Episode 13 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 13

Antiques challenge. Anita Manning and David Harper are halfway through their trip. After a successful last auction, David has the lead, but Anita is hot on his heels.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

-I don't know what to do.

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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-What a little diamond.

-The aim?

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To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-Back in the game! Charlie!

-THEY LAUGH

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There'll be worthy winners

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and valiant losers. SHE GASPS

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-So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

-Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's the third leg of the road trip

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for David Harper and our canny Scottish lassie, Anita Manning.

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We're going north, Anita, we're going north!

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-Isn't that the pleasure of this trip?

-I know.

-Isn't it?

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Seeing all these different landscapes.

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Buying a load of old iron as well whilst doing it.

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-Look, an iron bridge!

-An iron bridge!

-Great! Don't you love it?

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-I could flog that dead easy.

-He probably could as well,

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for dealer David's got a knack

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-of finding the golden dust in a bit of old rust.

-It is fabulous.

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And do you know what, Tony? I am desperate to buy it if it's cheap.

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His partner in crime, auctioneer Anita,

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has decades of antiquing under her belt,

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though she's not one to blow her own trumpet.

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SHE BLOWS BRASS INSTRUMENT

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-Do you think they'd let me into The Boys Brigade?

-Er, I don't think so.

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Anita and David are still eating up the miles, though,

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in this positively delectable 1965 Morris Minor convertible.

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Their last auction was a rip-roaring success

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with both of them making whopping great profits.

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-Yes!

-Get in there!

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-Oh!

-Oh!

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-Number nine.

-Oh!

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Bravo, chaps.

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Our two expert treasure hunters started the trip with £200.

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Anita now has £318.65 to spend.

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David, meanwhile, has taken the lead with £385.86 for this leg.

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-Hey, I tell you what, have we got some money to spend or what?

-Yes!

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-Crikey.

-We've got tons of dosh.

-I know.

-Tons of dosh.

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I'm looking forward to seeing what takes your fancy, Mrs.

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-Well, it won't be those bright red trousers.

-Oh, stop lying.

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They're the same colour as my nail varnish!

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Otherwise known as "shocking" red.

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David and Anita are travelling over 700 miles

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from Ramsbottom, Lancashire, snaking their way up through Yorkshire,

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all the way to bonny Scotland and the town of Paisley.

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Our journey commences today in Chester-le-Street, County Durham,

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ending up at an auction in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

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-I always aim to please.

-Oh, and you do. You never fail.

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-Right, have a great day.

-OK. David, spend, spend, spend.

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-Don't you worry about that. See you soon.

-Bye.

-Bye-bye.

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Anita is dropping David off at his first shop of the day.

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Crikey, those trousers really ARE bright. And tight.

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Now she's tootling just 20 miles south

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to the village of St Helen Auckland,

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where she's catching up with her old pal, Yvonne.

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-Yvonne!

-Oh, Anita, lovely to see you.

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Lovely to be back to this wonderful treasure chest.

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They really are happy to be reunited.

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YVONNE BLOWS INSTRUMENT

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-Wow, I did not do that!

-You're good at that.

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-Right, OK, hang on a wee second till I get the...

-The tone.

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SHE PLAYS ACCORDION

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I think that might take more than a second, Anita.

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Perhaps stick to shopping?

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Not THAT type of shopping.

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Bright pillar-box red handbag.

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Just the type of thing that would go with David's trousers.

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Oh, please don't encourage him.

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Distractions over, Anita soon spots something she likes.

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-Can I see your scent bottle?

-You can indeed.

-Is the top silver?

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Yes, hallmarked.

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-Right. I love these things.

-I do.

-I love them as well.

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There's no damage on the cut crystal.

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-And when you think of the amount of work that was done...

-Yeah, amazing.

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..to cut all that into all these little triangles, squares and so on.

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And I've got that nice quality polished base.

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The only thing that I'm worried about in that, Yvonne, is...

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-..the fact that we don't have the stopper.

-I know, I know.

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The missing stopper will reduce the value,

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but I dare say Anita will use that to her advantage.

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Ticket price is £60.

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What's the very best you can do on that, Yvonne?

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-To you, the very, very...

-The very, very best.

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And taking into consideration

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that we've got that very important part missing.

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Yeah. What about £45?

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-What I'm looking at is round about the £30.

-Mmm. If we said £35.

-£35?

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-Would that be...? Yeah.

-Let's go for that.

-Yeah.

-That's great.

-Excellent.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you, Anita.

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Generous discount of nearly 50% off.

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David, meanwhile, is starting his morning in Chester-le-Street,

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where he's meeting dealer Colin.

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It's just an Aladdin's cave. It's an adventure.

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Soon enough, David's eye is drawn to a Mouseman cheeseboard.

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It's very simple stuff, isn't it?

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But aged oak and they store the oak outside the factory premises

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-for 10 or 14 years, I believe, until it's just right to be cut.

-Right.

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And then they cut it and they use that tool - is it an adze?

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You know, the che-che - that, almost like a medieval tool,

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so the surfaces are never perfectly flat, are they?

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They've got that kind of wavy finish to them. And the old mouse there.

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Each Mouseman piece has a mouse carved on it

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which slightly varies depending on which craftsman was doing the work.

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The company was founded by Robert Thompson in the early 20th century

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-and is still running today.

-OK, what about that baby there?

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-Is that Mousey?

-Yep, same again.

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-Let's have a look.

-There we go.

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OK, so this is a different animal altogether, isn't it?

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This is the cow stool. Tripod with that facetted leg, all hand-cut.

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When you look closely at these things, people would criticise them

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because they're just off-centre and a little bit rough in places.

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-It's cos it's handmade, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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They are different, aren't they?

