Episode 11 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 11

Antiques challenge. David Harper and Anita Manning go head to head as they road trip through northern England and into southern and central Scotland.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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I don't know what to do. SHE SOUNDS HORN

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game. Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Oh!

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today marks the start of a brand spanking new road trip,

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with a couple of our old favourites, David Harper and Anita Manning.

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Well, David, here we are in Lancashire,

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at the beginning of our big adventure.

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You have no idea what's going to happen.

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I think part of the excitement of the trip

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is meeting all the characters.

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It draws in the eccentric, doesn't it?

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-Look at us.

-Exactly.

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You're telling me.

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Take a seasoned auctioneer, Anita, for example,

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she has certainly got an eye for a bargain.

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But does have a tendency to get distracted.

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A hula hoop.

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It is all the hip action. One, two, three.

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Whoo!

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THEY LAUGH

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Cor, what a mover. Ha!

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Her partner in crime is wheeler-dealer David Harper.

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He takes a more serious approach to his shopping.

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Is it a twizzly-wizzly? Look at that twizzly-wizzly!

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Normally...

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Oh! Ahem. Sorry about that, Roger.

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Mm.

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Our lovable oddballs are starting this journey with £200 each.

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Their mode of transport is an old favourite of Anita's,

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the 1965 Morris Minor convertible.

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I'm enjoying driving this little Morris,

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I think she's just a little beauty.

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I tell you what, this is like a glove to you.

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-It just fits you perfectly, doesn't it?

-Oh, thank you, darling.

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I think I'm more Morris 1000 than Maserati.

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DAVID LAUGHS

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Oh, I don't know, Anita's known for being a bit racy.

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-I've got on a Marks & Spencer silk vest.

-Oh, hello.

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Too much detail, I'd say.

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OK, this week David and Anita will be travelling over 700 miles,

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starting in Ramsbottom, Lancashire, before snaking through Yorkshire,

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all the way up to the town of Paisley in bonny Scotland.

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Today, they begin in the market town of Ramsbottom,

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and head towards an auction in Knutsford.

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Ramsbottom is actually believed to mean "valley of the ram"

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as opposed to, well, you know...

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Bottom's up, eh?

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SHEEP BLEATS

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Speaking of which.

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I'm raring to go, Anita. Positively raring to go.

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I will drop you here, David.

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And I want you, on our first day, to have lots and lots and lots of fun.

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-Off we go.

-Have a lovely time.

-Thank you.

-Bye.

-Bye.

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David's first shop is Memories Antiques and Collectors,

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where he is meeting dealer John.

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-Hello, there, you must be John.

-I am.

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-Hello, John, David Harper.

-Hello, David.

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-Very lovely to meet you.

-Lovely to meet you.

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-What a gorgeous, sunny day.

-It is.

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-Are you in a sunny mood?

-I am.

-Marvellous. Is that good for me?

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-Possibly.

-THEY LAUGH

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I like you, John.

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Right, David, let's get going.

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Nice box.

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Look at this thing, it is completely unfashionable.

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But 15 or 20 years ago, everybody wanted one.

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It's a mid-19th century walnut, brass-bound writing slope.

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It is absolutely, to my mind, drop dead gorgeous.

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But in the market, nobody wants it,

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and that's why it's languishing now, in an antiques centre, at £68,

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when, years ago, that would have been two or three or even £400.

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It's an absolute stonker.

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I've found fantastic love letters in things like this.

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Hidden away in secret compartments.

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What an old romantic. One to think about, perhaps.

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What else catches your eye in here, then?

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This better be good, this man cave, John.

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-You'll love it.

-Really?

-You will.

-I'll let you know.

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Ooh.

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Do you know what that is? Without reading the label.

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Oh, no, no, I'm not.

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Doesn't that sink into the ground, is that something...

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-That's right. It is a boot scraper.

-I like that.

-Yes, it is very nice.

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I like that.

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It is indeed a 20th-century blacksmith-made wrought iron

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boot pull and scrape. That's a bit of a tongue twister.

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-That sinks into about that level, yeah?

-Yeah.

-So it's nice and secure.

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You can scrape your boot on there and... You can remove your boot?

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-That's right, yes.

-That's very good. Wrought iron.

-Yeah.

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This is a proper man's cave object, isn't it?

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Ticket price is £65.

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-What sort of money could that be?

-Er...

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45.

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-OK.

-That's knocking...

-That's OK, that's OK.

-..quite a chunk off.

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-I think we'll have to say yes, don't you?

-I hope so.

-OK.

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-We've done a deal.

-Thank you very much.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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That generous discount gives David his first item.

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Meanwhile, Anita is heading just eight miles down the road,

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where she is on the hunt for a bargain in Bolton.

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She's visiting Bolton Antique Centre for a good old scout round.

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-I'm always drawn to jewellery, I always like it.

-Yeah, yeah.

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-And I noticed that you had a couple of Robert Allison pieces.

-I have.

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I like his work.

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Robert Allison is a renowned Glasgow silversmith

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and Anita is a right sucker for jewellery,

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especially with a Celtic theme.

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Both of these brooches are absolutely lovely. They're Scottish brooches.

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Why have I been drawn to Scottish brooches?!

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I can't imagine, Anita!

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-I'm finding these sort of irresistible, Rosemary...

-Right.

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-Sort of irresistible.

-Yes.

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The brooches have a combined price of £150 -

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quite a lot to blow so early on, Anita.

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-This one, I like it because it has the Celtic knot motifs.

-Yes.

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-I'm trying not to spend too much money...

-I understand.

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-This is my very first buy.

-I understand.

-My very first buy

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The Celtic cross brooch is cheaper and priced at £65.

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What's the very, very, very, very best you can do that?

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28.

