Episode 15 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 15

Antiques challenge. David Harper and Anita Manning embark on the final leg of their trip, starting in Ayrshire and travelling to the Isle of Bute, Glasgow and Renfrewshire.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-I don't know what to do.

-HORN TOOTS

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game! Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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-or the slow road to disaster?

-Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the final leg of the Road Trip for debonair David Harper

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and the queen of the auction room Anita Manning.

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-We're in your neck of the woods.

-We're in my neck of the woods.

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-Good buying venues in these parts, Anita Manning?

-Oh, yes.

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We are indeed just outside Glasgow. It's been a fun old Road Trip.

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Time for a bit of nostalgic reflection perhaps.

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Well, it's been a lark. It's been a great lark.

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Yep, yep, and it has been so much fun.

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-And we've seen wonderful places, David.

-We have, yes.

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I will miss you, Anita. It has been a really great adventure.

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David has a bit of a soft spot for his travel companion,

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but our bonnie auctioneer Anita Manning

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has already set her sights on someone else.

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-I quite fancy him.

-Ha!

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David Harper has his heart set firmly on winning the final auction,

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but could he be about to fall for the wrong thing?

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Oh, John, here I am looking at a pair of oriental vases.

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I can sense myself getting into all sorts of trouble here.

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Our lovestruck antiquers have been steadily eating up the miles north

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in their sturdy little 1965 Morris Minor Convertible.

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And our little car has just behaved like a dream.

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-She's been a little buzzer, hasn't she?

-I'm going to miss her.

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-I might even miss you.

-And me.

-Aw, so sweet.

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Our lovable duo started this trip with £200 each.

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On this final stretch, David has £429.84 to spend.

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Anita, however, has soared ahead, so she goes into this last leg

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in the lead, with £565.25 for the trip ahead

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and the competition's heating up!

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-Well, I'm a wee bit ahead of you, David.

-Oh, stop it.

-A wee bit ahead.

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A wee bit?

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You're miles ahead, it's ridiculous, and should be actually illegal.

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Quite right. Speaking of miles, David and Anita have been travelling

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over 700 of them, all the way from Ramsbottom, Lancashire,

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snaking their way up through Yorkshire to Bonnie Scotland,

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ending up in Paisley.

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Today's journey is commencing just outside the old weaving village

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of Kilbarchan in Renfrewshire

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and finishes at this week's final auction in Paisley.

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David's first shop of this leg is Gardner's Antiques,

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where he's meeting a dealer also called David. Stand by.

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-Keep it nice and simple. Two Davids together, eh?

-Nice to meet you.

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And he's quick to spot something of interest.

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And that's that big lump of glass screaming the 1960s.

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So cool and so stylish, very organic in its twisty shape.

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But look at the light fitting itself.

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That is not a recent addition, that is original,

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contemporary to the glass.

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That flying fish mark is a Strathearn Glass mark.

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Strathearn Glass was manufactured from 1965 to 1980.

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Aside from the leaping salmon, it's also recognisable

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by its bold, bright colours

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similar to the hugely collectable Italian Murano glass.

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So, something that has a real continental, stylish, Italian look

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was actually made probably no more than two hours

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from where we are standing right now.

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It's bang on trend and I want it so badly it's unbelievable.

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Its ticket price is £95, but will the other David be willing to do a deal?

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So, David, do you love 20th-century design or not?

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It's not really my thing, but I can appreciate that it is attractive.

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Right. That's bringing the price down, then.

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-No, not at all.

-No!

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-I didn't think so.

-Not looking too hopeful on that discount.

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-Maybe use some of that Harper charm.

-I love it.

-Yep.

-I've got taste.

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-You hate it...

-Not quite what I had in mind.

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-What's the best on that for me, trade?

-That would be £80.

-£80?

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-So that's it, as we say, the death?

-It is the death, yes.

-OK.

-£80.

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Well, I think I've got to have it, David. Thank you very much.

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David's spent big on his first item,

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heading boldly towards the final auction.

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Anita is ten miles south, in the town of Kilbirnie.

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Back in Ayrshire, and her old stomping ground,

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Anita is catching up with girlfriend Greta.

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-Hi, Greta.

-Anita, how are you?

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It's lovely to see you again and to be back in the Stirrup Cup.

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Anita has just over £565 burning a hole in her pocket.

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Can she spend some of it in here?

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MUSIC: My Heart Will Go On by Celine Dion

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Tell me a bit about this.

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It was made by this enthusiast, this chap, who has completely

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built it himself with its working steam engine inside.

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This boat has been painstakingly made but with a £250 ticket price,

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will thrifty Anita think it's worth the financial risk?

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-I do like it. I'm sorely tempted.

-You can't lose money on that.

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I know that I quite possibly could. It's a substantial buy.

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-It's not a modest buy.

-I know, I know.

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You wanted to come in and spend 30.

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Clearly Greta's dealt with Anita before.

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However, the fact that it's been made by an amateur

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could decrease its value at auction significantly.

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What is the very bottom that you would take for it?

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220.

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-I thought you were going to say 150.

-No, no, no, no, no.

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-I can't be that much in loss.

-Would you take the 200 for it?

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-I will.

-200, that's lovely. Thank you very much, Greta.

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-You're very welcome.

-That's a great boat.

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Brave move, Anita.

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She's risking her lead by spending a huge chunk of her cash

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on a bit of a gamble item.

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Perhaps time to get back to some familiar ground, Anita. Jewellery.

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-I was looking at this little brooch here.

-Isn't it sweet?

-That's nice.

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-It's just a pity there's not a name on it.

-Is there no marker?

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I don't see a sculptor's name on it.

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I think this is quite a nice thing, Art Nouveau, and I love that period.

