Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 7

Antiques challenge. Auctioneers Charles Hanson and Raj Bisram take their Triumph through Somerset, Dorset and Hampshire before ending at an auction in Swanmore.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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I don't know what to do!

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With £200 each, a classic car, and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What an old diamond.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game! Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to a taste of the West with Charles and Raj.

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Last night I had a pint of Somerset cider.

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Do you know what I really enjoy? If it's not cider, I love cheese.

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-Oh, well they make a very nice brie in Somerset.

-Do they really?

-Yep.

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Those two gourmands, in a Triumph Herald,

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are actually here to gobble up bargains.

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This is a treasure island and I just want to dig with you.

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Dig that, Charles Hanson, our auctioneer from Derby.

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Antiques expert and Rams fan.

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At the moment it's Hanson - 1, Raj - 0.

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Can it be 2-0 in Somerset?

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Not if Raj Bisram,

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our auctioneer from Kent, has anything to do with it.

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Antiques expert, llama aficionado, and wizard of the slopes...

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I was a downhill racer.

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-Oh, yes?

-Which means that I'm going to go flat-out to win.

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Highly competitive between these two, and it's only the second leg.

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Raj started out with £200 and he has already made a tidy profit,

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with £259.58 to spend today.

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While Charles, who began with the same sum,

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has done even better with £317.46 at his disposal.

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And boy, I love how you say Charles, say it again to me.

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-Charles.

-Yeah, I like that. Yeah.

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You say it in a nice ring.

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Our journey starts out at Corsham, in Wiltshire,

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and takes in most of the south-west of England, before ending

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up about 900 miles later at Crewkerne, in Somerset.

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But, today we begin in the Somerset village of Blackford

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and journey south and east towards an auction near the Hampshire coast,

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at Swanmore.

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Located deep in the heart of the Somerset Levels,

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Blackford's premier, and quite possibly only,

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antiques outlet is housed in an old primary school.

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-Good morning. Hello?

-Hello, good morning.

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-Good morning, sir, how are you?

-How are you, sir?

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Good to see you, what a wonderful building and I'm just greeted

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by astounding antiques.

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Yep, Les does have stock worth shouting about,

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especially the English furniture.

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I just can't believe the quality, I mean,

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the pair of credenzas over there,

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they must be worth upwards of £50,000.

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I think that might even be on the low side, Charles.

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Academic, really, considering your budget.

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They were strong in the arm in the Victorian times.

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With heavy-weight antiques and prices to match,

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our Charles will have to be on top form here.

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In this cabinet here, is some really good blue and white porcelain.

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Now...be careful, don't drop it, Charles.

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Took the words right out of my mouth!

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But when you're looking for blue and white, you're looking for

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rare Chelsea blue and white, you're looking for rare

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Lowestoft blue and white,

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and if you can find the rarer factories, in blue and white,

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the value can be ten times more than the more bog-standard.

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So I'm just having a quick peek in here now.

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Ooops!

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Nice. Put him up there. They're lovely.

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Put these...

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I've got six saucers, and matching tea bowls,

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one, two, three...

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Ah! I've got the six.

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Gosh, aren't they gorgeous?

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And if you think back to the times when us English were

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discovering secrets in ancient Greece and Italy in the 1760s,

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and Worcester were making these tea bowls and saucers

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with these ruinous finds.

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Look at the old metal riveting repairs to actually maintain them as

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objects of beauty.

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No price though.

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Knowing Les, I reckon the six could be £1,000.

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If you don't ask, you never find out.

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-Les?

-Yes, Charles.

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If I said to you, pluck a price for six tea bowls and saucers...

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200 quid.

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Interesting.

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But I don't really want to sell it.

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One more thing that I pulled out, this little tea bowl here.

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-That would be Chinese.

-I think it probably is.

-How much?

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Could be 40 quid? The other piece is a good early lot.

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-How much is that?

-Probably the same price.

-40 quid?

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-Yeah, you can have that for the same price.

-£40?

-Yeah.

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I'm from Derbyshire, you know, things seem to be a bit more

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-expensive down here.

-Really(!)

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You're not in Derbyshire now, Charles.

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Thank you, Les. I shall think on.

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I could take a chance, my mind's ticking.

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The gamble could be on.

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Sorely tempted, eh?

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Remember though, your only loss in the last leg

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was almost £40 on a little derby ewe.

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Be careful, Charles, have another look around at least.

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Oh, I quite like these figures down here.

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You've got him and her, they're still together.

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And these are modelled...

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..by James Hadley,

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who was a very important modeller at Royal Worcester.

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They've had some restoration, what a shame.

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Look at that one there, and look at the difference.

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-Les?

-Yes?

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Only a quickie, I'm really impressed

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with your Hadley his and hers ladies.

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-How much are they, for the pair?

-£100.

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£100, and between friends?

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£110, plus VAT(!)

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I like those. Time to take another peek at the old china, then.

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I might just ask Les

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if I could get a bit off because he's come straight in at £200.

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Next door to these are also these bits of broken Chinese porcelain.

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What I might do, is use this pile as a bargaining tool to,

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perhaps, buy two lots.

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Round two.

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I probably will take the tea bowls and saucers, could you do me

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anything on these bits of broken Chinese bits here?

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£225, and you can take the lot.

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Oh, dear.

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-I tell you what, 200 quid.

-For the whole lot?

-Yes, how about that?

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The break would be something like 180, for that lot there,

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and £20 there.

