Episode 14 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 14

Antiques challenge. It is the penultimate leg for antique hunters Anita Manning and David Harper as they start in Northumberland, England, and cross the border into Scotland.


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It's the nation's favourite antique experts...

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I don't know what to do!

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..with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction. But it is no mean feat.

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Back in the game!

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Charlie!

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There will be worthy winners

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and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Wow!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today marks the penultimate leg of the road trip for fancy pants

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David Harper and wily Anita Manning.

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Oh, Anita, does it get any more beautiful than this? Seriously!

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It becomes more and more beautiful the farther north you go.

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Listen, we are not in Scotland yet. This is Northumberland.

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-It is glorious!

-It's marvellous.

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Speaking of glorious, auctioneer Anita Manning might have decades

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of antiquing behind her, but she still has got a spring in her step.

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MUSIC: The Road To Dundee by Calum Kennedy

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-My first boyfriend used to sing that to me.

-Did he?

-That's true.

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I hope he's not watching.

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Ha!

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David always cuts a dash and is determined to pass on his

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expertise not just in antiques but fashion prowess to Anita.

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For the right price, of course.

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If it is really cheap, I'll buy it for her.

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It is 40 quid. She is not worth 40 quid.

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Oh, poor Anita!

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Our fanatic antiquing foragers are roaring their way up north

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in their beloved Morris Minor.

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You know what? I am so pleased as well that you are becoming

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reasonably fashionable with your yellow trousers, again.

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David, we are colour coordinated,

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but we do look a bit like a bunch of bananas.

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Our fruity fashionistas are currently neck-and-neck

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in the competition with just over £10 between them.

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They started the trip with £200 each.

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Anita now has £409.49

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to spend this time.

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David might have come in second at the last auction,

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but he is still in the overall lead with £422.60 to spend today.

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Well, I am absolutely willing to blow every pound

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if I see a chance of profit.

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-Would you do the same?

-I don't know.

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-I'm a bit more canny than you are.

-You are canny!

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-But I like your style, sir.

-Do you?

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Apparently so, as you appear to have borrowed a pair of his trousers.

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David and Anita are travelling

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over 700 miles from Ramsbottom,

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Lancashire, snaking their way up

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through Yorkshire all the way

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to Bonnie Scotland

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and the town of Paisley.

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Today's journey commences in Powburn, in Northumberland.

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And ends in Scotland, at an auction in the village of Kinbuck,

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near Dunblane.

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Here we are, David, Antiques Tea Room & Emporium.

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Perfect.

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-Coffees and teas all around.

-Life couldn't get any better.

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Well, it couldn't. Not with you, Anita. Not with you around.

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David and Anita are at Hedgeley Services this morning,

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in Powburn, shopping at two neighbouring establishments.

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If you need any help, David, give me a shout.

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OK, pop a kettle on.

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He is visiting Hedgeley Antiques Centre.

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And David is such a fan of Oriental artefacts,

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it doesn't take him long to find something right up his street.

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It is a wooden writing slope.

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South Chinese, Cantonese, probably during our Victorian period.

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Very symbolic. There we have, right on the front, chickens.

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The most important creature is the cockerel.

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Now it might just look decorative,

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but the cockerel is incredibly symbolic in Chinese culture,

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and he represents strength, vitality, masculinity.

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Everything that is strong and powerful about the male.

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It folds down, no doubt.

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Satinwood finish to the interior.

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Black velvet, which is probably original. Is it absolute stonker.

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And I need Jane.

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Yeah, don't we all? It's ticket price is £95.

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Is Jane prepared to do a deal?

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Right, Jane.

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I'm going to talk to you about this dreadful Chinese writing slope.

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-Yeah...

-I hate it!

-Right.

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-Yes.

-What could it be? I would love to pay 30.

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SHE LAUGHS

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I don't think so. I think we need a little bit more than that.

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-How much is a bit more than 30?

-Um...

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-50.

-40.

-SHE GASPS

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Um... Hm...

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Um...

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Can we do somewhere in the middle, 45?

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-I could not say no to that.

-Excellent.

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Cor, David was quick off the mark there.

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Anita is in the Village Tea Room & Emporium next door

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and has also found a couple of items she is keen on.

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Dealer Beryl is on hand to assist.

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-What I'm seeing here...

-Yes?

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..are the perfect accompaniments to the Antiques Road Trip.

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I have my picnic set for when we stop by the side of a wee loch

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and have a lovely picnic.

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And we have a picnic gramophone

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where we could have a dance.

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I can see where this is going.

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MUSIC: The Road To Dundee by Calum Kennedy

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-My first boyfriend used to sing that to me.

-Did he?

-It's true.

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I hope he's not watching.

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THEY LAUGH

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-He'd see a big difference.

-Oh?

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# To Dundee... #

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That...

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That was wonderful. But you are better looking than David Harper.

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I think that is a compliment.

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But is she actually going to buy anything?

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The gramophone is £55 and the picnic set, 38.

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The picnic set isn't of the finest quality.

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We don't have the container for the champagne.

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But it is quite nice and it has got a lovely period,

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vintage look about it.

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Wind-up gramophones are always great fun.

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I'm going to have another look around, but I might just go for them.

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Holiday time!

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Not quite ready to commit, Anita carries on browsing.

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David, meanwhile, has found another interesting object.

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Pretty naff kind of early 20th century,

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maybe 1930s, even '40s, ashtray.

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What I am interested in is actually what is underneath the glass base.

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And it is described as a glass and jade ashtray.

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There is your Jade.

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On the bottom.

