Episode 10 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 10

Antiques challenge. Charles Hanson and Raj Bisram's road trip concludes as they shop in Cornwall and head to the decisive auction in Crewkerne, Somerset.


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It's the nation's favourite antique experts...

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I don't know what to do.

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HORN HONKS

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

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to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game! THEY LAUGH

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah.

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It's the final leg of this week's adventure with our likely lads,

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Raj and Charles.

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You know, it's been a very, very lovely experience for me.

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And, of course,

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it wouldn't have been anywhere near this enjoyable without you.

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I think what's nice, Raj...

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I'm going to need therapy though, I have to say.

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-When I get home, I am going to need a little bit of therapy.

-Thanks a lot.

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As we all know, Charles Hanson is a road tripping veteran,

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who has a tendency to be a tad clumsy.

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Oh! No!

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I'm sorry.

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Whilst his partner in crime this week is newcomer to the road trip,

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expert auctioneer Raj Bisram.

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I don't think, if I do another trip, it will ever quite be the same.

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-Get out of here, Raj!

-There's

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nothing like having your first... THEY TALK OVER EACH OTHER

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-..nothing like having your first Charles Hanson.

-Get out of here!

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Raj started this trip with £200 in his pocket.

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And some wise buys now see him sitting pretty with £305.86.

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Charles started with the same £200 stake.

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After some profitable purchases though, his purse has more than

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doubled, with a fabulous £423.64 to play with on this last leg.

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Like a game of football, it's a big first half with an even

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bigger second half before the final whistle goes at our last auction.

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People might say, "Well, Hanson, you're ahead."

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But there is always, in a football match, that chance.

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And this could be your chance, Raj.

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This week's automobile of choice is tidy little Triumph Herald.

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Nicknamed Bella.

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RATTLING

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What was that, Raj?

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Raj, what was that?

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We've lost something.

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-Is it the exhaust pipe?

-I think something fell off.

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Oh, looks like this trip is taking its toll on poor Bella.

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GEARS GRIND

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Bella!

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ENGINE RATTLES

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THEY LAUGH

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Come on!

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Ha! It's been a long old journey for Bella and our boys.

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After starting their trip back in Corsham, Wiltshire,

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they've taken in most of the south-west of England

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and will finish their epic

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900-mile journey in Crewkerne, Somerset.

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Their final leg starts in Lostwithiel in Cornwall

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and will hopefully finish at auction in Crewkerne.

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If Bella makes it, that is.

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Here we go. We park up here.

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Put your back into it, Charles.

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Perfect. Well done, Charles.

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First shopping stop is Uzella Court Antiques Centre.

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-Let's go.

-Keep it real. Hello.

-Good morning.

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-Hello, Vicky. I'm Raj.

-Hello, Raj.

-Lovely to meet you.

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-And the famous Charles.

-And the famous Charles.

-Get out of here!

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-Far from it.

-Good morning.

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-You have a wonderful shop here.

-Yes.

-It is.

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It's not mine but I work here and it's a pleasure being here.

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-It's great fun.

-Do you specialise in certain things or is it a mixture?

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No, we have 16 people that have stock in here. That rent cabinets.

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And it's a whole mixture of everything.

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Everything you can think of.

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That means plenty of pretty pieces on offer for our experts.

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I'm going to be the Cornish cat that got the cream.

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Come on, Hanson. The Cornish cat that can find the cream.

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What about you, Raj?

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I've just noticed there is a lovely,

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lovely red serpentine stone lighthouse there.

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Serpentine stone goes back millions of years.

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And it comes in lots of different colours.

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But the red one I think is actually one of the most attractive ones.

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It's not a cheap piece but I'm going to speak to Vicky

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and see what we can do.

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Huh. With a ticket price of £55, is there a deal to be had?

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45 would be the very, very best.

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I'd like to get it for about £35.

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And I still don't think there is going to be a big

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-profit in this at auction.

-Perhaps not.

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But it has got a tiny little nick there, which I hadn't noticed.

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So I will have to reduce it.

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40, Raj, would have to be truly my very, very best.

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-And I'm speaking on behalf of the owner.

-OK.

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I'm not going to rush into it but if I can just put it to one side

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and think about it. Have a little look around and come back to it.

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-I will keep it safe.

-Thank you very much, Vicky.

-Bye-bye.

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Charles, meanwhile, is rummaging around upstairs.

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These are quite nice. I quite like these vases.

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What I love about these vases is they almost have a

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bit of a Christopher Dresser, Linthorpe look.

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These are twin-handled vases.

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With this gorgeous drip glaze.

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And I suspect the vase would date to around 1905, 1910.

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The birth of the 20th century.

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But look at the crevices.

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Look at that almost hairy dust which has been there many, many years.

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I can remove it.

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You almost want to leave it there because it gives a sure

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telltale sign that these are big capital A, like that, for antique.

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They are called a pair of Art Nouveau vases. £15.

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If I could perhaps acquire them for a tenner...

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They are a good buy.

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Actually, I might, in case Raj comes upstairs, put them down here.

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Out of harm's way.

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Smart thinking, old bean. Now, what has Raj found?

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-All these keys.

-I really like the crib boards. Do you play crib?

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No, I don't.

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-Really old-fashioned game.

-Yeah.

-Really old-fashioned game.

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I particularly like that one. It looks in pretty good condition.

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It's got lovely ball feet which are engraved.

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It's quite a nice, early one.

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I should think it's late 19th, early 20th century.

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Vicky, it's priced at £55. What would be the best on it?

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Um...

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-£40.

-OK.

-You can have that, Raj, for £40.

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That's not too bad.

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I'm going to put it to one side with the lighthouse.

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I'm putting a lot of things to one side at the moment.

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-And come back to it. That'll be great.

-Thank you.

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A third item has caught Raj's eye.

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This is a really nice, decorative magnifying glass.

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It's made up but it's really, really quite nice. It's got...

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It's made out of silver plate and mother-of-pearl.

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It's only got £14 on the ticket.

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Which isn't a great deal of money.

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If I can get this for £10-£12, there's got to be a profit in it.

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So, Raj has three lots on the table.

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Vicky has given a best combined ticket price of £90.

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Would you do a little bit better if I buy all three?

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Ah...

