Episode 9 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 9

Antiques experts Charlie Ross and Natasha Raskin start in Farnham in Surrey and end up at auction in Towcester, Northamptonshire.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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What about that?

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Can I buy everything here?

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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I'm feeling a little SAW.

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This is going to be an epic battle.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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-The honeymoon is over.

-I'm sorry.

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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We're back on the road again with Charlie Ross and

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Road Trip rookie - and new driver - Natasha Raskin.

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-Oh, wow.

-Do you know? I feel really relaxed with you driving.

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-Do you genuinely?

-Yeah, I do.

-Oh, good. I'm so glad you said that.

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Auctioneer Natasha Raskin loves her antiques in all shapes and sizes...

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Come on, giddy up, they are the best things I have ever seen.

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And internationally respected auctioneer Charlie Ross

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-knows when he's on to a good thing.

-Oh-oh-oh-oh!

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You know how to excite an old man, don't you?

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Huh. Both of our antiques addicts began their week with £200.

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Despite neither of them making a profit at the last auction,

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Natasha begins their penultimate venture with £206.70.

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But Charlie is still in front with £294.62.

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The 1971 Triumph TR6 is the trusty motor for the duo's journey,

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which kicked off in Falmouth, Cornwall, then headed east,

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taking in a wonderful tour of southern England

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and finishes up over 900 miles later in Stansted Mountfitchet, Essex.

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Today's stretch starts in Farnham in Surrey

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and teeters to an end in Towcester, Northamptonshire.

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-So, what's on the shopping list?

-What's near Towcester?

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-Silverstone.

-OK, so something to do with...

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-Find something to do with a Formula One car.

-OK, something to

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-do with a Formula One car.

-Also in Towcester, there's a racecourse.

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You know, as in... HE MIMICS CLOPPING HOOVES

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-Right, OK. Sort of hunting, shooting, fishing set?

-Oh, very.

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-They'll love a bit of that.

-Yeah, good to know.

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But that's not enough of a challenge for Charlie.

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Why don't you tell me something to buy? And I'll buy it.

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I don't know, you never buy anything...20th century.

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So maybe 20th-century items. Modern.

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Why don't you buy something related to cooking today?

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I've got to buy something 20th century

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-and you've got to buy something related to cooking.

-OK.

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-It's a deal.

-Sounds like a plan, even if it is a bit random.

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Today, both Natasha and Charlie are heading for the same shop

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in the gorgeous Georgian town of Farnham.

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I always think of Surrey as being commuter belt and built up,

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-but it isn't, it's absolutely lovely.

-It is lovely.

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Lovely, with a few foggy patches this morning.

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I do hope you'll find their way to their first shop,

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Bourne Mill Antique Centre.

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Where you going? There's a car park!

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-Come on, Charlie.

-Save me, Lord.

-Snap to it!

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You'll be fine. There's no use talking to the Lord now.

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I was a young man when I started out.

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Come on, come on, come on. Right, after you. After you, sir.

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Thank you.

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He may be older, but he's got almost £90 more to

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splash in this place than his young rival.

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Come on, young man.

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Straighten that back. Morning, ladies. Good morning.

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-Which way are you going, Charlie?

-I'm going down here.

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You're going down here? Well, I'm good to head this way

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and I will meet you anon.

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And off she goes.

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Natasha soon spots a cheeky little number in the corner.

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I'm really drawn to this chair. It's some sort of nice, soft wood.

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It's got little ivorine notches here.

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It's got a sort of rustic feel to it.

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This is so simple here, this structure.

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And then the legs could be the most simple replica of the top,

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but, in fact, they're actually really nicely turned,

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sort of...balustrades.

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I really like it, but it's a lovely thing and it was 35, it's now 20.

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So, does that mean that no-one wants this and I should put it right down?

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Probably. But where's the fun in that?

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Best find dealer Valerie Lock to state a claim, Natasha.

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I've seen something upstairs that I'm quite into.

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It is actually a fruit wood in nature and it's a lovely chair.

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Do you know the one? I'm going to fire at you with £9,

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and don't be horrified, just go with the flow, Val, go with the flow.

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-10, if I said 10...

-I think I'd definitely do it for 10.

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-Would you be OK with that?

-Yes, that would be all right, yes.

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-Oh, Val, that's amazing. Shall we shake on it?

-Not bad going, Natasha.

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Now, where's that Mr Ross gone?

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-Full steam ahead, Mr Boson, full steam ahead.

-Stop messing about.

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Dealer Melisa Montagnon is on hand to help Charlie today

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and she's starting him off in a room away from his usual fare.

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Oh, my God. Look at that.

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That's outrageous

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-That poor pheasant. Perfect.

-It's a bit of a statement.

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-Oh, I love it!

-Is it good?

-No, it looks good on you.

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No, it really doesn't.

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That is sensational.

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That would be a talking point of any saleroom.

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We can do it for a snip at £18.

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-Label says £20.

-I know, that's a discount.

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That's hard. £18?

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Yeah, it's good though.

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-I tell you what, I'll give it a bit of thought.

-OK.

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Yeah, you do that, Charlie.

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Meanwhile, Natasha's keen eye is onto something.

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This is so great.

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If this were silver, which it absolutely is not, it would

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be worth a packet because for some reason, novelty Victorian

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lace-up shoe pin cushions drive people wild at auction.

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It's looking great though, it's a tenner and wonderfully...

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It matches my outfits just perfectly.

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She is a snappy dresser.

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I think this is a wee bit of a goer.

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If only there was a hallmark, but there isn't, but it's nice and

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I'm going to ask about it because I think you can't go wrong with that.

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Well, Natasha's lower-priced items have done her

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proud at previous auctions.

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Something has caught my eye. I'll show you why.

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-Oh, very similar, isn't it?

-Just my style.

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So I was thinking, seeing as it's not silver, if I could maybe ask you

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if I could have it for a fiver?

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A little bit low. £6, I would say £6.

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-Shall we shake on £6?

-Yeah.

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So, that's £6 for the silverplated 1930s pincushion

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and £10 for the Edwardian fruitwood child's chair.

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Thank you so much again for your help.

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That's all right, it's been a pleasure to have you.