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28? Let's go for it.

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-That's absolutely wonderful.

-Thank you.

-I'm so pleased about that.

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I bought a Scottish thing, my very first buy!

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Excellent.

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That's a whopping £37 discount.

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Off to a strong start here, girl.

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-So, I've got one thing.

-Yes!

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There was another thing I was looking at here,

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which was a little pin with a wee diamond and pearl on it.

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-Oh...

-Like a freshwater pearl.

-The...gold?

-Uh-huh.

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We think that's possibly a South Sea Pearl.

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-I don't know whether...

-Have you got it hallmarked?

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I don't think it is, actually.

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Anita's eye has been caught by another piece of jewellery -

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a diamond and pearl set stick pin.

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It's referred to as yellow metal rather than gold,

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as it's got no hallmark.

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Ticket price is £95.

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What is the best that you could do on that?

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Um...

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60.

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-If it was hallmarked, I would be more encouraged to go with it.

-OK.

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-But I still think it's a bonny thing.

-Would 45 help?

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Oh, I'm so tempted!

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That's another great discount of over 50%!

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She's on a roll with Rosemary.

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You see these little horses, here.

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Oh, yes. Nice, actually.

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Little knife rests, would you say?

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They are, yes. A little set of four.

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-They're just white metal.

-I think they're quite kind of fun.

-Yes.

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You put them there...

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The only thing I worry a wee bit about is the age of them.

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I really don't know.

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-I've got a dilemma here.

-OK.

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Little pearl pin...

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Set of leaping, crazy horses.

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What's the best you can do on them?

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They're priced at £36.

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Is 25 too much?

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Could I buy the two for 50?

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55, I'd be happy.

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55.

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52?

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Go on, we'll do 52.

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-Will we do 52?

-52.

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-Thank you very much, that's great.

-Pleasure.

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So that's the knife rests for £12,

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and the stick pin for 40.

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Added to the earlier purchase of her brooch,

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Anita's already parted with almost half her budget.

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Back in Ramsbottom, David's search for a deal continues with John.

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-Eh, eh - car badges. Car-related stuff is good.

-Yeah.

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-Well, if you like car-related stuff...

-I do.

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Them gas headlights.

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Ah, interesting objects.

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They're from a very early vintage car, aren't they?

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Ah, right - OK.

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-Gas ones, so...

-I think that would date them...

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-Edwardian - 1905, 1910.

-Right.

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Are these yours?

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These are not mine, these are another dealer's,

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who's not here today.

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In the early 20th century, cars were luxury items

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that only the very rich could afford,

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so quality and durability were paramount.

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-Can we have a look?

-Course you can.

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Right, get your eyes...

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over these babies.

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I'm looking for a maker's mark.

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-There's nothing shouting out, there's no plaques.

-No.

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These were made, what, 110,

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115 years ago and I bet you,

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-if you plumbed them in to a vintage car, they will work.

-Yeah.

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Look at the lenses - look at that glass.

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-You can see, actually, that's hand-blown glass.

-Yeah.

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David is smitten.

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But with a ticket price of £120,

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John needs to speak to the owner.

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David's bid is £60.

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You can have them for £60.

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Thanks, John - bye.

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-Have we done it?

-You've done the deal.

-Marvellous, put it there.

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-Very good.

-Fantastic. Two purchases down, that's not bad going, is it?

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-First shop.

-That's very good.

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Not bad at all.

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But there's still one more item on his mind - or heart, I should say.

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So, Gina. The 19th-century writing box. Any price on that?

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-We had a chat, haven't we? 55.

-55.

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-It's devastating.

-What were you thinking?

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I love it, I love it.

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30, I'd have a go, but I've still got a chance of...

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It could make 60, it could make 10 quid.

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What about 35 and we'll give you a pound back for luck?

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Go on, then - whose hand do I shake?

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I'm going to shake your hand as well.

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So, 35 and a pound back for luck.

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This is old school trading, isn't it?!

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OK, come on then, mathematician - how much do I owe you?

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£139, by my count.

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45 for the boot pull and scrape,

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60 for the gas head lamps

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and 34 on the writing slope.

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He's also parted with quite a chunk of his budget.

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It's been a productive morning and now Anita is on her way to Rochdale,

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a town that rose to prominence during the Industrial Revolution.

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While this new era in the 19th century

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brought great wealth to factory owners,

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it forced many skilled labourers into poverty.

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But a group of local men challenged these social inequalities

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by pioneering a cooperative movement that has gone on

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to improve the lives of millions of people worldwide.

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-Hi! I'm Anita.

-Welcome to the Rochdale Pioneers Museum.

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I'm Gillian.

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Was this one of the original cooperative shops?

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It's the one that set the model

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by which all cooperatives after worked,

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so they put all the ideas together into a really workable model.

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That's what makes the Rochdale Pioneers so important.

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Between the 1820s and the 1840s,

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textile wages for skilled workers had actually halved.

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They were moving from woollen weaving into cotton weaving

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and throughout that period, food prices were going up and up.

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So there was a lot of poverty around the place.

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A group of 28 skilled labourers,

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who became known as the Rochdale Society of Equitable Pioneers,

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decided to come together and form a cooperative.

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They opened a shop selling fresh and fair priced food -

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a rare turn of events in those times.

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-Now, was there a money box here?

-Yes.

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-And...?

-And their scales.

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Very important to the Rochdale Pioneers

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that they put the scales on open show so everybody could see

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that they were getting fair weights and measures.

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A lot of private traders at the time were...

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a bit dodgy on their weights and measures.

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But this is where they sold, this is the counter

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and these are the items that they sold?

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-Yeah.

-There doesn't seem to be a lot on the shelves.

-No.

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They did not have very much money.

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There were 28 of them originally and they put together £28.