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This one's got more of a domed back, a bit fatter.

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And, apparently, there's a story

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behind how these mice came to be carved in the first place.

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These guys were moaning that they weren't getting paid much

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by Yorkshireman Robert Mousey Thompson

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and as they were moaning about it,

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this little mouse scurried across the church floor

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and one of them said to the other, "Look at that.

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"Here we are in a church and we're as poor as church mice."

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And from that day on, they started carving mice onto the furniture.

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The combined ticket price of the two items is £210.

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-I'd stand a chance if that was £160 for the pair.

-How much?

-£160.

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-I cannot. Go on, try a bit harder.

-I'll try a bit harder.

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£170 and I'm done.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Well, that's a very generous discount.

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It works out at £110 for the stool and £60 for the cheeseboard.

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Back with Anita and she's found something a little bit festive.

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Another thing that I was looking at, which I thought was quite fun...

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-Yes.

-These old Christmas card printing blocks.

-Yeah.

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-I thought they were good.

-They're really nice, aren't they?

-Uh-huh.

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What I kind of like about them is, although they're not old -

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they're not Victorian, Edwardian

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or even probably the first part of the 20th century -

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-they're kind of soppy.

-Yeah.

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-You know, that kind of old-fashioned Merry Christmas type of thing.

-Yeah.

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And I think it's the type of thing

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that people could have good fun with.

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-Yeah.

-You know, they could make their own vintage Christmas cards.

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-Mmm-hmm.

-Is there more printing stuff?

-There's those as well, Anita.

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-There.

-Oh, right.

-I think they're numbers as well.

-Right. These are...

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-These are numbers.

-Mmm-hmm.

-Oh, look, that's for money.

-Yeah.

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See all these together - who's going to want them except me?

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THEY LAUGH

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-Craft people.

-Craft people. That's right, craft people.

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Er... Are these throwaway dead...dead cheap?

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The printing blocks are priced at £22.

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-I'll do them at £20 for the lot.

-For the lot?

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-Could you do them all for a tenner?

-Oh, Anita!

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-ANITA LAUGHS

-That is so hard.

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They're just daft things but I like them.

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I tell you what I'll do, I'll do them for £15.

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-You'll do them for £15?

-Yeah.

-Let's go for it.

-Yeah.

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Another cracking buy, but there's still time for one more item.

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Er, I think it's German. I think it probably is German.

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Er, it has an Art Nouveau look about it.

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-It's got a bit of a mixture of styles.

-Yeah.

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But I kind of like this crazy thing.

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-It's almost like a crab or a sea creature or something.

-Oh, yes.

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And you've got these wee cherubs.

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It's a continental Art Nouveau porcelain mantle clock

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with a ticket price of £48.

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-I don't like it.

-Nor do I.

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-Do you not?

-I don't know why.

-I do!

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-I mean, how much do you not like it?

-A lot!

-A lot!

-She's right.

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No prizes in guessing where THIS conversation's going.

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Why don't you give it a throwaway price,

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-so that I can take this out of your life for ever.

-Yeah, for ever.

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It definitely won't be coming back?

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It won't be coming back, it won't be coming back.

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-I'm going to give you a one-off price...

-A one-off price?

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..today, which is a tenner.

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-Wonderful!

-YVONNE LAUGHS

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Boys, you're coming home with me!

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Well, they're going to the auction. Put it there.

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-I've got three items and I'm delighted with them all.

-Excellent.

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I'm not surprised.

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Anita's bought three cracking pieces for just £60.

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David, meanwhile, has spotted something a bit unusual.

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Right, what have we got in here of interest? What on earth is that?

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-Can I dive in there?

-You can.

-Is that a...?

-There you are.

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-It's a cigarette lighter.

-It's a what?!

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-It's a what?

-A cigarette lighter.

-Oh, I see.

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Why on earth do you make a bike...? It's a novelty cigarette lighter.

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-Yeah.

-Replica of a...

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It reminds me of my ten-speed racer when I was a young boy.

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Not long ago. Ticket price for this fun little piece is £25.

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You've got wheels that turn, brakes that work... That's ridiculous!

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A chain that... I can't believe that's a funct...

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-You could get on that and ride off!

-THEY LAUGH

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Is that cheap? It's a fun thing.

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-Yeah.

-Is it cheap?

-Yeah, it's cheap.

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-Well, I think £20 and that is cheap for that.

-£20?

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-Will you take £15?

-Yeah.

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Thank you very much. Marvellous! Purchase number three.

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-You're brilliant.

-Marvellous indeed.

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That's one shop down and three items in the bag for £185.

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Anita is now travelling over 25 miles east

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to the coastal town of Hartlepool.

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In the 19th century, Hartlepool was an important ship-building port.

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Sadly, this industry caused the town to be the target

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of a horrific attack by the German navy

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at the beginning of the First World War.

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Anita is here to learn more

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about this momentous day from curator Mark.

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Do you know, it's so peaceful here today,

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but I believe at the beginning of the First World War,

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really a lot happened.

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Yeah, if you were standing here 100 years ago,

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all hell was breaking loose around you,

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as shells from three German warships

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bombarded the town of Hartlepool and West Hartlepool.

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On 16th December, 1914,

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the war, that was seemingly being fought hundreds of miles away,

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came to the doorsteps of the working-class people of Hartlepool.

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This shock attack was the first of its kind on British soil

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and claimed the lives of 130 people.

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Over 500 more were injured. Wow.

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Local people had absolutely no idea.

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They're sitting eating their breakfast in the houses behind us,

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going to school, getting ready to go to work

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and then, suddenly, the shells start coming

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and the sound of thunder out to sea.

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Huge German 11-inch shells start falling on the town in huge numbers.