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-And wish me luck.

-Yes, I will do.

-Thank you.

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Upstairs, Charlie has re-entered his comfort zone.

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There's some nice bits of silver in here.

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And there's a bit that actually looks quite fun for me.

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It's a silver propelling pencil but what it's in the form of...

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A golf tee! And I play golf. Very badly, but there we go.

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Just needs a bit of lead in there.

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It's quite modern, it's 1980s, but it's a great

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thing for a golfing collector and it is hallmarked silver.

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It's priced at £45. I think that's got a bit of... A bit of a chance.

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And fortunately, Mel's on standby.

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I really like that.

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-It's beautifully made. It's quite modern but see what you can do.

-OK.

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I'm going to go and have a cup of tea.

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That's the bonus of an on-site teashop.

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And after a quick call to the pencil's dealer,

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Mel has an offer for Charlie.

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-Give me the price.

-£35!

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-You see.

-I'll have it.

-Great.

-I'm going to make you even more excited...

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-I'll have the hat.

-Brilliant, suits you.

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Making that a grand total of £53.

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That's £18 for the hat, £35 for the silver propelling pencil.

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Ticks the 20th century challenge box!

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-Cheers.

-Cheers.

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While Charlie has been supping tea, Natasha has taken

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herself off to the charming village of Chawton in Hampshire.

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She's heading for Chawton House,

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once home to Jane Austen's brother, Edward Knight.

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Chawton was where Jane Austen spent the last eight years of her life.

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It's where she revised her most famous books, Sense and Sensibility

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and Pride and Prejudice, and where she penned Mansfield Park and Emma.

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Jane Austen is one of the most successful female writers

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in the world.

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Fitting, then, a former home of hers now houses

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a well-respected centre for the study of early women's writing.

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Natasha's meeting Dr Gillian Dow to get an insight into the female

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trailblazers who laid the groundwork for women's education and

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influenced one of the most widely read writers in British history.

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-Hello, you must be Gillian.

-That's right, I am. Hello.

-Hi, Natasha.

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Welcome, Natasha, to Chawton House Library, lovely to see you.

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-Thank you so much! Shall we go inside?

-Let's go inside and find out some more.

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Chawton House Library houses one of the world's largest

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collections of books by female authors.

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They date as far back as the 17th century,

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a time when women were seen only as wives and mothers.

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They were largely uneducated, unable to hold professional jobs

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and unable to vote but a pioneering woman from Newcastle,

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now considered one of the first British feminists,

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was passionate about changing that,

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becoming one of the most groundbreaking breaking writers

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of her generation.

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So, in the Oak Room.

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We're here to learn about the history of female writing

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but Gillian, where on earth do you even start with that?

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So, one of the most interesting writers and a proto-feminist,

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I think we can call her a feminist, is Mary Astell.

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And she wrote this little work here.

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Little in size but as far as its contents is concerned,

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it's fascinating.

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Published in 1694 and it's really an appeal for the importance

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of female education.

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"And one would be apt to think indeed that parents should take all

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"possible care of their children's education

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"and though the son convey the name to posterity

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"yet certainly a great part of the honour of their families

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"depends on their daughters."

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-Oh, my goodness.

-So, she's really talking about creating a college for

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-women, an early university.

-Quite rightly, what an amazing woman.

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To think of 17th century feminism is just wonderful.

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Astell's middle-class family invested in her brother's

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intellectual development, whereas Mary received no formal education

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but her ability to debate with both sexes

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and her strong belief in equality for women led her to

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the now famous phrase,

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"If all men are born free, why are all women born slaves?"

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Her writing paved the way for women to expand their knowledge,

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encouraging their influence in the literary world.

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Almost 100 years later, another self-educated female writer,

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Frances Burney, became one of the most popular

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novelists of the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

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She was an older contemporary of Jane Austen

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and had a great influence on our young Jane.

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What was her influence on female writing?

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She published several novels, female-centred,

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focusing on the heroine.

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Camilla, the one we've got here, is her third novel, which she

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published by subscriptions.

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Basically, you told the public you were going to publish

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something and they would pay for it up front.

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And the person you've got here, in the list of subscribers,

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is a Miss J Austen of Steventon.

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That's absolutely amazing.

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Yeah, absolutely, and in fact,

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Burney's novels get mentioned in Austen's novels.

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So, in Northanger Abbey, there's a whole section where Jane Austen

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defends the novels and she talks directly about Frances Burney.

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That's absolutely amazing.

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So, Frances Burney was really going on about

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female-led characters,

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Astell was going on about female-led education, and is that something

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that links the two and perhaps links them to Jane Austen as well?

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Absolutely.

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I mean, I think education is the thing that links all these writers.

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Many female writers like Jane Austen followed these pioneering women and,

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as with her contemporaries, Austen published her novels anonymously.

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There was a stigma attached to having your name published,

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especially for the upper classes.

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-So this is a first edition?

-It is.

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This is a first edition of Mansfield Park.

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You see here it's advertised as "By the author of

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"Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice" but absolutely no

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reference to her name, there never was in her own lifetime.

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Strange, isn't it? It's unbelievable.

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I mean, it wasn't entirely unusual to be published anonymously in the

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period, and for women writers in particular, to publish as

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"By a lady" was actually very common.

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Jane Austen may have gone on to outshine most of her

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predecessors, but groundwork laid by female authors like Mary Astell

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and Frances Burney gave girls like Jane the opportunity

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and encouragement to follow their passion for writing.

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She probably didn't lead the most exciting life, did she?

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And to think that,

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here we are, standing in a whole centre dedicated to learning

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about female writing, how much would Jane Austen have loved that?

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I think she would have loved it.

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-I think she would have been very proud.

-Immensely proud.

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What a fabulous visit this has been. Thank you so much, Gillian.

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It's a great pleasure, Natasha. Thank you for coming to see us.

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Back in Surrey, Charlie has trundled a few miles from

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his last shop to Compton.

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This rural village is synonymous with the arts, being home to

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British artist George Frederic Watts during his later years.

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Victorian painter Watts' best-known works include

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a canvas named Hope, a favourite of US President Barack Obama.