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It's a piece of costume jewellery and I think it's very sweet.

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Ticket price is £45.

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Looking at a reasonable price that will give me a chance...

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I'd be... Is 25...?

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It's a bit low. I was thinking nearer 40.

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-Well, if I could get even 32.

-Could you go to 30 for it?

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-OK, then. Yes.

-Could we go to 30?

-Yeah.

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For £230, Anita has picked up two items in this shop

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and is on her merry way.

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Well, I hope my purchases will keep my profit afloat.

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-And good luck to you.

-Bye-bye.

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FERRY HORN BLOWS

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David is taking the 35-minute ferry ride across the Firth of Clyde

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to the beautiful Isle of Bute.

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He's here to visit Mount Stuart,

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one of the most spectacular Gothic revival buildings in Britain.

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David is meeting Head of Collections, Alice Martin... Lucky old Alice.

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-Hello, Alice.

-Hi, welcome to Mount Stuart.

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..to learn more about this beautiful building and the incredible history

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surrounding the family who created it.

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Alice, this is some entrance hall, is it not? This is a house.

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It is a house, yes. It climbs to about 89 feet.

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Every house should have one.

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It shows the stars in the northern hemisphere.

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The house is the hereditary seat of the Crichton-Stuart family,

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who share common ancestry with the Scottish monarchy.

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So, how many generations, then, do the family go back here?

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The family's involvement in the island goes right back to the 1300s.

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The family were intertwined with the earliest of the Stuart's kings

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so Walter, High Steward to the Scottish king,

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married Robert the Bruce's daughter, Marjorie.

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So, this family share common ancestry

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with Bonnie Prince Charlie, Mary, Queen of Scots

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and all of those great figures from Stuart royal history.

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The house was originally built in the 1700s but burnt down in 1877.

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The Third Marquess, thought at the time to be

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the richest man in Britain, rebuilt it in the 1880s.

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Unsurprisingly, no expense was spared.

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This house is actually a phoenix that arose out of the ashes

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and is estimated to have cost around £89 million in today's money.

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Well, you would if you could, wouldn't you?

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You would if you could.

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When it was rebuilt, the finest craftsmen of the time

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were brought in to replicate architectural marvels

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from around the world.

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Our floor in the marble chapel is a direct influence

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from the Sistine Chapel, for example.

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These banisters that you see around the gallery,

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they're all exact replicas of Charlemagne's Palace

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in Aachen in Germany.

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All of the marble that you see around here is Italian and Sicilian.

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He actually built a railway to bring all of the marble

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from the pier down below the house up to the house

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and built a worker's village for all the people that it took.

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-It sounds like a movie, doesn't it?

-It is incredible.

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-It's such a great script, that.

-It is a script.

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The house also comes equipped with some great historical characters.

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The Third Earl of Bute, who lived here in the 18th century,

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was the first Scottish Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

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He was also one of the founders of Kew Gardens

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and his love of botany is believed to have stemmed

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from the spectacular grounds here.

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-OK, so this is our grand dining room.

-Grand dining room, indeed.

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My gosh.

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Where did the money come from?

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A lot of the money that built this house comes from Wales and coal.

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The Second Marquess had inherited through his grandmother,

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Charlotte Jane Windsor, huge tracts of land in Wales,

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and he, being an entrepreneur, the Second Marquess,

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actually developed Cardiff from quite a small fishing village

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into one of the largest coal-exporting cities in the world

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by building massive docks, which were known as the Bute Docks.

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With unlimited resources,

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the house was equipped with all mod cons, such as ceiling lights,

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and claims to have the first indoor heated pool in the world.

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It was the most modern house in Britain.

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Gosh, Alice.

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I suppose this is a snapshot of absolute modern living...

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-Absolutely.

-..for the very rich late-19th century family.

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Yeah, yeah. I mean, if you had imagination and a lot of money,

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you built one of these and, of course, being the first

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that we know of in the world to be heated in a private home,

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this is pretty unique. And it's just fascinating

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cos this is obviously one of the parts of the house

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that didn't get finished when the Third Marquess died in 1900.

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-Sorry, the house was never finished?

-It's still a work-in-progress.

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Whilst the family no longer live in Mount Stuart,

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they are still dedicated to preserving

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the Crichton-Stuart family history and the building,

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now managed by the Mount Stuart Trust.

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Thanks to them,

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and not unlike Gaudi's Sagrada Familia in Barcelona,

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work on this incredible building still continues today

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based on its original designs.

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Across the water,

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Anita is in the traditional Scottish holiday resort of Largs.

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The last seagoing paddle steamer in the world, the Waverley,

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makes regular trips from here in the summer.

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Anita's catching up with yet another old pal at Narducci Antiques.

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In spite of spending big in her first shop,

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she's still got just over £335 left to spend.

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Stand by, everyone.

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I quite like this desk piece here.

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It's a wee desk accessory and I suppose you would put

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your papers and envelopes and so on in there.

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Letters and envelopes, uh-huh.

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And this would be where you would put your inkwells and a little...

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-For your nibs.

-Nibs or stamps or whatever.

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Probably... What would you say? Turn of the century?

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-Turn of the last century, yes.

-Edwardian.

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And these wee chookie birdies.

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They're sweet, aren't they? Lovely.

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This piece is fresh in today, so no ticket price.

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Chance of a bargain, perhaps?

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I'd like to be paying probably about £20 for it.

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-I was thinking more of around the 45 mark.

-Could you come further down?

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Could you come to 25?

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-30, how does 30 sound?

-30 is sounding better.

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Do you know, Franco, we're getting there?

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-I see you winning this one, do you know that?

-Do you know? I do too.

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28, Anita, how's that?

