy this you'll have to do the catalogue description

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cos you could go about four pages on that, couldn't you?

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-How's your Cyrillic?

-My Cyrillic's quite good actually.

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You get the job then.

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Cyrillic? Nice one.

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That's fantastic.

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Still, it looks like he might be staying in mufti today.

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Natasha, meanwhile, continues to fret.

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I think I want to be at the front of the shop near the owner.

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But Charlie is hogging this man. He has got him in his grasp.

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Have you got something that's come through the door, you know,

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-for the money, as it were?

-I bought this over the counter yesterday.

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-It's not Capodimonte, is it?

-It is.

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-Agh!

-I know. I thought that as well.

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-Yes.

-But it's 19th-century Capodimonte.

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Established in Naples in 1743, Capodimonte soon acquired

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quite a reputation and is recognisable

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for its densely moulded figures and flowers in alto-relievo.

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-Almost Meissen-esque isn't it, here?

-Yes.

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It's got quality to it. That's just come through the door, has it?

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-Yes.

-What, just like that?

-Yes. Paid 100 for it.

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I suppose you just want it as a very small working profit?

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Absolutely. That's fine with me. To make £15 on it, that's fine.

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-I saw similar online...

-Look at me.

-..for 750.

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Blimey.

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While Charlie ponders his porcelain, Natasha,

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badly needing to catch up, has finally found something.

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Look at this. What have we got here?

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"Tunic dress for the 2nd Regiment of Foot."

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That's quite nice, isn't it? Is that dandruff or is that just dust?

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It's just dust. That's quite nice, isn't it? I'd wear that.

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That's really wearable. I kind of want to try it on.

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It's a good fit.

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That is chic.

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-Charlie?

-Hello.

-What do you make of that?

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That's sensational!

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How good is that? So, 1930s, it says here.

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Comes with trousers with everything on them.

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Well, go and put the trousers on! Come on!

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-Each of those buttons is a work of art. It's got no moth either.

-No.

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I'll tell you what. If you walk up and down the auction wearing that...

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Oh, yes, that would make a fortune.

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Oh, yes, I think it would make 500 quid.

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Why is it so cheap compared to everything else in the shop?

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It's far too cheap. I think it should be 215, shouldn't it?

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-It could go that way, yes.

-Is this less collectable, really?

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-Is it because of the age of it?

-It's the age, yeah.

-OK.

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So I'm thinking that whilst £115 is still really cheap,

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I'd quite like to buy this uniform.

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-I'm going to leave this while you negotiate.

-Charlie.

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-Oh, my goodness.

-I can't possibly be around.

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What do you think? Could I get it in two figures?

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-I'll do it for 90, OK?

-You'll do it for 90?

-Yes.

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I think I might do it. I think I'm going to do it.

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Charlie had such good success yesterday.

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I wanted to buy something that was up your street when I was in your shop.

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-OK.

-Let's do it. My goodness.

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-Lovely.

-That was a huge amount of my money, though.

-Is it?

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That's a huge chunk.

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But Charlie told me to spend big and he's my guide.

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Did he really? It's almost half her budget.

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But if it does as well as Charlie's she'll be all right.

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He, meanwhile, has headed further into the depths.

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Here we've got a wonderful case of fish.

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We've got a pike, and we've got a trout.

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I don't know what that is.

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It looks rather nice to eat whatever it is.

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The ticket price is £300. Wow!

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-Andrew?

-Mm?

-Could I borrow you?

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This is quite fun because they're nearly always mounted singly,

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-aren't they?

-Yes.

-It's really nice to have a collection. A pike?

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-Don't ask me.

-A trout?

-A fish, a fish, a fish and another fish.

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-No, there's a pike and a trout. What's that down there?

-Is it chub?

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Chub. Possibly a chub. It's got a bit of age, too, hasn't it?

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-It's probably Edwardian.

-Yeah. About 1900 with that black ebonised...

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Yes. It'd be nice to find a little label there, wouldn't it?

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-Absolutely.

-Caught by hook and what-have-you.

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It's quite fun that.

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If I pulled out 150 crispies would that excite you?

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Are you a sort of...?

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-I could do two on it. Two.

-Two?

-Yeah.

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That's the third thing I've seen I've liked.

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How much would you like for the shopful?

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What's that got to do with the price of fish, Charlie?

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So, what's it to be?

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Do I want to spend £200 on something I really like, on fish,

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and do my money, or do I want to go

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for a bit of 19th-century Capodimonte which I don't like?

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And, although I don't like it,

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I just think somebody might pay money for that.

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Why am I coming into a wonderful militaria establishment

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and going out with a portrait of myself sitting on a barrel?

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So, £115...

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I'm going to have that. That's very generous of you. Thank you very much indeed.

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£115? Charlie's spent quite a bit already, too.

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Natasha, meanwhile, has headed elsewhere in Portsmouth.

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South, I'd say, to Southsea.

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-Robbie? Hello.

-Pleased to meet you. And your name?

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-I'm Tasha. Lovely to meet you.

-Pleased to meet you.

-How are you?

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-Yeah, fine.

-Good.

-Lovely weather.

-Lovely weather.

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-I brought it with me from Glasgow.

-I know that's a lie.

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Robbie's shop is certainly quite different

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from the one she was in earlier - a bit shabby chic, dare we say?

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And perhaps a tad more affordable.

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-I'll have a root around.

-Have a root around.

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I'll try and help you as much as possible.

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I should let you in on a secret. I don't have very much money.

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-You think I'm just saying that. I actually don't.

-They never do.

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Right, OK, here we go.

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No, Robbie, she means it.

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Less than £100 now. Charlie would like those.

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I want it, I want it, I want it.

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Oh, yes.

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The thing that I like in here is going to cost me

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an arm and a leg, so I don't think you're going to go for it at all,

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-but I love the cologne bottle.

-Yes.

-I love it.

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That's a period one, but we can't...

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It smells really nice, but we can't get the stopper out of the top.

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-OK.

-But it's fabulous.

-It's fabulous.

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And it's full of its original cologne.

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-That's not just coloured water?

-No, it's cologne.

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-It's not just for display purposes?

-No.

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-What's the price on it?

-£40 is the best I can do on that.

-£40.

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What about the Tunbridge ware box? That is absolutely gorgeous.