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I would think that would be reasonably accurate.

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You know you're going to.

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-Yeah, I will. Thank you very much.

-I knew you would. I've been done!

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I'm not so sure, Les.

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They're certainly a big gamble for Charles, not that he seems too worried.

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But, while all that excitement's been taking place,

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Raj has had a more leisurely start, making his way towards

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the village of Nether Stowey where

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he's come to visit one of the most cherished places

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in the history of English Romantic poetry, Coleridge's cottage.

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-Hello, Stephen.

-Hello, nice to meet you.

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It's nice to meet you, I'm Raj. What a lovely place.

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The Devon-born critic and philosopher,

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge, had just been discharged

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from the Royal Dragoons, and was editing a failing journal,

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when a meeting changed his life.

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Everything turned around

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when he met William Wordsworth in Bristol in 1795.

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It was that point, that the two of them realised that there was

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something that each of them had, a spark of genius.

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That was a hugely profound moment for both of them.

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And, they became friends from that moment onwards.

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Coleridge soon decided to leave Bristol and live in nature,

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moving his family to this cottage in the foothills of the Quantocks.

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He took long walks in the countryside

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and wrote works like The Nightingale and This Lime Tree Bower, My Prison.

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The Romantic poetry period is not about, sort of, Mills and Boon romantic love,

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it's much more about our connection to nature,

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how it makes us feel.

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That's what he wanted to start writing about,

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in a language that people understood,

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because all the poetry that went before was quite complex,

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the way it was structured.

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This was just in the language of ordinary men.

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So, Stephen, most of his famous work originates from here, the cottage?

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Yes, Frost At Midnight, which is

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one of his better known poems was written in this parlour.

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It's 1798, in February and it's absolutely silent.

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The only thing he could hear was the fire,

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the flame was this sole, quiet thing.

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His son, Hartley, was lying next to him in his cot here.

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And it's one of his most famous poems.

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These conversational poems were a great influence on Wordsworth,

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and soon he moved close by.

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Together they caused quite a stir.

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They used to go out at night, from their point of view that was

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experiencing nature at a different time of day.

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But, from the point of view of the village, they were a bit suspicious

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because at the time the French Revolution was going on

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and they just thought, "Are they spies?", and they believed

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they were mapping the area for the French to invade.

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-Really?

-And someone from the foreign office was sent here,

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he fortunately realised that they were just poets. That was it.

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-That was the end of it.

-Bit crazy!

-Yeah(!)

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The two poets published, in 1798,

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a work which was a landmark of the English Romantic age.

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This is the Lyrical Ballads.

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It's a first edition, and although it looks tiny,

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and quite insignificant,

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in terms of English literature, it's huge.

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One of Coleridge's contributions, The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner,

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became so famous that a particular phrase entered the language.

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Day after day, day after day

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We stuck, nor breath nor motion

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As idle as a painted ship

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Upon a painted ocean

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Water, water, every where

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And all the boards did shrink

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Water, water, every where

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Nor any drop to drink.

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Coleridge spent just three years in Nether Stowey,

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and although subsequently his collaborator became Poet Laureate,

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Coleridge fared less well.

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He developed an addiction to the laudanum he'd been prescribed

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and then quarrelled with Wordsworth.

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He continued to write, however,

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and was encouraged by Byron to publish Kubla Khan.

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Coleridge died in London, in 1834, aged 61.

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I think when people talk about Wordsworth,

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it's very rare you won't hear the name Coleridge in the same sentence.

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The two of them are always linked.

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It's Coleridge's work that endures, that is...

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his poetry that was written here is still remembered today.

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I suppose his legacy is that he was one of the crucial voices

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of the Romantic poetry movement in this country.

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Now, back on the lonesome road, our two travellers are together again.

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-Go right here, Raj.

-Certainly, Charles.

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Clear my way.

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Just about.

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-You know, if you ever decide to give up antiques...

-Yeah.

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-..the military's for you.

-I thought I might become a driving instructor.

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Yeah, and I might become a ballroom dancer! Ha!

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Getting along famously, aren't they?

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Around here, even if we see things outside,

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it's always worth maybe just stopping off and saying, look,

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let's knock on the door.

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Yeah, maybe we can be like rag and bone men.

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Well, strangely enough, Raj has it on good authority

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that there may be a bargain around here somewhere.

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Don't be long.

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-I've...

-No, I won't be too long.

-I've got shopping to do.

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Not sure Brian's workshop would be Charles' sort of thing anyway.

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Wowee, look at this.

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I'd like to sell this, but I can't.

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Well, to be honest, this is a little on the big side for me.

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This is the only one in the world.

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-It's the only one in the world?

-Yes.

-And what exactly is it?

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It's a portable steam engine, motive power,

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made by Paxman's of Colchester.

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-Amazing.

-I had been, in my collections,

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gathering little bits for years

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and I've got a little steam boiler,

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which would be very, very attractive to the right people.

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-If you wanted it, I'd sell it cheap.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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To be honest, I haven't got a clue what it's worth.

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But what are we talking about? A tenner? Can I buy it for a tenner?

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A little bit more than a tenner and I expect you could get...

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150, 200 for it.

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-What about £20 and I'll just take a chance?

-Done.

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-We have a deal.

-Good man.

-Fantastic! Thank you very much.

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-So, it's a vertical...

-A vertical steam boiler.

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-How old is it?

-Oh, there you are.