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Hardly detailed at all, but actually, that is a good sign

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because with jade being a hard stone,

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it is incredibly difficult to carve.

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Green jade is the most common type of jadeite, but there

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are various colours such as

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lavender, red, yellow, black and white.

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It is priced at £6.50. So another one to think about.

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Now back with Anita. What's she up to now? Sight going?

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I've come outside to have a closer look at this wee posy holder.

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It was in a cabinet.

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It would've had two glass tubes

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coming out of these funnels here.

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Now, it's priced at ten pounds.

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If I can find a hallmark, if it is silver,

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at ten pounds, it is a bargain!

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The ten-pound ticket price suggests the item has been

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valued as silver-plated.

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A hallmark would mean it is silver and therefore more valuable.

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Oh, yes.

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People often miss it.

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It is almost indiscernible.

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But it is there.

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This could be a real find.

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Anita is also still interested in the picnic hamper

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and the gramophone. But is Beryl The Peril willing to negotiate?

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Now, if I am buying three things, I was wondering if I could have a deal.

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-Right.

-On the three things.

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Their combined ticket price is £103.

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But what I'd like to pay for the ensemble

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is between £45 and £55.

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For the ensemble.

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Using a French word isn't going to make that offer any less cheeky,

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Anita. Merci.

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How about 60?

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-60 for the three?

-For the three pieces.

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-Let's go for it.

-I think you'll be all right.

-I think I am fine.

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And I love the items.

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That is nearly a 50% discount,

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working out at 30 for the gramophone,

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20 for the picnic set and ten for the silver flower holder.

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Tres bien, Anita, cherie!

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-Shall I include that Road To Dundee for you?

-Oh, yes!

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-Oh, yes.

-You can play that at the auction.

-We can play that.

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-I can kid on it was one of my old boyfriend's.

-Yeah.

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MUSIC: The Road To Dundee by Calum Kennedy

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David, meanwhile, unsuspecting of being dumped for Calum Kennedy,

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is in shopping heaven.

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One of my biggest weaknesses in life is cars.

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Now this thing, a car horn,

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dates way back to the early days of the car.

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A bit like the lamps that I bought not very long ago,

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which did a bit of a bomber.

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Oh, yes. That was their first auction.

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To tell you the truth, I'm surprised they went that far.

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Oh, charming(!)

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It is not exactly any old item, but for Anita,

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it will certainly fall into that category.

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She will hate this with a passion, which makes me love it even more.

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So it is a brass horn

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made for a vintage car, early 20th century.

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I don't know, probably Edwardian.

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Something like that. With its, I think,

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original little rubber squeezer, whatever you call it.

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It feels really dry. And brittle.

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There is quite a bit of damage on the rubber,

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but David seems undeterred.

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Perhaps because it is priced at just ten pounds.

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Now then.

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-We have an ashtray with a bit of old jade.

-Right.

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-And a bit of old iron/brass.

-THEY LAUGH

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-OK.

-Once part of a vintage car. I want them both very desperately.

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That's right, David, keep your cards close to your chest.

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The combined ticket price of the two items is £16.50.

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-Well, what about rounding it to 15?

-I am absolutely delighted.

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-Excellent.

-Thank you.

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Three things on my account very quickly!

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Very quick indeed.

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So that is £6.50 for the ashtray and £8.50 for the car horn,

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bringing David's total spend at this shop,

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with the Chinese writing box, to £60.

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Our duo are now heading about 30 miles north to the beautiful

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walled town of Berwick-upon-Tweed,

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just a few miles south

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of the Scottish border.

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In the medieval period, the town was captured

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and sacked 13 times, passing between English and Scottish

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rule until eventually falling under the control of England in 1482.

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It's great walls were originally created to keep out invading Scots.

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Ironically, the town is still home to the barracks

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and museum of the King's Own Scottish Borderers.

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I can't wait to get inside and for you to show me around.

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Come on, let's go.

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MARCHING DRUMS PLAY

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Anita is meeting the hugely enthusiastic

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Colonel Colin Hogg to learn about the important role

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that Scottish pipers have played

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in this regiment's history.

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During this time,

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these brave men were on the front line, leading the troops

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on with nothing but their pipes into hundreds of bloody battles.

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So formed in the 17th century,

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but I believe their regiment has been

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involved in all major conflicts since that time.

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Yes, ever since, really, the Battle of Killiecrankie.

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Through to Culloden.

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And then the Boer War.

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The First World War.

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The Second World War.

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And indeed, Afghanistan of late.

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-So it is still a major force.

-Yes.

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I believe that pipers have played

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a major part in this regiment.

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What did the piper do? Why was the piper there?

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On through history, there were pipers.

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What were they there for?

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Well, they certainly made you get up and go.

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I find that there is nothing more stirring

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than the sound of the pipes.

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Their music was like a war cry, rallying the troops into battle.

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It served to boost morale but also to intimidate the enemy.

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There are stories of Germans saying, you know, "What is it?

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-"These devils in kilts."

-Is that what they were called?

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"I'm putting my hands up."

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But there weren't enough of them always to be there and always

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to be in the front line, where they could be picked off very easily.

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So they were quite often used as stretcher bearers, runners,

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medics in the wider sense of the word.

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Or indeed riflemen themselves.

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Possibly one of the bloodiest conflicts the pipers had to

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endure was at the start of the 20th century.

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What would it have been like to be a piper in the First World War?

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I think it must've been terrifying.

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I mean, to get up over the trench,

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parapet, and blow,

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and you are an easy target.

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I don't how they did it.

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With just their bagpipes,

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the weaponless pipers would lead the charge into the battle.