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-Something like 1,500 shells in about 40 minutes.

-Out there?

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Yes, from just behind us here, out in the sea here,

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coming in from the mist.

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No public warnings of the attack came until it was too late.

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The few Royal Navy ships from Hartlepool responded to the attack,

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but were vastly outnumbered.

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By the time more help arrived, the Germans had scooted.

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Scarborough and Whitby were also hit

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but Hartlepool suffered the most damage.

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Inside Hartlepool Maritime Museum, Mark has some interesting artefacts,

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including some shrapnel from the attack, to show Anita.

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These are travelling at hundreds and hundreds of miles an hour -

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in some cases, faster than the speed of sound.

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So you can imagine, when the shells are exploding, there's no warning

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and it just takes a building and turns it into matchsticks.

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The devastation at the time was unimaginable,

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as people's everyday lives were suddenly turned upside down

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by the onslaught.

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So, this is the bombardment clock from Collingwood Road,

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where a family hear the shells...

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The shells are coming down, so they run out into the street

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and a shell hits the back of their house and completely demolishes it.

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The family discover the shrapnel-riddled alarm clock

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in the rubble of the house.

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It had stopped at the exact time the bombardment started.

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But look closely. Where's the alarm clock made?

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-"Made in Germany." Oh!

-It's a German import.

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It sounds like a day out of hell.

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But tell me about the ordinary man, the ordinary woman,

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the ordinary family on that terrible morning.

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People thought that the Germans were invading

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and went either to find out what was going on or went to try to get help.

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A lot of the people who were killed and wounded

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were injured by shells exploding,

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hitting the streets and being outside.

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People panicked

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and collected their families and their worldly possessions

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and tried to run off into the countryside.

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These were the first German attacks of this magnitude to strike the UK

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and, as such, resulted in the first civilian and military casualties

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of the First World war on British soil.

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Mark, you have painted me a terrifying picture

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of what happened to Hartlepool on that fateful morning.

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But what effect did it have on the people of Hartlepool?

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Anger and fear to start with.

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And then they turned their anger over

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into wanting to do something about it. What do you do?

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So, you join the army, you go to work in the munitions factories,

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making shells in buildings like the one we're standing in now.

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The events of that day changed the lives

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of the people of Hartlepool forever.

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Ultimately, though, the community rallied together.

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22,000 people volunteered for the armed forces.

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Even more impressive, they raised the modern equivalent

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of over half a billion pounds for the war effort -

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an incredible figure for such a small working-class community.

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Over 800 buildings were damaged during the attack

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and it took over a decade to restore Hartlepool to its former glory.

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David is now heading south to Darlington,

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a town said to be the birthplace

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of the world's first public steam-powered railway.

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He's hot to shop, with just over £200 to spend.

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-Hello, Tony.

-Hello.

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-Good to see you.

-And again.

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Very good to see you. I'm loving those glasses!

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After a quick mooch downstairs,

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Tony's got an item he thinks David will like the look of upstairs.

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-Now then. It's a little bit industrial here.

-Oh.

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-Um, be careful, it's fairly heavy.

-Oh, yeah.

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And watch those trousers as well.

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Why, what's it going to do? Grab them?

0:17:430:17:46

-It'll be fairly rusty.

-OK.

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It's an early 20th-century cast-iron hay grabber

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and, more importantly for David, a good chunk of metal.

0:17:510:17:55

Oh, there's the mechanism. There's your gear thing, switch that.

0:17:550:17:59

-Yeah, that's it.

-Oh, I see, I see. So, that goes onto the hay?

-Yeah.

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-It grabs it...

-Grabs it.

-Locks in...

-Locks in.

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-And then lifts the hay bale.

-That's right.

0:18:070:18:10

And that's your support there, all for your chains

0:18:100:18:14

and the thing just goes up, away and then down again...

0:18:140:18:18

I hope you followed that.

0:18:190:18:21

Now, I remember... You'll remember this.

0:18:230:18:25

-In 1895, when we used to work in the fields...

-Yes.

0:18:250:18:28

..doing these by hand.

0:18:280:18:30

-Do you remember them, Tony, those days?

-David, I do, yes.

0:18:300:18:33

You must remember, I put the first coat of primer on the Ark.

0:18:330:18:37

THEY LAUGH

0:18:370:18:41

Just like watching The Two Ronnies, isn't it?

0:18:410:18:44

I mean, it is fabulous and do you know what, Tony?

0:18:440:18:49

-I am desperate to buy it if it's cheap.

-I tell you what we'll do...

0:18:490:18:53

A tenner. £10.

0:18:550:18:57

10 quid. Thank you very much. That is not worth negotiating over.

0:18:590:19:03

That's a bargain and Anita Manning is going to be so jealous

0:19:030:19:08

because she loves all my bits of any old iron.

0:19:080:19:12

He sure spent big earlier,

0:19:120:19:14

but this last £10-buy marks the end of the first day's shopping.

0:19:140:19:18

Time for some much-needed shuteye for our dazzling duo. Night-night.

0:19:200:19:25

MUSIC: I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside

0:19:280:19:31

A new day has dawned and today,

0:19:310:19:33

they're starting out beside the seaside.

0:19:330:19:36

David, isn't that wonderful? Look at the sea, the wonderful North Sea.

0:19:370:19:42

And we're in Whitby, one of the most delightful little seaside towns

0:19:420:19:46

-in the north of England.

-It's gorgeous.

0:19:460:19:48

And I'm so excited, I want to swim in the sea.

0:19:480:19:52

Hmm, look out. You'd regret THAT pretty quickly.

0:19:520:19:55

Yesterday, big kid Anita bought some printing blocks,

0:19:560:20:00

a cut-glass crystal scent bottle with silver embossed top

0:20:000:20:04

and an Art Nouveau mantle clock.