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There's no maker's plate, but I would say it's got to be 100 years old.

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Well, at least it's an antique, then.

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-Charles.

-Raj.

-Close your eyes.

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Are you being serious? I can hear something jangling in the back.

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Raj?

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-Keep your eyes closed.

-What's going in the boot? There's a fair weight in there.

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-Yeah, mind the back axle.

-Fine. Thank you very much.

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Point to Raj, I reckon.

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-Why don't you, yeah, just pump it a bit?

-Pump it a bit?

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-You'll want an ambulance pump in a minute.

-You're blocked off now.

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That little encounter took place

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just outside the south Somerset town of Somerton.

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Although nowadays a fairly sleepy place,

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Somerton was once the county town.

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Some even think that back in 900 AD

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it might have been the capital of Wessex.

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-BEEPING

-Good morning.

-Good morning.

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-Sorry, afternoon, I beg your pardon.

-No problem.

-And your name is?

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-I'm Paul.

-Paul, Charles Hanson.

-Pleased to meet you, my friend.

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Now, Charles got off to a runaway start earlier,

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so what, we wonder, will his tactics be here?

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I've had a very eventful morning of big spend.

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I think now, it's time to pull myself in

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and just perhaps find something that's slightly...

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steady...

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but ready...to go, go, go.

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-Mixed messages, I'd say.

-I quite like...is it for sale,

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I think you're using it in your shop, this lucky dip bin?

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-It could be.

-Could it be for sale?

-It could be.

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I quite like it, because it's just....

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OK, it's not very old.

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What could it be, 1960s?

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'80s, '70s?

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Maybe '70s.

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-Was it your era, Paul, the '70s?

-Yes.

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-PAUL LAUGHS

-There we go, there we go.

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I'm normally very much into my antiques, Paul.

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An antique by definition needs to be 100 years old.

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This isn't, but to me it radiates a period,

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it radiates a style

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and almost, for me,

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-it's a yesteryear object that takes you back to your childhood.

-Yes.

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But what's the best price?

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-Between mates?

-Oh...

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£70 and you get the free gifts?

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-Really? As well?

-You get the free gifts as well.

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-This could get complicated.

-What are the gifts, Paul, inside?

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-I can't tell you that.

-Oh, no!

-You have to pay 50p to buy one.

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THEY LAUGH

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I reckon there must be at least

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the best part of 150 presents in here, mustn't there?

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-I don't think there's that many. About 80.

-So, 80.

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So, I might give the gifts a miss.

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I could then almost...have £40 off?

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-£30 off.

-Really? What's his name, by the way? Has he got a name?

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-No.

-No name.

-You can name him.

-I might call him Charlie.

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So, £40 and on the shortlist.

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-And elsewhere in Somerton, Raj is on the prowl.

-Raj.

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Nice to see you, it's Andrew, welcome to Market Cross Antiques.

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Hello, Andrew - nice to meet you. Lovely looking shop you've got here.

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-Thank you.

-Oh, yeah? No seaside clowns, though.

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Oh, well - I'm sure he'll find something.

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It's really nice to actually come in the shop and see so many antiques.

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Well, a quick look at the sign would have done it, Raj.

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There's a nautical cookery book here. It's a lovely little thing.

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I've never seen a nautical cookery book before.

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This dates from about 1920, 1930. It's an unusual little piece.

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Isn't this lovely, it says here, "The Nautical Cookery Book,

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"for the use of stewards and cooks of cargo vessels.

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"Stewed oysters or clams with white wine sauce",

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so they didn't eat too badly, did they?

0:16:110:16:13

It's got £20 on the ticket. I might be pushing it,

0:16:130:16:16

but if I get this for a fiver, I might do quite well on this.

0:16:160:16:19

I'm beginning to think that everything I buy is a fiver.

0:16:190:16:22

You're not alone there, Raj.

0:16:220:16:23

How's the lucky dip going?

0:16:250:16:27

Over here, we've got this almost magical figure on a carpet

0:16:270:16:32

-which appears to be a little Eastern cobbler, isn't he?

-Yes, he is.

0:16:320:16:36

Priced at £85, Paul.

0:16:360:16:38

-What's your best on him?

-50.

-50.

0:16:380:16:41

-Yeah, you see, you're good.

-Not everyone's cup of tea,

0:16:410:16:43

but he was designed by the famous CJ Noke,

0:16:430:16:47

plus, when it comes to

0:16:470:16:48

Royal Doulton, there's always a guide price to help out.

0:16:480:16:51

So there he is, HN1706.

0:16:510:16:56

Here.

0:16:560:16:57

His retail price is 275.

0:16:570:16:59

When it comes to auction, you normally drop it by about 75%.

0:16:590:17:05

It's a good price - food for thought.

0:17:050:17:07

So, the cobbler...

0:17:070:17:09

versus the clown.

0:17:090:17:11

It's like an episode of Batman in here. Holy knick-knacks!

0:17:110:17:15

He's already got plenty to ponder.

0:17:150:17:17

If I did buy and took a risk

0:17:170:17:19

-and bought the Doulton cobbler...

-Yes?

0:17:190:17:23

..and bought the clown, what would be your best prices to an old mate?

0:17:240:17:29

-£80 the pair.

-Oh, dear.

0:17:290:17:32

What do I really want to do?

0:17:330:17:35

-Your absolute bottom is?

-70. That's it.

0:17:350:17:39

Getting tense. Time for a spot of Somerset air.