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We're going to go for that. It's good at 28, but can I show you

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-something else? Which is a wee bit mad...

-OK.

-..and you might

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-just want to...

-Give you it.

-..get rid of it.

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Another dealer who knows our wily Anita's ways.

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So, that's one item down and another one still to play for.

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Franco, I know this is a bit crazy but my eye was taken to this...

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-For me, it's a little piece of sculpture.

-Uh-huh. Yes, it is.

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It's quite an unusual piece, a wee centrepiece for a table.

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-Uh-huh, for your candles.

-For your candles, yes.

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When I looked at it, I thought, "Is it brand-new?

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"Where does it come from? Is it just a piece of nothing, really?"

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In the end, I didn't care because I liked it.

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It reminds me of space travel and spaceships,

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and surface of the moon, and Sputniks,

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and all that sort of stuff.

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This looks like a Christofle piece to me,

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which could make it rather sought after.

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For you, I'll do that for £25.

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25?! Come on, Franco, you must know what you're selling here.

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I would really like to be buying it for a tenner.

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Try again. Try me again. Go on.

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I'll throw a cuddle in.

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-I'll throw a cuddle in if you say yes.

-15?

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-Let's go for both of them.

-Thank you, thank you.

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OK, thank you. Oh, Franco.

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I say, Franco definitely deserves a kiss.

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He's been incredibly generous there as Anita is about to find out.

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It turns out that this is Christofle,

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which is a good French make,

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and Franco has just pointed that out to me.

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He has also supplied me with the box for it

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and, if I had known that beforehand... Franco...

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You'd have paid me fortunes. You'd have paid me fortunes.

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I would have paid you another £3.

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Put it there, before you change your mind.

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No, I'm not changing my mind. A deal's a deal.

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That's unbelievably kind of you, Franco.

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For £43, Anita walks away with a French centrepiece

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and a fruitwood letter rack.

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And that wraps up Day One.

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Night-night.

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It's the final day's shopping for our adventurous treasure hunters

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and we're in Anita's hometown of Glasgow.

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-Into bonnie Glasgow.

-Into bonnie Glasgow.

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It suddenly got much warmer when we crossed the border, didn't it?

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-That's right.

-Palm trees appeared and everything.

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It's always Mediterranean climate in Central Scotland.

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Ha! Anita had a great day's shopping yesterday.

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She took a massive gamble on a working model of the Titanic

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and also picked up an Art Nouveau brooch,

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a fruitwood letter rack and got a Christofle centrepiece

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for a bargain, leaving her with just under £300 to spend.

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David, however, bought just one item, a Strathearn lamp.

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This means he has nearly £350 to splash today.

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David's first shop this morning is in Glasgow's Finnieston area,

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home to a wealth of trendy bars and restaurants.

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He's visiting Real Deal Antiques - I wonder where that name came from.

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A bit of a tight squeeze in here.

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Whoops. It's a broken one!

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-It's a bronze.

-Gosh, so tight.

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See, the good thing with the antiques business is

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you can use and abuse stuff and, when you do damage them like that,

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it just adds a little bit of character.

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-Isn't that right, Michael?

-Certainly.

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I'm not sure Michael's convinced. A bit more care needed, I think, David.

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A little tea caddy.

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It's quite unusual to find these things

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with their original little canisters in there.

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This is a tea caddy dating to about 1820,

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just after the Napoleonic wars.

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-Tea used to cost a fortune, didn't it?

-Really, yeah.

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300 years ago, one teaspoon would equate to the average wage

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of a servant girl, so that is pretty expensive stuff.

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Tea first became popular in Britain in the 17th century,

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when Portuguese Princess Catherine de Braganza married Charles II.

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Known as something of a trendsetter, her taste for tea soon caught on.

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This one's 1820, Regency, mahogany, sarcophagus shape.

0:19:050:19:09

Ticket price £25. Looks rough to me.

0:19:090:19:12

But those things, 20 years ago, in mint condition was £300.

0:19:120:19:18

Yeah, I can remember that.

0:19:180:19:20

In worn-out condition like that, a restoration piece, was 100.

0:19:200:19:24

-Now, it is a tenner's worth, isn't it? What is it?

-15.

0:19:240:19:28

Go on, then. Let's have that. It's a good start.

0:19:280:19:31

£15 for a Regency, 140-year-old,

0:19:310:19:34

thereabouts, tea caddy is absolutely ridiculous,

0:19:340:19:38

in the best possible way.

0:19:380:19:40

And if he can avoid knocking anything else over,

0:19:400:19:43

there's plenty more to see.

0:19:430:19:45

-What have we got here?

-Some bowling trophies.

0:19:450:19:49

I know this stand is silver-plate.

0:19:510:19:52

-Let's have a look. So, engraved 1975. Now, William Prout...

-Right.

0:19:520:19:57

..I think, was a trophy maker in Glasgow.

0:19:570:20:02

Ticket price is £35.

0:20:020:20:04

On a silver-plated stand.

0:20:040:20:06

Could it be reused as a trophy for someone else?

0:20:060:20:10

Well, it's nice to have a Glasgow

0:20:100:20:11

piece when you're in Glasgow, isn't it?

0:20:110:20:13

OK, well, it's silver but it's filled,

0:20:130:20:15

so it's very thin silver on a stand.

0:20:150:20:17

Is that 15?

0:20:170:20:20

Let me see it.

0:20:200:20:21

OK, we'll do that for 15.

0:20:250:20:27

Michael's obviously feeling generous

0:20:270:20:29

and that's another swift deal for the silver trophy.

0:20:290:20:32

Any more hidden treasure?

0:20:340:20:37

-Now that, I imagine, is a Henry Moore.

-Is it?