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A lot of it went on renting the building.

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The commodities that they sold,

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they looked at the things people wanted, people needed to eat.

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They chose butter, sugar, flour and oatmeal.

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Those four things, staples of the life.

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-So there was a basic desire for decency and fair trade.

-Yes.

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And also fair distribution of profit.

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All members had to buy into the co-op with any earnings

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shared equally based on each person's input.

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The principles of their cooperative

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were established at their weekly meetings.

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So this is the original minute book of the Rochdale Pioneers.

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It dates from their first-ever meeting,

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which was August the 11th, 1844.

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-So this is the very first meeting?

-Yes, it is.

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-And these were guys that were coming in after doing ten hours' work?

-Yes.

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There's a time when the building had been open for about a year

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when they decided they needed to do a stock take,

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so they chose the date, 25th of December,

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because it was the one day

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that everybody was available

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to do work in the society.

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-Christmas Day.

-Yes.

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The cooperative was not a new idea in the UK,

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but few were as successful as the Rochdale Pioneers

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and many turned to copy their principles.

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As the movement grew, so did their wealth, providing new premises

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and, more importantly, the promotion of education.

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One of the first things they did when they got a building

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was to start discussion groups,

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getting together to learn from each other.

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Then they started bringing in university lecturers to give talks

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and set up their own libraries as well.

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So the range of educational activities that people could have

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through their cooperative society was amazing.

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So they were able to provide children and grown-ups

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with educational facilities that the state

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-wasn't able to provide them with?

-Yes.

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Yes, you could learn anything.

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They also used funds to create better housing stock

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for their members.

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The big objective that they had

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was to arrange the powers of production, distribution,

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education and government.

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They felt if those four things were done through cooperation,

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the world would be a better place.

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They really wanted to change the world.

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And they truly did.

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As the Pioneers' fame went global, their movement also gathered pace.

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Many of their principles surrounding education, fair trade and housing

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are now enshrined in common law around the world.

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Out on the open road,

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David is heading to the picturesque town of Todmorden.

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He's visiting Picture House Antiques,

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clutching his remaining 61 smackers.

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Wa-hey!

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Gosh, quite a contemporary feel, don't you think,

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if you look around?

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Nicely spread out. Big, red walls.

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Modern things...

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Well, modern - '60s, '70s, vintage, retro,

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mixed with 18th-century furniture - it just works.

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-Now, you must be Roger.

-Yes, how are you, David?

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The thing I'm interested in is a real antique,

0:18:030:18:07

but it's got a contemporary feel about it.

0:18:070:18:09

That's the copper Art Nouveau Arts and Crafts dish.

0:18:090:18:12

I mean, it's pretty standard fare, isn't it?

0:18:130:18:17

But because it's reasonably plain,

0:18:170:18:19

it's got a bit of a modern look about it, hasn't it?

0:18:190:18:23

-I think that's circa 1900, bang on.

-Yeah.

0:18:230:18:27

It's got the Arts and Crafts quality, as in it's handmade,

0:18:270:18:31

hand-beaten and it's got the Art Nouveau decoration.

0:18:310:18:34

I'd have it for 20 quid. I would say yes and shake your hand right there.

0:18:350:18:39

Let me just consult with Pamela, because she knows this person.

0:18:390:18:43

Quite right. That would be a 50% off the ticket price.

0:18:430:18:47

So, let's hope Pamela's feeling generous.

0:18:470:18:50

Can I then, Roger, Pamela, buy it for 20?

0:18:500:18:54

Let's have a look.

0:18:550:18:57

-Don't look, but say yes!

-Yes!

0:18:570:18:58

Can I? Marvellous! Thank you very much!

0:18:580:19:01

Lovely to meet you and do a deal.

0:19:010:19:03

And, Roger, thank you for that one.

0:19:030:19:05

A cracking deal, eh? Anything else that would suit his meagre budget?

0:19:060:19:11

-The trick I think, Roger...

-How much have you got left?

0:19:110:19:14

-I've got £41 left.

-Yeah?

-After I've bought this.

0:19:140:19:18

Give me £41, you can have that piano stool, which sells for 100.

0:19:180:19:22

-I haven't seen the piano stool.

-It's an American one - here.

0:19:220:19:26

We're off somewhere else! Right.

0:19:260:19:28

-That...

-Oh, yeah?

0:19:290:19:31

-..I bought for a lot of money.

-OK.

0:19:310:19:33

-But with a lot of other things.

-Is it a twizzly-wizzly?

0:19:330:19:36

-It's a twizzly-wizzly.

-Look at that twizzly-wizzly!

0:19:360:19:39

Oh, Lordy.

0:19:390:19:40

That is marvellous.

0:19:400:19:42

Oh, yes.

0:19:420:19:43

You had him at twizzly-wizzly, Roger.

0:19:430:19:45

I've brought back several of these, because I brought a container,

0:19:450:19:48

a 40-foot container of antiques back from America. Normally...

0:19:480:19:52

Oh!

0:19:520:19:53

-That's all right, it does that!

-Sorry about that, Roger!

0:19:530:19:55

Careful, David, eh?

0:19:550:19:57

I thought I was spinning it in the correct direction.

0:19:570:20:00

It's all right, that's what it does.

0:20:000:20:03

The label reads Holtzman & Sons, Columbus, Ohio, who were,

0:20:030:20:07

in their heyday, one of the largest manufacturers of piano stools

0:20:070:20:11

and covers in the US.

0:20:110:20:13

Such a maker's mark could add value to this piece at auction.

0:20:130:20:18

-This is probably not far off American Civil War.

-No, it's good.

0:20:180:20:22

1865-ish. 1880, maybe.

0:20:220:20:26

Sometimes they're a mixture of things.