0:20:040:20:07

Today, she has £258.65 left to spend.

0:20:070:20:11

David's spent a big chunk of his money buying four items -

0:20:110:20:16

a Mouseman cheeseboard and milking stool,

0:20:160:20:19

a novelty racing bike lighter and an early 20th-century hay grabber,

0:20:190:20:23

leaving him with just over £190 for today's shopping.

0:20:230:20:27

Anita and David have travelled to the seaside town of Whitby,

0:20:290:20:32

a place that has a long history of maritime importance.

0:20:320:20:35

It was here that explorer Captain Cook learned seamanship.

0:20:350:20:39

-There you go, madam.

-There we are, down there.

0:20:420:20:46

-Delivered right to the door, just about.

-Ah.

0:20:460:20:49

-Well, you're keen to get out.

-Yeah.

0:20:490:20:51

You almost flung yourself out the door!

0:20:510:20:53

Is it the effect I have on women or something?

0:20:530:20:55

-I'm looking forward to shopping.

-Yeah, bye.

-Bye.

0:20:550:20:59

And so she should be, as her first shop of the day is The Bazaar,

0:20:590:21:03

packed full of interesting artefacts to get excited over.

0:21:030:21:07

There to help her is dealer Frank.

0:21:110:21:13

Frank, could I ask you about this little tea set

0:21:130:21:19

or party set over here?

0:21:190:21:21

-Oh, that, yes.

-I quite like that.

0:21:220:21:25

It's part of a tea set, Royal Crown Derby,

0:21:250:21:29

-in that wonderful imari pattern.

-Yes.

0:21:290:21:33

And this imari pattern is taken from the oriental,

0:21:330:21:36

with these wonderful...the blues,

0:21:360:21:39

the rust-reds and golds and I like that.

0:21:390:21:42

There seem to be some flaws though.

0:21:440:21:46

I think that this is probably unassociated with it.

0:21:470:21:51

-What, the plate?

-The plate, yeah.

-Yeah, that's...

0:21:510:21:54

It's a different mark, so it's been brought...

0:21:540:21:56

-Bits have been brought together.

-Yes.

-Uh-huh. And we've got a damage.

0:21:560:22:00

-Damage?

-Or a repair.

-Are you sure?

-Uh-huh, I think that's a repair.

0:22:010:22:05

Oh, yeah, that's a repair, yeah. I didn't notice that.

0:22:050:22:08

-Has that been there for a long time?

-Er, I shouldn't say, but it has.

-Oh.

0:22:080:22:12

THEY LAUGH

0:22:120:22:15

The item is priced at £150.

0:22:150:22:18

So, what was you thinking of offering?

0:22:180:22:21

-I'd be looking for round about £50.

-Pounds.

0:22:210:22:25

I tell you what. I could have a deal.

0:22:260:22:29

How about £70? Would that be any good?

0:22:290:22:31

-£70?

-Yeah.

-Could you come to maybe £60 on it?

0:22:310:22:35

-Is that possible?

-Well, it's been here for a...for a long time, so...

0:22:360:22:39

Has it been here for a long time?

0:22:390:22:41

-It's a long time, yeah, so I'll have a deal with you. £60.

-At £60?

-Yeah.

0:22:410:22:46

-That's wonderful. Thank you very much.

-OK.

0:22:460:22:49

-That's wonderful, thank you.

-That's an amazing discount.

0:22:490:22:52

So, for £60, Anita is now the proud owner of a Derby part-tea set.

0:22:520:22:58

David is also in Whitby, where the notoriously dangerous coastline

0:22:580:23:02

saw one of the biggest shipping disasters

0:23:020:23:05

in the history of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

0:23:050:23:08

This even went on to prompt a rethink

0:23:080:23:12

on how the RNLI functioned in UK waters.

0:23:120:23:16

He's visiting the Whitby Lifeboat Museum

0:23:160:23:18

to learn more about that fateful day

0:23:180:23:21

from curator and retired coxswain Pete Thomson.

0:23:210:23:24

That's a fine model of a ship, Pete. What are we looking at?

0:23:240:23:27

This is the famous Rohilla.

0:23:270:23:29

She was a hospital ship with 229 people on board.

0:23:290:23:33

It was bound for Dunkirk to pick up wounded soldiers,

0:23:330:23:37

basically from the front in the First World War.

0:23:370:23:40

The people on board were mostly medical staff and the ship's crew.

0:23:410:23:45

Sadly, though, the Rohilla never made its final destination,

0:23:450:23:50

as, struck by a huge storm, it was swept off course.

0:23:500:23:53

As a result of the German naval attack

0:23:550:23:57

that Anita learned about yesterday, there was a coastal blackout

0:23:570:24:01

and the ship ran onto a mile-long rock known as the Whitby Scar.

0:24:010:24:07

The impact split the vessel into three parts.

0:24:070:24:10

That would be the first notification that there was a ship ashore

0:24:110:24:16

and that's the way the rest of the town would find out.

0:24:160:24:19

The dangerous state of the seas

0:24:190:24:20

meant that the lifeboat couldn't leave from its normal launch site,

0:24:200:24:25

so the volunteer crews had to move the boat

0:24:250:24:28

to a safer location position opposite the wreck.

0:24:280:24:31

This involved lifting the lifeboat over an eight-foot wall

0:24:310:24:35

and then carrying it another quarter of a mile.

0:24:350:24:37

She was dragged by several hundred people.

0:24:400:24:44

It was damaged in the process of this,

0:24:440:24:48

so it was damaged before it actually left the shore.

0:24:480:24:52

Those waters must have been absolutely hell on Earth.