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Charlie's here to browse Old Barn Antiques, run by sheep farmer

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and dealer, Chloe.

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-It's Chloe, isn't it?

-Hello! It is.

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Lovely to meet you. Come on, Chloe.

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They're certainly getting along swimmingly so far.

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I'm just going to see if there's something that really grabs me.

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-Jumps out at you.

-Yeah, because I need something to grab me.

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-Well, I won't offer.

-Are those... Well, you can!

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-But then, you're not for sale, are you?

-No, quite.

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She's a feisty one.

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Luckily, Charlie's distracted by a cabinet full of treen.

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The fun about treen is, small wooden objects, is spotting the wood.

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That's right. And the different shapes, of course.

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The different shapes and what they're used for and I love it

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when they've got a really good patternation to them.

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There's something lurking behind there I quite like.

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-Yes, that's rather nice, isn't it?

-Isn't that...

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Now, that is lovely.

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Olive wood and I think that's 19th-century,

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I don't think there's any doubt about that. Early 19th century.

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-I'm going to put that on one side.

-Right.

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That's interesting, that's a bit of Yew wood, I think, isn't it?

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Now, how old is that? That, to me, looks a bit more modern, to be honest.

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Yew wood cup and cover... but it's a nice thing.

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I'll put that on one side.

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-They look good together, don't they?

-That's quite nice. Yes.

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Feel the weight of that.

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Gosh, it's heavy, isn't it? Yes, very heavy.

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Walnut. Lovely object.

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Well, that's interesting.

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He's on a roll here.

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That's a different weight, feel that one.

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-Gosh, that's jolly heavy, isn't it?

-Yeah. What have we got?

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19th century, presumably, a Lignum Vitae spice pot.

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-Well, it makes a nice little group, doesn't it?

-It's rather charming.

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Now, being a really mean chap, I want buy that lot for £40.

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The four items of treen

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have a combined ticket price of £79,

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so Charlie needs to call dealer, Peter.

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You're not going to take £40 for the lot, are you?

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No.

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What I'm going to do, Peter, if I may,

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is take the three without the salt.

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I think those three are delightful and that makes £35

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and I will leave £35 here.

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Thank you so much, bye-bye.

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-I've done a deal.

-Good.

-No, it's fine.

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£35 for the three without the salt.

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Right. You'll do well on those.

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Well, you never know.

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Peter's knocked off £14, giving Charlie the olive wood dice shaker,

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the Yew wood casket and the Lignum Vitae barrel for £35.

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-There £35.

-Thanks.

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-Thank you very much indeed. Bye Chloe, thank you.

-Lovely to see you.

0:16:500:16:54

And that's shopping wrapped up for the day

0:16:540:16:56

and lights out for the night.

0:16:560:16:57

Sweet dreams, you two.

0:16:570:16:59

But these early birds are soon up and at 'em in the TR6.

0:17:020:17:06

-# I won't betray his trust

-His trust, that's right.

0:17:070:17:12

# Though people say I must

0:17:120:17:16

# I've put to stay true

0:17:170:17:20

# Just as long as he

0:17:200:17:25

# Needs me! #

0:17:260:17:31

Unlike Oliver, we won't be asking for more.

0:17:310:17:34

Yesterday, Natasha found both an Edwardian child's chair

0:17:340:17:37

and a silverplated boot pincushion

0:17:370:17:40

for £16, leaving her with £190.70.

0:17:400:17:45

Charlie splashed £88 on a 1920s feather hat,

0:17:450:17:49

a silver propelling pencil and a collection of treen.

0:17:490:17:52

So, today, £206.62 is still burning a hole in his pocket.

0:17:520:17:58

-The forecast, today, I thought, was for rain.

-It was for rain.

0:17:580:18:01

And here we are, sun again.

0:18:010:18:04

How very nice for you.

0:18:040:18:06

From their launch in Farnham, Surrey,

0:18:060:18:08

they've crossed the border into Hampshire and edging towards Emsworth.

0:18:080:18:12

I'm thoroughly enjoying this leg, I have the to say.

0:18:120:18:15

Thoroughly, thoroughly enjoying it.

0:18:150:18:17

It's a very attractive county.

0:18:170:18:19

I was so excited to come to this part of the world because

0:18:190:18:23

the landscape is just dramatically different.

0:18:230:18:25

I mean, Scotland is beautifully hilly and green and mossy

0:18:250:18:29

-and brachen...

-Rugged.

-And rugged, yes! Rugged. But this is just...

0:18:290:18:34

-It very much is green and pleasant land, isn't it?

-It is.

0:18:340:18:37

Emsworth Antiques Etc is Natasha's next pit stop

0:18:390:18:44

and Hilary Bolt is the lady in charge.

0:18:440:18:48

Hello, I'm Natasha.

0:18:480:18:50

-I'm Hilary, pleased to meet you.

-Lovely to meet you.

0:18:500:18:53

I'm very interested in the Etc on your sign.

0:18:530:18:56

It covers a multitude of sins.

0:18:560:18:58

Absolutely.

0:18:580:19:00

Don't sell yourself short, Hilary. Natasha's into all sorts.

0:19:000:19:03

There's a little pair of salt and pepper pots in here

0:19:070:19:09

that are just so cute, they're actually

0:19:090:19:11

really horrific when I think that that's why I like them so much.

0:19:110:19:14

I don't see a price on them but I absolutely love them

0:19:140:19:16

because they're just really awful and quirky.

0:19:160:19:18

Underneath, you can see that they're Carlton Ware

0:19:180:19:20

and Carlton Ware is something that was very

0:19:200:19:23

popular at the middle of the end of the 20th century.

0:19:230:19:26

They look, I don't know, probably 1970s or '80s, something like that.

0:19:260:19:29

But they are for the kitchen.

0:19:290:19:32

Perhaps a closer look will help decide.

0:19:320:19:36

There's the price, oh, no!

0:19:360:19:38

Why do they have to be £65?

0:19:380:19:41

What if I offer you £30 for them.

0:19:410:19:44

I was hoping for £35 on them.

0:19:440:19:46

£35...

0:19:460:19:48

-Shall we go in the middle and do £32?