0:20:370:20:42

Well, if that was a Henry Moore, you and I would be retired, I think.

0:20:420:20:45

Well, in my view, it's got nothing to do with Henry Moore.

0:20:470:20:50

Anyway, the ticket price is £22.

0:20:500:20:53

I've probably had that about nine months.

0:20:540:20:56

I can't really tell you where that came from.

0:20:560:20:58

So, it's been in the cabinet for nine months

0:20:580:21:00

-and nobody has spotted it as a Henry Moore yet?

-No, no.

0:21:000:21:03

It's quite good fun I think, actually.

0:21:030:21:06

It's not bronze, it's just metal, isn't it? It's a bit mad.

0:21:060:21:10

Is that a five-pound note?

0:21:100:21:12

That's a good tenner's worth.

0:21:120:21:14

Go on, I'll give you ten quid for a Henry Moore.

0:21:140:21:17

Marvellous. I'm done. That's brilliant. I've bought three things.

0:21:180:21:21

-Right, OK.

-Thank you very much.

0:21:210:21:23

Let's get out before I smash something.

0:21:230:21:25

Quite right. That's a total of £40 for three lots. Good job.

0:21:250:21:30

Thank you very much.

0:21:300:21:31

Anita is also in Glasgow.

0:21:320:21:34

She's going to learn about famous Scottish comedian and singer

0:21:340:21:38

Harry Lauder, one of the greatest performers

0:21:380:21:40

and bestselling recording artists of his generation.

0:21:400:21:43

# Roamin' in the gloamin' on the bonnie banks o' Clyde

0:21:440:21:49

# Roamin' in the gloamin'... #

0:21:490:21:51

She's meeting Paul Maloney.

0:21:510:21:53

-Anita.

-Hello, Paul.

-Hello, nice to meet you.

-It's lovely to meet you.

0:21:560:21:59

# Oh, it's lovely roamin' in the gloamin'... #

0:21:590:22:04

They're at Glasgow University Library, home to one of the

0:22:040:22:07

largest collections of Harry Lauder memorabilia in the world.

0:22:070:22:11

-Would you like to come in and see the collection?

-Yes.

0:22:110:22:13

Who was Harry Lauder? What was his background?

0:22:150:22:19

Did he come from Glasgow?

0:22:190:22:20

No, he was born in Portobello, which is the seaside town

0:22:200:22:23

outside Edinburgh, and his father was a potter.

0:22:230:22:27

The family moved briefly to England

0:22:290:22:31

but following the tragic death of Harry's father,

0:22:310:22:34

moved back to Scotland, finally settling in Hamilton,

0:22:340:22:37

just outside Glasgow.

0:22:370:22:39

This meant that Harry had to become effectively the breadwinner

0:22:390:22:43

very early on in his life.

0:22:430:22:45

Harry started working in the flax mills

0:22:460:22:48

and eventually ended up in the mines.

0:22:480:22:51

Lauder claimed it was here that he learned to be a comic,

0:22:510:22:54

while working gruelling 12-hour shifts with no natural light.

0:22:540:22:58

It seems an unlikely background for a theatre performer.

0:23:000:23:04

He was always interested in singing and performing

0:23:040:23:06

and, in fact, about the time he started work as a boy worker,

0:23:060:23:09

in a way, he began entering competitions.

0:23:090:23:11

He was very successful. He was obviously very good at it

0:23:110:23:14

and, by the time we get to the 1890s,

0:23:140:23:17

he begins to get offers of work,

0:23:170:23:21

what were called semi-professional offers of work.

0:23:210:23:24

Lauder received his big break in 1892,

0:23:240:23:27

when he had an offer to tour the country with a concert party.

0:23:270:23:31

And so he goes off on a 14-week tour with a concert party

0:23:310:23:35

all over Scotland and it's a fantastic apprenticeship for him.

0:23:350:23:38

Despite Glasgow being at the heart of the heyday

0:23:390:23:42

of Scottish variety theatre, it wasn't until Lauder moved to London

0:23:420:23:46

that his career really took off.

0:23:460:23:48

In 1900, he decided to go to London to end what was in some ways

0:23:500:23:54

a make-or-break exercise and he got lucky.

0:23:540:23:57

A performer went off ill and he was asked at very short notice

0:23:570:24:00

by telegram to come and go on that night.

0:24:000:24:02

He charmed the audience. He sang his Scotch comic material,

0:24:020:24:05

and after that offers of work flooded in.

0:24:050:24:07

Paul, tell me a wee bit about the kind of act that he would have done

0:24:070:24:12

in those first days.

0:24:120:24:13

He would sing a succession of comic songs,

0:24:130:24:15

each with a different character. And sometimes he'd drag up

0:24:150:24:18

and play a woman or he'd play a whole range of people.

0:24:180:24:21

Lauder's arrival on the scene coincided

0:24:220:24:24

with the rise of the gramophone.

0:24:240:24:26

In 1902, he cut his first track

0:24:260:24:30

and was the first British artist to sell one million records.

0:24:300:24:34

When I think of Harry Lauder songs...

0:24:350:24:37

Roamin' in the Gloamin', I Love a Lassie -

0:24:370:24:40

-people are still singing these songs today.

-Yeah.

0:24:400:24:42

# I love a lassie

0:24:420:24:44

# A bonnie, bonnie lassie

0:24:440:24:46

# She's as pure as the lily in the dell... #

0:24:460:24:50

After a successful stint in panto in 1907, Lauder decided

0:24:500:24:55

to take his act to the United States, again with unbelievable results.

0:24:550:25:00

He was hugely successful there.