0:24:530:24:57

I would imagine surf running in from the Rohilla

0:24:570:24:59

would be anything like 12, 15 foot high,

0:24:590:25:02

so this little boat trying to get out through these huge breakers

0:25:020:25:07

to get alongside and rescue them

0:25:070:25:09

must have been a fantastic feat in itself.

0:25:090:25:12

It took off the first 17 people and landed them back through the waves.

0:25:120:25:19

Into the surf for a second time, and a further 18 people were rescued.

0:25:190:25:24

When she got back from that trip, after hitting the rocks,

0:25:240:25:27

it was so badly damaged that it had to be abandoned

0:25:270:25:31

and that's where we had to call for help from further stations.

0:25:310:25:34

Three other lifeboats from neighbouring towns -

0:25:350:25:38

one motorised - tried and failed to help.

0:25:380:25:42

And were people stuck on the boat? Were they in the water?

0:25:420:25:45

What was happening?

0:25:450:25:46

No, the survivors would be mustered in around the wheelhouse.

0:25:460:25:52

People were seen by the crowds on the cliff to be jumping into the sea

0:25:520:25:56

and trying to swim for it.

0:25:560:25:57

A lot were saved by Whitby people on the Scar itself,

0:25:570:26:02

wading into the water and pulling them out. Many, many died.

0:26:020:26:06

In desperation, they just jumped over into the water and that was it.

0:26:080:26:12

Time was running out for the passengers.

0:26:120:26:15

They were now entering their third day stranded

0:26:150:26:18

and the storm was showing no signs of abating.

0:26:180:26:22

Finally, a lifeboat from over 50 miles to the north

0:26:220:26:25

-was called upon to assist.

-And what happened next?

0:26:250:26:28

The final thing was to try and get a motor lifeboat down from the Tyne.

0:26:280:26:32

And they decided to sail through the night

0:26:320:26:36

the 50-odd mile from the Tyne mouth down to Whitby,

0:26:360:26:40

which they did through the full storm and everything went well.

0:26:400:26:44

They took our second coxswain and he then acted as pilot.

0:26:440:26:49

They went out through the storm, round to the wreck

0:26:490:26:53

and managed to get the last 50 survivors.

0:26:530:26:56

Until now, motorised lifeboats

0:26:560:26:58

were in the very early stages of development

0:26:580:27:01

-and were few and far between.

-On this occasion,

0:27:010:27:04

when everything failed with the rowing lifeboat

0:27:040:27:08

and, of course, the motor one succeeded,

0:27:080:27:12

then the RNLI quite rightly said,

0:27:120:27:14

"Now is the time to put a motor lifeboat in Whitby."

0:27:140:27:16

So, the disaster then was a catalyst for change.

0:27:160:27:19

It was, and a big step,

0:27:190:27:21

and the RNLI realised, and so did lifeboat men,

0:27:210:27:24

that oars were no longer the ideal way for saving life.

0:27:240:27:29

Many interesting artefacts were found at the time of the wreck

0:27:290:27:32

but perhaps the most fascinating was discovered in 2014 -

0:27:320:27:36

a trunk belonging to Mary Roberts,

0:27:360:27:38

the only female stewardess on the Rohilla.

0:27:380:27:41

She was no stranger to shipping disasters,

0:27:410:27:44

having also survived the most famous shipwreck of all time - the Titanic.

0:27:440:27:50

That's fantastic.

0:27:500:27:52

So, 100 years, certainly to the year, the trunk comes back.

0:27:520:27:56

-What a coincidence.

-I don't know whether Mary was lucky or unlucky.

0:27:560:28:01

What are your thoughts?

0:28:010:28:02

Well, she has been known to have said that, of the two disasters,

0:28:020:28:06

the Rohilla was the worst to experience

0:28:060:28:09

because of the severity of the weather.

0:28:090:28:12

Titanic was huge but it was flat calm.

0:28:120:28:15

So, her experience of the Rohilla certainly stuck with her.

0:28:150:28:19

2014 marked the centenary of Rohilla's fateful journey,

0:28:200:28:24

but the memory of that traumatic day

0:28:240:28:26

and the courage of the people of Whitby

0:28:260:28:29

and its surrounding towns lives on.

0:28:290:28:31

84 people died on that ship, but over the course of three days,

0:28:310:28:36

against all the odds, the RNLI managed to save 145 souls

0:28:360:28:41

and their bravery was rewarded with the gold medal

0:28:410:28:44

of the Royal National Lifeboat Institute,

0:28:440:28:46

the highest honour of its kind.

0:28:460:28:48

Anita is on her way, 20 miles down the coast,

0:28:510:28:53

to another popular seaside resort, Scarborough.

0:28:530:28:56

She's got just under £200 to spend

0:28:560:28:58

at Scarborough Antique and Collectors Centre. There she goes.

0:28:580:29:01

-Hi. I'm Anita.

-Pleased to meet you. I'm Matt.

0:29:010:29:05

Lovely. Lovely to be here.

0:29:050:29:07

The shop is brimming with Anita's Achilles heel - jewellery.

0:29:070:29:12

This may take some time.

0:29:120:29:14

Is this the bargain box?

0:29:140:29:16

Yeah, I suppose that's where we've put a lot of the reduced ones, yeah.

0:29:160:29:20

Yeah, like music to your ears, eh, Anita?

0:29:200:29:22

The brooches, silver and gold,

0:29:220:29:25

-aren't worn as much as they used to be, so...

-Yeah.

0:29:250:29:28

-When they do come in, we'd rather not scrap them.

-I know, I know.

0:29:280:29:33

-Nice wee lot, here, of four.

-Yeah.

0:29:330:29:37

We've got the little blister pearl here and I like those.

0:29:370:29:41

We've got this, it's a blue...