0:17:390:17:42

It's a difficult decision.

0:17:420:17:44

I've got to think about my big find, my Worcester,

0:17:440:17:47

and how I put those in the sale, but these two objects,

0:17:470:17:50

if the price is right, if he can come down a bit,

0:17:500:17:53

I might take the two and then work it out later.

0:17:530:17:56

Gird your loins, then.

0:17:560:17:57

Is there anything you could do on the £70?

0:17:590:18:02

Oh!

0:18:020:18:04

Um...

0:18:040:18:05

-We'll go down to 60. That's a good price.

-Yeah.

0:18:050:18:09

I just wonder if I could perhaps acquire them both at £25 each?

0:18:090:18:12

-Put your hand there.

-Thanks a lot.

0:18:120:18:14

£50 the two. They got there.

0:18:140:18:18

Now, I wonder what Raj has unearthed?

0:18:180:18:20

I've spotted a pair of watercolours by a listed artist.

0:18:200:18:25

This is by... I believe it's Abraham Hulk.

0:18:250:18:29

It could be either Hulk senior or junior.

0:18:290:18:32

Incredibly, there are a whole dynasty of 19th-century

0:18:320:18:35

Anglo-Dutch painters of maritime scenes.

0:18:350:18:39

The price for the two is £110...

0:18:390:18:41

I'm going to really chance my arm on these.

0:18:430:18:46

Time to pipe Andrew aboard.

0:18:460:18:49

I quite like these, they're very nice and decorative

0:18:490:18:51

and the auction they're going to is on the coast.

0:18:510:18:55

-They might be perfect and they've been well framed...

-Yeah.

0:18:550:18:59

-But I'm going to be cheeky.

-OK. Cheek away.

0:18:590:19:02

-I can do you a good deal on these.

-You can?

0:19:020:19:05

I bought them, they came with another watercolour I really wanted.

0:19:050:19:08

-Right.

-This could be the big one for you

0:19:080:19:11

that gets us ahead of Charlie Hanson.

0:19:110:19:13

-Really?

-I think it could.

0:19:130:19:15

Hear that! He's practically on your team.

0:19:150:19:18

-I mean, would you take £20 for them?

-Yeah, go on, as it's you.

-Really?

0:19:180:19:23

Yeah. You've got yourself a deal.

0:19:230:19:25

-Really?

-Yeah!

-Shake his hand, then.

0:19:250:19:28

-Now I feel bad!

-You want to give me some more, don't you!

0:19:280:19:31

Well, I WAS going to go higher, but I'll tell you what I'll do.

0:19:310:19:33

-To be fair, I'm going to give you 25 for them.

-25, we've got a deal.

0:19:330:19:37

-Well, that is a first.

-I've seen something else. While I'm on a roll!

0:19:370:19:42

-We're on a roll now, aren't we?

-Yes! Can I show you this?

-Course you can.

0:19:420:19:46

This just a nice little nautical cookery book.

0:19:460:19:49

Can I offer you a fiver for that?

0:19:490:19:50

I can go make a phone call and find out for you.

0:19:500:19:54

I can't believe I got the pictures for £25!

0:19:540:19:56

-They've got to do well.

-Raj...?

-Yes.

0:19:560:19:59

I've given the dealer a phone call and the best she can do is ten quid.

0:19:590:20:03

-I've got to squeeze you on this one.

-OK, mate.

-Eight?

-Yeah, go on, then.

0:20:030:20:07

-You've got a deal. Thanks very much.

-I'll sort her out for the other.

0:20:070:20:10

While you're here, is there anything else nautical that you can think of?

0:20:100:20:13

I'll take a bit of a look around and see if I can find something.

0:20:130:20:16

You never know, it would be nice if there was something to go

0:20:160:20:19

-with it, make it a little bit of a job lot.

-More?!

0:20:190:20:22

He can't stop buying, today.

0:20:220:20:24

I was just thinking there's a nice flag here.

0:20:240:20:27

Got a bit of age to it, St George's flag.

0:20:270:20:30

Could be a naval flag, it's the sort of size they use,

0:20:300:20:33

-naval signalling flags.

-Yes, that might go perfect with the book.

0:20:330:20:36

-Can I make you an offer?

-Course you can.

-Will you take a fiver for it?

0:20:360:20:40

Yeah, go on - I'll take a fiver for that.

0:20:400:20:42

So Raj now has his watercolours

0:20:420:20:43

and another nautical lot of the cookbook and the flag.

0:20:430:20:47

I think he's been inspired by The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner.

0:20:470:20:50

I don't think there's any great age to this,

0:20:500:20:52

but it's just a pretty little sloop.

0:20:520:20:55

I should think this is as modern as anything.

0:20:550:20:58

A sloop, from the Dutch "sloep",

0:20:580:21:01

is a sailing boat with a single mast.

0:21:010:21:03

The ticket price is £24.

0:21:030:21:05

I'll get this for a tenner. It'll add...

0:21:050:21:08

-Just give some more oomph to the lot I've got.

-Or sink it.

0:21:080:21:12

-Andrew, this naval lot...

-This is growing now.

0:21:120:21:15

Yes, it's growing into a convoy! This sloop, here.

0:21:150:21:18

What about a tenner?

0:21:180:21:20

The absolute death on it is half price, 12.

0:21:200:21:24

-I'm not going to quibble on that.

-OK, thank you very much. That's good.

0:21:250:21:29

-Lovely.