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If I said 80 for all three, Raj,

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that would have to be the absolute best I could do.

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If you are happy with that, I certainly am.

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I would certainly say yes.

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So a bold, last leg move there from Raj,

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buying three items in the first shop.

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Right, where is Charles?

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That's nice. Barnstaple. That's in Devon.

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We are really seeing some southern treasures.

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I love this because it's almost a glaze. It gives me an oceanic feel.

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It's like being here in Cornwall.

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And I just think it's a really stylish vase.

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What I could do with this vase, tactically,

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is almost put it with those vases

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and it almost gives them, the Art Nouveau, a bit more of a punch.

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Because this one is marked and it might put the two vases over there

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into almost a better league to be beside this.

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To be beside the sea.

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Ah, but is Vicky willing to do the deal?

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£15 is the initial ticket price on the vases. £9.50.

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All in, it makes 24.50.

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And I was hoping to buy the group for £15.

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Which is quite a big discount. Could you do it for £15?

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-No.

-No, OK.

-That's a bit low.

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20 would be ideal.

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-Yeah, I like your style. You're 20.

-Yes.

-I'm over here at 15.

-Yes.

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-If I take a walk in...

-Yeah.

-..can you meet me...

-At 18.

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Yeah. Come over here. That's it, great. £18. That's a deal.

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-All right?

-That's great. There is £20.

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-If I may have a solid £2 back.

-You can.

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-It could make all the difference.

-All right.

-I appreciate it.

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-Thank you very much.

-I got a bit of a discount. I was hoping for £15.

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-But Vicky...

-£2 change.

-..is a good dealer.

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That's great.

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And with that, Charles is off the mark.

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After a quick fix, Bella is back on the road

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and Raj is taking a break from shopping and has headed to Helston.

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He's come to meet local museum curator Katherine to find out

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more about Henry Trengrouse,

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a local man whose invention has saved lives all round the world.

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-Katherine, is that Henry Trengrouse?

-That's Henry Trengrouse, yes.

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He was actually from Mullion but he then moved to Helston

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and he was a local cabinet-maker.

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But, of course, it's not his cabinet-making that he's

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-famous for, is it?

-No, that's right, no.

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He was actually inspired to invent a life-saving

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apparatus for people at sea.

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What actually triggered that off?

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Just after Christmas in 1807,

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he heard that a ship had gone aground off Loe Bar,

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which is just outside Helston.

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And he went down to the beach to see.

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Unfortunately, many people were drowning.

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The ship was actually beached just slightly off the shore, just

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too far for people to get a rope across to it, to get people off.

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About 100 people drowned in front of him

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and the people watching on the beach.

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It sounds like he was really affected by what he'd seen.

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Are there any accounts of what actually affected him?

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Yes, we know exactly how he was feeling because we do have

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one of his notebooks where he describes the wreck.

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"It was then and there the annihilation of this fine ship

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"and so many of my fellow creatures most seriously

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"arrested my reflections and sympathy.

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"And freshened in my memory the premature

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"destruction of about 50 fine fellows at the wreck of a transport

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"ship only a few weeks preceding. And also near the same spot.

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"These melancholy disasters continue

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"to exercise my mind intensely day and night.

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"And I was led to consider what means could have been applied to

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"save those who had so miserably perished within hail of their

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"countrymen and friends, and within a few yards of land and safety."

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Wow, that really does...

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That really does give you a sense of exactly what

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-he must have been feeling.

-Yeah.

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Traumatised after helplessly witnessing men,

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women and children drown in front of him, Henry Trengrouse made

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it his life's mission to help save people from shipwrecks.

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And what did he actually do?

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Well, he actually thought that there must be a way of getting

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a rope across to the ship.

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And he though about how could you actually get it there.

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Actually, I think he had been to a fireworks display

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to celebrate some royal event.

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And the idea of the fireworks just gave him

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the idea to actually fire a rocket.

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So this rocket device, Katherine, how did it work?

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I think his original idea was that every ship would carry this

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apparatus with them. And then fire towards the shore.

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The rocket would get a thin line across to the shore

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which could then be pulled and attached to a larger rope.

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Then once you got a large, substantial rope across, you could

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then attach a seat to it which could be pulled backwards and forwards.

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And that's the Bosun's chair that he invented.

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And was he the first person to come up with this idea?

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He was one of several people who came up with a similar

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idea at the same time, yes.

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It took Henry Trengrouse ten years to fully develop his rescue system.

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Putting much of his own money into his big life-saving invention.

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How long was it used for?

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In actual fact, the basic idea of firing a rocket with a line

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was used up into the early 1980s.

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-Oh, wow.

-And sort of search and rescue helicopters still carry them.

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He must have been a very rich man then.

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Unfortunately not, no.

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He only made about £50 out of his idea from the Navy.

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Because unfortunately, he didn't patent his idea.

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And the other people who'd come up with a similar device

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patented theirs. So he missed out.

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-So no real recognition for his invention?

-Unfortunately not. No.

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And he actually died in poverty, which is very sad

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really considering the amount of lives he actually helped to save.

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Trengrouse's rocket-powered rescue system is estimated to

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have saved over 20,000 lives.

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So while he may not have made money from his ingenious invention,

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Henry Trengrouse did exactly what he set out to do -

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save peoples lives.

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It's a bit of a sad ending really, isn't it?

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I'm afraid so, yes.

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Well, at least it's good that you have recognised,

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and local people have recognised him.

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It's just a shame that, you know, the world's stage didn't.

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But it's been a fascinating story.

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Thank you very, very much for showing me around.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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-After you.

-Thank you.

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Charles, meanwhile, has hit the road

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and is headed to the most southerly city of mainland Britain. Truro.

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Where he is hoping to dig out a few fantastic finds to take to auction.

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-Are you open to a discount?

-Yeah, I can only say no.

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THEY LAUGH

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Sounds like dealer Gary might need some sweet talking, Charles.

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That's if you find something you fancy.

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These are quite decorative, aren't they? These beakers.

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And we have got these nice, almost leafy,

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overlapping designs radiating around the flared tumbler.

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-And in fact, Gary, you have called these Lalique.

-Mm-hm.

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Pair of Lalique tumblers with black enamel poppy design.

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And all-importantly here, on the bottom,

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is the mark for R Lalique, as in Rene, who died in 1945.