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With no means of defending themselves, their death rate

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was extremely high.

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During the First World War, over 1,000 pipers were killed,

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not helped by the introduction of poisonous gas.

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-There would have been fire, open fire going on.

-Open fire, gas.

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"Oh, there is the piper."

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He would have to take his gas mask off and play

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while the others, in the trenches, probably kept theirs on.

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Such incredible bravery resulted in the pipers being awarded

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over 100 of the most revered medals during the First World War.

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One of the most famous pipers was Danielle Laidlaw

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of the Seventh Battalion.

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During the Battle of Loos in 1915,

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morale was at rock bottom

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and the heavy fire and witnessing the heavy smog of poisonous gas

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for the first time,

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the troops were hanging back from going over the top.

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In spite of the dangers, Laidlaw was ordered out of the trenches.

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Lieutenant Young, Platoon Commander,

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turned to Laidlaw and said,

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"For God's sake, Laidlaw, pipe them forward!"

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And Laidlaw went out of his trenches,

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took his gas mask off and started playing.

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And he started playing a regimental march, Blue Bonnets Over The Border.

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And the jocks were stirred.

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Something said inside them, "I'm going over."

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An up they got.

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And forward they went.

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Whilst the Battle of Loos was considered a German victory,

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Laidlaw's music spurred his regiment out of the trenches,

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subsequently gaining valuable ground.

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Laidlaw was shot in both legs during the conflict

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but miraculously survived and

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became known as the Piper of Loos.

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Although wounded, he recovered

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and was to be awarded the Victoria Cross that day.

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He was also awarded the Croix de Guerre,

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with palm,

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and he was also promoted from piper to corporal.

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The history of the Laidlaw pipers did not stop there,

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as Daniel's nephew, Jock Laidlaw, is believed to be the last ever

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Army piper to lead British troops into battle in 1945.

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Although the days of the pipers on the front line

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are now in the past and their role is strictly ceremonial,

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the memory of their bravery is proudly preserved

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by the King's Own Scottish Borderers.

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David is just across the river in Tweedmouth. He still has just

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over £360 left to spend and is visiting Berwick Antique Centre.

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Good on him.

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-Dave.

-Dave, nice to meet you.

-Great to meet you.

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What a day, what a place.

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-So what have we got here?

-Right, we have a cafe.

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If you spend more than ten pound, you get a free cup of coffee.

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Very good, OK.

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Not that David ever needs any encouragement to spend.

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I love this building, it just -

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you can hear it - it just creaks.

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It is like being on an old boat.

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It has got such an atmosphere.

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I just love it.

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These are the kind of places that you could find...anything.

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And speaking of anything...

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See, I absolutely love that.

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Have you any idea what you think this could be?

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So it's bronze.

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Fantastically detailed. It is obviously Oriental.

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Is made mainly for a female, even though it is very heavy.

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And it is, you may be surprised to hear...

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..a mirror.

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That's it.

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The bronze would be highly polished, and that is your reflective mirror.

0:18:380:18:43

Mirrors today form part of our everyday lives,

0:18:440:18:48

but historically, they were rare and expensive commodities.

0:18:480:18:51

And the bronze mirror is not the only thing to catch David's eye.

0:18:510:18:55

So what have we got there? We have got a mahogany Georgian-style chair.

0:18:550:18:59

I love the tapestry seat.

0:18:590:19:01

That is not period,

0:19:010:19:03

I don't think, but it has got age.

0:19:030:19:06

But is it actually a Georgian chair?

0:19:060:19:08

The biggest telltale, really, for a period chair

0:19:080:19:11

are the internal blocks.

0:19:110:19:13

So we have the hand-cut, rounded blocks that keep the chair together.

0:19:130:19:19

So I can tell you, categorically,

0:19:190:19:21

that this chair is a period George III chair made

0:19:210:19:26

in about 1770 from solid mahogany.

0:19:260:19:31

What is it worth?

0:19:310:19:32

£24.

0:19:350:19:36

£24...

0:19:390:19:42

for a period Georgian mahogany chair

0:19:420:19:45

is absolutely bonkers.

0:19:450:19:47

Beyond belief.

0:19:470:19:49

I have got to buy that chair.

0:19:490:19:51

That would be dealer Stephen's cue.

0:19:510:19:54

I mean, to be honest with you,

0:19:540:19:56

I priced it because I wasn't sure about it.

0:19:560:20:00

If you think it is a genuine, I think it is

0:20:000:20:02

probably worth more than £25, but I'll do it for 20.

0:20:020:20:05

Well, and I obviously get a massive cup of coffee.

0:20:050:20:08

-You could have a mug.

-Do I get a bit of cake as well?

0:20:080:20:11

-A slice of cake.

-Perfect. Done deal.

0:20:110:20:14

Thank you very much, Steve, you are a delight.

0:20:140:20:17

Pushing your luck a bit there, David.

0:20:170:20:19

And there is still one more item to discuss.

0:20:190:20:22

Well, this actually came out of The Hermitage at Hexham, which this

0:20:230:20:27

is two old ladies that have lived in this house for about 100 years.

0:20:270:20:31

It was a family house.

0:20:310:20:33

So that is its provenance.

0:20:330:20:34

It probably is from that sort of an era, so...

0:20:340:20:37

I think it has got a great history,

0:20:370:20:39

and I totally believe it.

0:20:390:20:41

It makes me feel confident that I could describe it

0:20:410:20:44

as early 20th century.

0:20:440:20:46

Its ticket price is £140. Much more than David would like to pay.