0:25:000:25:02

By 1908 he was earning 5,000 a week playing in America

0:25:020:25:06

and, at the height of his success,

0:25:060:25:08

which came slightly later in the States,

0:25:080:25:11

he would have his own trains to travel with his company

0:25:110:25:13

called Lauder Expresses.

0:25:130:25:15

-He was a superstar.

-He was a superstar.

0:25:150:25:17

Hugely influential throughout his career,

0:25:180:25:21

Lauder met with five American presidents.

0:25:210:25:24

He had the world at his feet when World War I broke out.

0:25:240:25:28

In 1917 he got a telegram, the dreaded telegram,

0:25:300:25:33

saying that his son had been killed in action.

0:25:330:25:36

Following this devastating news,

0:25:370:25:40

Lauder's focus moved from show business to the war effort.

0:25:400:25:44

Against the advice of the War Office,

0:25:440:25:46

he took his show to the troops in the trenches to boost morale.

0:25:460:25:51

He even tried to enlist himself but was too old.

0:25:510:25:54

He was very concerned about the troops.

0:25:540:25:56

What would happen to all the wounded? What's going to happen

0:25:560:25:58

to them after the war? How are they going to survive?

0:25:580:26:00

Lauder went on to establish the Million Pound Fund

0:26:000:26:03

to help injured soldiers.

0:26:030:26:05

He also made a short film with close friend Charlie Chaplin

0:26:050:26:09

to help raise funds.

0:26:090:26:10

He was a hugely energetic man

0:26:110:26:13

and clearly poured all his energy into doing this.

0:26:130:26:16

In 1919, Lauder was knighted for his work during the war.

0:26:160:26:20

In the 1930s, he retired from the stage

0:26:200:26:23

but continued to do the odd performance and fundraised

0:26:230:26:26

during the Second World War.

0:26:260:26:28

In a career spanning four decades, he touched the lives of countless people

0:26:280:26:32

with his generosity, gentle humour and catchy tunes.

0:26:320:26:36

# Oh, it's lovely roamin' in the gloamin'. #

0:26:360:26:41

David is nearby, visiting Glasgow City Antiques.

0:26:430:26:47

He's got just under £310 left to spend.

0:26:470:26:51

So, this is my last chance on this WHOLE trip to pull it back.

0:26:510:26:58

One more purchase and I can't go the safe route.

0:26:580:27:01

Can dealer John help him find that winning item?

0:27:030:27:06

Oh, John, here I am looking at a pair of Oriental vases.

0:27:140:27:20

I can sense myself getting into all sorts of trouble here.

0:27:200:27:24

Do you love them?

0:27:240:27:26

-Nope.

-You don't?

-No!

-Seriously? Why?

0:27:260:27:29

-What is wrong with you?

-The amount of damage.

0:27:290:27:33

That doesn't seem to be putting David off...

0:27:330:27:35

..neither does the ticket price of £220.

0:27:370:27:40

I can't help be drawn to them.

0:27:400:27:42

There you have a pair of monumental Japanese

0:27:420:27:47

late-19th century Meiji-period Satsuma vases.

0:27:470:27:53

A pair, John. What's wrong with you?

0:27:530:27:56

It's make or break. David needs to seriously think about this.

0:27:560:28:00

They're beautiful vases but severely damaged.

0:28:000:28:04

Can I buy them for sub £100?

0:28:040:28:07

-100 quid, cash.

-That's not sub 100.

0:28:070:28:10

No. 100 quid, cash.

0:28:100:28:12

OK, I'm probably the only person in the world that is very happy

0:28:130:28:18

to buy a pair of smashed Satsuma vases.

0:28:180:28:21

I'm going to have to have them. I love them so much I don't care.

0:28:210:28:24

-£100.

-Wish me all the luck.

-I certainly do, yes.

0:28:240:28:28

Wow, I don't believe it.

0:28:280:28:30

He's got an incredible 50% off his final item

0:28:300:28:33

but it's still a bit of a gamble to buy something

0:28:330:28:35

SO badly damaged for the all-important last auction.

0:28:350:28:40

Anita has crossed over to the south bank of the River Clyde

0:28:410:28:44

and the district of Govan.

0:28:440:28:47

She's visiting the eclectic Love Salvage,

0:28:470:28:50

with just under £300 in her pocket.

0:28:500:28:52

Go, Anita. Go, girl.

0:28:520:28:55

Harley-Davidson. Vroom, vroom. Vroom, vroom.

0:28:570:29:01

5'4".

0:29:020:29:04

I've grown.

0:29:040:29:05

-It's a big adventure playground.

-And speaking of adventurous...

0:29:080:29:13

SHE LAUGHS

0:29:130:29:15

It's a laughing policeman.

0:29:180:29:20

-John!

-Yes?

-John, where did this come from?

0:29:220:29:25

You've got to tell me.

0:29:250:29:26

We got that a while back from another private dealer.

0:29:260:29:30

-It's papier-mache and some sort of fairground attraction.

-Uh-huh.

0:29:300:29:34

I've not got a lot of origin information about it.

0:29:350:29:37

I know, but it's such a hoot.

0:29:370:29:39

-It brightens up the place as well, you know?

-That's right.

0:29:390:29:42

I quite fancy him.

0:29:420:29:43

Yes, does she love him enough to fork out some serious cash?

0:29:430:29:48

Remember, you've already taken a Titanic-size risk on this leg, Anita.

0:29:480:29:52

-Is this guy for sale?

-He is indeed.

-Everything's for sale.

0:29:520:29:56

-Everything's for sale.

-OK, darling?

0:29:560:29:59

-But for what price?

-He should be OK there.

0:29:590:30:01

Anita is way in the lead, but one wrong buy could cost her dearly.

0:30:010:30:06

-Tell me what you might look for him.

-He's priced about £60 just now.

0:30:060:30:10

-60.