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And some of his most important Art Deco glass

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can fetch small fortunes.

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There are so finally blown...

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GLASS PINGS

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And they ring beautifully. And they haven't got much wear.

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I think they're probably 1930s.

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So, something to think about. Anything else, Charles?

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I quite like the vases up there.

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A nice pair of what appear to be Crown Ducal -

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they could be Crown Devon - vases

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with a blush ivory ground,

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maybe 1910.

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They are only £15, but it notes, Gary,

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-one has damage. May I have a look at them?

-Yeah.

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It all depends on how serious the damage is. Thanks, Gary.

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They're a good pair, aren't they?

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Oh, I say, they are cracked.

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They're priced at 15. What is the best on them?

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Yeah. As that one is not really worth anything...

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-Yeah, a fiver.

-OK. Yeah. Put it there.

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Oh, sorry, Gary.

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You need to work on that handshake, Charles. What about those tumblers?

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I see them probably...

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An auctioneer guiding them between £20 and £30.

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Is there any margin

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for you to give me a bit more off?

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25.

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-20?

-Five.

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-Meet me halfway?

-25.

-20?

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-No.

-Gary, you know what, I just like these

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-because they carry that magic name. Oh-la-la.

-Lalique.

-Exactly.

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And I think for that reason...

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£25, it is worth a gamble.

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-Gary, put it there. That's a deal. Thank you.

-No problem.

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Appreciate it. Thanks a lot, I am really pleased.

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So, with two lots bought, that is day one done.

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Nighty-night, chaps.

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The next morning,

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the boys are soaking up the scenery at Cape Cornwall.

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-Where fishermen go for lobster pots.

-Yeah.

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So far, Raj has secured himself three lots -

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the cribbage board,

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the serpentine lighthouse

0:17:040:17:06

and the decorative magnifying glass,

0:17:060:17:08

leaving him £225.86

0:17:080:17:11

available to spend.

0:17:110:17:13

Charles, meanwhile, has mainly bagged himself vases.

0:17:130:17:18

The first three he bought, he has grouped in one lot.

0:17:180:17:21

Then there was the Crown Devon pair.

0:17:210:17:23

And finally, just to mix things up, he snapped up the glass beakers.

0:17:230:17:26

That means he has still got £375.64 burning a hole in his pocket.

0:17:280:17:33

I've seen four crabs so far.

0:17:350:17:37

No time for a paddle, lads.

0:17:370:17:39

-Raj, do you want to hold my hand?

-No, thanks, Charles.

0:17:390:17:42

Hurry up.

0:17:420:17:43

There is shopping to be done.

0:17:430:17:45

First stop of the morning is the nearest town to Land's End -

0:17:450:17:48

St Just.

0:17:480:17:50

-Cheers.

-Buy some antiques.

-I will.

-Bye!

0:17:500:17:53

Raj has come to Bygones, hoping to uncover something special.

0:17:540:17:58

-Good morning.

-Good morning to you.

-Hello, I'm Raj.

-Vicki.

0:17:580:18:03

-Vicki, lovely to meet you.

-And you.

0:18:030:18:04

What a lovely little shop you have as well.

0:18:040:18:06

-Thank you. Have a browse.

-I will.

-See what you find.

0:18:060:18:09

In no mood to mess about today,

0:18:090:18:10

Raj has already sniffed out something he is cuckoo about.

0:18:100:18:14

This is a very nice little...

0:18:170:18:22

bronze dog.

0:18:220:18:23

It's...cold-painted bronze.

0:18:230:18:28

And it is... I'm trying to... I'm not exactly sure what kind...

0:18:280:18:31

It's a pug. It's a pug. There are a lot of pug collectors.

0:18:310:18:35

On the bronze, it's painted.

0:18:350:18:37

And then rubbed down.

0:18:370:18:40

And it has got a really nice little finish to it.

0:18:400:18:43

And it has got nice detail too, as well, on that.

0:18:430:18:46

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries,

0:18:460:18:48

there were a number of bronze foundries in Austria

0:18:480:18:50

specialising in these cold-painted figurines.

0:18:500:18:54

This is a modern reproduction, but it is real bronze and could

0:18:540:18:57

pull in K-9 collectors. Raj is keen.

0:18:570:19:01

The ticket price says 60.

0:19:050:19:07

Make me an offer I can't refuse.

0:19:100:19:12

Make you an offer you can't refuse...

0:19:140:19:17

I could probably make you a few that you could refuse. £25.

0:19:180:19:22

No.

0:19:240:19:25

-No? You didn't even think about it.

-No. I can't do it.

0:19:250:19:28

-You can't do it for 25?

-No.

0:19:280:19:31

Look, 35. Still a bargain for you.

0:19:310:19:34

Hello, Raj!

0:19:370:19:39

I tell you what we'll do, how about we split it?

0:19:390:19:42

30, and it will be cash.

0:19:420:19:44

You drive a hard bargain.

0:19:470:19:49

-We have a deal?

-Yeah.

0:19:490:19:51

-OK, we have a deal.

-You've got a deal.

0:19:510:19:54

And just like that, deal's done for Raj.

0:19:540:19:57

Meanwhile, Charles is made his way to Pendeen,

0:19:570:20:00

an area with a proud mining heritage.

0:20:000:20:04

Cornish mines like these played a vital role in transforming

0:20:040:20:07

the economic and social development of Britain in the 18th

0:20:070:20:11

and 19th centuries.

0:20:110:20:13

Charles is meeting ex-Geevor miner Eddie Strick to find out more.

0:20:130:20:18

What a sight we are on, with the sea just over there.

0:20:180:20:23

-But tell me, mining here, it was all about tin?

-It was all about tin.

0:20:230:20:27

It has been about tin for centuries here.

0:20:270:20:29

You know, you're talking about 1500 onward.

0:20:290:20:32

Tin, along with other metals,

0:20:320:20:33

have been used by humans for over 4,000 years.

0:20:330:20:37

And since 1860, tin mining has been Cornwall's biggest export,

0:20:370:20:42

even shaping the Pendeen landscape.

0:20:420:20:44

Eddie is taking Charles down the 18th-century Mexico Shaft

0:20:440:20:48

to get a closer look.