0:20:460:20:51

I would want that to owe me...

0:20:510:20:54

£40 or £50.

0:20:540:20:56

To stand a chance of it taking off.

0:20:560:20:59

£70 and I can do a deal.

0:21:020:21:03

Let's see if the polishes up all right.

0:21:030:21:06

And if it does, I'll have it for 60, how is that?

0:21:060:21:11

-OK.

-Whoa!

0:21:110:21:12

Time for a bit of spit and polish.

0:21:120:21:15

Are you ready to see yourself...

0:21:150:21:17

-No, thanks.

-..reflected

0:21:170:21:20

in a Japanese bronze geisha girl's mirror?

0:21:200:21:23

-Are you ready for it?

-I'm ready.

0:21:230:21:25

You are going to look stunning!

0:21:250:21:27

-That would be a first.

-THEY LAUGH

0:21:270:21:31

TINKLING

0:21:310:21:33

Absolutely gorgeous, Stephen.

0:21:330:21:34

-It wasn't a mirror before.

-I think you got a bargain.

0:21:340:21:37

Now it is a mirror.

0:21:370:21:38

-Well done. £60.

-Thank you very much.

0:21:400:21:42

David spent a total of £80 on two items in this centre

0:21:420:21:46

and got his free cake and coffee.

0:21:460:21:48

Not a bad way to make a living.

0:21:480:21:51

And that marks the end of a day's rip-roaring

0:21:510:21:54

adventure for our daring duo.

0:21:540:21:57

Nighty-night.

0:21:570:21:58

Morning has broken.

0:22:020:22:04

It is a new day and a whole new country. We think.

0:22:040:22:07

Anita, I think you'd better announce where we are.

0:22:070:22:12

I think we might be in Scotland now.

0:22:120:22:15

Well, come on, show a bit of enthusiasm!

0:22:150:22:17

We have been working our way up here.

0:22:170:22:20

I thought you'd be absolutely celebrating and going wild.

0:22:200:22:23

Well, I mean, I know we must be in Scotland,

0:22:230:22:27

but there are no border patrols.

0:22:270:22:30

Lucky for you, because those outfits are just criminal.

0:22:300:22:34

In spite of Anita's confusion, we have indeed crossed the border.

0:22:350:22:39

Yesterday, in England... Nice hat, Anita!

0:22:390:22:42

..she bought three themed items - a portable picnic gramophone

0:22:420:22:46

with record, a vintage picnic set and a silver flower holder.

0:22:460:22:50

Today, she has just under £350 left to spend.

0:22:500:22:54

David, meanwhile, bought five lots -

0:22:540:22:57

a 19th-century Chinese writing box,

0:22:570:22:59

a Chinese jade plaque made into an ashtray,

0:22:590:23:02

an early brass car motor horn,

0:23:020:23:05

a George III mahogany chair and a Japanese bronze hand mirror.

0:23:050:23:08

He has just over £280 left to spend today.

0:23:080:23:12

David and Anita have travelled inland to Duns,

0:23:130:23:17

believed to be the birthplace of 13th century religious philosopher

0:23:170:23:21

John Duns Scotus, from whom the word dunce was derived.

0:23:210:23:27

During the Reformation, Protestants declared that to follow his

0:23:270:23:30

Catholic beliefs and old-fashioned theories was simply foolish.

0:23:300:23:34

A little antique centre, both of us together.

0:23:340:23:37

-Don't be following me about.

-Happy days(!)

0:23:370:23:40

David and Anita are sharing the shop floor this morning.

0:23:400:23:44

David, you go that way.

0:23:440:23:47

-As far as I can.

-As far as you can go.

0:23:470:23:49

-For miles.

-For miles.

-For miles.

0:23:490:23:52

-But good luck, darling.

-Yeah, right!

0:23:520:23:55

Right, well, I am pretty safe, really.

0:23:550:23:58

I've got five cracking objects.

0:23:580:24:01

The idea here is to scan this place and see if I can find something

0:24:010:24:06

to add to one of my lots to make it much more appealing and desirable.

0:24:060:24:11

Anita, meanwhile, only has three lots.

0:24:110:24:14

But there is something that has already piqued her interest.

0:24:140:24:17

This is rather a nice, sweet thing.

0:24:190:24:21

It is a wee treen stuff box.

0:24:210:24:23

But what makes it special is the horseshoe motif.

0:24:230:24:28

One to think about.

0:24:280:24:31

Across the shop, David is buttering up dealer John.

0:24:310:24:34

-Now, listen, I've got a bit of a cunning plan here.

-Right.

0:24:340:24:38

-I've got this lovely Chinese writing box.

-Right.

0:24:380:24:41

-It doesn't have any inkwells in it.

-Right.

0:24:410:24:44

I might be looking for something like an inkwell.

0:24:440:24:46

Just something to lash it up a little.

0:24:460:24:50

Lucky for David, John has got just the ticket,

0:24:500:24:52

or inkwell if you like.

0:24:520:24:54

-Right, David, just come through.

-Right, OK.

-I think...

0:24:540:24:58

-This is the one I was thinking of.

-OK, let's have a look.

0:24:580:25:00

-That is a nice little one.

-OK.

0:25:000:25:02

-So we have a little probably early 20th century...

-The old charmer!

0:25:020:25:07

He doesn't just chat up the birds, he chats up the guys as well.

0:25:090:25:13

Listen, honestly, take no notice of her, John.

0:25:130:25:16

-How are you doing, darling?

-Not so bad.

0:25:160:25:18

Well, I was doing all right until you said something.