-Shall we go for it?

0:19:480:19:51

-Are you quite happy with £32?

-Yep, let's do that.

0:19:510:19:54

Let's do it.

0:19:540:19:55

That's £32 for the 1970s Carlton Ware cruet set.

0:19:550:19:59

No more kitchenware, eh?

0:19:590:20:01

Nice moustache.

0:20:010:20:03

-Thank you so much, I'm ever so grateful.

-Thank you.

0:20:030:20:05

-Wish me luck with those.

-I will keep my fingers firmly crossed.

0:20:050:20:08

Thank you so much, thank you.

0:20:080:20:10

Meanwhile, Charlie has been working his way towards West Sussex,

0:20:110:20:15

an area known for its striking scenery and historic city.

0:20:150:20:19

It's also home to a grassroots sport that shot up over the last 40 years.

0:20:210:20:25

Charlie's heading to Billingshurst

0:20:260:20:28

to the British World Championships of...

0:20:280:20:30

Lawnmower racing.

0:20:330:20:35

Ian Ratcliffe has been hooked on Britain's cheapest

0:20:350:20:38

and most accessible motor sport for over 30 years.

0:20:380:20:42

Ah-ha! Must be the main man.

0:20:420:20:45

-It's Ian, isn't it?

-It is. Hi, Charlie.

0:20:450:20:47

-Lovely to be here. This is a momentous day, isn't it?

-It is, yeah.

0:20:470:20:50

This is our world championship where today, there's going to

0:20:500:20:54

be a new world champion.

0:20:540:20:55

A new world champion, today.

0:20:550:20:57

The British Lawn Mower Racing Association, or BLMRA,

0:20:570:21:01

now has around 250 members.

0:21:010:21:03

The racing season is May to October,

0:21:030:21:05

culminating in the highlight of the year with the World Championships.

0:21:050:21:09

So, when did it all start?

0:21:110:21:12

Where did it all start?

0:21:120:21:14

It started in 1973

0:21:140:21:17

in a pub in Wisborough Green.

0:21:170:21:19

There was a group of guys sitting there wondering what

0:21:190:21:21

they could race because racing is quite an expensive sport

0:21:210:21:26

and they wanted something cheap and cheerful that anyone

0:21:260:21:28

and everyone could do

0:21:280:21:30

and they came up with the idea of a lawnmower.

0:21:300:21:33

And people come from all over the country for this, obviously,

0:21:330:21:37

this premier event.

0:21:370:21:38

Yeah, this is very popular, we've got about 30 mowers here today.

0:21:380:21:42

The sport has even attracted celebrities,

0:21:420:21:45

including racing legend Stirling Moss.

0:21:450:21:47

And today, Charlie Ross is about to add his name to the list who

0:21:470:21:51

have tried it at this relatively new motor sport.

0:21:510:21:55

A bit tight there!

0:21:550:21:56

-Agh! Do I look the part?

-You do.

-Now, what do I do?

0:21:560:22:00

It basically works like a motorbike, so you've got the clutch here...

0:22:000:22:04

-Yeah.

-..Break there on the throttle is here.

0:22:040:22:07

Easy peasy, eh? Now, Charlie is about to face the race of his life.

0:22:090:22:13

Frankly, I'm terrified.

0:22:130:22:16

I've never been on anything so low, so quick,

0:22:160:22:19

-so dangerous in all my life.

-Well, it's too late now!

0:22:190:22:23

Lewis Hamilton, eat your heart out!

0:22:230:22:26

I think the new boy's been given quite a head start, by the look of it.

0:22:280:22:32

Oh, my goodness me! This is horrendous! Oh!

0:22:320:22:35

The main rules are that they must have been originally designed,

0:22:360:22:40

made and sold commercially to mow household lawns -

0:22:400:22:43

with the blades removed for safety.

0:22:430:22:46

Bloody Nora!

0:22:470:22:48

The BLMRA are keen to keep the sport open to everyone.

0:22:480:22:53

With no sponsorship,

0:22:530:22:54

no prize-money and any profits given to good causes.

0:22:540:22:57

With clubs popping up across the country

0:22:570:22:59

and even spreading worldwide,

0:22:590:23:01

lawn mower racing is one of the most economical

0:23:010:23:04

and entertaining ways to experience the adrenaline rush of motor racing.

0:23:040:23:08

Apparently.

0:23:080:23:10

Agh!

0:23:100:23:13

I think they might be letting him win, you know.

0:23:130:23:16

The chequered flag is Rossco!

0:23:160:23:19

I felt I was doing about 100mph

0:23:210:23:22

and I was doing about 10mph!

0:23:240:23:27

-Thank you very much indeed.

-It's been a pleasure.

0:23:300:23:32

I'd like to see it been a pleasure... Actually, it has.

0:23:320:23:35

It's been a real treat!

0:23:350:23:37

In the meanwhile, Natasha has joined Charlie in West Sussex

0:23:420:23:44

in the stunning city of Chichester.

0:23:440:23:47

From its Georgian centre and Roman remains to its 900-year-old

0:23:470:23:51

cathedral and Tudor market cross, the city oozes history.

0:23:510:23:55

Perhaps the perfect place for Natasha to hunt out

0:23:550:23:58

a relic from yesteryear,

0:23:580:23:59

her next and final shopping stop is Peter Hancock Antiques.

0:23:590:24:03

Stand by.

0:24:030:24:05

-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hi, there! Mr Hancock, I presume?

-I'm Peter Hancock, yeah.

0:24:050:24:10

Hi, I'm Tasha. Lovely to meet you.

0:24:100:24:12

Peter's been in the business for over 50 years

0:24:120:24:14

and this shop is rammed to the rafters.

0:24:140:24:17

This is an absolute Aladdin's cave of smalls.

0:24:210:24:23

I think I have to go small but... I don't know what. It's just...

0:24:230:24:28

Bonkers stuff!

0:24:280:24:30

But with over £150 still to spend,

0:24:300:24:32

Natasha's keen to find another lot or two - bonkers or not.

0:24:320:24:37

I quite like this riding crop.

0:24:370:24:39

Pleated leather and it's nice and long.

