Episode 12 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 12

Antiques challenge. David Harper and Anita Manning travel through Yorkshire, where David learns about a 500-year-old mystery, and Anita meets two inspirational land girls.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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I don't know what to do!

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it is no mean feat.

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-Back in the game!

-Charlie!

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or a slow road to disaster?

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-Oh!

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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It's the second leg of a road trip for international

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man of mystery David Harper and fellow treasure hunter Anita Manning.

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I am enjoying this early-morning drive in Yorkshire.

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The sky is blue.

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It is a wee bit cold, it is a wee bit blowy,

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but we are nice and cosy-tosy in a lovely wee Moggie.

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Sorry, can you say that in English for me again, so I understand?

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CHUCKLES Languages may not be his forte,

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but antiques dealer David is a whiz at spotting hidden gems.

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He is perhaps not always as successful with the ladies, though.

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Stand by.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Do you like men in uniform?

-I do!

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I don't know about men with big heads!

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Oh, I say!

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Auctioneer extraordinaire and antiquing royalty,

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Anita specialises in jewellery and dressing up.

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Very Queen Mother.

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SHE LAUGHS

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Aye. Positively regal, Anita.

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Their jazzy ride is a 1965 Morris Minor convertible

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and their stage is God's own country, rural Yorkshire.

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-Fields...

-All right.

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-Fields, horses jumping over fences, all that sort of stuff.

-Marvellous.

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Stop leaping yourself, if you don't mind.

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Quite.

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Both made a loss at the first auction.

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Starting the trip with £200 each,

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David now has...

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Anita also made a loss,

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but is in the lead with...

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Got any advice for your rival, Anita? Seeing as how you are out front.

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I would keep away from these bits of cars and old bits of iron.

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HE CHUCKLES

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Good advice.

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Anita and David are travelling over 700 miles.

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From Ramsbottom, Lancashire,

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they snake their way up through

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Yorkshire all the way to Bonnie Scotland and the town of Paisley.

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Today, we are starting out near York

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in the village of Barmby Moor,

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ending up at an auction in Harrogate.

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-This looks fabulous.

-Oh, my gosh.

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-Anita...

-This is fabulous.

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Bar Farm Antiques occupies several old farm buildings, funnily enough.

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Looks like Serrell territory.

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Look! Is that one of your girlfriends?

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Listen, I'm off. I will see you later. Have a great day.

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Have fun, darling.

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-OK. See you.

-Bye.

-Bye.

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In spite of the size of the place,

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David spots something straight off the bat.

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That is a really, really wild thing. What on earth was it?

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Well, I'm guessing we are talking about police station, circa 1955.

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I am the police sergeant, you are the criminal,

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you are on that side, I have nabbed you.

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You are in big trouble and I want your fingerprints.

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And I think this is basically a fingerprint...

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I want to call it a machine.

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In 1901, the first fingerprint bureau was set up in the UK

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at Scotland Yard.

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Four years later, fingerprinting was used

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for the first time to convict a murderer.

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David likes it, so let's meet dealer Greg from New Orleans.

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-What's it like having your fingerprints taken, Greg?

-It's OK.

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THEY LAUGH

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Ha, ha, ha, David.

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-Are you looking for a price?

-Yes.

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-45.

-45.

-I think that is a pretty good price for a piece of furniture.

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HE SIGHS

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-It couldn't be 20?

-No, it can't be 20.

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You can't do a little better than that?

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Why don't we do what all the best dealers in the world have done

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for a million years.

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Compromise, meet in the middle?

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And where was the middle starting?

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25.

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-That will do.

-Good man. Thank you very much.

-That's all right.

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Great deal and David's first item in the old bag.

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Meanwhile, Anita is travelling just over ten miles west to

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the beautiful walled city of York.

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Where the infamous Guy Fawkes was born and educated.

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She is visiting the Antiques Centre York

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and Becky is on hand to assist.

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Stand by, Becky. Here comes Anita.

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-I quite like these wee silly condiments up here.

-Yes?

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-Do you want to have a look?

-Yes.

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They are a heck of a good fun. I think they are probably Continental.

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But good fun.

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Oh, I am quite tempted.

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Ticket price is £10.

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Oh, look. There's more.

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More condiments. This time...

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cuddling pigs.

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-That one has got a school tie on.

-THEY CHUCKLE

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They have a collective price of £26.

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I wonder if you could ask if these could be bought for

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15?

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-You can always ask.

-I can always ask.

-Uh-huh.

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That is quite a discount Anita is wanting,

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and after a quick phone call to the owners...

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-How did we get on?

-He can do two for 18.

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-Ah, wonderful, wonderful. Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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-They are fun, aren't they?

-They are fun, yeah.

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If you say so!

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One lot secured and it is time for some celebratory dressing up.

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Very Queen Mother.

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CHUCKLES

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David is also at it. Dear, oh, dear.

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# And then you'll start him laughing with all his blessed might

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# Ha ha-ha ha-ha ha-ha

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# Ha-ha... #

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Do you like men in uniform?

-I do.

-Well...

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I don't know about men with big heads!

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That really is criminal.

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Back to shopping?

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Tell you something, this is quite unusual, isn't it?

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It is a neat thing.

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I like Post Office things, plus it is old and during the war and...