0:25:180:25:20

Anyway, back to the inkwell. Its ticket price is eight pounds.

0:25:210:25:25

How much is it to me? Is it a pound or two?

0:25:260:25:29

Well, normally, we don't really do much for discount below ten,

0:25:290:25:32

but we could do four with that?

0:25:320:25:35

He is a right charmer.

0:25:350:25:37

-Three to you.

-It's getting better! It's getting better!

0:25:380:25:42

I'll just pause a bit longer.

0:25:420:25:44

Buy something for three pounds.

0:25:440:25:46

-Two then.

-Oh!

-Two pounds! Two pounds.

0:25:460:25:49

Do you know what, can't say no to that. Thank you very much.

0:25:490:25:52

So another item in the old bag for David,

0:25:520:25:55

leaving John free to give his full attention to Anita.

0:25:550:25:59

-There is a wee snuffbox in here.

-Oh, yeah, that is lovely, that.

0:25:590:26:03

-Which I liked.

-Yes, it is nice.

-It is like a hardwood, almost a rosewood.

0:26:030:26:08

But what I like about it is the little horseshoes

0:26:080:26:11

-and your little whip there.

-Yeah, the little crop.

0:26:110:26:13

-I think that is quite nice.

-Yeah, it is.

-Is there a very, very,

0:26:130:26:17

very good deal that you could do me

0:26:170:26:19

-on that little snuffbox?

-I'm sure I could do something.

0:26:190:26:21

-I am used to these Glaswegian persuasive powers.

-Oh, right!

0:26:210:26:24

-My wife is from Glasgow.

-Oh, right!

0:26:240:26:26

Wise man. Its ticket price is £45.

0:26:260:26:30

I am looking for in the region of kind of 18...£18.

0:26:300:26:37

Oooh, 18. I don't know if I could do 18.

0:26:370:26:40

I was thinking 28.

0:26:400:26:44

-Could you come to 20?

-I think we could, yes.

-Could you do that?

0:26:440:26:49

-Yes, to give you help.

-That's lovely.

-That's lovely, thank you.

0:26:490:26:53

-Thank you very much.

-There we go.

-I like that. It is a nice, sweet thing.

0:26:530:26:56

-Yes.

-Nice, sweet thing. All we need is a snuff-taking horseman.

0:26:560:27:01

It might happen, Anita.

0:27:010:27:03

So for just £20, John has come through again

0:27:030:27:06

with a cracking discount.

0:27:060:27:07

And that is Anita's fourth item done and dusted.

0:27:070:27:10

David has travelled 30 miles north to Dunbar,

0:27:140:27:17

a seaside town on the southeast coast of Scotland.

0:27:170:27:21

Dunbar is the birthplace of one of the founding fathers of the

0:27:210:27:25

environmental movement - world renowned conservationist John Muir.

0:27:250:27:30

In his autobiography, he describes with great affection

0:27:300:27:33

his childhood pursuits here in the 1840s.

0:27:330:27:36

It is not hard to see how this spectacular coastline

0:27:360:27:39

and beautiful countryside inspired his passion in nature.

0:27:390:27:43

To find out more about this remarkable man,

0:27:430:27:45

David is taking a stroll along a stretch of land named

0:27:450:27:49

in his honour with Joe Mullen,

0:27:490:27:51

museum officer of John Muir's Birthplace.

0:27:510:27:54

-David, welcome to Dunbar.

-Well, thank you very much.

0:27:550:27:59

My gosh, what a view!

0:27:590:28:01

This is perfect for exploring John Muir's playground.

0:28:010:28:04

He spent the first ten years of his life in Dunbar.

0:28:040:28:08

You can see, can't you, that this

0:28:080:28:09

environment would also stimulate an amazing imagination?

0:28:090:28:12

Oh, the imagination, but also his passion for the nature

0:28:120:28:16

and wildlife around him. Him and his boyhood friends

0:28:160:28:19

would talk about the birds' nests that they could find.

0:28:190:28:22

And they would have competitions to see who knew the most birds,

0:28:220:28:26

who knew the most nests.

0:28:260:28:28

Another major influence in John Muir's life

0:28:280:28:31

was his grandfather, who not only taught him about nature

0:28:310:28:34

but also helped to educate him.

0:28:340:28:36

His grandfather taught him his letters and numbers.

0:28:360:28:40

From walks on the high street, they would go down the street

0:28:400:28:43

looking at the shop signs and the numbers on the clock tower

0:28:430:28:46

at the townhouse. And that is how he learned his first numbers

0:28:460:28:49

and letters, before he went off to school at the age of three.

0:28:490:28:52

John's education, however, ended abruptly, aged ten,

0:28:520:28:57

when his father decided to move to Wisconsin, in America,

0:28:570:29:01

where he was forced to work on the family farm.

0:29:010:29:05

John was set to the plough. His life was hard work and labour.

0:29:050:29:09

But he still had this passion to learn.

0:29:090:29:11

But Father was a devout religious man and Father

0:29:110:29:14

believed the only book you should have in the house was the Bible.

0:29:140:29:17

Self-educated, John eventually gained a place at university, where

0:29:170:29:21

his gift for inventions resulted in him procuring employment

0:29:210:29:25

in factories.

0:29:250:29:26

While he was working in one of those factories,

0:29:260:29:29

he had an accident that was to change the course of his life.

0:29:290:29:33

He was...

0:29:330:29:35

He was using a file to tension a belt and it slipped

0:29:350:29:38

and pierced his eye.