0:20:260:20:28

Don't you find that amazing, when you handle an object...

0:20:280:20:31

that you know was either in existence

0:20:310:20:33

during the American Civil War,

0:20:330:20:34

or used by people who were there during the Civil War.

0:20:340:20:38

-And how much is it?

-£41.

0:20:390:20:41

-Roger THAT.

-OK.

0:20:410:20:43

And that's all my money gone.

0:20:430:20:46

David has now bought a late 19th-century piano stool for £41,

0:20:460:20:51

an Art Nouveau copper dish for £20...

0:20:510:20:54

A brave move spending all his money on day one.

0:20:540:20:58

Back together again

0:20:590:21:01

and it's time for our duo to rest up in preparation for another busy day.

0:21:010:21:05

Well, for Anita, anyway. So, nighty night!

0:21:050:21:09

It's a dreary old morning,

0:21:130:21:15

but there's no dampening the spirits of our intrepid adventurers.

0:21:150:21:19

Isn't this wonderful?

0:21:190:21:21

We're in New Brighton, we have the sea over here,

0:21:210:21:24

-we have palm trees back there.

-We do not have palm trees!

0:21:240:21:28

We COULD be in Monte Carlo!

0:21:280:21:31

Well, the Wirral is not quite the French Riviera,

0:21:310:21:33

but I suppose they do have a promenade.

0:21:330:21:36

Don't let anybody ever tell you

0:21:360:21:38

that I don't take you to glamorous locations!

0:21:380:21:40

Well, I'm sitting here in a little fast car...

0:21:400:21:45

Sorry...

0:21:450:21:46

-..with a glamorous sort of guy...

-Now you're right!

0:21:460:21:49

..with designer stubble!

0:21:490:21:51

What is that all about? Did you sleep in?

0:21:510:21:53

HE LAUGHS

0:21:530:21:55

I'd like to say it was intentional, but I just forgot to shave!

0:21:550:21:57

-Oh, dear, dear, dear.

-You can have a feel, if you like.

-No thanks!

0:21:570:22:01

-Go on, have a feel!

-No, thank you!

-Make your day!

0:22:010:22:04

He may not be Cary Grant, but David did shop boldly yesterday.

0:22:070:22:11

He bought the early 20th-century boot pull and scrape,

0:22:120:22:16

the motorcar head lamps,

0:22:160:22:19

a walnut writing slope,

0:22:190:22:20

a piano stool

0:22:200:22:22

and Art Nouveau copper dish.

0:22:220:22:24

Spending all of his £200 budget.

0:22:240:22:27

Anita, on the other hand, was more prudent.

0:22:320:22:34

She bought three lots for £80 - a Celtic brooch,

0:22:340:22:38

four white metal knife rests

0:22:380:22:40

and a diamond and pearl set stick pin,

0:22:400:22:42

leaving her with £120 to play with today.

0:22:420:22:45

HONK, HONK!

0:22:470:22:49

David and Anita have raced along to Wallasey and Anita's first shop.

0:22:510:22:55

In the late 19th century, Wallasey was a popular seaside resort

0:22:580:23:01

and is currently undergoing regeneration.

0:23:010:23:05

Anita is meeting Tina at the aptly-named Tina's Treasures.

0:23:070:23:12

Fingers crossed she finds some.

0:23:120:23:14

And without further ado, she's off.

0:23:150:23:18

Just like a kid in a toy shop.

0:23:180:23:20

I like hats. I really like hats.

0:23:200:23:23

And toys too, apparently.

0:23:230:23:26

Ah!

0:23:260:23:27

THEY LAUGH

0:23:270:23:28

What a lovely, smiley doll.

0:23:300:23:32

This doll, she's so sweet.

0:23:320:23:36

Hi! You're bringing a smile to my face.

0:23:360:23:39

Tina, could you tell me a wee bit about this doll here?

0:23:410:23:44

It's a...Norah Wellings, Islander.

0:23:440:23:48

Yes, she made this range around the 1930s.

0:23:480:23:52

Originally, I think it may have had feet,

0:23:520:23:55

but because I haven't found one quite the same...

0:23:550:23:57

But it's just beautiful features, isn't it? Really sweet.

0:23:570:24:01

Norah Wellings was a highly esteemed soft doll maker.

0:24:010:24:05

She designed all of her dolls herself.

0:24:070:24:09

Her motto was, "Quality, not quantity,"

0:24:090:24:12

which obviously worked, as they're still very collectable today.

0:24:120:24:16

Plenty more to see, though.

0:24:160:24:17

Or play with, in Anita's case.

0:24:170:24:19

LOUD RASPBERRY

0:24:200:24:24

I'm no good at that. No.

0:24:240:24:26

It's not one of my talents,

0:24:260:24:29

playing the didgeridoo.

0:24:290:24:31

THAT is an understatement.

0:24:310:24:33

But enough tomfoolery. Time for...

0:24:330:24:36

A hula hoop.

0:24:360:24:38

Brace yourselves.

0:24:380:24:40

-It's all the hip action.

-It is, isn't it?

0:24:400:24:42

-Ready, and...

-Go!

0:24:420:24:44

Are you actually going to buy anything, Anita?

0:24:470:24:50

-Tina.

-Yes?

0:24:500:24:52

-I'm very tempted...

-Go on, make me an offer.

0:24:520:24:54

I'm very tempted with this doll

0:24:540:24:57

and it's because she's such a cheery doll.

0:24:570:25:00

The doll's priced at £55.

0:25:010:25:04

Time for some serious haggling.

0:25:040:25:07

What I would do, I'd probably put say...

0:25:070:25:11

15 to 20 on it.

0:25:110:25:13

How about 25?

0:25:130:25:15

Is it possible to...