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The stamp box. I can do that for £30.

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£30. It's all adding up. It's all adding up. OK.

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Yes, it is.

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You should have come here first when you had a big budget.

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I know, I'm a plonker. But there are some interesting things.

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I do really love the cologne though.

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And the other thing I saw when I walked in - tools, the big tools.

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The farm tools. How long have you had those - years?

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-Do you want to get rid of them?

-No, they came yesterday.

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-Get away from me, yesterday(!)

-But you're welcome to have a look

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and I can sort you a deal out. There's one bit in there

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I don't know what it is so you might be able to tell me.

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-Let's have a look.

-Sounds intriguing!

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I have to say it brings a smile to my face

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that you're asking me what this is.

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I'm not from the country but, look, it spins both ways.

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It's suffering a bit from woodworm, isn't it?

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Someone must know what that is.

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I'd say it was a flail or thresher,

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to separate the wheat from the chaff.

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I really like these. I think they're quite good fun.

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-What do you think? I'm steering away from naval items.

-That could sell.

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That could sell. What about the whole lot?

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How many bits? 50 quid.

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-Oh, jeez!

-That's cheap.

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What was I doing this morning, spending all my money?

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£40 the lot and that is me on the floor.

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If you can't earn a profit out of that...

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There's five bits. Look, every bit of it's old.

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-Lovely fork.

-I know.

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And if they don't sell you can take them home

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and start an allotment or something.

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He's good, isn't he?

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If you try and get something else, a couple of bits you like,

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-I'll see what I can do for the whole lot for a deal.

-OK.

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Right, OK, I'm going to have a think about it.

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Take my thinking stick.

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OK, whatever the stick thinks, we're definitely getting somewhere.

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There's the tools for £40, or the perfume bottle for £40,

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or the stamp box for £30, or, like Robbie says,

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there could be a parcel.

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-This is just...

-That's fabulous, that is.

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Do you know, that is exactly the word. Fabulous.

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It makes me think of a department store

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-cos it's big enough for a display.

-Look, "Galeries Lafayette".

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Galeries Lafayette is the place to go in Paris to buy perfume

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and, really, it is the top, top, top place in Paris.

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And you've got it in Southsea.

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Exactly!

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This couldn't be more different because here is a stamp box.

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The only thing is I noticed a little crack here.

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We've got a loss here.

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I'd have a little crack if I was the age of that.

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-Not the end of the world, is it?

-No.

-But it is lovely.

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I mean this really delicate parquetry.

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-Very fine work on the top.

-It's unbelievable, isn't it?

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So those two are contenders.

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And then, again, on a totally different scale, the tools.

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I'm back to the tools and my thinking stick.

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And they're a good seller, the tools.

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I think you'd do well over there. I'll tell you what I can do for you.

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-I'll chuck the shoeshine box in over there...

-A shoeshine...

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Which is lovely. You'll get £10 to £20 on that, hopefully.

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I can do the whole lot for you and that would be £80.

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-That's the best I can do.

-No, you can't.

-That's the best I can do.

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-For all of those things?

-All those bits.

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Blimey, Robbie, are you sure?

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-I think we should do it. Robbie. Oh, my goodness.

-You will do well.

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You will have a profit. You'll have a profit.

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-I can't believe you've done that. Is it because I'm from Glasgow?

-Yes.

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Well, it's not often that someone bravely blows

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almost all their cash on day one.

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What's more, I've never had the chance to say,

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"Exit with thinking stick".

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Cheerio.

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Charlie, meanwhile,

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has motored further along the historic harbour-side

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in search of a lift to one of Portsmouth's

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more forbidding landmarks.

0:14:190:14:21

-You must be Mark.

-Hello, Charlie. Nice to meet you.

0:14:210:14:23

-Hello. Lovely to see you.

-Step on board.

0:14:230:14:26

Charlie's off to visit one of the four Solent forts

0:14:270:14:30

built in the 19th century to protect the port

0:14:300:14:33

from sea attack and bombardment.

0:14:330:14:35

So what are these forts?

0:14:350:14:38

Well, they were put in place by Lord Palmerston

0:14:380:14:40

against the possible threat of Napoleon III.

0:14:400:14:43

Full 360-degree firing batteries designed to repel the French.

0:14:430:14:47

-We were that worried about the French invading, then?

-Very much so.

0:14:470:14:50

Lord Palmerston felt if Portsmouth fell

0:14:500:14:52

the rest of the country would follow.

0:14:520:14:55

They had to protect Portsmouth and that was at all costs.

0:14:550:14:58

Do we have any historical evidence

0:14:580:15:00

that old Napoleon was attempting something?

0:15:000:15:03

Sadly not, it looks like...

0:15:030:15:04

We look back on the history books and he never intended to,

0:15:040:15:07

so they got the lovely nickname of Palmerston's Follies.

0:15:070:15:10

Prime Minister Palmerston had passed away by the time the forts

0:15:100:15:14

were eventually completed in 1880 and, although they were fully

0:15:140:15:17

manned and armed, they were never actually used in anger.

0:15:170:15:20

-That's one of the forts there?

-That's right,

0:15:210:15:23

that's Spitbank Fort right there.

0:15:230:15:25

We've converted that into a luxury hotel.

0:15:250:15:28

-Well, we might stop off there on the way back.

-Glass of champagne?

0:15:280:15:31

The forts were deactivated after World War II

0:15:310:15:34

and eventually closed in the 1960s.

0:15:340:15:36

Charlie's heading for Horse Sand Fort, which,

0:15:360:15:39

closed to the public, remains very much as it was -

0:15:390:15:42

forbidding.

0:15:420:15:43

Now, this is fascinating for someone like me.

0:15:430:15:45

-We love our antiques to be untouched.

-You've come to the right place.

0:15:450:15:49

Yes, 1967 was the last time this fort was occupied.

0:15:490:15:52

Crikey.

0:15:520:15:53

And we're looking now to convert it to a living museum.

0:15:530:15:56

We're looking to have the different cannon, the different era...

0:15:560:15:59

-And a gun comes out each of these portholes?

-That's exactly right.

0:15:590:16:02

The fort, which cost £424,694 to build,

0:16:020:16:08

was constructed, like the others, by means of gigantic

0:16:080:16:11

carved granite blocks dropped directly onto the sand bank.