0:29:380:29:39

Blinded for several weeks, this accident made him

0:29:390:29:43

re-evaluate his life. He decided to devote his time

0:29:430:29:46

to exploring nature rather than the man-made creations

0:29:460:29:50

he had been focusing on.

0:29:500:29:51

He set off on 1,000-mile walk from Indiana to the Gulf of Mexico,

0:29:530:29:57

by the wildest, leafiest route that he could find.

0:29:570:30:01

After this epic journey,

0:30:010:30:02

he travelled to the West Coast, where he fell in love with

0:30:020:30:06

the Sierra Nevada and Yosemite and became devoted to protecting it.

0:30:060:30:11

His ability to see how everything in the universe is hitched together.

0:30:110:30:15

He could see that if you clear felled forest on a steep slope,

0:30:150:30:20

you would then have problems with soil stability.

0:30:200:30:23

You'd get erosion, which would have an impact on water quality

0:30:230:30:26

further downstream, which would have a knock-on effect elsewhere.

0:30:260:30:29

-Somebody way ahead of his time.

-Oh, definitely.

0:30:290:30:32

John became famous in the States through his writing.

0:30:320:30:36

In 1890, he wrote two articles, published in Century Magazine,

0:30:360:30:40

pushing for National Park status for Yosemite.

0:30:400:30:44

And that same year, it was granted.

0:30:440:30:47

He realised very early on that was crucially important was to make

0:30:470:30:51

other people, or help other people,

0:30:510:30:53

become as passionate about wild places as he was.

0:30:530:30:56

In 1892, he founded the Sierra Club,

0:30:560:30:58

the world's largest grass root environmental organisation,

0:30:580:31:04

of which he was president for life.

0:31:040:31:06

His passion was so contagious of that in 1903,

0:31:060:31:09

fellow nature lover President Roosevelt wrote to him,

0:31:090:31:12

requesting a camping trip in Yosemite.

0:31:120:31:15

John and the president set out on a camping trip with no other support.

0:31:150:31:20

No security, no media, no other things you would expect

0:31:200:31:23

today of a presidential visit.

0:31:230:31:25

And they went off.

0:31:250:31:26

John took him into the backcountry of Yosemite

0:31:260:31:29

to experience it first-hand.

0:31:290:31:32

As a result of that camping trip,

0:31:320:31:34

there was a bill passed that put in place the protection

0:31:340:31:38

that was needed for Yosemite National Park.

0:31:380:31:41

-Quite a seal of approval there.

-Oh, definitely.

0:31:410:31:43

Whilst Yellowstone was in fact the first national park, the bill

0:31:430:31:48

Roosevelt went on to pass afforded Yosemite even greater protection.

0:31:480:31:53

National parks now exist all over the world, with 15 in the UK.

0:31:530:31:57

Hard to believe that from such humble but beautiful origins

0:31:590:32:02

came perhaps the greatest pioneering conservationist of modern times.

0:32:020:32:07

Anita has made her way to the beautiful riverside

0:32:090:32:13

town of Jedburgh,

0:32:130:32:15

where Mary Queen of Scots resided in 1566.

0:32:150:32:18

She has got just under £330 left to spend

0:32:180:32:22

and is meeting dealer Mary in Bygone Days Antiques.

0:32:220:32:27

The sun is shining, so why are you eyeing up some snowshoes, old girl?

0:32:270:32:31

I can't stop looking at these snowshoes.

0:32:310:32:35

THEY LAUGH

0:32:350:32:38

Because they are so quirky. They are so quirky.

0:32:380:32:42

-A wee bit of damage on them.

-Yes, on the toe.

0:32:420:32:45

And old attached ticket says "Snowshoe Club, Montreal, 1889."

0:32:450:32:51

Is it something that sells well?

0:32:510:32:53

THEY LAUGH

0:32:530:32:56

-Sorry.

-Have you had them for a wee while?

-I have, yes.

0:32:560:33:00

-You have?

-Would you like to look at them?

0:33:000:33:02

It is certainly a change from Anita's normal choice of jewellery.

0:33:040:33:07

Oh, careful! Oh.

0:33:090:33:11

It is beginning to be tempting. They're a wee bit quirky.

0:33:120:33:17

That's why I'm drawn to them. And who knows the price of them?

0:33:170:33:21

Mary, probably. Ticket price is £100.

0:33:210:33:25

-Could I make you a daft offer?

-Oh, you can try me.

0:33:250:33:28

Could these be bought for £25?

0:33:280:33:31

Is Mary going to throw her out of the shop?

0:33:320:33:35

OK then, yeah.

0:33:350:33:37

-Are you going to go for it?

-I will, yes.

-Thank you very much.

0:33:370:33:41

Yeah, crikey!

0:33:410:33:43

Mary is obviously feeling generous.

0:33:430:33:44

For just a quarter of their original price,

0:33:470:33:49

Anita is now the proud owner of a pair of the Victorian snowshoes.

0:33:490:33:53

This now joins her gramophone with record, vintage picnic set,

0:33:530:33:57

silver flower holder and treen snuffbox.

0:33:570:34:00

She spent just £105.

0:34:000:34:04

David has erred on the frugal side,

0:34:040:34:06

spending just £142.

0:34:060:34:09

For this, he has bought a 19th-century lacquer writing slope

0:34:090:34:12

with inkwell now,

0:34:120:34:14

A jade 20th-century ashtray, a motorcar horn,

0:34:140:34:18

a George III mahogany chair, and a Japanese bronze mirror.

0:34:180:34:21

Oh, I say, fantastic!

0:34:210:34:24

If you say so, David.

0:34:240:34:26

It is the end of another shopping spree. But what are their thoughts?