0:20:480:20:50

Well, Eddie, I am looking the part now, aren't I?

0:20:500:20:52

You are looking well dressed for the part, yes.

0:20:520:20:54

This mine, to me, is very low. It seems quite narrow.

0:20:540:20:59

Well, it is a bit of a Victorian mine, as you will see later on.

0:20:590:21:02

This would have been worked by a family, more than likely.

0:21:020:21:04

The founders used to like to work together in this early period

0:21:040:21:08

-to keep their costs down.

-Yeah.

-So children as well.

-OK.

0:21:080:21:12

-Well, Dad, after you.

-There we go.

-Come on, Dad.

0:21:120:21:16

The pioneering mining techniques developed in these Cornish mines

0:21:160:21:20

played a key role in the industrialisation of Britain.

0:21:200:21:24

Hey there, I've got a backache.

0:21:240:21:26

Here you'll be able to straighten up a bit.

0:21:260:21:28

-Oh!

-Bumped your head.

0:21:280:21:30

Oh, OK.

0:21:300:21:32

Wowee, Eddie. It is like being in an igloo.

0:21:320:21:34

Where are we now, Eddie?

0:21:340:21:35

We are on the hauling shaft,

0:21:350:21:36

where all the ore was hauled to the surface.

0:21:360:21:38

As you see in front of you, the kibble, OK, that is

0:21:380:21:42

what they used to load up.

0:21:420:21:43

And that would then be pulled to the surface by a horse whim.

0:21:430:21:46

You mentioned families who work together.

0:21:460:21:49

The girls were on the surface milling their dirt,

0:21:490:21:52

so as it was hauled up in these kibbles, of course...

0:21:520:21:55

The women's side of the family would be up there processing that

0:21:550:21:58

where the men and boys would be here, hauling it out.

0:21:580:22:01

So if they had big families then...

0:22:010:22:03

In the Victorian families, there might have been of seven or eight

0:22:030:22:06

-in a family.

-Yeah.

-Uncles, nephews, all come together.

0:22:060:22:09

Paid on the amount of ground they had broken,

0:22:090:22:12

wages for mining were generally higher than other local occupations

0:22:120:22:17

like farming or fishing, but came with much bigger risks, too.

0:22:170:22:20

Accidents and deaths from blasting,

0:22:200:22:23

drowning and rock falls were common, as were serious long-term

0:22:230:22:27

health problems caused by breathing in the silica dust underground.

0:22:270:22:32

Although these walls can't talk,

0:22:320:22:34

it really does give you a feeling of the emotion of,

0:22:340:22:37

in part, the passion but more the hard life miners who

0:22:370:22:43

I'm sure were much younger than me had to go through and endure.

0:22:430:22:46

I can feel the work in the walls. Where are we going next?

0:22:460:22:49

Well, we are going where they'd go at the end of the shift.

0:22:490:22:52

They obviously wouldn't be.

0:22:520:22:53

-They'd be going home to a tin bath.

-Yes.

0:22:530:22:55

We are going up to the dry where we would shower.

0:22:550:22:58

-Oh, lovely. Shower...

-And homeward with a bit of luck.

0:22:580:23:00

-Have a hot drink.

-A hot drink and home we go.

0:23:000:23:02

-That sounds more my style.

-We will make our way.

-I'll follow you.

0:23:020:23:05

Cornwall pioneered

0:23:050:23:07

the transfer of the British Industrial Revolution overseas.

0:23:070:23:10

As Cornish miners migrated, they took their special skills with them.

0:23:100:23:14

The gold rush in Australia, the South African diamond in

0:23:160:23:20

-Kimberley.

-Getting in the hard rock, this is where the Cornishmen were.

0:23:200:23:24

So really, that Cornish love affair with mining really

0:23:240:23:27

spread around the world and showed the world the Cornish way.

0:23:270:23:32

That's right. And there is a saying,

0:23:320:23:33

"Wherever you go in the world, look down one hole.

0:23:330:23:36

"There is usually one Cornishman amongst them."

0:23:360:23:38

The Cornish miners didn't just export their technology,

0:23:380:23:41

they took their culture too - wrestling,

0:23:410:23:44

pasties and saffron cakes became well-known in Australia and America.

0:23:440:23:49

And Cornish place names can be found on every single continent.

0:23:490:23:53

Over the 1900s, Cornish tin production declined.

0:23:530:23:57

There was a sudden revival of the industry in 1970 and '80

0:23:570:24:01

which gave it a last brief boom before disappearing in the 1990s,

0:24:010:24:05

when this mine was shut.

0:24:050:24:07

-It has been an amazing visit, thank you so much.

-And the fleas.

0:24:080:24:11

I've got to tell you about the fleas, cos there were fleas here.

0:24:110:24:14

Now you tell me!

0:24:140:24:15

-But you are all right with that jacket.

-Yeah, I bet I am.

0:24:150:24:18

It feels a bit itchy, actually.

0:24:180:24:19

We used to have to fumigate this place every so often.

0:24:190:24:22

Yeah, thanks a lot.

0:24:220:24:23

I have got to see my mate, Raj, now and I'll pass the jacket onto him.

0:24:230:24:26

Nice to see you, Eddie. Take care. Thanks, Eddie. See you.

0:24:260:24:29

A little further along the coast,

0:24:330:24:35

Raj has made an unscheduled stop, as he has spotted local

0:24:350:24:39

fisherman Steve, who is surrounded by a load of lobster pots.

0:24:390:24:43

-This is an old lobster pot.

-This is an old lobster pot.

0:24:430:24:46

-How old would that be, Steve?

-Is about five or six years old.

-OK.

0:24:460:24:51

-The problem is, the bottom rubs on the hard seabed.

-Ah-ha.

0:24:510:24:55

Rubs the plastic off and then the saltwater rusts it.

0:24:550:24:58

-OK.

-But for what you want...

0:24:580:25:01

What would people do? I mean, that looks ideal to put a plant in.

0:25:010:25:04

-Yep.

-A flower in the garden or something.

-Trailing plants, whatever.

0:25:040:25:07

You are not actually going to buy one of those, are you?

0:25:070:25:10

So if I were to offer you... If they are worth 20 quid at auction,

0:25:100:25:13

-if I were to offer you a fiver, would you be happy with that?