0:16:110:16:16

-Is it one of those "don't look down" moments?

-Yeah. Think light thoughts.

0:16:160:16:20

That's why I didn't have breakfast.

0:16:200:16:22

The first blocks were placed by divers,

0:16:220:16:25

then gradually built up above sea level.

0:16:250:16:27

It doesn't sound that firm a foundation,

0:16:270:16:29

but they've not moved since.

0:16:290:16:31

-What's this, a storage tank of some sort?

-It's actually the front door.

0:16:320:16:36

What?!

0:16:360:16:37

It's an iron door, over 15 feet thick.

0:16:370:16:41

It's several tonnes. and it was designed to be rolled out

0:16:410:16:44

-and plug the door that we just walked through.

-Amazing.

0:16:440:16:47

Do you know, in a funny sort of romantic way,

0:16:470:16:49

it's rather a shame that Napoleon III didn't invade.

0:16:490:16:54

It would have been nice to see.

0:16:540:16:55

Yeah, they'd have had a lot of fun on here, wouldn't they?

0:16:550:16:58

They were certainly prepared.

0:16:580:16:59

With artesian wells from which to draw water from beneath the

0:16:590:17:02

seabed and a plentiful supply of fish, the fort,

0:17:020:17:05

with around 600 men on three floors,

0:17:050:17:08

even had the means to make small arms.

0:17:080:17:10

We've actually got a set of the bellows brought across

0:17:100:17:13

from Spitbank, but they are original.

0:17:130:17:15

They're wonderful, aren't they? Fully working.

0:17:150:17:18

Are they for sale?

0:17:180:17:20

Although the forts never saw action,

0:17:200:17:23

the deterrent they provided to any would-be invader was undeniable.

0:17:230:17:27

-What sort of range would that travel, do you know?

-Up to a mile.

0:17:280:17:32

-Up to a mile?

-Yeah.

0:17:320:17:34

-Any accuracy?

-Pretty good, actually.

-Really?

0:17:340:17:37

-They were rifled, as well, so they would be able to...

-Oh, really?

0:17:370:17:40

-Yeah.

-And would they had been made on the fort, as well?

0:17:400:17:43

No, they wouldn't. They'd have been shipped over, because

0:17:430:17:46

-if you try and lift it, you can understand why.

-Cor, blimey!

0:17:460:17:49

-It IS heavy.

-Deceptive, isn't it?

0:17:500:17:52

-You'd know if that hit you, wouldn't you?

-Yeah.

0:17:520:17:54

Just designed to pierce and sink ships, that was it.

0:17:540:17:56

There was no ballistics, it didn't explode on impact, it would just go

0:17:560:17:59

-straight through the hull into the bottom of the sea.

-Sink the ship!

0:17:590:18:03

And perhaps the best place to understand exactly how the forts

0:18:030:18:07

were designed to protect the dockyard is from the roof.

0:18:070:18:10

Wonderful, a roof garden.

0:18:100:18:12

Because Horse Sand and the rest are just the most visible parts

0:18:120:18:15

of the defences the Victorians cunningly devised.

0:18:150:18:18

So the shipping going into the harbour goes there, does it?

0:18:180:18:22

That's right, so they actually have to come round the fort this way,

0:18:220:18:25

because, in fact, there's a submarine barrier.

0:18:250:18:27

-And those markers mark the submarine barrier.

-Which is still there?

0:18:270:18:32

That's right. At low tide, it's only about six foot beneath the surface.

0:18:320:18:35

So if they tried to come in that way, submarine barrier would get them?

0:18:350:18:39

-That's right.

-And if they come in this way, they'd be shot to bits?

0:18:390:18:42

-Between the two forts.

-You couldn't win, could you?

-Perfect location.

0:18:420:18:45

Meanwhile, back on terra firma, Charlie's young rival

0:18:470:18:50

is experiencing an altogether different version

0:18:500:18:53

of life beside the sea.

0:18:530:18:54

Wonderful, coconut ice cream. Local, coconut ice cream.

0:18:540:18:57

What more could you want on this glorious day on the beach?

0:18:570:19:00

Sitting here keeping an eye out for Charlie.

0:19:000:19:02

I'm sure we'll see him soon. In a life ring.

0:19:020:19:05

Huh. I wonder who'll be sunk at the auction, then, eh?

0:19:050:19:08

Nighty-night.

0:19:080:19:10

Next morning, Natasha - who's only recently passed her test -

0:19:110:19:15

-is behind the wheel. Watch out.

-Oh, where's the break?

0:19:150:19:19

Where's the break?

0:19:190:19:20

Relax! I'm fairly sure she's joking, Charlie.

0:19:200:19:24

Yesterday, the new girl, in a bold bid to make up ground,

0:19:240:19:27

grabbed whatever her shops had to offer, acquiring some scent,

0:19:270:19:32

a stamp box, a shoe shine box, some farming tools and a uniform,

0:19:320:19:37

-for the grand total of £170.

-Hello.

0:19:370:19:41

What do you make of that?

0:19:410:19:43

Leaving just £15 left over for anything else she might fancy.

0:19:430:19:48

While Charlie made only one buy, although it was a bit pricey...

0:19:480:19:51

Somebody might pay money for that.

0:19:510:19:53

..splashing out £115 on a Capodimonte mug,

0:19:530:19:56

which means he still has almost £180 left to spend today.

0:19:560:20:01

Good old boy.

0:20:010:20:02

Later, they'll be making for an auction in the village of Swanmore,

0:20:040:20:08

but our next stop is at Lower Upham.

0:20:080:20:10

I love barns!

0:20:140:20:16

Have you ever driven into one?

0:20:160:20:18

No, I don't want to drive into a barn.

0:20:180:20:20

-Ladies first.

-Thank you.

-Madam.

0:20:200:20:23

OK, let's go into a barn.

0:20:230:20:25

Aye, aye, ladies first. He's up to something. Look out...

0:20:250:20:28

You go and look round.

0:20:280:20:31

-Hello, hi, I'm Natasha.

-Roy.

0:20:310:20:34

Roy, lovely to meet you. What a fabulous place.

0:20:340:20:37

Yes, it is, Natasha.

0:20:370:20:38

So good, that Charlie's not made it through the door yet.