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it is nice. And the way it is just worn.

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George VI, he was on the throne from 1937 to our current Queen.

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Greg got this sign from a local Post Office.

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Items like this can be hugely collectable.

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"Can" being the operative word.

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-I would have a go at 30 or 40.

-OK.

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-Is that anywhere near for you?

-It might be all right. 40 is all right.

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-OK.

-40 is all right.

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I will have a go at 40.

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-OK, I want you to make some money.

-Thank you very much. Good show.

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Well, that was easy. At £40, that is another good deal.

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And HRH Anita has also made an interesting find.

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Here we have a sort of 1950s, a kind of "kid on" agate,

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-it's all "kid on", isn't it?

-Yeah.

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I don't mind.

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I don't mind it being "kid on".

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Otherwise known as costume jewellery, Anita. Ticket price £18.

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-If I can get it for a tenner, that would be great.

-Yeah, I'll ask.

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-Do you want to try?

-Yeah.

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Do your best for me, darling.

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Anita is all about the cheeky offers today.

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But will Becky come through for her again?

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-Yes, we can do that.

-Can you?!

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Come here.

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You have been very good.

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Yes, a tenner is good indeed.

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Frugal Anita has now bought two items for just £28.

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David, meanwhile, is still exploring.

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I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with sofas like this.

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He has found a 1920s drop-end settee.

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Please, sit down.

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Let me demonstrate how this sofa works.

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Greg, please step into my office.

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-Right, get yourself comfortable.

-I'm all right.

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-How are the springs feeling?

-Mm-hm. Pretty good.

-Are you sure?

-Perfect.

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-Because they often stick in places...

-No, it's perfect.

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..you don't want. No, they are sticking in places you don't want.

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They are definitely sticking...

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Not surprising, in those tight trousers, David.

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There we go.

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-Ah, I can lay down.

-You can be recumbent.

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So it converts into a little chaise.

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So, in the business, it is referred to as a 1920s drop arm...

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-Don't fall asleep, I'm not that boring!

-OK.

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These settees can be picked up cheaply as they can cost

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over £1,000 to restore and cover.

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Once covered, though, you have a 100-year-old sofa worth,

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sometimes, thousands of pounds.

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How much is it?

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-£20.

-No, yeah...

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I want to say for goodness' sake buy it for 20 quid,

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it is ridiculous, it will cost 5,000-7000 to create it...

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£10! £5.

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Five?!

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Five?!

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The wheels are worth five.

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£5. Good man.

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-Greg, it's a delight doing business with you.

-All right.

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David has spent a total of £70 on three items.

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Pretty good for a morning's shopping!

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Anita, meanwhile, is on her way to Murton,

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a small village on the outskirts of York.

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She is visiting the Yorkshire Museum of Farming

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and meeting curator Louise to learn about the Women's Land Army,

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an institution that was established during the First World War.

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At this time, the majority of men were on the battlefields

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and it was estimated that Britain would run out of food

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within three weeks.

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In response, women were rallied to help out in the fields

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to build food supplies. Bless 'em!

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Who were the Land Girls?

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They were inspirational women, really,

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again, out of the kitchens and back onto the land,

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showing that they were just as capable as the men

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of doing these jobs.

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Many of the girls came from the city and, with no real training,

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were flung straight in at the deep end -

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ploughing fields, clearing ditches, milking cows,

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all the things a man would have traditionally done.

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-I imagine it might have been a bit of a shock to the system.

-Yeah.

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To get involved in very hard manual labour.

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Yeah, I imagine it would have been.

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You do see examples as well about a woman being killed by a horse

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cos she was thrown off the horse,

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so, yes, it was very hard work at the time.

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-And could be dangerous.

-Yeah, it could be very dangerous.

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At the end of the First World War,

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women were encouraged to return to more ladylike occupations.

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That doesn't seem awful fair, does it?

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-They'd been given a taste of freedom.

-Girls, you've done well.

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Off you go back home to the kitchen!

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Their contribution to the war effort went a long way

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to help the women's suffrage movement.

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By the time the Land Army was re-established

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for the Second World War,

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women had been afforded the right to vote for over a decade.

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How many women worked on the land? How many Land Girls did we have?

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In the Second World War, by the end of it,

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there was about 80,000 of them.

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Dorothy Taylor and Iris Newbold are two of these exceptional women.

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They belonged to the East Riding Women's Land Army

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and now, aged 87 and 90,

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are two of only three that are still alive today.

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-What was your favourite job?

-Haymaking.

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I loved haymaking, the old way.

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We used to load up the wagon and then sit on top of the hay wagon

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and roll home with the horse and wagon.

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Wonderful days, I loved hay time.

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And long, hot summers.

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And mine was going on the milk round

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and you'd meet some of the lovely people on the way.

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A lot of evacuated people were there

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and it was just friendly all the way.

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Dorothy came from a mining community and Iris was a city girl.

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Neither had farmed before.

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It must've been a very important time for you

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when you look back on it.

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Well, we were girls when we went in and we were grown-up girls

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-when we came out.

-It made me a different person.

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Three-and-a-half years made a difference to you altogether.

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More confident, yes.

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In spite of the long hours and exhausting work,

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the girls still found the energy for a bit of fun.

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Tell me, when all the work was done,

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-were you able to go out and play?