0:29:410:29:43

-It's not a sapphire. I think it's just a blue gemstone here.

-Right.

0:29:430:29:47

Little gold one with the flower...

0:29:470:29:50

..and this pearlized stone here.

0:29:520:29:55

-Four of them, all nine-carat gold, in the bargain basement box.

-Yeah.

0:29:550:30:01

The combined ticket price for the four brooches is £80.

0:30:010:30:05

I'd be looking to pay...

0:30:070:30:09

..£35-40 as a wee group, taking all four of them,

0:30:100:30:15

-so it's a kind of quick sale on four.

-Right, I see.

0:30:150:30:18

-Um...

-Yeah...

-Tell me how you feel about that.

-Right.

0:30:180:30:22

I mean, they're already in the bargain basement

0:30:220:30:25

and I'm a bit of a tight Yorkshireman...

0:30:250:30:27

Oh, hello, Yorkshire pot, meet Scottish kettle.

0:30:270:30:31

-I could do them for £50, Anita.

-£50? Could you take it to £40?

0:30:310:30:36

-Could you take it to £40?

-I...I think I could do £45 for you.

0:30:360:30:41

You could do £45 on that? I think I'll go for that. That's lovely.

0:30:410:30:44

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much, Matt, that's wonderful.

0:30:440:30:47

And with that, Anita has bought her final lot.

0:30:470:30:51

David has travelled inland to the village of Sleights

0:30:560:30:59

in the Esk Valley.

0:30:590:31:00

He's visiting Eskdale Antiques, where he's meeting owner Philip.

0:31:000:31:05

He's still got just over £190 left to spend

0:31:050:31:08

and a whole host of interesting objects to choose here.

0:31:080:31:11

Hmm.

0:31:160:31:18

Little papier-mache 19th-century snuffbox here.

0:31:190:31:22

Now, these things can be very ordinary, can't they,

0:31:240:31:26

-and bought for a few pounds?

-Sorry, who are you talking to, David?

0:31:260:31:32

But I love this because of the doggy on there.

0:31:320:31:34

What's all this about? What do you know about this one?

0:31:340:31:36

Ah, Philip, hello!

0:31:360:31:38

Nice little scene on the front - dog carrying its prey back, I think.

0:31:380:31:41

Yeah, rabbit there, "To be delivered immediately" to its master.

0:31:410:31:46

I love snuffboxes and I love the story behind snuff.

0:31:460:31:51

In the 17th century, it was astonishingly expensive

0:31:510:31:54

and people would have urns of snuff

0:31:540:31:56

worth the equivalent of thousands of pounds and rooms locked,

0:31:560:32:01

-didn't they, so people couldn't pinch the snuff?

-Right.

0:32:010:32:04

It's priced at £45.

0:32:040:32:07

-OK, what's the trade on that?

-Um, I can do £25 on that.

-£25.

0:32:080:32:14

Can we go £20?

0:32:150:32:16

-Yeah, we can do £20.

-Shall we do it?

-That's fair, yeah.

-Phil, thank you.

0:32:170:32:22

So, for £20, David has bought a 19th-century snuffbox,

0:32:220:32:25

making his total spend on this leg just £215.

0:32:250:32:30

His other purchases are a Mouseman cheeseboard and milking stool,

0:32:300:32:34

a vintage racing bike lighter

0:32:340:32:36

and a 20th-century cast-iron hay grabber - as you do.

0:32:360:32:40

Anita has spent £165.

0:32:400:32:43

She bought some assorted printing blocks,

0:32:430:32:46

a cut-crystal scent bottle,

0:32:460:32:48

an Art Nouveau porcelain clock,

0:32:480:32:50

a late 19th-century Derby part-tea set and four gold brooches.

0:32:500:32:55

Their shopping is complete

0:32:570:32:58

but what do they think of each other's purchases?

0:32:580:33:02

The little bar brooches - they're not my cup of tea

0:33:020:33:04

but she knows these things inside out. £45 purchase price.

0:33:040:33:09

There's gold in there. I think she'll do pretty well.

0:33:090:33:13

I love David's Mouseman items.

0:33:130:33:16

The little cheeseboard is a sweetie

0:33:160:33:20

and the stool - isn't that such a delight?

0:33:200:33:24

Our jubilant duo are heading over 70 miles north

0:33:270:33:30

to an auction in Newcastle.

0:33:300:33:32

Well, David, we're in sunny Newcastle.

0:33:320:33:34

-As we travel north...

-It gets warmer.

0:33:340:33:37

-..the clouds are parting, the sun is shining.

-Yes.

0:33:370:33:41

-By the time we get to Scotland...

-We'll be in our swimwear!

0:33:410:33:45

-I'm hoping.

-THEY LAUGH

0:33:450:33:47

Oh, Lordy! Well, if ever there was a reason to stay south of the border...

0:33:470:33:52

Good luck.

0:33:530:33:54

There we go. And you can leap out...now.

0:33:550:34:00

OK. Well done, David, well done.

0:34:000:34:02

Our action today is taking place at Thomas Miller Auctioneers

0:34:020:34:07

and wielding the all-important gavel this morning is Guy Macklam.

0:34:070:34:11

I think the Mouseman items obviously stand out. They're always popular.

0:34:110:34:16

You never struggle to do well

0:34:160:34:17

with Mouseman furniture and collectables and things like that.

0:34:170:34:20

Derby, synonymous with super quality,

0:34:200:34:23

but I have to say, tea sets, dinner sets,

0:34:230:34:26

even good quality, are not making a lot of money now,

0:34:260:34:29

so you're probably looking at less than £50 for that lot, I'd think.

0:34:290:34:32

The auction's about to commence. Those two are unusually silent.