0:25:160:25:19

to say 20 on her?

0:25:190:25:21

-I'll do 20 on her.

-Will we do 20?

0:25:210:25:22

-That'll give you a chance, then.

-That'll give me a chance.

0:25:220:25:25

-Look, she's smiling!

-She is!

0:25:250:25:26

-You've got a new mummy!

-And she's going to have a new home!

0:25:260:25:30

-Tina, thank you very much.

-You're most welcome.

0:25:300:25:33

I think she's great fun. I've enjoyed playing with all these toys.

0:25:330:25:37

-I'm so glad you have.

-I've had a great morning. It's terrific!

0:25:370:25:41

So that's a Norah Wellings doll

0:25:430:25:45

purchased for the bargain price of £20.

0:25:450:25:48

David, meanwhile,

0:25:510:25:52

is journeying across the Mersey.

0:25:520:25:55

Well, under it, actually.

0:25:550:25:57

-ENGINE PURRS

-Ohh!

0:25:570:25:59

Even the Moggy Minor sounds throaty going through this tunnel.

0:25:590:26:03

Much of Liverpool's economic growth

0:26:070:26:08

came from the Mersey and its maritime trade.

0:26:080:26:11

# So ferry 'cross the Mersey

0:26:110:26:16

# Cos this land's... #

0:26:160:26:17

Sadly, and less well-known, is the fact that the cornerstone

0:26:170:26:21

of this wealth was derived from its transatlantic slave trade.

0:26:210:26:25

But one unsung hero fought for equality and justice.

0:26:250:26:28

Edward Rushton was a poet and revolutionary.

0:26:300:26:33

After losing his sight in his late teens,

0:26:330:26:35

Rushton introduced facilities for the blind

0:26:350:26:38

and played an important role in the abolition of slavery,

0:26:380:26:41

even taking on the President of the United States.

0:26:410:26:44

So, Alex, who exactly was Edward Rushton?

0:26:440:26:47

Well, Edward Rushton was the man who dared to take on George Washington.

0:26:470:26:52

-This is him here?

-This is a portrait by Moses Horton.

0:26:520:26:55

He was a boy who was at sea at the age of ten.

0:26:550:27:00

His father apprenticed him to a slaving company

0:27:000:27:03

and Liverpool, in the 1770s,

0:27:030:27:06

was the capital of the slave trade.

0:27:060:27:09

During this time, Edward witnessed first-hand

0:27:100:27:13

the cruelty the slaves were forced to endure.

0:27:130:27:16

He made a good friend in an African -

0:27:160:27:19

a boy called Kwamina, who he taught to read.

0:27:190:27:23

Kwamina and he were in a boat that capsized

0:27:230:27:26

and Kwamina actually saved his life.

0:27:260:27:29

But in doing so, he lost his own.

0:27:290:27:33

Greatly moved by his friend's sacrifice,

0:27:330:27:36

Rushton devoted his life to championing all oppression,

0:27:360:27:40

in particular the abolitionist cause.

0:27:400:27:43

During one particular journey, he discovered many slaves were locked

0:27:430:27:46

below deck due to a contagious eye infection that led to blindness.

0:27:460:27:50

Appalled by their suffering, he insisted on taking them food.

0:27:520:27:56

As a grim consequence, he too succumbed to infection

0:27:560:28:00

and lost his own sight.

0:28:000:28:02

As a result of this, he came home to Liverpool

0:28:020:28:06

a blind man, impoverished.

0:28:060:28:08

At what age?

0:28:080:28:10

At what age? At only just 19.

0:28:100:28:12

Despite his disability and with little assistance,

0:28:120:28:16

Rushton took on various jobs, including editor of a paper.

0:28:160:28:20

He continued to campaign against slavery through his poetry

0:28:200:28:24

and more famously,

0:28:240:28:25

a letter he sent to the first President of the United States.

0:28:250:28:28

-In 1796, he writes a letter to George Washington...

-Right.

0:28:280:28:35

..lambasting him for being a personal owner of slaves

0:28:350:28:40

and for failing to free the enslaved people

0:28:400:28:44

when he beat the English and set up the American...

0:28:440:28:48

Well, of course - he'd just fought the War of Independence, hadn't he?

0:28:480:28:51

Giving freedom to all Americans,

0:28:510:28:53

apart from, quite obviously, the slaves. Huge contradiction.

0:28:530:28:58

How does he go about this letter?

0:28:580:29:01

This is what he says -

0:29:010:29:03

"Shame, shame that man should be deemed the property of man.

0:29:030:29:07

"Or that the name of Washington should be found

0:29:070:29:10

"among the list of such proprietors."

0:29:100:29:12

Does George Washington respond to this?

0:29:120:29:15

George Washington sent the letter back, apparently,

0:29:150:29:19

with no word of reply.

0:29:190:29:21

Not to be deterred, Rushton published the letter,

0:29:230:29:26

both in the UK and in the States.

0:29:260:29:28

It went on to play an important part in the abolitionist campaigns,

0:29:280:29:33

particularly in the US.

0:29:330:29:35

You know, I think the irony is marvellous,

0:29:350:29:38

because the insult was sent back, but he takes the opportunity

0:29:380:29:41

to use that letter and reignites the abolition movement.

0:29:410:29:45

The abolition of slavery

0:29:450:29:47

was not the only movement Rushton was involved in.

0:29:470:29:49

A passionate and outspoken revolutionary,

0:29:490:29:52

he couldn't help but rail against the injustices he encountered.

0:29:520:29:56

And, there was none more close to home

0:29:560:29:59

than the plight of the visually impaired.

0:29:590:30:01

Now, Rushton, blind in the late 18th-century,

0:30:010:30:04

that would have made life pretty difficult.