-No.

0:25:130:25:16

-You wouldn't be.

-No.

-No. God, you are a hard man already.

0:25:160:25:19

I could tell. OK... OK, how about ten?

0:25:190:25:23

-That has got to be fair.

-Ten sounds better.

-We shake on it?

-Yep.

0:25:230:25:26

We have a deal.

0:25:260:25:27

Cor, pretty unconventional auction lot,

0:25:270:25:30

but I do love the fact that Raj is getting into the road trip spirit.

0:25:300:25:33

Aren't you?

0:25:330:25:35

While Raj has been taking in the sea air, Charles has travelled

0:25:360:25:39

40 miles northeast to Redruth, with some serious shopping to do.

0:25:390:25:44

Hats off.

0:25:440:25:46

-Charles!

-How are you?

-How are you doing?

0:25:460:25:48

-You got the name.

-You got here eventually.

0:25:480:25:50

We have met before, have we?

0:25:500:25:52

-No, no, I've seen you on TV loads of times.

-Oh, thanks.

0:25:520:25:55

-There we go.

-I just couldn't wait to see you.

0:25:550:25:57

Could we do a deal today, do you think?

0:25:570:25:59

-Hopefully. It would be lovely, I need the money.

-Get out of here!

0:25:590:26:03

Get out of here! I like your necklace, by the way. Goodness me.

0:26:030:26:06

-You carry the gold well.

-Brass.

-Is it?

0:26:060:26:08

You have a look round, Charles. I'll just be behind here.

0:26:080:26:12

-What is your name?

-Walter.

-Walter.

-Yeah, my friends call me Wal.

0:26:120:26:15

-Hey, Wal.

-Right on.

0:26:150:26:17

Yeah, man! Charles, what are you after?

0:26:170:26:20

Well, I quite like... Walter, follow me over here.

0:26:200:26:23

There is one thing I have seen that I quite like.

0:26:230:26:25

-Lots of glass, lots of pottery but I quite like...

-Oh, right.

0:26:250:26:29

-..the bottle.

-It is certainly different,

0:26:290:26:31

a wooden bottle, isn't it?

0:26:310:26:33

I don't think it is overly old.

0:26:330:26:35

-I...

-It definitely isn't Louis XIV.

0:26:350:26:39

The Sun King. Where is our sun today? I quite like this.

0:26:390:26:43

-Interesting, isn't it?

-Yeah. What is your very best on that?

0:26:430:26:47

-I'll do it for a tenner.

-You wouldn't.

-Yeah, why not?

-Look at me.

0:26:470:26:50

I'm looking at you. You look like a nice man.

0:26:500:26:53

I think this is what you might call, in the auction, a fine

0:26:530:26:57

Edwardian oak-banded and coopered

0:26:570:27:01

brass-bound novelty

0:27:010:27:05

wooden wine bottle with a stopper, and it is just uncorked.

0:27:050:27:10

-Because I am going to buy it for £10.

-Go for it.

0:27:100:27:12

-Wal, put it there.

-Done.

-As it Wal or Walter?

-Wal will do.

0:27:120:27:15

-Thanks, mate.

-Right on!

-Right on!

-You got a deal.

0:27:150:27:18

Thanks a lot. Hold on, Wal, I am going to fly the flag. There we are.

0:27:180:27:21

That is one down.

0:27:210:27:23

Firm friends already,

0:27:230:27:24

Wal is offering up a little titbit for Charles.

0:27:240:27:28

The little pot is different, at the top there, Charles.

0:27:280:27:30

-Is that peculiar?

-Strange, yeah. I have no idea what it is.

0:27:300:27:34

What does it look like to you?

0:27:340:27:36

I would have said a portable inkwell, but maybe not.

0:27:360:27:39

If it was an inkwell, I would have thought it would have had...

0:27:390:27:43

A seal of some sort maybe?

0:27:430:27:45

Some remnants inside of maybe where a glass liner was.

0:27:450:27:48

And I just wonder whether it is to do with

0:27:480:27:53

maybe a nipple cover

0:27:530:27:55

if you were perhaps... What is the phrase? When you feed a baby.

0:27:550:28:02

Breast-feeding.

0:28:020:28:04

Also if you'd fill a bottle, what do you call it?

0:28:040:28:07

What is the phrase?

0:28:070:28:09

What are you on about, Charles?

0:28:090:28:11

-Express.

-Oh, right.

-You've had a baby and you are expressing.

0:28:110:28:14

I just wonder whether maybe there was some sort of nipple cover...

0:28:140:28:19

-In the box?

-In the box.

0:28:190:28:20

You might be onto something there, Charles.

0:28:200:28:23

I could believe that.

0:28:230:28:25

It is marked London.

0:28:250:28:26

I think you've quite rightly dated it to Edwardian.

0:28:260:28:29

It is decorative, it's not got much weight to it.

0:28:290:28:32

But it is quite a dainty object.

0:28:320:28:34

If I was estimating it for auction, I would be quite hard

0:28:340:28:37

-and say it is probably going to make between £15 and £30.

-Yeah.

0:28:370:28:40

Is there much scope to knock a bit off that? What could

0:28:400:28:43

you do it for, do you think, Wal?

0:28:430:28:45

Um... I would let you have that for 25.

0:28:450:28:47

It is a shame the marks are rubbed. I think it is an interesting box.

0:28:470:28:51

-You wouldn't do it for 20, would you?

-Go on, go for it.

0:28:510:28:53

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-Put it there. Thanks a lot.

0:28:530:28:56

So that's a box and a bottle bought. Anything else, Charles?

0:28:560:29:00

What I quite like is...

0:29:000:29:02

-I've stuck that on the second shelf.

-Right.

0:29:030:29:05

Four nice pendants. You've got cycling, that is all the rage.

0:29:050:29:09

And that is a pendant from 1931.

0:29:090:29:14

So early cycling interest.

0:29:140:29:17

Then you've got an interesting little pendant here,

0:29:170:29:21

which appears to be in the form of a sundial.

0:29:210:29:24

Then you've got soccer, football as we call it all over here,

0:29:240:29:28

with a beautiful little blue...

0:29:280:29:30

-Enamel, yeah.

-..enamelled football.

-Lovely.