0:34:320:34:37

-Could it be jitters?

-Are you nervous?

-I am nervous.

-Good, I like that.

0:34:370:34:42

-You like that?

-Yeah.

0:34:420:34:44

First up, David's 19th-century snuffbox.

0:34:460:34:49

20 is bid for it. Any advance on 20?

0:34:490:34:51

-Come on.

-30. 35. 40. 45.

-Yes, good boy!

0:34:510:34:56

At £45. Down here, £50.

0:34:560:34:59

At £50. To the lady at £50.

0:34:590:35:01

Looking for some more here. At £50, all done.

0:35:010:35:03

-All finished at £50.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:35:030:35:05

-That's good. That's good.

-Good start.

0:35:050:35:08

-Are you happy?

-No. Not yet.

0:35:080:35:12

You should be. 150% profit. It's a great start!

0:35:120:35:16

Next, it's Anita's numerical printing and greeting card blocks.

0:35:180:35:23

-Here we go. Keep your fingers crossed.

-I will.

0:35:230:35:25

I'm bid £10. Madam, thank you. Any advance on £10?

0:35:250:35:28

Go down the King's Road, wouldn't buy you a block.

0:35:280:35:30

12 bid. 15. Oh, come along. 15 offered.

0:35:300:35:33

Right in front of me. Selling at 15.

0:35:330:35:35

-Oh.

-It's yours, madam, at £15. All done. Are we quite sure?

0:35:350:35:38

Wouldn't buy you a block, I'm telling you. 15, right in front.

0:35:380:35:41

-Going at £15, all done.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:35:410:35:43

Not a bad result.

0:35:430:35:44

Time for David's cast-iron hay grabber.

0:35:470:35:50

-Amway, let's go to the scrap dealer.

-£10 for it or are we going to pass?

0:35:500:35:54

-Oh, we've got it. 10 bid.

-£10? That's...

-Come on!

0:35:540:35:58

At 10 at the back of the room, sir. Your money and it's away.

0:35:580:36:01

-All finished at 10.

-Oh!

-Back of the room, an offer at 10.

0:36:010:36:03

All finished at £10. Selling at £10.

0:36:030:36:05

-I can't believe it!

-I can.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:36:050:36:08

-They've got no style.

-THEY LAUGH

0:36:080:36:12

So, a loss after auction costs and no sympathy from Anita.

0:36:130:36:17

-I loved you for buying that...

-Thank you.

-..piece of rubbish.

0:36:180:36:21

THEY LAUGH

0:36:210:36:23

Charming. Time, if you pardon the pun,

0:36:240:36:27

for Anita's Art Nouveau mantle clock.

0:36:270:36:30

10 is bid. Any advance on only 10?

0:36:300:36:33

12, 15, 17, 20.

0:36:330:36:35

-Come on!

-Ooh...

-At £20. Any advance at £20 for the lot?

0:36:350:36:40

Selling at £20. Right-hand side, at £20.

0:36:400:36:43

Are we finished? Think we are. Selling at 20. At 22. Not quite.

0:36:430:36:46

-Yes!

-Oh!

-At 25 on the right, standing at 25. You're out, madam.

0:36:460:36:50

-I've got 25. 27.

-Yes!

-Hello.

-27 seated. All finished at 27.

0:36:500:36:55

-All done. Sell for £27.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:36:550:36:58

-Oh, well done. Well done.

-Well done, indeed.

0:36:580:37:01

That's a decent profit.

0:37:010:37:04

David's Mouseman pieces have received all sorts of praise

0:37:040:37:08

-but how will his cheeseboard fare this morning?

-Is your heart beating?

0:37:080:37:13

10 bid. 15, 20, 25. At £25. Any advance on £25?

0:37:130:37:18

-30, 35, 40, 45...

-Come on, come on.

0:37:180:37:22

£45 against you, sir. It's got to go.

0:37:220:37:26

50 bid. At £50.

0:37:260:37:27

Looking for another 5. At 50 at the back then. Selling at 50.

0:37:270:37:30

-55.

-Yes, good, good, good.

0:37:300:37:34

55 at the back. 60.

0:37:340:37:36

And again, sir. At 65.

0:37:360:37:38

-At 65.

-Not climbing there.

-Hammer's up. At £65.

0:37:380:37:43

-No!

-GAVEL BANGS

0:37:430:37:44

-Ooh.

-Oh!

-£65.

0:37:440:37:46

It's still a profit for David, but less than expected.

0:37:480:37:51

Next, Anita's cut-glass scent bottle with the silver embossed top.

0:37:530:37:58

20 is bid. Any advance at 20?

0:38:000:38:02

-25, 30, 35.

-Oh.

0:38:020:38:05

40, 45, 50.

0:38:050:38:07

And again, sir. £50 to a lady at the back.

0:38:070:38:11

At £50. 55, 60.

0:38:110:38:14

At 60 in the distance then.

0:38:140:38:15

Going away at £60. Gents are out.

0:38:150:38:18

Selling here to a lady at £60, all done.

0:38:180:38:20

-GAVEL BANGS

-Nice one.

-Yeah.

0:38:200:38:22

A great profit, despite the missing stopper.

0:38:240:38:27

-Two more each to go.

-Two more.

-This is the telling section, isn't it?

0:38:290:38:34

It is, indeed.

0:38:340:38:36

David loves his vintage bicycle lighter, but will anyone else?

0:38:360:38:40

10 bid. Any advance on only 10?

0:38:410:38:43

At 10, 12, 15, 17.

0:38:430:38:48

At 17 for the lot then. Nearer me then, at 17.

0:38:480:38:51

-All finished at 17. You have it, sir.

-No!

0:38:510:38:54

All finished at 17. 20 bid. Not quite. 22? 22.