0:30:040:30:07

At this time,

0:30:070:30:09

there were no facilities in the UK to help the blind.

0:30:090:30:12

Knowing just how difficult it was

0:30:130:30:14

to support oneself with this impairment,

0:30:140:30:17

Rushton campaigned to build a ground-breaking school.

0:30:170:30:21

This was to open in January 1791.

0:30:210:30:24

And the idea was that the people who would attend the school

0:30:250:30:31

would be trained to be self-supporting.

0:30:310:30:34

Was this the first school of its type in Liverpool?

0:30:340:30:36

It was, it was the first school of its type in the country.

0:30:360:30:40

-My gosh.

-And it's still going.

0:30:400:30:43

King George IV was later to become a patron of the school

0:30:430:30:47

and the number of students steadily grew.

0:30:470:30:50

This school had 45 students within two...three years.

0:30:500:30:54

And, by the end of the century, they were having to build

0:30:540:30:58

because they had 80 people on the waiting list.

0:30:580:31:01

Rushton may have been forgotten for 200 years,

0:31:010:31:03

but he was remembered in the blind school and that is his legacy.

0:31:030:31:07

Rushton dedicated his life to battling oppression

0:31:070:31:11

whenever he encountered it and remained politically active

0:31:110:31:14

until his death in 1814.

0:31:140:31:17

His school still exists today,

0:31:170:31:20

a testament to its little-known founder

0:31:200:31:23

and his incredible achievements.

0:31:230:31:25

Anita has now hotfooted it to Liverpool

0:31:320:31:34

and is heading into Wayne Colquhoun Antiques.

0:31:340:31:38

She's still got £100 left to spend.

0:31:380:31:41

-Hello, I'm Anita.

-How are you?

0:31:410:31:43

I'm great. I love 20th-century design.

0:31:430:31:46

Same here.

0:31:460:31:48

-Wayne, there's a rather pretty mirror here in a box.

-I know which one...

0:31:510:31:56

-That's the expensive one!

-Is it?! I've got good taste!

0:31:560:32:00

Good taste that, yes, that's beautiful. It's a French one.

0:32:000:32:02

-It's several hundred pounds, though.

-Several hundred? Uh-huh.

0:32:020:32:05

A tad on the pricey side.

0:32:050:32:07

The hunt continues, Anita.

0:32:100:32:12

-What about something as simple as a cocktail shaker?

-Oh, yes.

0:32:120:32:18

Full of fingerprints.

0:32:180:32:19

Uh-huh, yeah.

0:32:190:32:21

Yeah, that's...

0:32:220:32:24

When that shined up and clean, and silver...

0:32:240:32:26

All bright, it sort of sums up the age.

0:32:260:32:29

-People would sit around and make their Martinis and things.

-Uh-huh.

0:32:290:32:32

Bet you do that at home now, yourself.

0:32:320:32:35

-Saturday night!

-Saturday night, my cocktails!

0:32:350:32:38

Have a little shake and a shimmy.

0:32:380:32:41

Is it...? It's empty.

0:32:410:32:43

A bit early, Anita.

0:32:440:32:46

It makes me think of Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire,

0:32:460:32:48

all those fabulous frocks and so on.

0:32:480:32:51

I think she means she likes it.

0:32:510:32:53

Ticket price is £20.

0:32:560:32:58

Could that be bought...

0:32:580:33:00

for a tenner?

0:33:000:33:02

Not quite a tenner.

0:33:030:33:05

Because it's a good one, that. It's a good, thick plate on that.

0:33:050:33:08

-Let's do 15, but I couldn't go much below 15.

-You couldn't go below?

-No.

0:33:080:33:13

Could you go to 12?

0:33:130:33:15

-Don't if you don't want to.

-Um...

0:33:170:33:20

Go on, seeing as it's you. I'll do £12!

0:33:200:33:22

I knew I was in for a rough ride!

0:33:220:33:25

-Oh, thank you!

-As soon as I saw you!

-Thank you so much!

0:33:250:33:27

Bottoms up, chaps.

0:33:270:33:29

So, for £12, Anita has bought her final item -

0:33:290:33:32

an Art Deco cocktail shaker.

0:33:320:33:35

Which, along with her Celtic brooch,

0:33:350:33:38

leaping horses knife rests,

0:33:380:33:40

diamond and pearl set pin

0:33:400:33:43

and Norah Wellings doll,

0:33:430:33:45

cost her a total of £112.

0:33:450:33:47

David went all-out

0:33:500:33:52

and spent his full £200 on day one,

0:33:520:33:55

picking up a 20th-century boot pull and scrape,

0:33:550:33:59

some vintage motor car head lamps,

0:33:590:34:01

a mid-19th century writing slope,

0:34:010:34:04

a piano stool

0:34:040:34:07

and an Art Nouveau copper dish.

0:34:070:34:09

But what do they think of each other's purchases?

0:34:120:34:14

Let's start from the top - boring, the stick pin.

0:34:140:34:18

I mean, I have seen millions of those things

0:34:180:34:21

and I don't dream about them.

0:34:210:34:24

David has a mixed bag of items there.

0:34:240:34:28

Some of which I like and some of which I think are...weird.

0:34:280:34:32

Then we move on to the...quite atrocious, let's be honest,

0:34:320:34:36

knife rests.

0:34:360:34:38

They were probably made on Wednesday of last week,

0:34:380:34:41

I would guess, and a bit on the horrid side.

0:34:410:34:43

Only time will tell who has bought best

0:34:440:34:47

as our experts travel the final 30 miles to their first auction

0:34:470:34:51

at Knutsford Fine Art Auctioneers.

0:34:510:34:53

Now, are you a wee bit worried, David,

0:34:530:34:56

or do you feel confident that you're going to blast forward?