0:29:300:29:33

Which is 1950s.

0:29:330:29:35

And then, are you at darts player?

0:29:350:29:37

-No, not at all.

-No?

0:29:370:29:38

As a sporting lot, what will be the best price on all four?

0:29:380:29:42

-As a one-hit.

-I'd go £40.

0:29:420:29:46

-For the whole lot?

-For the lot.

0:29:460:29:48

You wouldn't do a bit less, would you, Walter?

0:29:480:29:50

-Is there another one we could throw in?

-Get out of here!

0:29:500:29:53

If that is the case, Walter... You have got one here.

0:29:530:29:57

I think you have picked the dearest one, Charles.

0:29:570:29:59

Well, now you've got five, I will do the five for 50.

0:29:590:30:03

You wouldn't do them for...

0:30:030:30:05

Not a bit less?

0:30:050:30:07

-Oh, Charles...

-£45?

0:30:070:30:09

-Go on, have a go.

-Are you sure?

-Go for it.

-Happy?

-No.

0:30:100:30:13

-Have you been here a while?

-Yes.

-Look at me. You've got to be happy.

0:30:130:30:16

You have upset me now.

0:30:160:30:18

-Don't say that.

-Have you ever seen me cry?

-We have done so well.

0:30:180:30:22

-The journey was well and truly on. Are you sure?

-Yeah.

0:30:220:30:24

Is there a margin in it for you?

0:30:240:30:26

-Not a lot.

-No, but is there a bit of a margin?

-Just a bit.

-OK, sold.

0:30:260:30:30

Thanks a lot. Put it there. Sold.

0:30:300:30:32

So our dapper dandy is all spent up with three final lots bought.

0:30:320:30:37

Raj isn't done yet, though.

0:30:380:30:40

So he has made his way to the ancient town of

0:30:400:30:42

St Columb Major and is off to his final shop on this road trip.

0:30:420:30:48

-Hello.

-Hello there.

0:30:480:30:50

-I'm Raj.

-I'm Tina.

-Tina, lovely to meet you.

-And you.

0:30:500:30:53

It is a pack shop,

0:30:530:30:55

so you'll need to use your head to find your final lot.

0:30:550:30:58

Hello, Charles.

0:30:580:30:59

Oh, suits you, sir. Right, anything looking good, Raj?

0:30:590:31:04

This is really, really quite nice.

0:31:040:31:06

It is a copper inkwell which is slightly different

0:31:060:31:10

because it is very Art Nouveau-y, and it looks like it might be

0:31:100:31:15

from the Newlyn School, which is obviously not very far from here.

0:31:150:31:20

The Newlyn School started around the 1880s and went on

0:31:200:31:24

until the early 20th century.

0:31:240:31:27

It is where a lot of artists went from the cities down here

0:31:270:31:31

because they... They became a colony, basically.

0:31:310:31:35

And they were all able to help each other and work on art forms.

0:31:350:31:40

And this looks very, very typically of a Newlyn Art Nouveau-y piece.

0:31:400:31:46

I can't see of signature on this at all, but it would've sat...

0:31:460:31:49

it would've sat on a desk.

0:31:490:31:51

It's missing its liner, which it would've had.

0:31:510:31:54

But it is definitely got age to it.

0:31:540:31:56

In fact, it has got here "Possibly Newlyn".

0:31:560:31:59

It has got a price on it of £79.

0:31:590:32:02

For POSSIBLY being Newlyn, 79 is quite a heavy ticket.

0:32:020:32:06

Better see if there's a deal to be had with Tina.

0:32:060:32:10

-I see you've got £79 on the ticket.

-I have.

-Now, what could you do?

0:32:100:32:15

-OK.

-I don't want to have to get down on my knees, yet.

0:32:150:32:19

-OK.

-But I will.

0:32:190:32:20

How about if we said...

0:32:200:32:23

65?

0:32:230:32:24

65...

0:32:260:32:27

-I'll tell you what I'd like to pay for it...

-OK.

0:32:280:32:31

..that might give me a chance. I'd like to pay £40 for it.

0:32:310:32:34

Right. Do you think we could do 42?

0:32:360:32:39

-And you could have a deal.

-Are you happy at £42?

0:32:390:32:42

-Yes, I'll be happy with 42.

-You sure?

-Yes.

-Tina, we have a deal.

0:32:420:32:47

Great, thank you.

0:32:470:32:48

And with that, the boys are all bought up.

0:32:500:32:52

Raj spent £162 on six lots.

0:32:540:32:57

The cribbage board,

0:32:570:32:59

the serpentine lighthouse,

0:32:590:33:01

the magnifying glass,

0:33:010:33:02

the lobster pot,

0:33:020:33:04

the bronze pug

0:33:040:33:06

and the Art Nouveau inkwell.

0:33:060:33:08

Charles spent £123,

0:33:100:33:12

buying the trio of vases,

0:33:120:33:14

the wooden coopered bottle,

0:33:140:33:16

the unusual silver box,

0:33:160:33:18

the selection of sports pendants,

0:33:180:33:21

the moulded glass beakers

0:33:210:33:23

and the pair of Crown Devon vases.

0:33:230:33:25

So, what do they make of each other's lots?

0:33:260:33:29

What I really, really like and what might be my Achilles heel,

0:33:290:33:33

it's only got three letters - the pug. It might just go...

0:33:330:33:36

-HE HOWLS

-At auction.

0:33:360:33:38

The wooden bottle, £10, it is

0:33:380:33:41

a nice piece of treen with some brass surrounds.

0:33:410:33:44

There is a small profit in that.

0:33:440:33:45

The cribbage board, it's a game of yesteryear. It's nice.

0:33:450:33:48

The enamelling on the club and the heart are slightly damaged.

0:33:480:33:53

Even so, it is in inspired buy.

0:33:530:33:55

Charles has bought well. He hasn't spent a lot of money.

0:33:550:33:58

He has played it very, very safe.

0:33:580:34:00

It is never over until the auctioneer for the last time

0:34:000:34:02

says, "Going, going, gone."

0:34:020:34:04

After starting this leg in Lostwithiel,

0:34:060:34:08

our experts travelled all around the Cornish coast

0:34:080:34:11

and are now off to the very last auction in Crewkerne.