0:38:540:38:58

At 22 to a gent then. Quite sure at 22? Going to sell it to you, sir.

0:38:580:39:03

-Hammer's up at £22.

-Oh!

0:39:030:39:04

-GAVEL BANGS

-Ooh...

0:39:060:39:08

I thought someone else was going to come in then.

0:39:080:39:10

Sadly not. But every little helps, as they say.

0:39:100:39:14

Will Anita's collection of four gold brooches do any better?

0:39:150:39:19

-50 start. Any advance on 50?

-Oh, my gosh.

0:39:190:39:23

-60. 70, 80, 90.

-Yes!

-Seriously...

-100.

0:39:230:39:26

-And 10. 120. 125.

-Yes!

0:39:260:39:29

-130.

-Yes!

-At £130, lady at the back.

-Amazing.

0:39:290:39:34

£130. All out over this side.

0:39:340:39:36

Looking for another £5. Selling at 130. You have it, madam.

0:39:360:39:40

-Selling away now, at £130.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:39:400:39:44

-Yes!

-£130.

0:39:440:39:46

That's a great profit for Anita and her beloved brooches.

0:39:460:39:51

She's nearly tripled her money.

0:39:510:39:53

-I'm pleased at that.

-That's amazing. That is the best of the day so far.

0:39:530:39:57

Up next, it's David's Mouseman milking stool.

0:39:570:40:01

He spent a fair whack on this.

0:40:010:40:03

Let's hope it does better than the cheeseboard.

0:40:030:40:06

-You know I'm going to hold your hand, don't you?

-Oh...hold my hand.

0:40:060:40:11

Start me at £100 to go. 100 bid.

0:40:110:40:14

-£100!

-Come on.

-Any advance at £100? At £100 for the lot.

0:40:140:40:18

-120, 140. At £140.

-Come on!

0:40:180:40:23

Any advance for the stool? At £140.

0:40:230:40:25

-Looking for 160. Take a half, 150 bid.

-Come on!

0:40:250:40:28

-Accepted. 150 offered.

-Come on!

0:40:280:40:31

-At £150. Another £10 anywhere else?

-Go on!

-At £150.

0:40:310:40:34

-160 bid. New buyer.

-Oh, yes!

0:40:340:40:37

At £160. Yours in the middle of the room, sir, at £160.

0:40:370:40:40

Selling away then, in the middle of the room at £160.

0:40:400:40:43

GAVEL BANGS

0:40:430:40:44

-Well, that's all right. It's all right.

-Got my heart beating.

-I know!

0:40:440:40:49

Yours?! I'm surprised I'm still sat down.

0:40:490:40:52

I thought I'd be on the floor by now!

0:40:520:40:54

That profit has put David back in the game.

0:40:540:40:57

Maybe Anita does have the magic touch after all.

0:40:570:41:00

Anita's biggest buy, and perhaps biggest gamble,

0:41:020:41:05

was her slightly damaged tea set.

0:41:050:41:07

Listen, very best of luck with this one.

0:41:080:41:12

-10 bid. 15, 20, 25. At £25.

-There's still a long way to go.

0:41:120:41:16

Come along. 25 offered. 30. 35. 40.

0:41:160:41:20

At £40. Are you bidding, sir? 45.

0:41:200:41:23

-Come on.

-50. 55, 60, 65, 70.

0:41:230:41:27

-Gone, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

-80. Now, it's £80, corner right has it.

0:41:270:41:31

Any advance on £80 for the lot?

0:41:310:41:34

-Quite sure?

-That's a lot of money for that.

-It is a bit.

0:41:340:41:38

-Selling at £80.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:41:380:41:40

-That's very good.

-Ah.

-That's a good, healthy profit.

0:41:400:41:43

-I'm happy enough with that.

-Yeah.

0:41:430:41:45

And so she should be, considering how auctioneer Guy predicted it.

0:41:450:41:50

-Phew!

-Massive profit, massive profit.

0:41:500:41:52

It was a bit nail-biting at times.

0:41:520:41:55

I think we need to lie down.

0:41:550:41:57

-Separately, of course!

-Of course!

-Go on, you go.

0:41:570:41:59

Well, if you can remain vertical for now, chaps,

0:41:590:42:02

the results are as follows...

0:42:020:42:05

David started this leg with £385.86.

0:42:050:42:09

Today, he's made a solid profit of £36.74,

0:42:090:42:14

meaning he carries forward £422.60.

0:42:140:42:18

Nice cheesy grin, David, thank you.

0:42:180:42:21

Anita, meanwhile, emerges victorious. She started with £318.65.

0:42:220:42:27

After auction costs, she has made an incredible profit of £90.84.

0:42:270:42:33

So, although she's still trailing slightly behind David overall,

0:42:330:42:37

with £409.49, she has won the day.

0:42:370:42:41

That was exciting, David. Oh, thank you.

0:42:430:42:45

-You know what, you deserve that.

-What a gentleman.

-You deserve it.

0:42:450:42:48

-You are my hero, Anita. Ready?

-Yeah.

-Strap yourself in.

0:42:480:42:52

-Get ready for another adventure, eh?

-Yes, indeedy.

0:42:540:42:57

I, for one, cannot wait.

0:42:570:43:00

Next time, on Antiques Road Trip, Anita shows off her many talents...

0:43:010:43:05

# ..To Dundee. #

0:43:050:43:08

..while David sees something he really likes.

0:43:110:43:14

Ooh, I say! Fantastic!

0:43:140:43:16

Anita Manning and David Harper are halfway through their trip. After a successful last auction, David has the lead, but Anita is hot on his heels as they shop in Yorkshire and County Durham before heading into Newcastle for the auction.