-Not a bad haul, Raj.

0:21:290:21:31

Now, back to the driving lessons.

0:21:350:21:37

You know when you have a junction like back there,

0:21:370:21:40

-always go into first gear.

-Really?

0:21:400:21:42

You just let me know when you want me to do an emergency stop

0:21:420:21:45

and I'll do one.

0:21:450:21:46

Not quite yet!

0:21:460:21:47

TYRES SQUEAL

0:21:470:21:48

Right. Night-night!

0:21:500:21:51

Today is someone's very special day.

0:21:540:21:57

-It's your birthday!

-It sure is.

0:21:570:21:59

The sun is shining, you're on the road with your new best mate

0:21:590:22:04

and it's your birthday.

0:22:040:22:05

-How old are you today?

-Cut!

0:22:050:22:07

Our experienced experts certainly had a good day yesterday, acquiring

0:22:090:22:14

some watercolours, a cookbook, a flag, a sloop and a steam boiler.

0:22:140:22:19

To be honest, I haven't got a clue what it's worth.

0:22:190:22:21

Those set him back £70, leaving almost £190 in his wallet,

0:22:210:22:26

while Charles was equally acquisitive, plumping

0:22:260:22:30

for a clown, a Doulton figurine

0:22:300:22:32

and enough tea bowls to open a cafe.

0:22:320:22:34

I'm from Derbyshire, you know -

0:22:340:22:36

-things seem to be a bit more expensive down here.

-Really?!

0:22:360:22:39

That lot cost £250.

0:22:390:22:41

So, he's got just under £70 left for today's bargains.

0:22:410:22:45

I have to say that spending my birthday with you today is

0:22:450:22:48

a real pleasure. What are we stopping for?

0:22:480:22:51

Sorry, I was looking at a sign back there.

0:22:510:22:53

-I thought it was a stone, I thought it might be for sale!

-You carry on!

0:22:530:22:57

Later, they'll be making for an auction in Hampshire at Swanmore,

0:22:570:23:00

but the next stop

0:23:000:23:01

is at Wareham in Dorset.

0:23:010:23:03

Between the rivers Frome and Piddle sits the delightful town of Wareham.

0:23:070:23:12

I wonder if our birthday boy will find a pressie?

0:23:140:23:17

Good morning, Jake.

0:23:170:23:18

-Hi, how're you going?

-Very well, thank you.

-Nice to meet you.

-Lovely to meet you, too.

0:23:180:23:22

Very nice little shop you have here.

0:23:220:23:23

Anything that you think would be a good little buy for me?

0:23:230:23:27

We've got what I thought was a Chinese or Japanese cup, there.

0:23:270:23:31

We did have an Oriental expert look at it

0:23:310:23:33

and she actually said it was English.

0:23:330:23:35

I'm not saying it's going to be worth as much as the Ming one

0:23:350:23:38

-that went for about 20 million!

-If only, that would definitely upset Charles!

0:23:380:23:43

Yes, I think it would upset me as well, a little bit!

0:23:430:23:46

Quite, Jake!

0:23:460:23:48

The ticket price is £49. Odd he's after blue and white as well...

0:23:480:23:52

-Yeah, it's a 19th-century copy, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:23:520:23:55

But it's unusual to have these marks on the bottom.

0:23:550:23:57

If I was going to put money on that, I'd have said it was Japanese.

0:23:570:24:00

-What could you do it for?

-Um...

0:24:000:24:02

To give you a chance, I could definitely come down to 20 for you.

0:24:030:24:07

I guess they said it was what, mid-19th century?

0:24:070:24:09

Yes, I reckon it could be a little bit older.

0:24:090:24:12

I reckon it could be 200 years old.

0:24:120:24:15

It's got a lovely little design on it, too.

0:24:150:24:17

It's got the Japanese lady there.

0:24:170:24:19

It's blue and white, blue and white is...

0:24:190:24:21

Lots of people collect it.

0:24:210:24:23

-Well, we know two, anyway.

-£20, you say?

0:24:230:24:26

Yes, I reckon you'd have a chance at that.

0:24:260:24:29

-You've got a deal.

-All right, brilliant.

-Thanks very much.

-Cheers.

0:24:300:24:33

It could create a buzz at the auction.

0:24:330:24:36

I think Charles has similar hopes, Raj!

0:24:360:24:38

-What else do they have?

-Here's a nice old piece.

0:24:380:24:41

In fact, funnily enough, at our auction rooms,

0:24:410:24:44

we have a collection of gavels!

0:24:440:24:46

I wonder when he'll finally splash some serious cash?

0:24:460:24:50

What do you think is your rarest piece in here?

0:24:500:24:52

These are actually quite nice.

0:24:520:24:54

We had these looked at, they're solid silver.

0:24:540:24:57

It's actually a Danish silver mark.

0:24:570:25:00

That's quite an unusual design.

0:25:000:25:02

What have you got on those? 169.

0:25:020:25:06

They could be Georg Jensen.

0:25:060:25:08

Georg Jensen is one of the most famous Danish makers.

0:25:080:25:11

Just as a matter of interest, what would be the best on these?

0:25:110:25:14

I might be able to do 100 on them for you.

0:25:140:25:17

If I was going into an auction where the auction was going to be

0:25:170:25:19

online, I think I'd snap those up.

0:25:190:25:22

-I think because I'm not sure, Jake, I'm going to have to leave them.

-Ah!