0:24:390:24:41

So, it's for a good, you know, stallion, this horse.

0:24:410:24:45

And it's got a silver collar at the top.

0:24:450:24:47

And it's got the brand name, Swaine Ltd of London.

0:24:470:24:51

We've also got initials here, A R McD,

0:24:510:24:54

so, perhaps of Scottish heritage there. And it's 1937.

0:24:540:24:59

And it's got this nice antler handle.

0:24:590:25:01

And Charlie told me in the car that Twocester is quite

0:25:010:25:04

hunting, shooting, fishing set.

0:25:040:25:06

And maybe, for Twocester, a riding crop is just what they need.

0:25:060:25:11

Well, it could well be! Swaine Adeney Brigg has been making

0:25:110:25:14

equestrian and leather goods since the mid 18th century.

0:25:140:25:18

And they're still using traditional crafts and techniques.

0:25:180:25:21

Now, Natasha must have her crack at the whip.

0:25:210:25:25

-So, you've got £45 on it.

-Yes.

0:25:250:25:27

And I don't reckon that we'd get that in the auction.

0:25:270:25:29

But what would you say if I were to offer you £20?

0:25:290:25:31

-I mean, that's less than half price.

-It's less than half price.

0:25:310:25:34

-It's less than I've given for it.

-So, what would you say?

0:25:340:25:38

-Well, it cost me £30.

-What would be your very best price on it, Peter?

0:25:380:25:42

-32.

-32.

0:25:420:25:44

I just got something else in another shop for £32,

0:25:440:25:47

so maybe 32 is my new lucky number.

0:25:470:25:49

-Yes.

-I think we should go for it. £32.

0:25:490:25:52

Hurrah! Now, what else can Peter tempt Natasha with?

0:25:520:25:56

-She's got money to burn.

-Some cute little things in here.

0:25:560:25:58

I mean, I'm looking at these wee items here.

0:25:580:26:01

-I think they're both really sweet.

-Yes, they're nice.

0:26:010:26:03

And although, you know, one's for a man, one's for a woman,

0:26:030:26:07

they've got more purpose than that, don't they?

0:26:070:26:09

-Because this is specifically for nurses.

-That hangs...

0:26:090:26:12

the nurses watch hangs on that.

0:26:120:26:14

So that you can just tip it up and look at the date.

0:26:140:26:16

What's nice about this is that the little central here,

0:26:160:26:19

-the little cartouche in the middle...

-Yes...

0:26:190:26:21

..is un-engraved. But we've got hallmarks on the back.

0:26:210:26:23

We've got Birmingham marks here, your hallmark,

0:26:230:26:25

we've got the maker mark on the other side.

0:26:250:26:28

And on the back of the nurse's watch, erm, bar pin here, we've also got...

0:26:280:26:32

Let¹s have a wee look...

0:26:320:26:33

We've also got Birmingham marks and also our makers.

0:26:330:26:36

And there is another wee one here in a box, which is quite sweet.

0:26:360:26:39

A little three-leaf clover. And very Celtic in its style.

0:26:390:26:42

What about if we were to offer in the region of £25 for the three?

0:26:420:26:46

Very generous.

0:26:470:26:49

It's not often you hear that from a dealer.

0:26:490:26:51

-I will take £20.

-I'm really grateful, Peter. £20.

-OK.

0:26:510:26:55

That's a bizarre bit of dealing, with Peter very generously giving Natasha

0:26:550:26:59

the 1930s riding crop and the selection of silver items for £52.

0:26:590:27:03

Well, thank you, Peter. Thank you so much!

0:27:060:27:09

Meanwhile, Charlie's made his way

0:27:110:27:13

20 miles north to Liss,

0:27:130:27:14

near Petersfield.

0:27:140:27:16

This East Hampshire village dates back to medieval times

0:27:160:27:19

and is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

0:27:190:27:21

With over £200 still to spend, he's hoping Terry McCarthy

0:27:210:27:26

from Plestor Barn Antiques can help him keep his nose in front.

0:27:260:27:31

-It's Terry, isn't it?

-Hi, Charlie. How you doing?

-We've met before!

0:27:320:27:35

-We certainly have.

-You've still got your wonderful aeroplane.

0:27:350:27:38

Now, Charlie, what did he punt for? China? Glass?

0:27:420:27:45

There's a real selection here.

0:27:450:27:47

-What have you done here?

-Not guilty!

-Terry!

0:27:470:27:51

Do you know, that's the remains of something as good

0:27:510:27:55

a quality as you would ever get...

0:27:550:27:57

-I agree.

-Rosewood, satinwood... Look at it. Ah...

0:27:570:28:03

The damaged Regency period occasional table

0:28:030:28:05

has a ticket price of £30.

0:28:050:28:08

Is that a sort of firewood price or are you hoping to restore it?

0:28:080:28:13

-No, I'm not restoring that, no.

-I don't suppose that's...

-£15, Charlie.

0:28:130:28:17

Oh, God, that's so tempting, it's ridiculous!

0:28:170:28:20

That really is not a lot of money, is it? Not a lot of money.

0:28:200:28:23

-It's ridiculous! It makes me want to be a restorer.

-I know.

0:28:230:28:27

That's got him excited.

0:28:280:28:30

Got any more damaged furniture you could sell him, Terry?

0:28:300:28:32

What about a Victorian mahogany loo table?

0:28:320:28:37

It's tripod based, with a platform base with a really nice claw foot.

0:28:370:28:40

Lovely claw foot! A small amount of damage to the top there.

0:28:400:28:45

-There is minor damage.

-It's rather tricky to see among the furniture

0:28:450:28:48

but a loo table isn't something you put in your downstairs WC.

0:28:480:28:51

It's actually a circular table for playing the card game, loo, on.

0:28:510:28:55

Get it?

0:28:550:28:57

That can't be the same price as you're absolutely exquisite

0:28:570:29:00

-occasional table, can it? 15 quid?

-How about £20?

0:29:000:29:05

Can't say fairer than that, Charlie.

0:29:060:29:08

HE CHUCKLES

0:29:080:29:09

Whether that's a reasonable enough offer for Charlie remains to be seen.