-Yeah.

-It is just such great fun.

0:30:100:30:15

Would you take £40 for him?

0:30:150:30:16

-I could do him... 45 probably would be the best.

-45?

0:30:190:30:22

I'd be sad to see him go, but he has been here a wee while.

0:30:220:30:25

-Well, I think maybe he's got a new home then at 45.

-Fantastic.

0:30:250:30:30

Put it there, John. That's great, thank you.

0:30:300:30:32

-Thank you very much, Anita.

-You're coming home with me.

0:30:320:30:36

-And he's still smiling!

-He's still smiling.

0:30:360:30:39

And so is Anita.

0:30:390:30:41

-Thank you very much, John.

-Thank you for your custom.

0:30:430:30:45

Thanks for your visit.

0:30:450:30:46

That last purchase for £45 wraps up this trip's shopping.

0:30:460:30:51

Anita adds the policeman's head to her giant risk

0:30:510:30:54

of the model of the Titanic

0:30:540:30:56

and her potentially valuable Christofle centrepiece.

0:30:560:31:00

She also bought an Art Nouveau brooch and a letter rack.

0:31:000:31:03

Anita spent a total of £318.

0:31:030:31:07

David, for once, has spent less than Anita, just £220.

0:31:070:31:12

For this, he picked up a Strathearn lamp,

0:31:120:31:14

a circa-1820s tea caddy,

0:31:140:31:17

a silver bowls trophy,

0:31:170:31:18

a modernist golf trophy and also took a bit of a gamble

0:31:180:31:22

on a pair of Meiji Japanese Satsuma vases, which are bust.

0:31:220:31:26

But what do they think of each other's final purchases?

0:31:260:31:29

Now, this is where it starts to get serious - the Titanic model.

0:31:310:31:35

It's got bigness. It's a big baby that could make her a bit,

0:31:350:31:39

but I'm hoping... Please! ..it's going to lose her a bit.

0:31:390:31:43

The vases! These are massive. They are immense.

0:31:430:31:48

The damage is going to make a difference.

0:31:480:31:50

He's taken a chance. He's been brave but well done, David.

0:31:500:31:54

The last auction is finally upon us

0:31:570:31:58

and our dazzling duo are just outside Glasgow in the town of Paisley.

0:31:580:32:02

With a lot of catching up to do, are you feeling a bit nervous, David?

0:32:030:32:08

-Our very, very last auction.

-Stop it!

0:32:080:32:11

I'm far too nervous to talk about it.

0:32:110:32:14

We've both got potential for profits, David.

0:32:140:32:17

Yeah, we do actually. We do.

0:32:170:32:19

But we've also got potential for losses.

0:32:190:32:21

You have taken some chances and I love you for it, I really do.

0:32:210:32:25

It makes it very exciting.

0:32:250:32:26

The auction today is online and in the room,

0:32:260:32:29

and is taking place at Collins & Paterson Auctioneers.

0:32:290:32:33

Wielding the gavel this morning is Stephen Maxwell.

0:32:330:32:35

The Titanic should sell really well, I think.

0:32:350:32:38

It's in fantastic condition and I believe it is in working order

0:32:380:32:41

as well, so I'm very confident it should sail off at a good price.

0:32:410:32:46

The pair of tall Japanese vases do have extensive damage,

0:32:460:32:50

so I have my doubts as to whether they might sell particularly well.

0:32:500:32:55

Only time will tell, so let the auction commence.

0:32:550:32:58

Oh, it's so exciting, eh?

0:32:580:33:00

-You're up first.

-I'm up first.

0:33:010:33:03

Calm yourself, David. First up, Anita's brooch.

0:33:050:33:07

Straight in at £12...

0:33:090:33:11

-Oh, good, I was going to get excited at that.

-I know.

0:33:110:33:13

..18, at 20 now is your bid, sir. At £20 has it.

0:33:130:33:17

I need a wee bit more.

0:33:170:33:19

At £20. Gone to number 289.

0:33:190:33:23

-Mm... Not brilliant. Not brilliant.

-Not brilliant.

0:33:230:33:27

A disappointing start there for Anita and that was her safe item.

0:33:270:33:31

I feel fantastic. Absolutely... I'm ecstatic!

0:33:310:33:35

-Sorry, did I say that out loud?

-Not very sporting, David.

0:33:350:33:39

Will he be quite so smug after HIS first lot, the silver bowls trophy?

0:33:390:33:44

At 15, in at 15. 15, I have here.

0:33:440:33:46

Are you bidding? Oh, £18. 20.

0:33:460:33:49

-And 2, 22.

-Come on, come on.

0:33:490:33:52

We'll sell it, then, at £22... Gone there...

0:33:520:33:55

That's £7 on-paper profit.

0:33:560:33:59

Not a bad start for David,

0:33:590:34:01

though he's going to need to do better than that to catch his rival.

0:34:010:34:04

I'm getting there, Anita. I'm catching you. I'm catching you up.

0:34:040:34:07

Can his tea caddy shrink Anita's lead even more?

0:34:090:34:12

-How do you feel about that?

-Very confident.

0:34:130:34:16

-It should double its money.

-Yeah?

-Really, it should.

0:34:160:34:20

I'm going for the 100%. I'm going double bubble.

0:34:200:34:23

-It's a wee bit tired, David.

-I know. Well, aren't we all?

0:34:230:34:26

If you'd been around since 1820, you'd be a bit tired.

0:34:260:34:29

Any tea drinkers in today? Come on, now. £30, surely.

0:34:290:34:32

-At 20 then.

-Ugh.

0:34:320:34:34

At £20. Thank you, madam. £20 we have. Do I have 22?

0:34:340:34:38

22 at the back. 25?