0:20:380:20:42

Rather a nice cast iron fireback.

0:20:420:20:44

Now, although it has a date on it of 16-something...

0:20:450:20:49

Cor, blimey!

0:20:490:20:51

..it's probably 1890.

0:20:510:20:53

It might even be into the 20th century.

0:20:530:20:56

I can't get it back.

0:20:560:20:57

-HE GROANS

-Careful, Charlie.

0:20:570:20:59

Inside, there's a lot of very nice furniture. Reasonable prices, too.

0:21:010:21:05

But, when you've only got £15 to spend, you have to

0:21:050:21:08

think outside the box.

0:21:080:21:10

I don't know if I were to add that, for example, to my Tunbridge ware

0:21:100:21:13

stamp box, would it do anything to the lot?

0:21:130:21:16

Would it simply dilute it, would it add anything to it?

0:21:160:21:19

I don't think it would add anything to it. Although, inside

0:21:190:21:22

it says 12 quid, which is nothing.

0:21:220:21:24

I think I'll leave that alone.

0:21:240:21:26

Charlie, now back with us,

0:21:260:21:28

has meanwhile found some encouraging signs.

0:21:280:21:31

Now, this is quite interesting.

0:21:310:21:32

There's a crisis here amongst the management.

0:21:330:21:37

Arts and crafts hall stand, £280.

0:21:370:21:40

On the other coat hook, arts and crafts hall stand..

0:21:410:21:44

..£150.

0:21:440:21:46

Which would you like?

0:21:460:21:47

I think we can all agree on that one.

0:21:470:21:49

-Natasha, however, may be about to save her £15.

-Charlie!

-Hello?

0:21:490:21:54

How are you getting on?

0:21:540:21:56

I might be getting on jolly well.

0:21:560:21:58

I had a good look around, but I don't think there's

0:21:580:22:00

anything for me, Charles.

0:22:000:22:01

-Really?

-No.

-Have you met the owner?

-Oh, Roy. Yes, I have met Roy.

0:22:010:22:05

-Is he nice?

-He seems very flexible.

0:22:050:22:08

Oh, I love someone who is flexible. Bye-bye.

0:22:080:22:11

So, then there was one, and, strangely enough, after all

0:22:130:22:16

that talk of finding something nautical by the seaside...

0:22:160:22:19

I'd quite like a ship's wheel.

0:22:190:22:22

It's got no price on it.

0:22:220:22:23

If that ship's wheel was in Portsmouth, it would be £150.

0:22:230:22:29

Probably.

0:22:290:22:30

It might be cheaper up here. But we'll ask.

0:22:300:22:33

What's his name? Ron, I think.

0:22:330:22:36

-Roy!

-Roy! Roooooy!

0:22:360:22:38

Don't wear it out, Charlie.

0:22:380:22:41

How are you, Roy?

0:22:410:22:42

-I'm very well indeed. Loving your shop, Roy.

-Thank you.

0:22:420:22:46

Now, I almost tripped over an enormous cast iron fireback

0:22:460:22:49

coming in here. Is it for sale? It hasn't got a price on it.

0:22:490:22:53

£40.

0:22:530:22:55

It's quite cheap per pound, isn't it? Per pound weight.

0:22:550:22:58

-And there's a ship's wheel here. Is that...?

-That one can be £60.

0:22:580:23:03

-That's not much money, is it, really?

-No, no.

0:23:040:23:07

So, there's that and the print.

0:23:070:23:08

Would you like to come and have a look at the print with me?

0:23:080:23:11

You might be able to educate me.

0:23:110:23:12

It was this.

0:23:130:23:14

-Yes, it's a nice, early one.

-It is early, isn't it?

0:23:160:23:20

1733, as far as I can see. Titchfield Abbey.

0:23:200:23:23

So it's not far from here.

0:23:230:23:25

-About six miles.

-There's more...

0:23:250:23:27

William Waynfleat, who was Bishop of Winchester.

0:23:280:23:31

They go nice together, actually, don't they?

0:23:310:23:34

If I made you an offer for the fireback, the ship's wheel

0:23:340:23:39

and the two prints, could there be a bit of a bulk buy?

0:23:390:23:42

I think that we possibly could do something.

0:23:420:23:44

It would be too cheeky to say 80 quid, wouldn't it, for the lot?

0:23:440:23:47

-Yes, I think it would be.

-Yeah, I thought it would be. Hmm.

0:23:470:23:51

Where do you see yourself coming to?

0:23:520:23:54

-100.

-Do you? I thought you were going to say that. 100 for the three.

0:23:540:23:59

Would you show me the door if I said 90 quid?

0:23:590:24:02

95.

0:24:020:24:03

I love your flexibility.

0:24:050:24:06

I can't say no, I think that's a really, really generous offer.

0:24:060:24:09

-Are you happy with that?

-Absolutely.

-You sure?

-Yep!

0:24:090:24:12

I think that's fantastic. Thank you very much.

0:24:120:24:14

So, that's £20 for the prints, £50 for the ship's wheel

0:24:140:24:17

and £25 for the fireback.

0:24:170:24:19

Fast work, Charlie.

0:24:190:24:21

Now, where's that Natasha slipped off to?

0:24:230:24:26

I think we can rule out shopping.

0:24:260:24:28

On our way to Winchester, the county town of Hampshire.

0:24:300:24:34

Oh, this is gorgeous.

0:24:340:24:35

She's come to visit a museum dedicated

0:24:350:24:38

to some of our bravest fighting men.

0:24:380:24:41

-Hello, hi. Gavin?

-Hello, Natasha.

-Natasha, exactly.

0:24:410:24:45

Lovely to meet you.

0:24:450:24:46

The story of the Gurkhas begins with the Anglo-Nepalese War

0:24:480:24:51

in the early 19th century.

0:24:510:24:53

The tiny, mountainous kingdom came face-to-face

0:24:530:24:56

with the might of the East India Company

0:24:560:24:58

and such was the tenacity with which its soldiers fought

0:24:580:25:01

that, afterwards, they were encouraged to serve FOR the British.

0:25:010:25:05

Then, during the Indian mutiny in 1857,

0:25:050:25:08

the Gurkhas' reputation was firmly established.