0:34:260:34:30

The highest profit, I think,

0:34:310:34:33

is probably going to come from the old silver epergne.

0:34:330:34:36

Very late 19th century.

0:34:360:34:38

It is missing its glass bits, but for a tenner,

0:34:380:34:40

she is going to make some money.

0:34:400:34:43

Ashtrays are not popular.

0:34:430:34:46

Smoking is not PC.

0:34:460:34:49

So that type of item isn't great in this market.

0:34:490:34:53

But the addition of the -

0:34:530:34:55

some people call it jade - that might attract people to it.

0:34:550:34:59

It is that all-important auction day.

0:35:000:35:02

And this morning, we are in the village of Kinbuck,

0:35:020:35:05

just four miles north of the Scottish

0:35:050:35:07

cathedral town of Dunblane.

0:35:070:35:09

But sadly, due to a family emergency,

0:35:090:35:12

David will be missing today's auction.

0:35:120:35:14

David isn't with us today.

0:35:140:35:16

But I will be rooting for his items, tooting them on,

0:35:160:35:20

but not too much as I want to win.

0:35:200:35:23

Yes!

0:35:230:35:24

Today's auction is taking place at Robertsons Auctioneers,

0:35:240:35:27

and our auctioneer today is Struan Robinson.

0:35:270:35:30

The vintage picnic set. I think this is really nice. It's complete.

0:35:300:35:34

You could take it straight out, have a picnic with it if you wanted.

0:35:340:35:37

I would say the Oriental bronze mirror with the polished front,

0:35:370:35:41

I think that is my favourite.

0:35:410:35:43

Something a bit different.

0:35:430:35:44

I think that might make the highest out of the lot today.

0:35:440:35:48

David and Anita have just over ten pounds between them

0:35:480:35:51

in this competition, so there is everything to play for today.

0:35:510:35:55

The room is packed!

0:35:550:35:57

Let the auction commence.

0:35:570:35:59

First up, it is Anita's gramophone with record.

0:36:010:36:05

Now, this is a really nice piece here.

0:36:050:36:06

You've even got the record there,

0:36:060:36:08

you can go straight out into the grass and have a wee listen. OK?

0:36:080:36:11

And if you really want, OK, take Jamie with it.

0:36:110:36:13

And Jamie can serenade you as you are sitting, having your picnic

0:36:130:36:17

listening to your music, OK?

0:36:170:36:19

-£30. 30 bid.

-He started at 30, that's good.

0:36:190:36:23

34. 36. 38. 40.

0:36:230:36:26

-45. 50.

-Yes!

0:36:260:36:29

Advance on 50? 55. 60.

0:36:290:36:31

Advance on 60? Advance on £60?

0:36:310:36:34

All out on 60, then.

0:36:340:36:36

That is good, £60. I'm happy with that.

0:36:360:36:41

That's the sweet, sweet sound of a profit. Bravo, Anita.

0:36:410:36:44

Next, it is David's 20th-century brass car horn.

0:36:460:36:51

-£15. Ten pounds, not dropping. Come on, ten pounds.

-Ten, we are started.

0:36:510:36:55

He is in profit already.

0:36:550:36:57

Advance on 10? 12. 14. 16.

0:36:570:37:00

18. Advance on 18? Still cheap, guys.

0:37:000:37:02

Advance on 18?

0:37:020:37:04

All out on 18, then.

0:37:040:37:05

£18, that is not bad.

0:37:050:37:09

I am sure David would be pleased.

0:37:090:37:12

Not sure he will be. But he has doubled his money there.

0:37:120:37:15

Will Anita's vintage picnic set fair any better, though?

0:37:150:37:19

Now, if you bought the picnic gramophone earlier, OK,

0:37:190:37:22

what a lovely wee accompaniment.

0:37:220:37:23

OK? And again, you'll have Jamie with you.

0:37:230:37:26

He'll sing along and he will actually feed you grapes as well,

0:37:260:37:28

OK? So you have got all that there, OK?

0:37:280:37:32

25 then. £25. £25.

0:37:320:37:34

-25 bid.

-26. 28. 30.

0:37:340:37:37

32. £32. Advance on 32?

0:37:370:37:39

34. 36.

0:37:390:37:41

£36. Advance on 36? Still cheap. 38.

0:37:410:37:44

£38. 40. Advance on 40? Next is 5.

0:37:440:37:48

Advanced on 45? 50. Advance on 50?

0:37:480:37:51

Advance on £50? Advance on 50?

0:37:510:37:53

Keep that open there, Jamie. Keep enticing her. Advance on 50?

0:37:530:37:56

Advance on £50? Jamie is worth it. All out on 50 then.

0:37:560:37:59

£50, that is not bad.

0:37:590:38:02

It is no picnic making profits at auction.

0:38:030:38:06

That is another good buy for Anita, though.

0:38:060:38:08

Now for something with significantly more age -

0:38:080:38:12

David's George III mahogany chair.

0:38:120:38:14

And I'll start the bidding off at 30. Advance on 30?

0:38:140:38:17

-In at 30.

-Advance on 30? Advance on £30?

0:38:170:38:20

All right on 30 then. Last chance at 30.

0:38:200:38:24

Maiden bid at 30. That is not too bad at all.

0:38:240:38:28

Quite right.

0:38:280:38:29

Who says brown furniture is not that popular at the moment?

0:38:290:38:32

Cos that is actually quite a decent profit.

0:38:320:38:33

Something both experts thought was a great find,

0:38:350:38:38

though, was Anita's silver flower holder.

0:38:380:38:41

That is my best item and I am really interested to see how far it will go.