0:34:380:34:40

-Got you now, sir.

-Go on!

-Still at 25.

0:34:400:34:43

-We'll sell it, then, at £25.

-A bit more!

0:34:430:34:46

-Gone there. It's 309.

-It's not double bubble, so I'm not happy.

0:34:460:34:50

Still, not a bad profit though, David.

0:34:500:34:53

Next, it's Anita's letter rack.

0:34:540:34:56

Thank you, sir. 25, I have straight in.

0:34:580:35:00

-28, £30...

-30.

-You're in.

0:35:000:35:03

..35, 38? The bid's now at the back. It's with the gent now at £38.

0:35:030:35:08

Gone there, 216. £38.

0:35:080:35:10

That's all right. Are you pleased with that?

0:35:100:35:12

-I'm happy.

-You've made back the loss.

-I'm delirious.

-Are you?

0:35:120:35:15

-I'm delirious.

-It doesn't take much, does it?

0:35:150:35:18

Apparently not. Another nice little profit.

0:35:180:35:22

I'm very happy for you.

0:35:220:35:24

-Are you very, very happy?

-Yeah, delighted. Ecstatic.

0:35:240:35:28

Let's see a big smile, then.

0:35:280:35:29

Next up, it's David's Strathearn lamp that he fell in love with

0:35:310:35:36

-and rated so highly.

-Good Scottish glass lamp, this.

0:35:360:35:39

Start there at 20, surely? 20.

0:35:390:35:41

Thank you, sir. £20, we have. 20 bid.

0:35:410:35:43

Do we have...? 22 at the back. 25?

0:35:430:35:47

No, you're out, madam. With the gent at 25.

0:35:470:35:49

Do we have 28? It's with the gent there and we're selling...

0:35:490:35:51

-This is going to be horrible. No.

-Gone, 338. £25 there.

0:35:510:35:55

That's terrible. I knew it. I knew it.

0:35:550:35:57

But I loved it. What can you do? What can you do?

0:35:570:36:00

Well, bad luck, David. It's a big loss.

0:36:000:36:02

Just not what he needed in this all-important last auction.

0:36:020:36:06

-I'd buy it again.

-Would you?

0:36:060:36:09

HE SOBS

0:36:090:36:10

I bet you wouldn't.

0:36:100:36:11

Probably not. Next up, it's Anita's accidental great find,

0:36:150:36:19

a Christofle centrepiece.

0:36:190:36:21

She got this for a steal but will it live up to its potential?

0:36:210:36:25

I love it. It's modernist, it's French, it's, "Ooh, la, la."

0:36:250:36:30

It's got everything going for it.

0:36:300:36:32

-I'm starting on... OK, I'm actually straight in at £20...

-Unbelievable.

0:36:320:36:36

..on the candle holder. At 22, the gentleman. 25?

0:36:360:36:39

28. 30 and 2.

0:36:390:36:41

Now it's your bid, sir. It's in the room and 32 has it.

0:36:410:36:44

35, new bidder.

0:36:440:36:45

-38, 40...

-It's away!

-Well, I never. That's taken off!

0:36:450:36:49

..50, 5, 60, 5, 70, 5,

0:36:490:36:53

80, 5, 90, 5, £100?

0:36:530:36:58

-110, 120, 130...

-Crikey, and it's still going!

0:36:580:37:03

..170, 180, 190, 200,

0:37:030:37:07

210, 220, 230?

0:37:070:37:11

240, 250? 260, 270...

0:37:110:37:16

-I thought it would sell for a fiver.

-280!

-..290?

0:37:160:37:19

You're out. The bid's with the gentleman in grey.

0:37:190:37:21

We're selling to the room, fair warning to you, at £290.

0:37:210:37:25

-Gone. It's yours, sir. 290 there.

-Yes!

0:37:250:37:27

That's my Titanic then, isn't it? Never mind that thing.

0:37:270:37:31

That is unbelievable!

0:37:310:37:32

Unbelievable. It really was an incredible buy.

0:37:330:37:38

That amazing profit has now pushed Anita even further into the lead.

0:37:380:37:42

-Well, I must say that I'm quite happy about that.

-Happy?

0:37:430:37:47

-You should be doing the blinking cancan.

-The Highland fling?

0:37:470:37:50

Do that if you like.

0:37:500:37:51

Well, David, you've really got your work cut out now.

0:37:520:37:56

It's your modernist golf trophy up next.

0:37:560:38:00

£10 for the trophy. £10 surely for the trophy?

0:38:000:38:03

-£5...

-For goodness' sake!

0:38:030:38:05

Any advance on £5? 8, the lady now! £10.

0:38:070:38:10

-The lady of taste.

-Thank you, madam.

0:38:100:38:13

Are you back in at £12, no?

0:38:130:38:14

Yes, £12.

0:38:140:38:16

15. Still with the gentleman.

0:38:160:38:19

We're selling at £15. Gone there!

0:38:190:38:21

-Ugh! Disaster zone.

-You've made a profit.

0:38:210:38:25

A fiver. I need a lot more than that to catch you.

0:38:250:38:30

Anita's laughing policeman's head was an unusual pick.

0:38:300:38:33

Let's see how he does this morning.

0:38:330:38:36

Yes, a papier-mache fairground head of a laughing policeman, no less.

0:38:360:38:40

I never thought I'd say those words in an auction room.

0:38:400:38:42

Interesting lot. What can we say about it? Where would you start?

0:38:420:38:45

I have no idea. How about £20?

0:38:450:38:48

Yes, thank you, sir. Straight in at 20.

0:38:480:38:50

£20, we have. Do we have 22?

0:38:500:38:53

22, 25, 28, 30,

0:38:530:38:57

32, 35. For the same gent at 35.