0:25:080:25:11

After mutineers had seized Delhi, Ghurkhas of the Sirmur Battalion

0:25:120:25:16

stayed loyal and trustworthy to the British in the Indian armies

0:25:160:25:20

and fought side-by-side gallantly and bravely

0:25:200:25:23

against the mutineers, fighting off substantial and huge attacks.

0:25:230:25:28

Major Charles Reid, who was the officer commanding the Gurkhas

0:25:280:25:32

at the siege of Delhi, he was carrying that very telescope

0:25:320:25:36

when a mutineer's shell exploded above his head,

0:25:360:25:39

sadly killing the Gurkha who was standing next to him.

0:25:390:25:43

But, as you can see, it is carrying the scars of battle to this day.

0:25:430:25:47

When news of their bravery reached Britain,

0:25:470:25:50

our country's love affair with the Gurkhas began.

0:25:500:25:53

Military honours were soon awarded and the Gurkhas,

0:25:530:25:55

with their trademark weapon, became part of the new British Indian Army.

0:25:550:26:00

Tell me more about the weapons,

0:26:000:26:02

because I see at the back there a kukri knife.

0:26:020:26:04

Used for a variety of purposes.

0:26:040:26:06

A Gurkha soldier obviously uses it as a weapon.

0:26:060:26:10

Back home, in his homeland,

0:26:100:26:11

he would use it for a variety of domestic activities.

0:26:110:26:15

During the latter half of the 19th century,

0:26:150:26:17

Gurkha regiments fought in most of Britain's campaigns

0:26:170:26:21

and during both World Wars

0:26:210:26:22

more than 200,000 men served with distinction.

0:26:220:26:26

What's on this table, you've plucked a few from the cabinets.

0:26:260:26:29

I have indeed. This particular

0:26:290:26:31

Victoria Cross was the first to be awarded to a Ghurkha.

0:26:310:26:35

Until 1911, Gurkhas were ineligible for this award

0:26:350:26:38

and the First World War saw the first award of a Victoria Cross.

0:26:380:26:43

Rifleman Kulbir Thapa left the British trenches

0:26:430:26:47

and attacked the Germans.

0:26:470:26:49

Sadly, his comrades were all killed and wounded.

0:26:490:26:52

He managed to make it to the German front line, crossed the line,

0:26:520:26:55

found a wounded soldier of the Leicestershire Regiment,

0:26:550:26:59

brought him back to relative safety, went back,

0:26:590:27:02

saved two more Gurkha's lives, brought them back

0:27:020:27:05

and then went back out again in broad daylight under heavy fire

0:27:050:27:09

to bring in the wounded Leicestershire man.

0:27:090:27:12

On the back, you will see his name engraved and the date of his award.

0:27:120:27:17

-Oh, my goodness.

-And remember that Gurkha regiments have won 26 VCs...

0:27:170:27:22

-In total?

-In total. 13 to Gurkhas and 13 to British officers.

0:27:220:27:26

-Oh, my goodness.

-Amazing total.

0:27:260:27:28

When India won independence in 1947,

0:27:280:27:31

the Gurkha regiments were split between the Indian

0:27:310:27:34

and British armies and, 200 years after they first demonstrated

0:27:340:27:38

their bravery by fighting against Britain, they're still serving.

0:27:380:27:43

-This is our latest acquisition.

-Oh, really? Wow.

0:27:430:27:46

And this was presented to us by Lance Corporal Tuljung Gurung

0:27:460:27:50

-of 1st Battalion, the Royal Ghurkha Rifles.

-OK.

0:27:500:27:52

And this is the combat helmet and kukri that he carried.

0:27:520:27:57

When, recently in Afghanistan, he was attacked by Taliban fighters

0:27:570:28:01

who fired at him in his sentry post,

0:28:010:28:04

a round hit him in the front of the helmet and exited at the back.

0:28:040:28:09

This knocked him backwards.

0:28:090:28:11

He came round to find a grenade bouncing

0:28:110:28:13

across the floor of his post.

0:28:130:28:15

He picks it up, throws it out, it explodes and knocks him back again.

0:28:150:28:20

He then comes round again to find a Taliban insurgent

0:28:200:28:24

inside his sentry post,

0:28:240:28:25

so he takes out his kukri, fights off the Taliban.

0:28:250:28:29

The two of them tumble out of their sentry post onto the ground

0:28:290:28:33

-and another Taliban comes in to join the fight.

-Oh, my goodness.

0:28:330:28:36

Lance Corporal Tuljung beats them both off with his kukri

0:28:360:28:39

and they flee into the distance.

0:28:390:28:42

That is the most unbelievable story but, strangely, after all these

0:28:420:28:45

things I've heard about Gurkhas, totally believable.

0:28:450:28:48

-For that action, he was awarded the Military Cross.

-That is...

0:28:480:28:52

Do you know, that gives me the chills.

0:28:520:28:55

Can you imagine what that felt like? And did he survive?

0:28:550:28:59

He did indeed.

0:28:590:29:01

The bullet entered the front of the helmet, exited at the back

0:29:010:29:05

and just missed the top of his ear, so he was really fortunate.

0:29:050:29:09

Lance Corporal Gurung remains on active duty,

0:29:090:29:13

one of almost 3,000 Gurkhas in today's army.

0:29:130:29:16

What a hero. What an absolute hero.

0:29:160:29:18

Now, let's have a look at our Charlie.

0:29:220:29:24

With one shop left to go, our hero.

0:29:240:29:27

He's taken the route both south and east towards Wickham,

0:29:300:29:33

birthplace in the 14th century of William of Wickham,

0:29:330:29:36

who became a Bishop of Winchester -

0:29:360:29:38

not to be confused with William Waynfleat,

0:29:380:29:40

the one whose picture Charlie bought earlier.

0:29:400:29:43

-They like their Ws round here, don't they?

-Hello, I'm Charlie.

0:29:430:29:46

-I'm Liz.

-Hello, Liz.

0:29:460:29:48

-I like the bunting.

-Thank you.

-It's coronation day. It's very exciting.

0:29:480:29:53

-I'll have a look around, if I may.

-Yes, certainly.

0:29:530:29:55

What's here for King Charlie, then? Some nice things, certainly.

0:29:550:29:59

But he's already picked up a few items.