-Yes, yes.

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If you were near to a town, I was two-and-a-half miles away,

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so you had to walk into town after you'd finished work.

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And if you were going to a dance or the cinema,

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then you had to walk back again.

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Girls, what did it feel like after the war, when the war was over?

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You'd worked hard, you knew that you'd made your contribution

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-to the war effort...

-Flat.

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-And then you were sent back into the kitchen.

-Yes, flat.

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-Very flat.

-Yes, it was.

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I went into horticulture so I could just find my feet

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and get over the shock of changing again to city life.

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And I went into Marks & Spencer!

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What a change that was!

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Whilst these remarkable ladies

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may not have been on the actual front line,

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the jobs they carried out were vital in keeping Britain fed.

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Their ability to take on work originally done by men

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also played an important role

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in developing women's future economic and political rights.

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Now, what's David up to?

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Also in York, he's popping into Red House Antiques,

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where dealer Michael is on hand to help him spend his remaining £96.

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Go, Dave!

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What about that ginger jar there? Can I have a quick look at that?

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Of course you can.

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It's been adapted to a table lamp

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and the one downside to it

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is, obviously, that it's been drilled.

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It's been drilled, has it?

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Ouch! Ouch!

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-Gosh, it's a nice pot, isn't it?

-It's without its lid, obviously.

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Yeah, without its lid.

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Ginger jars were originally used to transport caramelised ginger

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and for storage and they became popular ornaments

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-when the ginger was eaten up.

-So it's definitely Chinese.

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These symbols here are Buddhist, aren't they?

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But it's very good quality for a ginger jar.

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Michael's ringing the owner to see

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if there's any movement on the ticket price.

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£55 is the very best.

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Well, at £55, Michael, I've just got to say yes.

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Thank you very much indeed, That is brilliant.

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For £55, the Chinese ginger jar is David's last purchase of the day.

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Together again and it's time to rest up in preparation

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for another exciting day's shopping tomorrow.

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Night-night!

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Next morning, our duo are hitting the antique trail once more.

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So, David, our second day of buying, we're in wonderful Yorkshire,

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the gateway to the North. The sun is shining, the sky is blue.

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-And the roof is off!

-And it's blooming freezing!

-Oh, no, stop it!

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You look so glamorous, though!

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David went big yesterday, spending £125 on four lots -

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a police fingerprinting table, a Post Office letterbox,

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a 1920s drop-end settee and a Chinese ginger jar lamp.

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Today, he has just £41.46 left to spend.

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Anita, in contrast, went small.

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She bought two pairs of condiment sets and a 1950s brooch.

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Having spent just £28,

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she still has £164.14 left for today.

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David and Anita are travelling around 30 miles

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to the historic market town of Pickering

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and to Anita's first shop today.

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So what treasures await you here, then, Anita?

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I've just been shown this wonderful board of photographs.

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Now, these photographs are showing the war weekend in Pickering.

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It's in October and during that weekend,

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servicemen and ex-servicemen come together really to celebrate

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the wonderful work that they did during the war

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and they get all dressed up in uniforms and look who we have here!

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We have our wonderful Land Girls

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and there is Dorothy and there is Iris.

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They're all dressed up in their breeches and their uniforms

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and don't they look smart!

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What are the chances, eh?

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Sadly, this is not for sale, but what else has she found?

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Owner Caroline is on duty to help.

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I notice you had some Mauchline ware there.

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-Could I have a wee look at it?

-Yeah.

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-These have just come in, have these ones.

-Right, OK.

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I'm very fond of Mauchline ware.

0:18:310:18:33

It was made in a little village in Ayrshire called Mauchline

0:18:330:18:38

-which was associated with Robert Burns.

-Oh, right, yes.

0:18:380:18:41

He lived in that area.

0:18:410:18:42

Anita has spotted a collection of Machline treen,

0:18:420:18:47

comprising a wool winder,

0:18:470:18:49

pocket watch holder, needle box and money box.

0:18:490:18:52

They have a collective ticket price of £62.

0:18:520:18:55

Considering the fact that we do have damage,

0:18:570:19:01

I would like to be paying in the region of around about £20 for them.

0:19:010:19:04

-I couldn't go that low, no.

-Could you come to 25?

0:19:040:19:09

-Go on, then.

-Would you do 25? That's lovely.

0:19:090:19:13

Thank you very much, Caroline.

0:19:130:19:15

Swift business! Oh, there is more!

0:19:150:19:19

This is like Italian glass. It's like Murano glass.

0:19:220:19:26

That's the word. I couldn't remember!

0:19:260:19:28

Yes, it's like Murano glass,

0:19:280:19:30

but there's nothing to indicate on the base.

0:19:300:19:34

Murano glass has been made on the Venetian island of Murano

0:19:340:19:37

for centuries and is very collectable.

0:19:370:19:40

Whilst this particular vase may not be Murano,

0:19:400:19:43

it is Italian, with a price of £48.

0:19:430:19:46

Would you do 20 on that?

0:19:460:19:48

-Yeah.

-Let's go for that one.

-That one?

-Yeah, £20, that's great.

0:19:500:19:54

That's lovely.

0:19:540:19:56

Anita has now spent a total of £45 in this shop.