0:38:570:39:01

Any advance? We're selling then at £35.

0:39:010:39:04

-Gone. Amazingly.

-Oh!

-140 at £35.

0:39:040:39:08

It was love at first sight for Anita,

0:39:080:39:10

but clearly not to the people of Paisley.

0:39:100:39:14

But her last item was the big gamble.

0:39:140:39:16

Time for Anita's Titanic model.

0:39:170:39:20

Will it sink or will it soar?

0:39:210:39:24

A lovely item, this.

0:39:240:39:25

I'm hoping it will sail away to somewhere nice shortly.

0:39:250:39:28

Hopefully profit.

0:39:280:39:29

£100. Thank you, sir. Gentleman has the bid at £100. 110 bid.

0:39:290:39:35

120, 130, 140, 150...

0:39:350:39:38

-The room's going quiet now.

-..160, 170. The bid's here at 180.

0:39:380:39:42

Are you bidding, sir, in white? 190, 200?

0:39:420:39:45

You're out. The bid's still in black. It's to my left

0:39:450:39:47

with the gentleman. Selling at £200.

0:39:470:39:49

-Gone. Number 67.

-Well!

0:39:490:39:51

£200 for the Titanic.

0:39:510:39:53

Wiped its face. Now, Anita must be massively relieved with that result.

0:39:530:39:58

Next, it's the final lot of the competition and it all rests

0:39:580:40:00

on David's beloved Meiji vases.

0:40:000:40:03

David might be behind but could this all be about to change?

0:40:030:40:06

I could make a bit of profit but I'm not going to catch up to you, am I?

0:40:060:40:11

Come on, David. Where's your fighting spirit? Stiffen up, man.

0:40:110:40:14

-Start me at £100.

-Oh, go on.

-£100 surely for the pair.

0:40:140:40:18

Large vases, £100.

0:40:180:40:20

Go on! Ahem. Sorry, did I say that out loud?

0:40:200:40:23

I'll start, then. On commission I have £50 here

0:40:250:40:27

to start the lot at 50. Just a starting point. 50 is with me.

0:40:270:40:30

Do we have 5? 55 bid. £60?

0:40:300:40:32

-65, 70...

-Come on, come on...

-..75, 80?

0:40:320:40:36

You're out. Still with me at 80. It's on commission at 80.

0:40:360:40:39

Do we have 85? Still with me at 80. We'll sell them, then, at £80.

0:40:390:40:41

You won't. Don't sell them, don't sell them.

0:40:410:40:44

-Gone to number 30.

-Oh, no!

0:40:440:40:46

-Unbelievable.

-Aw.

0:40:480:40:50

Crikey, someone's got those for a bargain. Bad luck, David.

0:40:510:40:56

I don't care what you say,

0:40:560:40:57

you have absolutely thrashed me within an inch of my life,

0:40:570:41:01

so I think we should go and...

0:41:010:41:03

-Cup of tea, cake, regroup and do the figures.

-Uh-huh.

0:41:030:41:06

So, at the end of five incredible auctions, the results are as follows.

0:41:070:41:12

David started this leg with £429.84. After auction costs are deducted,

0:41:120:41:18

he made a loss of £83.06, meaning he ends this competition

0:41:180:41:22

with a respectable £346.78.

0:41:220:41:27

Anita started out with £565.25.

0:41:280:41:33

She's had another great auction today, making, after costs,

0:41:330:41:36

a profit of £160.06.

0:41:360:41:40

This means she's not just today's winner but also

0:41:400:41:44

the victor of this Road Trip,

0:41:440:41:45

with a spectacular final figure of £725.31.

0:41:450:41:51

Well done, Anita, and all profits go to Children in Need.

0:41:510:41:55

So, you know what? That's one each.

0:41:550:41:58

Several years ago, you and I hit the road and I beat you,

0:41:580:42:02

so I'm going to give you two or three years off

0:42:020:42:05

and I'm going to re-challenge you.

0:42:050:42:08

Be it on your own head!

0:42:080:42:10

It's been a memorable old Road Trip...

0:42:110:42:14

# The way you wear your hat

0:42:140:42:19

# The way you sip your tea

0:42:190:42:24

# The memory of all that... #

0:42:240:42:27

-The sun is shining, the sky is blue...

-And the roof is off!

0:42:270:42:31

# No, they can't take that away from me... #

0:42:310:42:35

..with some big, big wins...

0:42:350:42:37

-Wahey! Whoa!

-Mwah!

0:42:370:42:39

..and some serious blows.

0:42:390:42:41

FALTERING TOOT

0:42:410:42:42

# The way you sing off key... #

0:42:420:42:44

# ..to Dundee! #

0:42:440:42:46

# The way you haunt my dreams... #

0:42:460:42:49

-Do you like men in uniform?

-I do!

-I quite fancy him.

0:42:490:42:52

But above all, an unbreakable bond has been formed.

0:42:520:42:56

I've got on a Marks & Spencer silk vest.

0:42:560:42:59

Oh, hello.

0:42:590:43:01

Next week, a brand-new pair of experts hit the road

0:43:010:43:04

when wisdom meets youth...

0:43:040:43:06

SHE GASPS FOR BREATH

0:43:060:43:08

..with Philip Serrell

0:43:080:43:10

and Natasha Raskin.

0:43:100:43:12

-How old are you?

-Shut up.

0:43:120:43:14

SHE LAUGHS

0:43:140:43:15

David Harper and Anita Manning embark on the final leg of their trip, starting in Ayrshire and travelling to the Isle of Bute, Glasgow and Renfrewshire. They each take a massive risk in a bid to win the week, but who will come out on top when they head to the deciding auction in Paisley?