0:29:590:30:02

I like it when you've crossed out one price and put another one in.

0:30:020:30:05

As long as it's lower.

0:30:050:30:06

Huh. He's still got £83 left to spend, too.

0:30:060:30:10

Look at that.

0:30:100:30:12

American Frohse Anatomical Charts.

0:30:120:30:17

I wonder what date that is? Edwardian?

0:30:170:30:20

Gosh, isn't that extraordinary?

0:30:200:30:22

That's what we all look like when you strip us down, isn't it?

0:30:220:30:25

You speak for yourself.

0:30:250:30:27

-It is free, it's got no price.

-It is over 100.

0:30:270:30:30

-Is it?

-But I can call him, if you like?

0:30:300:30:32

I'm not really going to be around the £100 mark.

0:30:320:30:35

-If you would like to ring him up?

-Certainly, yeah.

0:30:350:30:38

I think that would be super. Just get a sort of feel for it. I'll carry on looking around.

0:30:380:30:41

-Ah, actually, he's here.

-What?

-He's here.

-As if by magic?

0:30:410:30:44

-He's turned up, yes.

-Hello, sir.

0:30:440:30:46

-Hello.

-And you are?

-I'm Nick.

0:30:460:30:48

-Hello, Nick. I'm Charlie.

-Hi, Charlie.

0:30:480:30:50

-You lucky man.

-Yes.

-You own that?

0:30:500:30:52

We do, yes. Me and my business partner do.

0:30:520:30:54

-You and your business partner.

-Yeah.

-Which is which?

0:30:540:30:57

I'm the one with the beating heart.

0:30:570:30:59

Where did you get it from?

0:30:590:31:01

I got it from a retired GP.

0:31:010:31:03

-We like it cos it draws people into the area.

-Immediately.

0:31:030:31:07

He doesn't seem anxious to sell, Charlie.

0:31:070:31:09

-The rock bottom on it would be about 140 for us.

-Would it? Yeah, yeah.

0:31:090:31:13

Ah, well. Time for that keen eye to look elsewhere.

0:31:130:31:16

Oh, is that a thatcher's needle?

0:31:160:31:18

-Isn't it in super condition?

-Yes. I thought you'd like it.

0:31:190:31:24

You know what I like - quirky things. I think that's lovely.

0:31:240:31:27

Not quite sure how you work it. What you do with your thatch.

0:31:270:31:31

-I think you thread something...

-Put the cord in there?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:31:310:31:35

-..and hook it over the thatch.

-Hook it over the thatch.

0:31:350:31:39

-Catch it there and pull it back, yeah, so it binds the thatch.

-Yes.

0:31:390:31:42

There is something here that's fab but I'm not quite sure what it is.

0:31:420:31:46

-A vacuum pump.

-Yes.

0:31:460:31:48

A piece of laboratory equipment, possibly.

0:31:480:31:52

Well, you wind the wheel...

0:31:520:31:53

WHEEL RASPS

0:31:530:31:54

I beg your pardon?

0:31:540:31:55

WHEEL RASPS

0:31:550:31:58

..and that cylinder produces a vacuum coming out of here,

0:31:580:32:01

so it's to suck air out of something.

0:32:010:32:03

Who does it belong to?

0:32:030:32:05

-A guy called Steve.

-Steve.

-I can ring him.

0:32:050:32:07

He might be able to tell us a bit more information about it.

0:32:070:32:09

He's already reduced the price, I can see here.

0:32:090:32:12

It's come down from 65 to 50.

0:32:120:32:14

He's already getting desperate, isn't he?

0:32:140:32:16

Sounds like Steve's about to get a call.

0:32:160:32:18

Hello, Steve. Charlie Ross here. How are you?

0:32:180:32:22

I've been looking at your things.

0:32:220:32:24

I love your thatcher's needle. Isn't that a lovely thing?

0:32:240:32:26

It's beautiful. Well, Liz has shown me how to use it.

0:32:260:32:29

She's obviously done a bit of thatching in her time.

0:32:290:32:31

Almost more interesting for me is your extraordinary vacuum pump thing,

0:32:310:32:37

which is quite fun.

0:32:370:32:38

But why would you want to suck the air out of something?

0:32:380:32:42

Any idea? Stop laughing.

0:32:420:32:45

Looking at the label, you've already got fed up with it, I can see that.

0:32:450:32:49

Is it on an inexorable plunge downwards?

0:32:490:32:52

Hey, he may not know how it's used, but he's certainly keen.

0:32:520:32:54

Oh, but I will go on to my knees,

0:32:540:32:56

I'm prepared to do absolutely anything to do a deal.

0:32:560:32:58

How's that?

0:32:580:33:00

Shall I confirm it?

0:33:000:33:02

Yes, yes, hang on, she's just going to prove to you

0:33:020:33:05

that's what I'm doing.

0:33:050:33:06

Hello, Steve. Yeah, Charlie is on his knees.

0:33:060:33:08

If I actually lay down, would you...

0:33:080:33:11

could you go to 40?

0:33:110:33:14

Is that really necessary, Charles?

0:33:140:33:16

That's really kind. I will give Liz 40 quid cash

0:33:160:33:19

and relieve you of your pump,

0:33:190:33:21

and I'll just keep my fingers crossed for the auction.

0:33:210:33:24

Thank you very much indeed, Steve. All the best. 40 quid. Done a deal.

0:33:240:33:28

It was an awful lot of kneeling for a tenner, Charlie.

0:33:280:33:31

Thank you so much. It's been wonderful.

0:33:310:33:33

Nice to meet you.

0:33:330:33:36

Shopping done, it's time to take a look at what they bought.

0:33:370:33:40

With Charlie acquiring a pair of prints, a ship's wheel,

0:33:430:33:46

a fire back, a tankard, and a vacuum pump for a total of £250.

0:33:460:33:52

While Natasha spent just £170 on a uniform,

0:33:530:33:56

a shoeshine box,

0:33:560:33:58

a scent bottle,

0:33:580:34:00

a stamp box, and some farming tools.

0:34:000:34:03

So, what's the verdict?

0:34:030:34:05

Natasha has done a lot better this time.

0:34:050:34:07

She's learning fast, isn't she?

0:34:070:34:10

That collection of agricultural implements, I think,

0:34:100:34:14

are a steal at £45.