0:34:110:34:15

Presiding over the auction today at lovely Lawrences

0:34:150:34:19

is Richard Kay.

0:34:190:34:20

So what is he make of our lads' lots?

0:34:200:34:22

The Cornish lobster pot is a bit of a surprise.

0:34:220:34:24

We have a huge variety in our sales,

0:34:240:34:26

but I don't think we've ever had one of those before.

0:34:260:34:28

I think it might be a little bit too fishy for some collectors' tastes.

0:34:280:34:31

This has been called a nipple box, which is a new term to me.

0:34:310:34:34

I think it is a small piece of beautifully made silverware

0:34:340:34:36

from the Edwardian period.

0:34:360:34:38

It's precise purpose is unclear, but we won't dwell on that now,

0:34:380:34:41

I think, we'll just hope for a good price on the day.

0:34:410:34:43

I think the one I am going to put my money behind is the copper inkwell.

0:34:430:34:47

There is no signature on it, which is a little off-putting,

0:34:470:34:50

but the quality is lovely. It is a charming piece.

0:34:500:34:52

So I think that could be quite a good price today.

0:34:520:34:54

So, for one last time, our boys are getting ready to head-to-head.

0:34:540:34:59

The journey starts now, this is the final curtain.

0:35:000:35:03

First up is Raj's mahogany and brass cribbage board.

0:35:050:35:09

Bid's here, start me at 20. 25, 30 is bid.

0:35:090:35:12

-Well done, profit.

-It's 35, I'm out.

-Keep going.

0:35:120:35:16

40, new bidder. 45.

0:35:160:35:19

Are you bidding? 50. 55.

0:35:200:35:22

-£55 now.

-Excellent.

-That is awesome, Raj.

0:35:220:35:26

At £55...

0:35:260:35:28

Storming start there for Raj.

0:35:280:35:30

Will Charles be as lucky with his pair of Linthorpe-style

0:35:300:35:33

vases together with the blue Brannam vase?

0:35:330:35:37

What shall we say, £10 for all three?

0:35:380:35:40

-10 is bid.

-Come on.

-12 now.

0:35:400:35:42

15. 18. 20. Five.

0:35:420:35:44

25, lady's bid at £25.

0:35:440:35:47

-Uh-oh.

-30, new bidder. 35.

0:35:470:35:50

40. 45.

0:35:500:35:52

-Selling this one at 45.

-Oh!

0:35:520:35:54

That's good!

0:35:540:35:56

It is indeed, more than doubling your money there.

0:35:560:35:58

Well done, Charles.

0:35:580:36:00

-Well, we are both off to a good start.

-Wowee!

0:36:000:36:02

Like the sun, we are burning in the profit, aren't we?

0:36:020:36:05

Right, Raj, let's see how

0:36:050:36:07

your Cornish serpentine stone lighthouse fares.

0:36:070:36:10

-I light up your life.

-You do. You do.

0:36:110:36:13

£10 for it. 10 is bid. Opening at 10. Selling at 10 only?

0:36:130:36:16

-Come on.

-Are we done? £10?

0:36:160:36:19

At £10.

0:36:190:36:21

-Let's go.

-All done at 10? I'm selling.

0:36:210:36:23

Last time.

0:36:230:36:24

That loss means Charles is still in the lead.

0:36:240:36:27

Can he pulled further ahead with his oak and brass-coopered bottle?

0:36:270:36:32

£20 for that. £20 is bid.

0:36:320:36:34

That's good. Come on. Let's move.

0:36:340:36:37

£20, then. And selling this one. 25.

0:36:370:36:40

30. 35.

0:36:400:36:43

40. No? £40.

0:36:430:36:46

-It is the lady's bid at 40.

-Cost me how much?

-Ten.

-That's good.

0:36:460:36:49

The champagne's on ice, the show is almost over...

0:36:490:36:53

-Brilliant, well done.

-Thank you.

-That's a good one.

-Thank you.

0:36:530:36:55

Another top profit there for Charles.

0:36:550:36:59

-You've done very well.

-Thank you.

-I have to say.

0:36:590:37:02

-Are you enjoying yourself?

-I'm loving it.

0:37:020:37:04

I'm loving it!

0:37:040:37:05

Well, here is hoping you are still is chipper

0:37:050:37:08

after your decorative magnifying glass goes under the gavel.

0:37:080:37:12

£10 for that. £10 for it.

0:37:120:37:14

-£10, surely.

-Is that a profit?

-5, then. 5 is bid.

0:37:140:37:17

I saw the lady's bid first.

0:37:170:37:19

£8, sir. Are you bidding?

0:37:190:37:21

10. 12. £12 now.

0:37:210:37:24

Selling at 12. At £12, last time.

0:37:240:37:28

So, although it is a £2 profit, after auction costs,

0:37:280:37:31

it means Raj actually made a bit of a loss there.

0:37:310:37:34

Up next is Charles' unusual silver box.

0:37:360:37:39

-£25 for it. 20 then.

-Interesting box.

-£20.

0:37:400:37:43

£15, anywhere?

0:37:430:37:45

-15 is bid.

-Come on.

-18.

0:37:450:37:47

20. £20. I am selling this one at 20. All done?

0:37:470:37:52

Interesting.

0:37:520:37:54

Again, after auction costs, although he broke even,

0:37:540:37:57

that actually results in a bit of a loss for Charles.

0:37:570:38:00

Next, the lot the auctioneer felt was a bit off-piste -

0:38:000:38:04

Raj's lobster pot.

0:38:040:38:06

£10 for that?

0:38:060:38:08

5 anywhere? 5 is bid.

0:38:080:38:10

-8 now. 10. 12.

-Well done. Well done, Raj. Profit.

0:38:100:38:14

12. 15. 18. £18.

0:38:140:38:17

Selling at 18.

0:38:170:38:19

-All done at 18?

-Well done!

0:38:190:38:21

-Very good. You gave it all that.

-I gave it all that, and it worked.

0:38:210:38:24

And you got all of that.

0:38:240:38:26

So, a pretty profit there for an old lobster pot.

0:38:260:38:29

Can Charles' collection of silver sports pendants perform as well?

0:38:290:38:34

-What shall we say, £15 for them?

-Oh, dear.

-18. 20.

-There we go.

-Five.