0:29:090:29:13

Now, has he finally spotted something that isn't damaged?

0:29:130:29:16

-It's an Edwardian cabinet on stand.

-Exactly.

0:29:160:29:19

I've just sold one, together with something else for 100 quid.

0:29:190:29:24

And it struggled there. Is 50 quid in a reasonable offer?

0:29:240:29:27

I can't do it, Charlie. I actually, I'd be losing money.

0:29:270:29:29

-Seriously, I did pay £100 for it in a very weak moment.

-Did you?

0:29:290:29:33

75 quid, cash.

0:29:330:29:35

Because I think it would make 100 quid at auction, less commission, 80 quid.

0:29:350:29:39

It's a fair shout but, to be honest, unless I get my money back,

0:29:390:29:43

-to be honest, it's quite useful...

-25 quid. I mean, it's a takeaway.

0:29:430:29:46

-It's quite useful as a display.

-It's a takeaway.

0:29:460:29:49

Terry is sticking to his guns, giving Charlie pause for thought.

0:29:490:29:53

I really don't know.

0:29:530:29:54

Am I trying to beat Natasha or am I trying to indulge

0:29:540:29:58

myself in fine antiques?

0:29:580:30:00

If I'm trying to beat Natasha,

0:30:000:30:01

it's got to be two knackered pieces of furniture.

0:30:010:30:05

Because I think there's a bit of profit.

0:30:050:30:09

Back to the master.

0:30:090:30:11

-I've had a good old thought.

-Right, OK.

0:30:110:30:14

And I've come to the conclusion I could put into auction the loo

0:30:140:30:20

table with the occasional table.

0:30:200:30:24

They are different periods but they might appeal to the same restorer.

0:30:240:30:28

You offered me the cabinet for 100. I offered 75.

0:30:280:30:33

As I see it, that comes up at 135 for the three items.

0:30:330:30:38

I'd like to pay you 100 quid for the three

0:30:380:30:40

and I think I'll make something.

0:30:400:30:42

Can you make another £10, then I think we could have a deal.

0:30:420:30:45

It would be rude to turn it down, wouldn't it?

0:30:460:30:49

Brilliant.

0:30:510:30:53

So, that's £15 for the Victorian loo table,

0:30:530:30:55

£15 for the Regency occasional table and £80 for the Edwardian cabinet.

0:30:550:30:59

-Thanks for the deal.

-Thanks very much indeed, Terry.

0:30:590:31:03

And that's shopping done and dusted.

0:31:050:31:07

So, let's take a look at their collections.

0:31:080:31:11

Along with Charlie's furniture haul,

0:31:110:31:13

he also gathered a 1920s feather hat,

0:31:130:31:16

a silver propelling pencil and three items of treen,

0:31:160:31:18

costing him a grand sum of £198.

0:31:180:31:22

Natasha purchased an Edwardian child's chair,

0:31:240:31:27

a silver-plated pincushion, a Carlton Ware cruet set,

0:31:270:31:32

a 1930s riding crop and three pieces of silver, spending just £100.

0:31:320:31:38

So, what did they make of their opponent's offerings?

0:31:390:31:42

She put a chair for £10. Profit.

0:31:450:31:49

A pincushion? Profit.

0:31:490:31:52

Bathers? Profit, I think.

0:31:520:31:55

There'll be a lot of people after that riding crop.

0:31:550:31:58

So, profit, profit, profit, profit, profit. Well done!

0:31:580:32:01

Out of all the things that he'd bought, I think

0:32:010:32:03

I'm most drawn to the silver propelling pencil golf tee,

0:32:030:32:06

as opposed to the sort of random bits of treen.

0:32:060:32:10

Charlie's pheasant hat is great. He's a genius, he's a genius!

0:32:100:32:13

But our experts won't be the ones splashing their cash at the

0:32:130:32:16

imminent auction showdown.

0:32:160:32:19

After a quick foray in Farnham, Surrey, their trail took them

0:32:190:32:22

through Hampshire and West Sussex

0:32:220:32:24

and is ending in a rather rainy Towcester, Northamptonshire.

0:32:240:32:28

I'm glad you're here, actually, because if it weren't for you,

0:32:280:32:31

I'd probably be pronouncing this area Tow-cester!

0:32:310:32:34

-Because...

-Oh, Tow-cester!

-It's a nice part of the world, though.

0:32:340:32:37

It is nice, though. Nice countryside.

0:32:370:32:39

It's a shame we don't have the weather today. But such is life.

0:32:390:32:42

On their way to their penultimate showdown,

0:32:420:32:44

-it could be Charlie's turn to get nervous.

-Are you feeling confident?

0:32:440:32:48

Because you are slowly but surely catching me up, aren't you?

0:32:480:32:51

-The gap is closing.

-Just creeping along.

0:32:510:32:53

Today's auction house is fifth generation family run

0:32:530:32:56

auctioneers, J P Humbert, who've been in the business since 1842.

0:32:560:33:01

-Another sale, another thrashing...

-Well, we'll soon find out.

0:33:020:33:06

You'd better be ready, Ross. This is it, I'm catching up. You OK there?

0:33:060:33:10

Do you need a wee hand?

0:33:100:33:12

-Ha-ha! Actually, I wouldn't mind!

-Come on, gorgeous.

0:33:120:33:15

Hang on, I'm still in my seat belt!

0:33:150:33:18

-I'm sorry to pull your arm out its socket! Right, come on.

-Oh, dear.

0:33:180:33:21

-Money to make.

-Money to lose!

-Come on!

0:33:210:33:26

The chap behind the rostrum today is auctioneer Jonathan Humbert,

0:33:260:33:29

who's taken a look at the pair's wares.

0:33:290:33:32

Natasha's delicate riding crop has sadly suffered some damage.

0:33:320:33:36

But Jonathan still has high hopes.

0:33:360:33:38

The gentleman's hunting crop, which is unfortunately damaged,

0:33:390:33:42

I think this might surprise us yet. The golf tee, we like.

0:33:420:33:45

It's got everything good about it.

0:33:450:33:47

The Carlton Ware cruet set, actually is a bit of retro genius.

0:33:470:33:50

The pincushion, we like. I think this might do £50, £60.