0:25:230:25:27

I thought we were getting somewhere, then.

0:25:270:25:30

-Chess sets suit you better, sir?

-It's not that old.

0:25:300:25:33

It's definitely a sort of turn-of-the-century one,

0:25:330:25:35

I'd say this was probably early 1900s.

0:25:350:25:39

Looks like it's a boxwood...

0:25:390:25:41

-What have we got on there, 29?

-29.

0:25:410:25:43

I can certainly come down to 20 for you.

0:25:430:25:46

To be honest, I'd want to be paying more about ten.

0:25:460:25:49

How about meeting in the middle at 15?

0:25:490:25:51

I think there's definitely a profit in this, Jake, with that at 15.

0:25:510:25:54

No doubt about it. The thing is, I don't know

0:25:540:25:57

if you know, but I'm up against Charles Hanson!

0:25:570:25:59

I suppose Charles ought to be flattered by such tactics!

0:25:590:26:03

All right, then - to give you a chance, I'll do it for a tenner.

0:26:030:26:05

How can I turn down a chess set for £10?

0:26:050:26:08

There is actually a wooden board down there.

0:26:080:26:10

It doesn't actually belong to the chess set,

0:26:100:26:12

but it might be something that you could look at.

0:26:120:26:15

That's not a bad board.

0:26:150:26:18

-Can you do that for a tenner?

-Yes,

0:26:180:26:20

I'll throw it in.

0:26:200:26:21

-Brilliant.

-Yeah.

-Fantastic. Great.

0:26:210:26:24

So, £20 for those and £20 for the cup and saucer.

0:26:240:26:28

-£40.

-Thanks a lot.

0:26:280:26:29

-Thanks again.

-He's got quite a pile, now.

0:26:290:26:33

Meanwhile, just outside Wareham, Charles has come to find the

0:26:360:26:40

tiny cottage that was once the home of a legendary British war hero.

0:26:400:26:45

-Good morning!

-Morning, Charles.

0:26:450:26:47

-Alison.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:26:470:26:49

I feel like saying, "I'm Hanson of the Road Trip!"

0:26:490:26:52

Yes(!)

0:26:520:26:54

Clouds Hill was where TE Lawrence, better known as Lawrence of Arabia,

0:26:540:26:57

came after his famous exploits during World War I.

0:26:570:27:01

He came down here in 1923,

0:27:010:27:02

found the cottage as a place to retreat from what he called

0:27:020:27:06

"the brutality of the barrack life" and it's very individual inside.

0:27:060:27:10

Lawrence was stationed with the Tank Corps nearby - they're still here -

0:27:100:27:15

when he rented this old forester's cottage.

0:27:150:27:18

Every detail from the Greek inscription over the lintel,

0:27:180:27:21

which means "Why worry?" to the interesting plumbing,

0:27:210:27:23

reflects his unique personality.

0:27:230:27:26

Wowee, Alison - it's just a cottage like no other.

0:27:260:27:31

It is a tiny cottage with just four rooms.

0:27:320:27:35

It's so dark in here - why is it so dark?

0:27:350:27:38

Because there was no electric lighting,

0:27:380:27:39

we've kept it the way Lawrence had it, with no electric light.

0:27:390:27:42

When was the building given to the Trust?

0:27:420:27:44

In 1937, his brother gave it to us, so just two years after his death.

0:27:440:27:48

We've been looking after it for nearly 80 years.

0:27:480:27:50

So, in fact, there was no time to see any alterations,

0:27:500:27:54

it's just how he left it.

0:27:540:27:56

-We have it very much like that.

-Well, almost,

0:27:560:27:59

because this room, the book room,

0:27:590:28:01

once contained 2,000 volumes.

0:28:010:28:03

So when many of the more valuable tomes were removed to the

0:28:030:28:07

Ashmolean Museum, Lawrence's friends replaced them with images of

0:28:070:28:11

the man who brought about the Arab Revolt against the Turkish army.

0:28:110:28:15

He was by no means the only British officer helping the Arabs,

0:28:160:28:20

but he was unique in that he had learnt their language,

0:28:200:28:24

he'd absorbed their manners and he adopted their dress and he enabled them.

0:28:240:28:29

He just was this unique character, which they adored.

0:28:290:28:32

Exactly, he didn't try to tell them what to do,

0:28:320:28:36

he recognised that they were tribespeople used to travelling about,

0:28:360:28:39

so he developed guerrilla tactics

0:28:390:28:41

and he earned the respect of the Arabs

0:28:410:28:44

because he showed that whatever they could do, he could do as well.

0:28:440:28:48

And the archaeologist who could ride a camel as well as converse

0:28:480:28:51

in at least eight languages created a bolthole to match.

0:28:510:28:55

Is this a bedroom, then, or...?

0:28:550:28:58

-Lawrence didn't do anything in a conventional way.

-No.

0:28:580:29:00

Not a conventional bed, a huge divan, it must be about 6ft square,

0:29:000:29:04

covered in leather.

0:29:040:29:06

He used it more as a couch, somewhere to sit and look at his books.

0:29:060:29:09

Really? So he'd almost recline on this couch...

0:29:090:29:12

Yes, maybe talking to friends.

0:29:120:29:14

Then, in the middle, you can see there's a sleeping bag.

0:29:140:29:17

-He stitched those words "Me um" onto it...

-Which means?

-Mine, in Latin.

0:29:170:29:21

-Really?