0:34:560:35:00

No, I'm not confident! No, I'm not!

0:35:010:35:03

I was trying to pull myself up, there, but no, actually, I'm not.

0:35:030:35:07

-Here we are.

-Just in here, David.

0:35:090:35:12

Get you right to the door, madam.

0:35:120:35:14

"Auction today!" Hello!

0:35:140:35:17

How very exciting.

0:35:170:35:19

Our auctioneer today is Rachel Houston-Holland,

0:35:200:35:23

who's had a look over our experts' lots.

0:35:230:35:26

The Holtzman piano stool is rather interesting,

0:35:260:35:30

really unusual glass ball feet.

0:35:300:35:32

Hopefully, that should do really well.

0:35:320:35:34

And what of Anita's knife rests?

0:35:340:35:36

Little bit of a gamble.

0:35:360:35:37

If they were silver, they'd be fantastic,

0:35:370:35:40

but unfortunately, they're not. Um... Yeah...

0:35:400:35:43

I hope too much wasn't paid for those!

0:35:430:35:45

Hmm, mixed reviews there.

0:35:450:35:47

Let the auction commence.

0:35:470:35:49

First up is David's Art Nouveau copper dish.

0:35:510:35:55

-Are you nervous? Are you nervous?

-Yes! Aren't you nervous?

0:35:550:35:57

-No.

-No! I am.

0:35:570:35:59

£20 to start.

0:35:590:36:00

-Yes.

-£10 then, if it helps. 10, I have. 10, 12,

0:36:000:36:04

15, 18, 20, at £18...

0:36:040:36:07

-Come on.

-..selling now at £18.

0:36:070:36:10

At £18, selling now at 18.

0:36:100:36:12

I want to shout, Anita.

0:36:120:36:13

Oh! £2 down.

0:36:130:36:16

Yes, but it's a very small loss.

0:36:160:36:18

Next, are Anita's leaping horse knife rests.

0:36:200:36:23

£10. £10 for them, surely.

0:36:230:36:25

-£10.

-Come on!

-£10. Come on, £10.

0:36:250:36:28

Thank you, madam. £10.

0:36:280:36:30

Lady's bid now at £10, and 12, 15,

0:36:300:36:32

-15, 18...

-Oh, oh.

-..20.

0:36:320:36:35

-22, 25...

-Yes.

-..28,

0:36:350:36:38

30. At £28...

0:36:380:36:40

-Oh.

-..gentleman's bid now at £28.

0:36:400:36:42

Are we all done now? Selling at 28.

0:36:420:36:46

Yes!

0:36:460:36:47

They may not have been silver,

0:36:480:36:50

but Anita's more than doubled her money there.

0:36:500:36:53

Well done. Well done, very good start.

0:36:550:36:57

Let's see if she can continue to stir things up

0:36:570:37:00

with her self-polished Art Deco cocktail shaker.

0:37:000:37:04

-£10 for it, £10, I have...

-Oh, they're in, look.

0:37:040:37:06

12, 15, 18, 20.

0:37:060:37:09

-At £18, on my left, selling now at £18...

-I love it, Anita.

0:37:090:37:12

Are we all done? Selling, £18.

0:37:120:37:15

-Oh, check it. Well done, well done.

-£18.

0:37:160:37:19

Another profit for Anita. Cheers to that.

0:37:190:37:23

You're on fire, missus. You're on fire.

0:37:230:37:25

Back with David and his tongue twister of a boot pull and scrape.

0:37:250:37:30

£20. £20, thank you, sir.

0:37:300:37:32

Someone knows what he's doing there.

0:37:320:37:34

20, 22, 25, 28.

0:37:340:37:36

-A long way to go.

-£25, seated.

0:37:360:37:38

-Are we all done, surely, at £25?

-No!

0:37:380:37:43

Anita!

0:37:430:37:44

That's another loss for David, I'm afraid.

0:37:440:37:47

Ah, ah...

0:37:480:37:50

ANITA LAUGHS

0:37:500:37:52

Fingers crossed his walnut writing slope will put him back in the game.

0:37:530:37:57

-And I must start the bidding now, at £30 commission...

-Yes, yes.

-Come on.

0:37:570:38:01

Commission bid now, 32, 35, £38...

0:38:010:38:04

Come on, come on.

0:38:040:38:05

In the room, and 40, 42, 45, 48, 50.

0:38:050:38:10

-50 anywhere else?

-Come on.

0:38:100:38:11

£48, on my left. Selling. 50, fresh bidder. 55,

0:38:110:38:15

-60...

-Yes.

-Good.

-Come on.

0:38:150:38:18

No, at...£55, on my left, selling now, are we all done?

0:38:180:38:22

-Oh!

-60, back in. 65...

0:38:220:38:24

-He's got taste, this fella.

-..gentleman's bid at 60.

0:38:240:38:28

-Marvellous.

-Yes.

0:38:280:38:30

Marvellous, indeed.

0:38:300:38:32

David followed his heart and with that one, it paid off.

0:38:320:38:35

-Are you happy now?

-I'm delighted.

-Ah.

-I'm delighted.

0:38:370:38:40

-That's good, that's good.

-Back on an even keel now, aren't I?

-You are.

0:38:400:38:43

-So that's good.

-Excellent.

0:38:430:38:45

Now it is David's late 19th-century piano stool.

0:38:460:38:49

A twizzly-wizzly, if memory serves.

0:38:490:38:52

£40, surely, to start. Come on, £40.

0:38:520:38:55

20?

0:38:550:38:56

You all want it now, for £20.

0:38:560:38:59

You, sir, right at the back at 20. 22, 25, 28, 30, 32, 35.

0:38:590:39:04

35 anywhere else?

0:39:040:39:05

-35, thank you, 38.