0:38:340:38:39

30. Five. 35. By the pillar at 35.

0:38:390:38:43

Selling this one at £35. Last time.

0:38:430:38:46

All done.

0:38:460:38:47

£10 down.

0:38:470:38:49

No sports fans in the house today, it seems.

0:38:490:38:52

What about dog fanciers?

0:38:520:38:54

A profit on the pug would give Raj a healthy lead.

0:38:540:38:57

-The reason I bought this was because I thought of you...

-Why?

0:38:570:39:00

-..when I saw the pug.

-Am I the pug? Pugs are quite unattractive.

0:39:000:39:04

-HE LAUGHS

-What are you trying to say?

0:39:040:39:06

Very charming little piece. Bids here start me up at 40. 45. £50.

0:39:060:39:11

-Well done.

-£50 is bid. 55. 60.

0:39:110:39:14

Five. 70. Five. 80. Five. 90.

0:39:140:39:18

-Wow!

-£90, the bid is still with me.

-Wow!

0:39:180:39:21

At 90, I am selling this one at 90.

0:39:210:39:23

£90 then. All done?

0:39:230:39:26

-Put it there.

-Yes?

-Wonderful, wonderful.

0:39:260:39:28

HE HOWLS

0:39:280:39:30

HE BARKS

0:39:300:39:32

A delightful doggy profit for the pug.

0:39:320:39:36

I am going to be woofing all the way home.

0:39:360:39:38

HE HOWLS

0:39:380:39:39

Right, enough of the puppy puns,

0:39:390:39:41

Charles is playing catch-up with his Art Deco glass beakers.

0:39:410:39:45

Which shall we say, £40 for them?

0:39:450:39:47

-£40 for them? 30 then?

-Oh. Uh-oh.

-£30 is bid. 35 now.

0:39:470:39:51

40. 45.

0:39:510:39:54

Any more? It is 45. At the cabinets at 45. All done?

0:39:540:39:57

Nice little earner there for Charles.

0:39:580:40:00

But a good result on Raj's

0:40:000:40:02

last lot could see him win this final leg.

0:40:020:40:05

It is the auctioneer's favourite, the copper inkwell.

0:40:050:40:08

-Charming piece. Bids start me at 50 on this one.

-Oh, my goodness!

0:40:080:40:11

-He's in.

-55. 60. Five, 70. Five, 80.

0:40:110:40:15

Five. At £85 now. I'm out in the room.

0:40:150:40:18

90, new bidder. 95. 100.

0:40:180:40:21

-Are you bidding? 110. 120.

-You've done it!

0:40:210:40:24

It is 120. It is your bid, madam. At 120. And selling at 120

0:40:240:40:28

-if you are done elsewhere. Last time.

-I think you have done it.

0:40:280:40:31

Are we done?

0:40:310:40:32

I think you bought a wonderful object and I think

0:40:320:40:35

you're flying high.

0:40:350:40:37

Fantastic result, but it is not over yet.

0:40:370:40:40

You have still one last chance, Charles.

0:40:400:40:42

It is the final lot of the trip - his Crown Devon vases.

0:40:420:40:46

Come on, auctioneer.

0:40:460:40:47

-I am going to call the room out.

-Blush ivory vases.

-Come on.

0:40:470:40:50

No, no, no, stop that.

0:40:500:40:51

What shall we say, £10 for the two, quickly, for them?

0:40:510:40:55

-£10 here.

-Come on!

-£10 anywhere?

0:40:550:40:58

-Five?

-I need some help.

0:40:580:40:59

-£5.

-It's awful!

-£2 anywhere?

0:40:590:41:03

It's only a pound each.

0:41:030:41:04

-£2 is bid.

-Help! Help!

0:41:040:41:08

At £2. Only 2? Selling at 2? Are we done with them?

0:41:080:41:11

And £2 only... Four, just in time.

0:41:110:41:13

-One more!

-Six. Selling at six.

-Thank you!

0:41:130:41:15

You made a profit!

0:41:170:41:18

After auction costs, that means a teeny-tiny loss there for Charles.

0:41:180:41:22

-Come on.

-After you. No, you go first, I salute you.

0:41:220:41:25

Well done, chaps, but the big question is -

0:41:280:41:30

who is this week's winner?

0:41:300:41:33

Raj started out with £305.86 and made,

0:41:340:41:37

after paying auction costs, an incredible profit of £88.10.

0:41:370:41:42

Making him today's winner and leaving him

0:41:430:41:46

with an impressive final total of £393.96.

0:41:460:41:51

Well done, that, man.

0:41:510:41:52

Charles began with £423.64.

0:41:530:41:58

And after paying auction costs, also made a profit of £33.62.

0:41:580:42:04

That means he may have lost this leg,

0:42:040:42:06

but he has won the overall trip with a fabulous final tally of £457.26.

0:42:060:42:13

All profits go to children in need. Well done, Charles.

0:42:130:42:17

-For the last time.

-For the last time.

-Foot on break.

0:42:170:42:20

-It is a bit of a sad moment.

-Now, go to first gear.

0:42:200:42:23

-I can say, "Going, going..."

-Gone.

-There we go. That whole time.

0:42:230:42:27

Watch it, watch it.

0:42:270:42:29

What a week our cheeky chaps have had!

0:42:290:42:32

Who is this guy?

0:42:330:42:35

It has been a magical journey.

0:42:350:42:37

Completely and utterly disappear.

0:42:370:42:39

That's brilliant. Wowee!

0:42:390:42:41

And although there have been a few bumps along the way...

0:42:410:42:45

Bella!

0:42:450:42:46

-Go down. Whoops. Sorry.

-Oh!

0:42:460:42:49

We have witnessed the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

0:42:490:42:52

Raj, do you want to hold my hand? Good luck.

0:42:520:42:54

Next time sees the start of a brand-new road trip with

0:42:580:43:01

Butterfingers David Harper...

0:43:010:43:03

Normally...

0:43:030:43:05

Sorry about that, Roger.

0:43:050:43:06

..and the ever-entertaining Anita Manning.

0:43:060:43:09

Whooo!

0:43:090:43:10

Charles Hanson and Raj Bisram's road trip concludes as they shop in Cornwall and head to that decisive auction in Crewkerne, Somerset.