0:34:140:34:16

I think they'll at least double her money on that.

0:34:160:34:19

I think Charlie has gone very traditional this time

0:34:190:34:22

with those prints of the Archbishop and the Abbey

0:34:220:34:25

and he's got that ship's wheel.

0:34:250:34:26

He's gone down quite a conservative route.

0:34:260:34:29

But I think my fun farmers' tools are a little bit out there

0:34:290:34:32

and my cologne bottle, and my uniform -

0:34:320:34:35

if that does as well as Charlie's tunic then I'm in with a winner.

0:34:350:34:38

Cos Roscoe had a tunic that did well, what do you do?

0:34:380:34:41

Don't go out and buy a tunic -

0:34:410:34:43

not if it's a 20th century tunic and not if it costs £90.

0:34:430:34:49

There's going to be a bit of a loss on that.

0:34:490:34:52

After setting off from Portsmouth,

0:34:520:34:55

our experts are now heading for an auction in Swanmore.

0:34:550:34:59

Do you know what the name of the auction is?

0:34:590:35:01

-We're going to Pump House Auctions.

-And what have I bought?

0:35:010:35:04

-A pump!

-Yes.

0:35:040:35:05

Well, it could work, Charlie.

0:35:050:35:08

Absolutely gorgeous building. Look at this.

0:35:080:35:10

-Can you come and help me out?

-Yes, of course I can.

0:35:100:35:15

-Welcome to the Pump House.

-Wait till you are my age, my dear.

0:35:150:35:19

So, what are their chances at this establishment?

0:35:190:35:22

Let's hear from auctioneer Dominic Foster.

0:35:220:35:25

The British Army uniform,

0:35:250:35:27

the Regiment of Foot, is very collectable.

0:35:270:35:29

Military items are very sought after.

0:35:290:35:32

The old vacuum pump is quite an interesting item.

0:35:320:35:35

Scientific instruments are very collectable.

0:35:350:35:37

Maybe £60-£80, again. Maybe £100, if we're lucky.

0:35:370:35:40

Encouraging. Looks like the weather could have helped

0:35:400:35:44

attract a decent crowd, too.

0:35:440:35:45

It's mobbed, Charlie. It's mobbed. They have all come to see you.

0:35:450:35:48

They may have come to see me,

0:35:480:35:50

but they haven't come to buy my things, have they?

0:35:500:35:52

Well, maybe Charlie's pictures. Will they be a local hit?

0:35:520:35:56

You bought something from Hampshire.

0:35:560:35:57

-The south-east of Titchfield Abbey in Hampshire. Where are we?

-Hampshire!

0:35:570:36:01

-And a framed, glazed print of William Waynflete, Bishop of...

-Winchester!

0:36:010:36:07

Couple of bids here. 12, 14 here. 16 anywhere? 16, 18, 20, 22. 24?

0:36:070:36:15

No? At 22. 24 anywhere?

0:36:150:36:18

24, 26, 28,

0:36:180:36:20

30, and two...

0:36:200:36:23

-Look at you!

-34?

0:36:230:36:25

At 32. 34 anywhere?

0:36:250:36:27

There are some sophisticated buyers in this saleroom.

0:36:270:36:30

Selling at £32, then?

0:36:300:36:31

Your number?

0:36:310:36:32

Holy profits, Charlie.

0:36:340:36:36

You're too clever. You're so good, you're so good.

0:36:360:36:40

Natasha's turn. Her bargain half bottle of scent.

0:36:400:36:44

Do you do this with all your lots -

0:36:440:36:46

-get given them because you look rather attractive?

-No.

0:36:460:36:50

Because I looked like I needed help.

0:36:500:36:52

A couple of bids, 20,

0:36:520:36:55

I've got 25, 28 is there...

0:36:550:36:58

28. There is 30. 32? 34.

0:36:580:37:00

I can't see you.

0:37:000:37:01

34. 36, 38 anywhere?

0:37:010:37:05

38, 40.

0:37:050:37:06

There's a voice from under a table.

0:37:060:37:08

44, 46,

0:37:080:37:10

48, 50?

0:37:100:37:12

No, at 48 here. 50 anywhere?

0:37:120:37:16

At 48, then. Yours, sir.

0:37:160:37:19

Yes. It smells good to me.

0:37:190:37:21

It does indeed and if you don't like it you can always use

0:37:210:37:25

Charlie's vacuum pump to get rid of the pong.

0:37:250:37:27

-I've got 40, 45. 48 anywhere?

-Right, you're in.

0:37:270:37:32

48 anywhere? 48 there.

0:37:320:37:34

Is 50 anywhere? 50 there is. And two?

0:37:340:37:37

52. 55 anywhere?

0:37:370:37:40

55, £55.

0:37:400:37:41

58 anywhere?

0:37:410:37:43

Selling for £55.

0:37:430:37:46

-Pow!

-That is genius. 55 quid.

0:37:460:37:50

Getting onto his knees definitely paid off.

0:37:500:37:53

I wonder what he's doing later? I might take him to the pub.

0:37:530:37:55

You're taking me out for dinner.

0:37:550:37:57

THEY LAUGH He overheard that!

0:37:570:37:59

'Talking of good deals, how about Natasha's £5 shoeshine box?'

0:37:590:38:04

I've got again a couple of bids for 12, I've got 14, 16 anywhere?

0:38:040:38:08

-Keep going!

-Steady.

0:38:080:38:10

16, 18, 20, 22?

0:38:100:38:12

At £20. Two anywhere?

0:38:120:38:15

22, 24.

0:38:150:38:16

26, 28,

0:38:160:38:18

30, 32,

0:38:180:38:20

34?

0:38:200:38:21

At 32. 34 anywhere?

0:38:210:38:23

No? Sell it for 34.

0:38:230:38:27

36, 38.

0:38:270:38:28

Yes? 40?

0:38:280:38:31

And two.

0:38:310:38:32

44, 46 anywhere, then?

0:38:320:38:36

Selling at £44.

0:38:360:38:38

Yes!

0:38:380:38:40

Nobody can beat those profits, surely?

0:38:400:38:43

Though the auctioneer does have high hopes for Charlie's wheel.

0:38:430:38:46

-50 for it. 50 bid.

-50 is bid!