0:19:560:20:01

David's just a few minutes away at Pickering Parish Church,

0:20:010:20:04

a beautiful place of worship

0:20:040:20:06

that has held an amazing secret for most of its existence.

0:20:060:20:10

Archaeologist Dr Kate Giles is showing him around.

0:20:100:20:13

Kate, I really didn't expect to see pictures painted onto the wall.

0:20:160:20:21

I've never seen anything quite like them in my life before.

0:20:280:20:30

If they're impressive to me today, in the 21st century,

0:20:300:20:34

what did they mean to people in the 15th and 16th century?

0:20:340:20:38

The pictures depict various saints

0:20:380:20:40

who are hugely revered by the medieval Christians.

0:20:400:20:44

Well, even I can recognise George.

0:20:440:20:47

St George and the Dragon, yes, that's absolutely right.

0:20:470:20:51

What's really exciting for us at Pickering

0:20:510:20:54

is that we know that these saints' images

0:20:540:20:57

were placed in calendar order.

0:20:570:20:59

This makes them the only medieval paintings of their kind in the UK.

0:20:590:21:04

The medieval calendar differed from ours

0:21:040:21:07

with the year beginning in March rather than in January

0:21:070:21:10

and the first saint's day depicted in the church paintings is in April.

0:21:100:21:14

So, this is the beginning of the calendar with George, April.

0:21:140:21:17

That's right, and then we have May with Christopher.

0:21:170:21:20

We go on to St John the Baptist

0:21:200:21:23

and the Virgin above him, July and August,

0:21:230:21:26

and then November and December by the time we get to the east end.

0:21:260:21:30

These magnificent works of art are believed to have been done

0:21:300:21:33

by a group of travelling painters,

0:21:330:21:35

moving around monastic houses and churches of the region.

0:21:350:21:38

And colours, colours galore.

0:21:380:21:40

Of course, they've faded over the last several hundred years.

0:21:400:21:43

Would they have been really bright and vibrant in their day?

0:21:430:21:46

Churches were about giving people a little glimpse of heaven

0:21:460:21:49

and that's part of what these paintings are designed to do.

0:21:490:21:52

I can see it.

0:21:520:21:54

But these exquisite images spent many years under whitewash.

0:21:540:21:58

It's so hard to believe, isn't it,

0:21:580:22:00

that anybody would dream of covering them up?

0:22:000:22:02

It is, isn't it, but during the Reformation,

0:22:020:22:06

-images of saints were highly controversial.

-Dangerous?

-Yes.

0:22:060:22:10

The 16th century Reformation

0:22:100:22:12

was sparked by corruption within the Catholic Church.

0:22:120:22:15

It resulted in the fundamental break from many Catholic practices,

0:22:150:22:19

such as the veneration of the saints, which became outlawed.

0:22:190:22:23

It's not until the 19th century that they were re-uncovered

0:22:230:22:27

during the course of restoration works in 1852.

0:22:270:22:29

The rediscovery evoked great joy from the parishioners and antiquarians,

0:22:290:22:35

a sentiment that was sadly not shared

0:22:350:22:37

by the incumbent vicar, Ponsonby.

0:22:370:22:39

He wrote a series of very worried letters to his archbishop,

0:22:390:22:43

expressing his concern about the paintings.

0:22:430:22:45

Ponsonby worried about the dangers

0:22:450:22:47

surrounding the Catholic nature of the images.

0:22:470:22:51

He was also concerned that they would distract from his sermons.

0:22:530:22:57

The Archbishop is really interested in the paintings

0:22:580:23:01

and he encourages the Reverend Ponsonby to leave them alone

0:23:010:23:04

and he uses the fateful words, "Don't do anything to them

0:23:040:23:08

"until they have been copied by some skilful or competent artists."

0:23:080:23:12

Sadly, Vicar Ponsonby interpreted this to the letter,

0:23:120:23:16

waiting until copies were done of the paintings

0:23:160:23:18

then covered them up once more.

0:23:180:23:20

It was another 20 years until they were rediscovered again.

0:23:200:23:23

Ponsonby's gone, the Reverend Lightfoot arrives,

0:23:230:23:27

does a huge programme of restoration in the church

0:23:270:23:30

and people start to tell him about the paintings

0:23:300:23:33

and he decides to uncover them yet again.

0:23:330:23:36

In his eagerness to restore the pictures,

0:23:360:23:38

Lightfoot brings in stained-glass and paintings experts

0:23:380:23:42

to work on the images,

0:23:420:23:43

giving them a distinctive 19th-century Pre-Raphaelite feel.

0:23:430:23:48

As it's the 19th-century, Victorians would call it being improved.

0:23:480:23:51

They would do the same with furniture -

0:23:510:23:52

send it back to workshops to be modernised

0:23:520:23:55

and brought up to date and I think I can see here

0:23:550:23:57

that the medieval picture has been brought up to date, hasn't it,

0:23:570:24:01

to 19th-century imagery?

0:24:010:24:02

It has and I think it's what makes the story of Pickering

0:24:020:24:05

so unique, that we not only have the original medieval wall paintings,

0:24:050:24:09

but we also have the 19th-century interventions as well

0:24:090:24:12

and what's more amazing is that we actually have the original copies

0:24:120:24:17

of the drawings of the paintings made in 1852,

0:24:170:24:20

which we found in the vestry of the church.