0:38:410:38:46

I am hoping for great things on this little one.

0:38:460:38:50

And I'll start the bidding off at 80. At 80.

0:38:500:38:52

-Yes!

-85. 90. 95.

0:38:520:38:55

One. 110 with you.

0:38:550:38:57

Advance on 110? Advance on £110?

0:38:570:39:00

All out on 110, then.

0:39:000:39:02

-Last chance on 110.

-110! 120!

-120.

0:39:020:39:04

Advance on 120? 130.

0:39:040:39:06

Advance on 130? Advance on £130?

0:39:060:39:09

-140.

-140.

0:39:090:39:11

Advance on 140? Advance on £140?

0:39:110:39:14

All out at 140, then.

0:39:140:39:16

140! What a result!

0:39:160:39:19

Yes! That's an amazing profit and a great find. Well done, Anita.

0:39:190:39:23

Lesson there - look for the hallmarks.

0:39:230:39:26

They can be underneath a piece of embossed work.

0:39:260:39:30

Will David's jade based ashtray do as well?

0:39:300:39:34

He paid very little for it.

0:39:340:39:36

It is going to do well.

0:39:360:39:38

Ten, I'm not dropping. Come on, guys. It has got to be worth that.

0:39:380:39:40

-Ten bid. An advance on ten?

-Ten, it is started.

-Come on, guys, bid.

0:39:400:39:44

-Advance on ten? 12. £12. 14. 14.

-It's climbing.

0:39:440:39:48

Advance on 14? Advance on £14? All out on 14, then.

0:39:480:39:52

£14. Well, it's still profit.

0:39:520:39:54

Another small profit there. David needs a big win to catch up.

0:39:550:39:59

Next, it is Anita's treen snuffbox.

0:40:010:40:05

-25 starts it then. 25 bid.

-25! 25.

0:40:050:40:08

30. 32. £32.

0:40:080:40:10

-34.

-We are in profit.

-Advance on 34?

0:40:100:40:13

Advance on £34? All out on 34, then.

0:40:130:40:17

I am happy enough with that. £34.

0:40:170:40:20

That was probably just about the right price for it.

0:40:200:40:23

If you are happy, then I am happy too, Anita.

0:40:230:40:27

I am soaring ahead at the moment.

0:40:270:40:30

But David has his two best items to go.

0:40:300:40:35

Speaking of which, it is David's writing box with the inkwell.

0:40:350:40:40

-50 bid.

-50 bid! 50.

-Advance on £50?

0:40:400:40:42

55. 60.

0:40:420:40:44

65. 70. £70. Advance on 70?

0:40:440:40:48

Advance on £70? All out on 70, then.

0:40:480:40:50

Not a bad profit.

0:40:500:40:52

Not bad indeed. David will be sad to be missing the excitement.

0:40:540:40:58

-Time for Anita's snowshoes.

-I'll start the bidding off than at £20.

0:40:590:41:04

Advance on 20? 22. 24. 26.

0:41:040:41:06

-There is a wee bit of interest in there.

-30.

0:41:060:41:08

£30. 32. 34.

0:41:080:41:12

£34. An advance on 34?

0:41:120:41:14

Advance on £34? Still cheap, guys.

0:41:140:41:16

Nice gear at £34.

0:41:160:41:18

All out on 34, then.

0:41:180:41:20

That is good enough, I am happy with that.

0:41:200:41:23

Anita is having a great day today.

0:41:230:41:25

David's biggest spend and most quirky item -

0:41:250:41:28

his Japanese bronze mirror - is up next. Stand by.

0:41:280:41:31

This could be a flyer.

0:41:330:41:35

£40.

0:41:350:41:36

£30, then. Come on. £30, guys. 30 bid. Advance on 30?

0:41:360:41:40

32. 34. 36. 38. 40.

0:41:400:41:45

45. Advance on 45? 50.

0:41:450:41:49

-Yes. Come on.

-Advance on 50? Advance on £50?

0:41:490:41:51

Advance on 50? All out on 50, then?

0:41:510:41:55

Oh, £50. Didn't quite make it.

0:41:550:41:59

In fact, you could call it a sad reflection.

0:41:590:42:01

He'd be disappointed with that.

0:42:010:42:04

Better luck next time. Onwards and upwards.

0:42:040:42:07

David started today with £422.60.

0:42:080:42:13

He has made a small profit of £7.24 after auction costs.

0:42:130:42:17

He takes forward £429.84.

0:42:170:42:23

Anita, however, has had a great auction today.

0:42:230:42:26

She started with £409.49 and after costs,

0:42:260:42:30

she made a profit of £155.76, meaning she takes

0:42:300:42:35

the lead from David with £565.25 to spend on their final adventure.

0:42:350:42:41

That auction went terrifically well for me

0:42:450:42:48

and I am absolutely delighted.

0:42:480:42:50

David might be lagging behind,

0:42:500:42:53

but he has still got a healthy budget going forward.

0:42:530:42:56

Safe home, Anita. And hurry back, David!

0:42:560:42:59

Next time, on their final leg of the road trip,

0:43:000:43:03

Anita takes a titanic-sized risk.

0:43:030:43:06

Well, I hope my purchases will keep my profit afloat.

0:43:060:43:10

But who will come out victorious?

0:43:100:43:12

Don't sell them. Oh, no!

0:43:120:43:15

It's the penultimate leg for antique hunters Anita Manning and David Harper. Starting in Northumberland, England, and crossing the border into Scotland, they search for hidden gems before heading to auction in Kinbuck, Stirlingshire.