0:38:460:38:49

Are we on the ship's wheel?

0:38:490:38:52

And five. 70?

0:38:520:38:54

-Come on.

-And five.

0:38:540:38:56

-It's all go. Yes!

-I want a free ship for this money.

0:38:560:38:59

90. And five?

0:38:590:39:02

Nope, at £90.

0:39:020:39:04

Five anywhere?

0:39:040:39:06

Selling, then, at £90.

0:39:060:39:08

One more.

0:39:080:39:09

Yes! That's all right.

0:39:090:39:12

It certainly is.

0:39:120:39:13

What about Natasha's little Tunbridge stamp box?

0:39:130:39:17

£50 for it somewhere? 50 for it?

0:39:170:39:20

Nope? I've got 40 here, then. Five anywhere?

0:39:200:39:23

Oh, he's got 40 quid on it.

0:39:230:39:25

45 there is, 48 anywhere? 48.

0:39:250:39:27

50? At 48 with me. 50 anywhere?

0:39:270:39:30

50 there.

0:39:300:39:31

Do you know, I'd rather be hit by your thresher.

0:39:310:39:35

And that's still to come.

0:39:350:39:38

At £56. 58 anywhere?

0:39:380:39:40

This is exciting. £56!

0:39:400:39:42

Thank you!

0:39:440:39:46

This is really quite some auction, you know.

0:39:460:39:49

Charlie's fire back's next.

0:39:490:39:51

£80 for it somewhere? 80 bid.

0:39:510:39:53

Oh, straight in. Straight in at 80.

0:39:530:39:55

85 anywhere? At £80.

0:39:550:39:58

85 there is. 88? 88.

0:39:580:40:01

-90 anywhere?

-Come on.

0:40:010:40:04

-At 88. No? Selling then...

-88! Two fat ladies.

0:40:040:40:07

£88. Yours, sir.

0:40:070:40:09

Wow, everything has made a profit so far

0:40:090:40:11

but will Natasha's uniform do as well as Charlie's did?

0:40:110:40:14

She's decided against modelling it, I see. Shame.

0:40:140:40:18

-Here we go. Regiment...

-Is this yours already?

0:40:180:40:21

£40 for it somewhere? 40 for it?

0:40:210:40:23

This could be a problem.

0:40:230:40:25

30 if you like, then. 30 for it. 30 bid. Two is there?

0:40:250:40:29

32, 34...

0:40:290:40:32

We need this to make more.

0:40:320:40:33

You've just bought it, dear.

0:40:330:40:35

At £38, then.

0:40:350:40:38

Oh, no.

0:40:380:40:40

No, no!

0:40:400:40:41

Ouch! Her risky lot cost her dear.

0:40:410:40:44

-Oh, no.

-Learn.

0:40:440:40:47

Take it as a lesson.

0:40:470:40:50

My pump did all right, but don't go out and buy a pump next time.

0:40:500:40:55

Probably best not to buy one of these, either.

0:40:560:40:59

Even Charlie's not keen.

0:40:590:41:00

The best thing that could have happened to my Capodimonte

0:41:000:41:03

is that they dropped it and I'd claim the insurance.

0:41:030:41:07

I've got bids. 30, I've got £35 here.

0:41:070:41:10

-It can climb.

-HE MUTTERS

0:41:100:41:11

40 there is. And five anywhere?

0:41:110:41:13

45 there is. 50?

0:41:130:41:14

Come on, it must be worth more than this.

0:41:140:41:17

55, 60.

0:41:170:41:18

58 if you like, sir?

0:41:180:41:20

58.

0:41:200:41:22

-Good boy.

-Come on!

0:41:220:41:24

Selling then at £58.

0:41:240:41:28

-Ooh.

-HE SIGHS

0:41:280:41:30

Now the old hand's dropped a clanger, too,

0:41:300:41:33

but if Natasha's tools can make just a modest profit

0:41:330:41:36

she'll carry the day.

0:41:360:41:38

What do you think your tools will make?

0:41:380:41:40

I'm going to say £50. I'm going to make a fiver.

0:41:400:41:43

I'll have a little sportsman's bet with you.

0:41:450:41:48

What do you reckon?

0:41:480:41:49

I'll bet you a soft drink that these make £100.

0:41:490:41:53

-I've got 35 and I've got 45 here.

-See!

-50 is there.

0:41:530:41:58

Is 50 anywhere?

0:41:580:41:59

-No, see!

-50 there is, and five?

0:41:590:42:02

I've got 60. And five anywhere?

0:42:020:42:05

-At £60 then...

-See, see!

0:42:050:42:07

A bit closer to Natasha's assessment than Charlie's,

0:42:100:42:13

but good news all the same.

0:42:130:42:14

I'm going to buy you that soft drink that you so richly deserve.

0:42:140:42:19

So, the new girl wins today's contest and gets back in the game.

0:42:200:42:26

Charlie, who started out with £293.06,

0:42:260:42:28

made - after paying auction costs -

0:42:280:42:31

a profit of £14.86,

0:42:310:42:34

leaving him with £307.92 to spend tomorrow.

0:42:340:42:38

While Natasha, who began with £185.78,

0:42:390:42:43

after paying auction costs made a profit of £31.72.

0:42:430:42:48

Still in second place but catching up fast.

0:42:480:42:52

-Well done.

-We did it.

0:42:520:42:54

I couldn't have been thrashed by a lovelier girl.

0:42:540:42:56

Thank you so much. I can't believe it.

0:42:560:42:58

-I'll take you away.

-It feels nice. You must be used to this feeling.

0:42:580:43:01

You've learnt how to do it now, haven't you?

0:43:010:43:03

Oh, there'll be no holding you. One tip, no more tunics.

0:43:030:43:07

No more tunics.

0:43:070:43:09

Full steam ahead, eh?

0:43:090:43:10

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:120:43:13

our experts unearth big bargains...

0:43:130:43:16

Ohh! You know how to excite an old man, don't you?

0:43:160:43:19

..and tiny treasures.

0:43:190:43:21

Come on, giddy up. They are the best things I've ever seen.

0:43:210:43:25

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:410:43:43

Charlie Ross and new girl Natasha Raskin make for an auction in the Hampshire village of Swanmore, but start out in the famous naval city of Portsmouth.


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