0:24:200:24:23

19th-century drawings of the paintings

0:24:230:24:25

had been lost and found several times.

0:24:250:24:28

In 2014, half-life size drawings

0:24:280:24:30

were found in the church's safety deposit box,

0:24:300:24:34

dating back to the 1950s.

0:24:340:24:35

It makes you wonder

0:24:350:24:37

if there's anything else yet to be discovered.

0:24:370:24:40

Yes, if I've learnt anything over the last ten years,

0:24:400:24:43

it's that Pickering has the power to surprise

0:24:430:24:45

and who knows what might emerge from the walls

0:24:450:24:47

or come out of the drawers or archives in the future.

0:24:470:24:51

Whilst the paintings have spent much of their existence hidden away,

0:24:510:24:55

today, they are celebrated in their full glory,

0:24:550:24:57

attracting thousands of visitors each year.

0:24:570:25:00

Anita is travelling nearly 30 miles to Thirsk,

0:25:020:25:05

hometown of Alfred Wright, author of All Creatures Great And Small

0:25:050:25:10

and on which he based the fictional town of Darrowby.

0:25:100:25:13

She's visiting Three Tuns Antiques and Curios

0:25:170:25:21

with just under £120 left to spend.

0:25:210:25:23

Ah, something shiny has caught her eye.

0:25:230:25:27

Surprise-surprise(!)

0:25:270:25:29

-Could I take this outside to have a wee look at it?

-Yes.

0:25:290:25:33

You not going to do a runner, are you?

0:25:330:25:36

I hope not!

0:25:360:25:37

Judging by the glint in Anita's eye, she is up to something, though.

0:25:370:25:40

Don't go back, Anita.

0:25:400:25:41

I wanted to see this in the light.

0:25:410:25:44

It's a lidded vessel

0:25:440:25:46

which would have been used to hold the host during Mass.

0:25:460:25:52

Now, it has a price of £10 on it,

0:25:520:25:58

but what I thought when I handled it was, "Is this silver?

0:25:580:26:04

"Is this silver and not silver plate?"

0:26:040:26:06

When I look at the top of it and apply a wee bit of pressure,

0:26:060:26:11

I've got some give there

0:26:110:26:13

and that's indicating that it is a softer metal.

0:26:130:26:17

Now, silver plate would be a harder metal than that.

0:26:170:26:21

Its official name is a ciborium

0:26:210:26:24

and it also has markings, which are Continental and complicated.

0:26:240:26:28

Now, if this was silver plate,

0:26:280:26:30

both pieces would not have been hallmarked like that.

0:26:300:26:34

So that's giving me another indication that it may be silver.

0:26:340:26:39

This might be the Holy Grail!

0:26:390:26:40

Now, that really would be something, wouldn't it?

0:26:400:26:44

-So, £10 on that.

-Yes.

0:26:440:26:46

That's great.

0:26:460:26:48

So, for just £10, Anita has bought an ecclesiastical vessel

0:26:480:26:52

that she believes to be made of solid silver.

0:26:520:26:55

Meanwhile, our other little cherub, choirboy David,

0:26:560:27:00

has driven east to the picturesque village of Thornton Le Dale.

0:27:000:27:04

He's got one more shot to spend his remaining £41

0:27:070:27:10

and he's meeting manager and dealer Jan. Hi, Jan!

0:27:100:27:14

What about...

0:27:140:27:16

-This is a different, quirky item.

-Is it a watering can?

-No, it's not.

0:27:160:27:21

What is it?

0:27:210:27:23

It's from a railway and they used it for flares in emergencies.

0:27:230:27:29

-No! So, what's it fired by?

-Either kerosene or paraffin.

-Right.

0:27:290:27:34

-It would be dropped on the line.

-It would be like a Roman torch.

0:27:340:27:40

In a line so that, in emergencies, they could see what was going on.

0:27:400:27:45

My goodness me!

0:27:450:27:46

Emergencies could be anything from heavy fog to signal failure.

0:27:460:27:50

So, date wise, are we thinking early part of the 20th century

0:27:500:27:54

-or even earlier?

-Even earlier, actually, I think.

-Right!

0:27:540:27:57

OK, its ticket price is £30

0:27:570:27:58

and it's not the only piece of railway interest.

0:27:580:28:02

-Just one more piece of railwayana as well.

-Blinking hell!

0:28:020:28:05

-A gear lever.

-What's all this with you and railwayana?

0:28:050:28:09

You do not look like someone who is a train spotter!

0:28:090:28:12

-I'm not a

-train spotter! Are you not?

-No, definitely not.

0:28:120:28:15

-OK, so this is a gear lever of some disruption.

-Right.

0:28:150:28:23

It comes from sort of the tender, engine box.

0:28:230:28:26

-Actually, is it very heavy?

-It is very heavy, yes.

0:28:260:28:29

-It's made of cast iron.

-Let's have a look at it. Oh, gosh, yes!

0:28:290:28:33

And when you say a tender box, it actually would be on the train?

0:28:330:28:37

-On the train itself.

-I love that, I absolutely love that.

0:28:370:28:42

Its price is £35, but can Jan do a deal on the lever and the flare lamp?

0:28:420:28:48

What's your offer, David?