-Upstairs, you'll see the one that goes with it, "Tu um" - yours.

0:29:210:29:27

Even this chair, I've never seen such an angular Art Deco chair.

0:29:270:29:32

-That was made for him.

-Made for him?

-He was very slight.

0:29:320:29:34

When he came back from the war,

0:29:340:29:36

he was probably only about 80lbs.

0:29:360:29:39

-He'd lost a phenomenal amount of weight.

-80lbs?!

-But lovely, isn't it?

0:29:390:29:42

He's got sheepskin, so it'd be lovely and warm at his back.

0:29:420:29:45

He would have had it turned around, feet on the fender, reading his book.

0:29:450:29:50

-He designed this and had it made by some friends.

-What an ingenious man.

0:29:500:29:53

He even had a little gadget there

0:29:530:29:54

so he didn't have to hold his own toasting fork up.

0:29:540:29:57

This comes out, you pop your toasting fork in there to toast your bread.

0:29:570:30:01

I just feel so close to the great man,

0:30:010:30:04

it really is quite a special feeling.

0:30:040:30:07

But crumpets aside, Lawrence was no cook.

0:30:070:30:11

Instead, he lined a huge larder with aluminium to store tinned food

0:30:110:30:15

and added a bed for his overnight guests.

0:30:150:30:18

Lawrence did his entertaining upstairs, in the music room.

0:30:180:30:22

It's so different. What I love is this huge gramophone.

0:30:220:30:25

I've never seen such a big horn.

0:30:250:30:27

I mean, it's almost like a bachelor pad.

0:30:270:30:30

Absolutely, he often describes in his letters sitting here with

0:30:300:30:33

friends, playing music, saving certain ones until it was dark

0:30:330:30:37

-because they had more impact.

-Really?

0:30:370:30:40

At Lawrence's soirees, the likes of EM Forster and Robert Graves

0:30:400:30:44

would apparently sit round clutching a tin of olives - Thomas Hardy, too.

0:30:440:30:48

Although there is a bathroom, I wonder how they coped without a loo?

0:30:480:30:52

-So no toilet, but hot water.

-Absolutely.

0:30:520:30:54

He always said that if he had the luxuries, he could do without the

0:30:540:30:58

essentials and his luxuries were his hot bath, his books and his music.

0:30:580:31:01

I like his style. I'd better go.

0:31:010:31:03

It's been wonderful, thank you so much. I think nature is calling!

0:31:030:31:08

Let me show you where the spade would be, by the front door!

0:31:080:31:10

Thank you very much!

0:31:100:31:12

Now, fortunately for our two,

0:31:140:31:15

Wareham is a convenient distance from the Hampshire

0:31:150:31:18

town of Ringwood, where they'll be

0:31:180:31:20

enjoying one last shop - together.

0:31:200:31:23

-Oh, dear.

-To be honest, if you go up there and park up up there...

0:31:230:31:28

If you... If you...!

0:31:280:31:31

-Steady on!

-If you can park up up there, I'd appreciate it!

0:31:310:31:35

-Wait for me!

-Lordy(!)

0:31:350:31:38

-He won't let me in!

-Control yourself, please.

-Sorry about that!

0:31:400:31:44

-Our best behaviour, OK?

-Yes, best behaviour. Hello, Carol.

0:31:440:31:47

-Hello, I'm Carol Miller.

-How do you do? Nice to meet you, I'm Raj.

0:31:470:31:51

Which way are we going?!

0:31:510:31:53

-Who's this?

-I'm Charlie.

-Oh, sorry, Charles!

0:31:530:31:56

We can hardly blame him for getting a little overexcited.

0:31:560:32:00

It's a very nice shop, after all,

0:32:000:32:01

with a bit of French influence here and there.

0:32:010:32:04

-You like oysters, don't you?

-Well, I don't, but my husband did.

0:32:040:32:08

I've noticed in all the rooms are these beautiful oyster dishes.

0:32:080:32:11

Yes, that's quite a nice one, that oyster plate.

0:32:110:32:15

That's quite nice. That's French.

0:32:150:32:17

Dating it, I would say between 1890 and 1910.

0:32:170:32:21

Yes, that's about right.

0:32:210:32:23

It's difficult to tell exactly, but they are good...

0:32:230:32:26

That one's in good condition, too.

0:32:260:32:28

How much could you do this for?

0:32:280:32:29

Really, it's marked 65...

0:32:290:32:33

45.

0:32:330:32:35

That's a good deal.

0:32:350:32:36

Could you do it a little bit less?

0:32:360:32:39

What do you mean by "a little bit less"?

0:32:390:32:41

-It's not going to be a tenner!

-Has she seen him in action?!

0:32:420:32:45

Would you do £30?

0:32:450:32:47

Oh, I don't know that I could do 30.

0:32:470:32:49

-I'll do 35 just to be... Just to be nice.

-35?

0:32:500:32:53

-Are you sure you're happy with that?

-Yes, yes.

0:32:530:32:55

In that case, definitely, we have a deal at 35,

0:32:550:32:58

thank you very much indeed, Carol.

0:32:580:33:01

-Now, what's Charles up to?

-I quite like this lamp over here, Valerie.

0:33:010:33:06

It, um...

0:33:060:33:08

jumps out because it's probably eastern.

0:33:080:33:10

If we lift it up very carefully...

0:33:100:33:12

..without damaging the...

0:33:140:33:15

-Oops!

-Oh! Cor, dear(!)