-Come on.

-40.

0:39:050:39:08

-Come on, come on.

-42, 45.

-Come on.

0:39:080:39:11

No? It's at £42. A gentleman, fresh bidder, 45, 48, 50.

0:39:110:39:16

55, 60.

0:39:160:39:18

65, 70.

0:39:180:39:20

-At £65...

-Ooh!

-..on my left now, nice lot...

0:39:200:39:23

-It is nice.

-£65.

0:39:230:39:26

-Good.

-Good, well, good.

-Well done, David.

-So...

0:39:260:39:29

After a shaky start, that's a second good profit for David.

0:39:290:39:33

-24 profit.

-Now, are you happy?

-I'm happy. I've been happy all day.

0:39:330:39:38

ANITA LAUGHS

0:39:380:39:39

OK, Mr Happy.

0:39:390:39:40

THEY LAUGH

0:39:400:39:42

Back to Anita now, as her Norah Wellings doll is up next.

0:39:420:39:46

£30.

0:39:460:39:47

20 then, if it helps.

0:39:470:39:49

£20 at the back, and 22 works, come on, it seems cheap, at £20...

0:39:490:39:53

-Oh, that...

-Oh...

-..22, 25, 28, 30.

0:39:530:39:57

-No, it's at £28.

-Oh.

-On my left now at £28, are we all done?

0:39:570:40:01

-Surely, at 28.

-DAVID LAUGHS

0:40:010:40:05

Anita has secured a profit on every item so far.

0:40:050:40:08

David's final and most expensive item,

0:40:100:40:14

the gas-powered car lamps were a bit of a gamble.

0:40:140:40:17

£20 I have, at £20.

0:40:170:40:19

Standing now, are we all done? 22, 25.

0:40:190:40:21

At 28, 30.

0:40:210:40:23

-At £30, in the room now at £30.

-Come on.

-32?

0:40:230:40:26

32, 35. 38.

0:40:260:40:28

At £35, standing now, are we all done?

0:40:280:40:32

-Come on, guys.

-At £35. 35.

0:40:320:40:35

Light the match, Anita.

0:40:350:40:37

Say goodbye.

0:40:370:40:39

-To tell you the truth, I'm surprised they went that far!

-Oh, charming(!)

0:40:390:40:42

THEY LAUGH

0:40:420:40:44

Oh, bad luck, David.

0:40:450:40:47

They could've fetched a good price for the collector,

0:40:470:40:49

had this auction been online.

0:40:490:40:51

But let's see if Anita's pin will keep up her run of profits.

0:40:530:40:57

-I call gentleman's jewellery, gentleman's furniture.

-Do you?

0:40:580:41:02

-THEY LAUGH Yes!

-Why?

0:41:020:41:05

I don't know!

0:41:050:41:06

I've got commission interest.

0:41:070:41:09

-Yes, commission bid!

-I'll start the bids at...

0:41:090:41:12

-£28, to start.

-Ooh.

-£28 to start...

-28.

-..30,

0:41:120:41:15

32, 35, at £35 on my left now, at 35.

0:41:150:41:19

-Come on, come on!

-Selling now at £35, are we all done?

0:41:190:41:22

Selling at 35...

0:41:220:41:25

-35.

-Mmm!

0:41:250:41:27

Nearly made it.

0:41:270:41:29

-Nearly made it.

-Mmm, nearly.

0:41:290:41:31

Anita's first loss of the day, but it's a small one.

0:41:310:41:34

That was a big diamond. Well, it was a little diamond.

0:41:360:41:39

-No, but you bigged it up, that was good.

-I bigged it up.

0:41:390:41:42

THEY LAUGH

0:41:420:41:43

It's their final item of the day, Anita's Robert Allison brooch.

0:41:430:41:48

Last one.

0:41:480:41:49

-£20. £20...

-No...

-..come on, 10 then?

0:41:490:41:53

£10. 10, I have, 12, 15.

0:41:530:41:55

18, 20.

0:41:550:41:57

At £18 at the back of the room now, at £18. Are we all done?

0:41:570:42:01

-Mm...

-Selling now at £18...

0:42:010:42:03

C2...

0:42:050:42:06

-The two jewellery pieces brought me down there.

-Yeah. Interesting.

0:42:060:42:10

That's disappointing. Anita normally does well with jewellery.

0:42:100:42:14

-This is a very complicated sum.

-That's why I'm leaving it to you.

0:42:140:42:17

-What are you going to do?

-Have a cup of tea.

-I'm going to come with you.

0:42:170:42:20

Oh, come on then.

0:42:200:42:21

Good idea. Ha!

0:42:210:42:22

And the numbers are in.

0:42:230:42:24

Our two competitors started this road trip with £200 each.

0:42:240:42:28

After paying auction costs, David made a loss of £33.54,

0:42:280:42:33

leaving him with £166.46 to carry forward.

0:42:330:42:38

Anita made a smaller loss of just £7.86

0:42:400:42:45

and emerges victorious,

0:42:450:42:47

with £192.14 for the next adventure.

0:42:470:42:52

Onward, Macduff!

0:42:520:42:54

McHarper! THEY LAUGH

0:42:540:42:56

Bon voyage, chaps.

0:42:570:42:59

Next time, Anita and David go deep undercover...

0:43:040:43:07

-It will pop on your head.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:43:070:43:10

Very Queen mother. SHE LAUGHS

0:43:100:43:12

..with some royally good results.

0:43:120:43:14

-Oh!

-Yes! Yes! HE LAUGHS

0:43:140:43:17

Antique experts David Harper and Anita Manning go head to head as they road trip through northern England and into southern and central Scotland. This first leg sees them travel through the north west and head to an auction in Knutsford, Cheshire.