0:28:480:28:50

-Do you want all my money?

-I want all your money.

-You got it, baby.

-OK.

0:28:500:28:53

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:28:530:28:56

Technically, he's still got 46p,

0:28:560:28:58

but that discount means David is now the proud owner

0:28:580:29:02

of two pieces of railway interest.

0:29:020:29:05

He's spent a total of £166

0:29:050:29:07

and also picked up the police fingerprinting table,

0:29:070:29:12

his 1940s letterbox,

0:29:120:29:15

the Chinese ginger jar

0:29:150:29:18

and the 1920s drop end settee.

0:29:180:29:20

Anita has spent just £83 on her five lots,

0:29:220:29:26

purchasing two sets of condiments, a 1950s brooch,

0:29:260:29:30

a collection of Mauchline treen boxes, a 1960s Italian glass vase

0:29:300:29:37

and a white metal cyborium with gilt interior.

0:29:370:29:42

So, what do they think of each other's items?

0:29:420:29:45

I mean, the condiment sets, oh, my gosh,

0:29:450:29:49

they are diabolical beyond belief!

0:29:490:29:51

They have no age whatsoever

0:29:510:29:54

and need to be chucked in the nearest bin possible.

0:29:540:29:58

What he's done with the flare lamp and that other bit of old iron,

0:29:580:30:03

is he has bought definitely the weird!

0:30:030:30:06

Somebody might fall in love with it, but, to me,

0:30:060:30:09

it's just another big lump of old iron.

0:30:090:30:13

Anita and David are travelling south again to an auction

0:30:130:30:17

in the historic spa town of Harrogate,

0:30:170:30:19

voted the happiest place to live

0:30:190:30:22

by a popular property website in 2013 and 2014.

0:30:220:30:26

Despite the dire weather,

0:30:260:30:28

happy Harrogate seems to have rubbed off on our excited pair.

0:30:280:30:32

Listen, if it didn't rain,

0:30:320:30:34

would we have this beautiful greenery all around about us?

0:30:340:30:38

I always say that, actually.

0:30:380:30:39

-BOTH SING:

-# Always look on the bright side of life

0:30:390:30:43

-# Be-doo... #

-# Be-doop-be-doop-be-doo... #

0:30:430:30:46

Wayhey! Here we are.

0:30:460:30:48

Second auction, David, let the battle commence!

0:30:490:30:53

Oh, my kind of woman. Come on!

0:30:530:30:55

Today's auction is being held at Harrogate Auction Centre

0:30:570:31:01

and the auctioneer is George Allen.

0:31:010:31:03

The condiment set, well, it's a bit quirky, they're a bit fun,

0:31:030:31:07

but cheap items, I'm afraid.

0:31:070:31:10

They're not going to do a right lot of money at all.

0:31:100:31:13

The letterbox is a very rare find, is that, and I think

0:31:130:31:16

you'll be quite surprised by how much that is going to make.

0:31:160:31:19

Let's hope so! Time for the auction.

0:31:190:31:23

Let's get comfy, David.

0:31:230:31:26

On our thrones, Anita, thrones.

0:31:260:31:29

And speaking of regal, it's Anita's king and queen condiments

0:31:290:31:34

-and cuddling pigs first.

-Well, good luck.

-Thank you, darling.

0:31:340:31:38

Can we see five anywhere on that one? £2?

0:31:380:31:41

The flags are up now.

0:31:410:31:43

-They all want them!

-Four bid, six bid, eight bid.

0:31:430:31:48

Ten, is that, number nine? It is ten bid. 12 bid.

0:31:480:31:52

14, lovely attractive lady on the front. 14 bid.

0:31:520:31:57

14 bid, is that 16, number nine?

0:31:570:32:00

14 the bid. 14 bid.

0:32:000:32:02

15 bid! 16 bid.

0:32:020:32:06

You're out, sir. 16 bid, any advance on 16? Any more?

0:32:060:32:12

18, she's back in.

0:32:120:32:14

20. 22. 22 bid, any more?

0:32:140:32:20

All done? Don't miss out on these. 22 bid.

0:32:200:32:24

The room's on fire!

0:32:240:32:27

-Are you all done at £22?

-Ahhh!

0:32:270:32:29

Not a king's ransom, but still a profit.

0:32:310:32:35

That was pressure, wasn't it?

0:32:350:32:38

From two! I thought they were going to sell for two.

0:32:380:32:40

So did I, my wee heart was beating!

0:32:400:32:44

-Next up are David's train lever and flare lamp.

-Can I leave now?

0:32:460:32:52

-Can I go?

-Shall I hold your wee hand?

0:32:520:32:54

I think you're going to have to.

0:32:540:32:56

-50. 40.

-Go on.

-30. 20.

0:32:560:33:00

This is for the two items. Five bid, five the bid. Any advance on five?

0:33:000:33:05

Ten bid, here we go. 15 bid.

0:33:050:33:09

20, 25, 30, 35 bid, 40 bid.

0:33:090:33:13

£40 the bid, 45, 50 bid. £50 bid. Any more?

0:33:130:33:20

55 bid, 60 bid. 65 bid.

0:33:200:33:24

65, 70 bid.

0:33:240:33:27

Any advance? 75 bid.

0:33:270:33:29

75. 80 bid. 85 bid. Any more?