0:33:500:33:54

I think if something is going to struggle today,

0:33:540:33:57

it's going to be these tables.

0:33:570:33:59

It may be hit and miss from Jonathan

0:33:590:34:01

but now it's over to Towcester's finest buyers.

0:34:010:34:04

Is that Humpty Dumpty?

0:34:040:34:07

First to go under the gavel is Charlie's 1920s pheasant hat.

0:34:070:34:11

-Would you wear this hat?

-Would I wear it? Are you mad?

0:34:110:34:14

You've met me, of course I would!

0:34:140:34:16

She's as bad as he is!

0:34:160:34:17

I can start as a whole 10 and £15...

0:34:170:34:21

-BOTH:

-Ooh!

0:34:210:34:22

£15, the hammer is up. And £20 anywhere else? It's up to you.

0:34:220:34:26

-Oh, no!

-No, don't bid.

-£15, bid £20, anywhere else?

0:34:260:34:28

It's up to you at £15 bid. £15. Sold and away at £15 only...

0:34:280:34:33

-Oh!

-Well, it could be worse.

-Huh, a £3 loss isn't the best start.

0:34:350:34:39

But he's right, it could have been worse.

0:34:390:34:41

Not too shoddy, for a mad, feathered hat.

0:34:410:34:43

No, I think, for a feathered hat, that was a result, really.

0:34:430:34:47

Next, it's Natasha's Edwardian child's chair.

0:34:480:34:51

Auctioneer Jonathan thinks this may struggle.

0:34:510:34:54

-I can come straight in here at £10 only. 15 upstairs...

-Oh!

0:34:540:34:57

-15 upstairs.

-Five... Nod of the head. 25 far away. 30 anywhere else?

0:34:570:35:03

25 bid. At 25 bid, then the hammer's up.

0:35:030:35:06

-Bang on middle estimate, 30 on my left.

-Oh, a new bidder!

0:35:060:35:08

At £30, takes you out. At £30, bid five if you like.

0:35:080:35:11

-It's a shake of the head.

-It's amazing, the lack of taste they have in Towcester, isn't it?

0:35:110:35:15

Sold and away then. Hammer's up. Done at £30.

0:35:150:35:19

Yay!

0:35:200:35:22

-That's a serious, serious result!

-Certainly is.

0:35:220:35:25

-Natasha's tripled her money.

-Charlie, I'm coming to get you...

0:35:250:35:31

Now, it's back to Charlie, with his silver propelling pencil.

0:35:330:35:36

Straight in, lower estimate, £20 we start with.

0:35:360:35:39

-Oh, so not bad, now, come on, chaps!

-Five... 30... Five, sir?

0:35:390:35:42

-35 online.

-Come on, come on. Yes!

-Bid. 40. Time out.

0:35:420:35:45

Five online, if you like. 45 far away, sir. Thank you.

0:35:450:35:48

At £45, you're in, sir.

0:35:480:35:50

At £45, straight through underneath and we're all done.

0:35:500:35:53

Selling under the mezzanine at £45...

0:35:530:35:55

Yours, sir. Well done.

0:35:590:36:01

A profit, like auctioneer Jonathan thought,

0:36:010:36:04

putting Charlie back on track.

0:36:040:36:06

-That's better.

-That feels so good!

-I'm coming to get you, baby!

0:36:060:36:10

But can Natasha's three-part silver collection help close the gap

0:36:100:36:14

-a little further?

-Who's going to start me? A tenner, surely? 10, bid.

0:36:140:36:18

-At £10, bid. Then 15. 15 upstairs.

-15's bid.

-20 if you like.

0:36:180:36:21

£20, bid five if you like?

0:36:210:36:24

At £20 bid. I'll take two... Two bid. Five. At 22 upstairs.

0:36:240:36:29

All done at 22.

0:36:290:36:31

-Oh, that's OK.

-It's OK. It's not bad.

0:36:310:36:33

Not bad at all, actually. It's a profit, albeit a small one.

0:36:330:36:38

Now, it's Charlie's three items of treen.

0:36:380:36:41

I've got 12 and £15 on commission. I'll take 18, sir. 25 is next...

0:36:420:36:47

-That's better.

-At £20, five, surely? One more. 25 online.

0:36:470:36:51

The book is out at 25 online. Hammer's up.

0:36:510:36:54

At £25 bid, then 30 anywhere else? At 25 bid, hammer's up, at £25...

0:36:540:36:59

-Thank you, 392.

-Well, somebody online recognises good quality.

0:37:020:37:07

Sadly, not enough people, though, giving Charlie a £10 loss.

0:37:070:37:11

Next up, it's Natasha's Carlton Ware novelty bathers cruet set.

0:37:120:37:17

An interesting...amount of pre-sale talk about these items...

0:37:170:37:24

-Oh, talk...

-..resulting in a commission bid of

0:37:240:37:28

-not 10, not 20, not even 30...

-Ooh!

0:37:280:37:31

-..but £38 commission starts...

-I don't know why I'm cheering!

0:37:320:37:37

-£38 bid, I'll take 40 in another place. 40 online.

-Ooh!

0:37:370:37:41

40 online. At £40, the book is out, you're online.

0:37:410:37:45

At £40 bid then, online, the internet takes it here.

0:37:450:37:48

Sold and away at £40...

0:37:480:37:52

Yay!

0:37:520:37:53

That's a third profit for Natasha.

0:37:530:37:56

She's certainly got Charlie in her sights now.

0:37:560:37:59

-Well done!

-I was so worried about those.

-I knew.

0:37:590:38:03

I knew those would swim away, I really did.

0:38:030:38:05

Next, it's the damaged tables.

0:38:050:38:07

The auctioneer wasn't a fan

0:38:090:38:10

and Charlie is hoping for a restorer in the room.

0:38:100:38:15

£20 anyone?

0:38:150:38:17

-HE SOBS

-Tenner away, it's up to you

0:38:170:38:19

-for a tenner. Tenner away...

-I give up.

0:38:190:38:22

-What's happening?

-It's up to you for a £10 bid online.

0:38:220:38:26

At 10, we're out of the traps and were away. 15 bid. 15 upstairs.