0:33:290:33:35

-When is it going to stop?

-Go on! Never!

-90 bid. 95 bid.

0:33:350:33:40

95, round it up, make it to double figures. 100 bid.

0:33:400:33:46

-That's more like it, yeah.

-All done at £100?

0:33:460:33:52

-Ohhhh!

-Brilliant!

-Thank you, Anita.

0:33:520:33:56

An incredible result - from such a slow start,

0:33:560:34:00

David has more than doubled his money.

0:34:000:34:03

It's so exciting!

0:34:030:34:05

-I was digging my nails into your hand.

-I noticed!

0:34:050:34:08

Now, it's Anita's 1950s brooch.

0:34:080:34:12

Four bid, £4 bid. £6, £8 bid.

0:34:120:34:16

Eight the bid and ten. Ten bid, 12 bid, 14.

0:34:160:34:21

-And you're off!

-14 bid. Any advance on 14?

0:34:210:34:25

Come on, buy it for your lady. 14 bid, any more? Another one?

0:34:250:34:30

14, 15, he's back in. 15, 16.

0:34:300:34:34

16 bid, any more? All done at £16?

0:34:340:34:39

-You're going to miss out on this one.

-Go on!

0:34:390:34:42

All done at 16...

0:34:420:34:44

-Yes!

-Well done, well done.

0:34:440:34:47

She's very excited!

0:34:470:34:49

And so she should be!

0:34:490:34:51

She got it at a great price. Still, it's a small profit for Anita.

0:34:510:34:56

Now it's David's most expensive item - his Chinese ginger jar.

0:34:560:35:01

-Has your heart started going?

-Yeah, it's going.

0:35:010:35:04

I am 50 bid, straight in at 50. 60 on the telephone. £60 bid.

0:35:070:35:14

70 on the book, £70 bid.

0:35:140:35:18

80 bid. 90 with me. 95 bid.

0:35:180:35:21

-100 bid on the book.

-Come on!

0:35:210:35:24

Any advance on 100? I'm into triple figures. Any more?

0:35:240:35:27

All done at £100...

0:35:270:35:31

-Ohhhhh, that's a good one!

-Well done, darling.

-It's all right.

0:35:310:35:35

-Listen, let me give you a wee kiss.

-Thank you.

-That is great.

0:35:350:35:38

Wow! That's another great profit for David.

0:35:380:35:41

He went big with his buys and, so far, it seems to be paying off.

0:35:410:35:46

David is in the lead

0:35:460:35:48

so Anita needs a big profit on her Mauchline treen

0:35:480:35:51

-to stay in the game.

-Ten bid.

0:35:510:35:52

£10 bid, any advance on 10?

0:35:520:35:56

Any more? All done? 15?

0:35:560:36:00

-One piece is worth more than that. 20 bid. £20 the bid.

-Go on!

0:36:000:36:03

£20 bid. 25 bid. The lady in blue is back in at 25.

0:36:030:36:08

30 bid.

0:36:080:36:10

£30 the bid, I'll take 2.50 if it will help anybody.

0:36:100:36:14

£30 the bid, any more? All done?

0:36:140:36:18

32.50 bid, are you all done at 32.50?

0:36:180:36:23

Another profit for Anita - what a brilliant crowd here today!

0:36:230:36:28

I love his 50ps! It makes all the difference.

0:36:280:36:31

-He gets every single penny!

-He doesn't half, he doesn't half.

0:36:310:36:34

Well, every penny counts.

0:36:340:36:36

Let's see if Anita's next item can bring in a few more.

0:36:360:36:40

-It may not be Murano, but it still is an Italian vase.

-Ten to start me.

0:36:400:36:46

Ten bid. Any advance? 15. 20.

0:36:460:36:49

-It's all over, it's all over!

-25. 35 bid.

0:36:490:36:54

40 bid. 45. 50 bid.

0:36:540:36:57

-Any advance? 55 bid. 60.

-Are you bidding?

0:36:570:37:02

-I'm just getting excited!

-Any advance? 65 bid. 65. £70 the bid.

0:37:020:37:09

75 bid. 80 bid. 85 bid.

0:37:090:37:12

85 the bid, any advance on 85?

0:37:120:37:18

An exciting lot, there. 90 bid.

0:37:180:37:20

-Ohhhh!

-£90. 95 bid. £100 bid.

0:37:200:37:25

We've hit the magic mark. 100 bid.

0:37:250:37:30

-105 bid.

-Yes!

-105 the bid. Any more?

0:37:300:37:36

All done?

0:37:360:37:38

110. 110, the lady is back in at 110.

0:37:380:37:42

All done at 110?

0:37:420:37:46

-Ohhhh!

-Number nine.

0:37:460:37:48

Oh, what an auctioneer!

0:37:510:37:53

That's an incredible profit for Anita.

0:37:540:37:58

She has quadrupled her money, putting her firmly back in the game.

0:37:580:38:02

Now, let's see if David's 1940s letterbox gets the same reception.

0:38:020:38:07

40. 50. £50 bid. Any advance on 50?

0:38:080:38:14

60. 70. £70 bid. 80. 90.

0:38:140:38:19

100 with me. £100 bid.

0:38:190:38:21

Come on! Cling onto me.

0:38:210:38:25

-Good luck!

-130 bid.

0:38:250:38:29

130 bid. Any advance on 130? I'm out.

0:38:290:38:33

In the room at the very back there at £130 the bid.

0:38:330:38:37

It's there to go at 130...

0:38:370:38:41

-Yes!

-Get in there!

0:38:410:38:44

Well done, George.

0:38:440:38:46

Well done, David! Another massive profit. Quite the auction today!

0:38:460:38:52

-This is wonderful! Isn't it wonderful?

-It is, it is wonderful.

0:38:530:38:57

David got his 1920s sofa for a steal, but will it fare today?

0:38:570:39:03

Ten anywhere?

0:39:030:39:04

Ten bid. £10 bid, 20 bid. 30 bid.

0:39:040:39:08

40 bid. £40, 50 bid. 60 bid.

0:39:080:39:13

-You're in profit.

-Come on!

-60, were getting there.

0:39:130:39:15

£60 the bid, 70 bid. 70 bid, lovely piece.

0:39:150:39:20

80 bid. £80 the bid.

0:39:200:39:22

-90. Magic figure, £90 the bid, any more?

-Come on, get another hundred.

0:39:220:39:27

-100.

-Yes!

-100.

0:39:270:39:29

110. 110, it's selling itself. 110 the bid.

0:39:290:39:35

Any more? All done at £110?

0:39:350:39:40

David...

0:39:400:39:45

That's 200% profit.

0:39:450:39:47

200? It's more than that. It's about 4 million.

0:39:470:39:50

We're both rubbish at maths!

0:39:500:39:53

Apparently so. It's actually just over 2,000% profit.

0:39:530:39:58

Next, It's Anita's incredible find - her cyborium.

0:39:580:40:03

Anita still believes it's silver,

0:40:030:40:05

but has been unable to identify its marks

0:40:050:40:09

-so it's being sold as white metal.

-£20 bid. 20 bid.

0:40:090:40:12

20 bid. It's not where we start, it's where we finish. 30 bid.

0:40:120:40:16

£30 the bid. 35. 40 bid.

0:40:160:40:20

45. 45. 50 bid.

0:40:200:40:24

50 bid, any advance on 50?

0:40:240:40:27

55. 55, you won't get another one.

0:40:270:40:30

-55, 60 bid. 65 bid.

-Come on!

0:40:300:40:36

Any advance on 65? It's worth a lot more.

0:40:360:40:40

65. 70 bid. 75 bid.

0:40:400:40:44

Any more? All done? Finished at £75?

0:40:440:40:50

A stroke of luck or divine intervention?

0:40:520:40:54

Either way, that's a fantastic profit.

0:40:540:40:58

Profits all over the place! What a feeling, eh?

0:40:580:41:02

It's certainly too close to call.

0:41:020:41:05

Time for David's final and most unusual item -

0:41:050:41:07

his police fingerprinting table.

0:41:070:41:09

Can we see 20? Ten bid.

0:41:110:41:14

£10 bid, any advance on ten? You'll never get another one.

0:41:140:41:17

-You'd never WANT another one!

-£20 the bid. Any advance on 20?

0:41:170:41:23

-Any more? 30. £30.

-Come on! Come on!

0:41:230:41:29

The bid is at the back of the room.

0:41:290:41:31

£30, any more? All done?

0:41:310:41:35

Finished at £30 only bid?

0:41:350:41:39

That's all right!

0:41:390:41:41

-Well done, that's all right.

-It's still a profit.

-That's all right.

0:41:410:41:44

It's still a profit.

0:41:440:41:45

It's small, but it's still a profit.

0:41:450:41:48

What an incredible auction with no losses!

0:41:480:41:51

Now, that makes a change, doesn't it?

0:41:510:41:54

David, that was absolutely fabulous!

0:41:540:41:58

What are we going to do now?

0:41:580:42:01

We're going to forget about cups of tea,

0:42:010:42:02

-let's go straight for the champagne!

-You are my kind of girl!

0:42:020:42:06

Well, before we go popping any corks,

0:42:080:42:10

let's find out who came out on top.

0:42:100:42:12

Anita started this leg with £192.14.

0:42:120:42:16

After auction costs, she made a profit of £126.51,

0:42:160:42:22

leaving her with £318.65 to spend next time.

0:42:220:42:27

David, however, emerges victorious this week.

0:42:270:42:31

He started off with £166.46.

0:42:310:42:35

After auction costs, he's made a whopping profit of £219.40

0:42:350:42:41

so takes forward £385.86 to the following leg.

0:42:410:42:46

-Go on, you.

-You're such a sweetie!

-In you go!

0:42:480:42:52

-Right, are you in?

-Yep.

0:42:530:42:55

What an amazing day it's been! So, cheerio, chaps!

0:42:550:43:00

Next time on Antiques Road Trip, Anita considers other career options.

0:43:000:43:06

SHE BLOWS A RASPING NOTE

0:43:060:43:09

Whilst David takes a leaf out of his competitor's book.

0:43:090:43:12

I am desperate to buy it if it's cheap.

0:43:120:43:15

David Harper and Anita Manning travel through Yorkshire. Along the way, David learns about a 500-year-old mystery, and Anita meets two inspirational land girls before she and David head towards their second auction in Harrogate.