0:38:260:38:29

-I'll take your 15. I'll take your 15. 20 online, surely.

-Keep going!

0:38:290:38:33

-It's £20 online.

-Yes!

-Five if you like, just one more.

0:38:330:38:36

-At 25 upstairs...

-Yes, that's my boy!

-£30, surely?

0:38:360:38:42

At £25, bid 30, comes again at £30 here online.

0:38:420:38:46

-£30 bid five, one more? And why not? 35 I've got.

-Yay!

0:38:460:38:52

-Where is this man?

-At £35, bid 40 against you online.

0:38:520:38:55

-Oh! I might have to buy him a cup of tea.

-Goodness me.

0:38:550:38:57

And sold here online at £40. Are we all done?

0:38:570:39:00

Sold and away then, at £40...

0:39:000:39:03

-Aah!

-Yay!

-You're a genius, sir!

0:39:070:39:11

He most certainly is. With £40 for a couple of broken tables, eh?

0:39:120:39:16

A little bird has told me that the

0:39:160:39:19

auctioneer rather rates your next lot.

0:39:190:39:22

Oh, really? What's next? What's my next lot? Oh, the pin cushion!

0:39:230:39:27

Natasha's seen silver versions going for a pretty penny at her auctions.

0:39:290:39:32

But will her silver-plated option do just as well?

0:39:320:39:36

-We have a cunningly low estimate...

-Oh...

0:39:360:39:38

..and accordingly, a cunningly large pair of commission bids,

0:39:380:39:41

where I start the bidding at £80.

0:39:410:39:45

What?! Ooh, sorry!

0:39:450:39:46

£80 here on commission. £80 is where we start. Is £80 where we finish?

0:39:470:39:51

At £80 bid then 90 if you like.

0:39:510:39:53

£80, at £80, at £80 bid, then it's first and it's final.

0:39:530:39:56

We're selling all the way, all done. Sold here then at £80...

0:39:560:40:01

You need a hanky! That's absolutely fantastic, £80! What did it cost?

0:40:030:40:09

-Six pounds.

-Six?!

0:40:090:40:10

Incredible! That's an amazing £74 profit. Well done, Natasha.

0:40:120:40:16

-I think I squealed. I'm so sorry.

-You did squeal.

0:40:160:40:20

Charlie should be getting worried. If his Edwardian cabinet bombs,

0:40:210:40:25

-Natasha could end up first past the post.

-£20, surely. £20, straight in.

0:40:250:40:30

-Thank you, £20 bid then five anywhere?

-I can't believe this.

0:40:300:40:33

At £20, bid five online. £30? Five online? 35 bid. 40 if you like.

0:40:330:40:40

-Come on, come on!

-£35. 40 if you like.

-They're giving it away!

0:40:400:40:43

-40 bid. Five online again.

-No, but that's no good.

0:40:430:40:45

-It's half what I paid.

-45 bid. Sold online at 45...

0:40:450:40:49

I want to go home!

0:40:510:40:53

Oh, dear, Charlie. No-one likes a sore loser.

0:40:530:40:56

So, we're pretty much going to be level pegging.

0:40:560:40:59

-Not if the crop makes 300.

-Well... The chances of that are very slim.

0:40:590:41:03

Now, Natasha's 1930s riding crop.

0:41:050:41:08

Could it be the dark horse of the race?

0:41:080:41:11

It's exciting.

0:41:110:41:12

THEY HUM WILLIAM TELL OVERTURE

0:41:120:41:16

-25 and £30 starts me.

-£30...

-Not bad...

-40, I'm out. Five...

0:41:180:41:24

At 45, straight through. At £45, bid 50 in another place?

0:41:240:41:27

-Come on, 50, 50, 50...

-At £45, bid 50 online, yes or no? It's 50 here.

0:41:270:41:31

-60, sir?

-No! Oh!

-£50 here. 60, if you like? 55, I'll take.

0:41:310:41:36

-Yes, he'll take it.

-At 55, I'll take it. Against you online, at 60.

0:41:360:41:39

55, I'll split the bid. At 55 straight through, are we all done?

0:41:390:41:43

Hammer's up. Are we all out online? It's £55. Fair warning. At £55...

0:41:430:41:49

-Yes!

-Bravo!

0:41:510:41:52

Inspiring, Ms Raskin. Bravo, indeed. Five profits for five.

0:41:520:41:57

What a fabulous finish.

0:41:570:41:59

-I'll drive you away, so you've got time to count your money.

-Oh, thank you.

0:41:590:42:03

-Thanks ever so much.

-What a thrilling day.

0:42:030:42:07

Now, the results are in.

0:42:070:42:08

Charlie began today's trip in the lead on £294.62.

0:42:080:42:12

With more losses than profits along with auction costs,

0:42:130:42:17

he's down £58.60, leaving him with £236.02

0:42:170:42:21

Natasha was lagging behind, with £206.70.

0:42:240:42:28

Some clever buying and a brilliant day has meant that after

0:42:280:42:32

auction costs, she made a well-deserved £86.14,

0:42:320:42:35

taking her into pole position, with £292.84.

0:42:350:42:40

-Come on, my dear.

-Well... Oh!

-Look, it's dark!

-You're such a gentleman.

0:42:410:42:45

You be making so much money, the auctioneer's taken so long,

0:42:450:42:47

it's dark!

0:42:470:42:50

-Such service!

-Come on, in you get.

-Thank you so much, Charlie.

0:42:500:42:54

Thank you.

0:42:540:42:55

HE TOOTS HORN

0:42:550:42:57

Onwards!

0:42:570:42:59

Be off with you, then!

0:43:000:43:02

Next time on Antiques Roadtrip...

0:43:030:43:05

MIMICS SCOTTISH ACCENT: I've bought something that's wheaty!

0:43:050:43:08

-Natasha gets her skates on.

-I'm just about to wow you!

0:43:080:43:12

And Charlie gets a frock on. Ooh!

0:43:120:43:15

Oh, James, would you mind?

0:43:150:43:17

This episode sees Charlie Ross and Natasha Raskin start in Farnham in Surrey and end up at auction in Towcester, Northamptonshire.


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