0:33:150:33:18

Without damaging the shade?!

0:33:180:33:20

I'll put it on there for safekeeping! It is...

0:33:200:33:24

A very nice Japanese bronze vase,

0:33:240:33:29

probably Meiji period,

0:33:290:33:32

so 19th century.

0:33:320:33:33

Beautifully patinated

0:33:330:33:36

in this lustre, oily bronze.

0:33:360:33:38

I'm so sorry, but it isn't for sale.

0:33:380:33:41

-She wouldn't be open to an offer at all?

-Not at all.

-What a shame!

0:33:410:33:44

That is unfortunate! Although his rival may not see it that way.

0:33:440:33:48

-Have you bought up already?

-I think I might have done.

-Being serious?

0:33:480:33:51

-I'm serious!

-OK. Well, the world's my oyster!

-Yeah!

0:33:510:33:54

-Funny you should say that.

-Quite!

0:33:540:33:57

Now, Charles hasn't actually added to his purchases here,

0:33:570:34:00

so let's have a look at what they'll be taking to the auction.

0:34:000:34:03

Raj parted with £145 for a steam boiler.

0:34:030:34:07

A flag. A sloop and a cookbook.

0:34:070:34:10

Some watercolours.

0:34:100:34:12

A cup and saucer.

0:34:120:34:14

A chess set and board.

0:34:140:34:16

And, finally, an oyster dish.

0:34:160:34:18

While Charles spent £250 on a clown.

0:34:180:34:21

A Doulton figurine.

0:34:210:34:23

Some oriental tea bowls and six Worcester tea bowls

0:34:230:34:26

that he's dividing into three lots of two. Get it?

0:34:260:34:30

So, what did they make of each other's buys?

0:34:300:34:32

There's no doubt about it that Charles has a reputation

0:34:320:34:35

for being a bit of a clown.

0:34:350:34:37

I just can't believe that steam boiler.

0:34:370:34:39

I think it cost £20. Market value probably today is more like £10.

0:34:390:34:44

I do like the Worcester blue-and-white bowls.

0:34:440:34:47

They are lovely.

0:34:470:34:49

I do like the 18th-19th century-style tea bowl and saucer.

0:34:490:34:53

In fact, it's more like 1920s.

0:34:530:34:56

Full of Eastern promise, I doubt!

0:34:560:34:58

After setting off from Blackford in Somerset,

0:34:580:35:01

our experts are now heading for an auction

0:35:010:35:03

close to the Hampshire coast at Swanmore.

0:35:030:35:06

The car is purring. You are driving it like a man.

0:35:060:35:09

Your feet look better on the pedals as well, sir, I don't know why.

0:35:090:35:12

-Are you wearing different shoes?

-No.

0:35:120:35:14

Welcome to this fine Edwardian pump house,

0:35:150:35:18

now converted to a quite different use.

0:35:180:35:20

-Feeling pumped up?

-Yep.

0:35:200:35:23

I wonder what auctioneer Dominic Foster thinks will prosper here?

0:35:230:35:27

Period ceramics don't sell that well.

0:35:270:35:29

Things like the period Worcester might be a little bit slow.

0:35:290:35:33

My favourite item today is probably the cast-iron boiler cylinder,

0:35:330:35:37

it's quite an interesting object. It's quite useful,

0:35:370:35:40

could be used as a stick stand or in the garden, something like that.

0:35:400:35:43

Hey, I didn't see that coming. So, boiler time for Raj.

0:35:430:35:46

Heavy enough. But how hot can it be?

0:35:460:35:49

-I've got 40, 50 and I've £60.

-No!

-Nice.

-Wow.

0:35:490:35:53

-62 there, 65 anywhere?

-Well done.

0:35:530:35:56

-65 here. 68? 70.

-I can't believe it.

0:35:560:36:01

-£70 here. 2 anywhere? 75 here.

-Keep going, I need it.

-You are.

0:36:010:36:06

78 anywhere?

0:36:060:36:07

-Come on.

-75, I'll sell it then at £75.

0:36:070:36:11

Give me a high five.

0:36:110:36:13

-GAVEL BANGS

-That's brilliant. Wowee!

0:36:130:36:16

Riveting result, what!

0:36:160:36:18

Next up, it's Charlie the clown.

0:36:180:36:20

Look at me, son, when I'm talking to you.

0:36:200:36:22

Bids on it here, I've got 40, 45.

0:36:220:36:25

-Come on, let's go.

-48 there is.

0:36:250:36:27

50 anywhere?

0:36:270:36:29

-There is 2.

-Good man, we're going, we're going.

0:36:290:36:32

58, 60. At 58. 60 anywhere?

0:36:320:36:35

"Gottle of geer."

0:36:360:36:39

Oh, is it my lot, is it my lot? Oh, no.

0:36:390:36:42

-It's definitely yours.

-65 anywhere?

0:36:420:36:44

-Oh, no.

-Sell it for £62 then.

0:36:440:36:47

-GAVEL BANGS

-165.

0:36:470:36:49

-Was that for the clown?

-It was.

0:36:490:36:51

-Yes, it was.

-It was.

-Do try and keep up.

-Sorry, sir, I apologise.

0:36:510:36:55

Nice profit, Charlie.

0:36:560:36:58

Next, it's Raj's little maritime collection.

0:36:580:37:02

A couple of bids here, 20, 24 here.

0:37:020:37:04

Well done. Profit.

0:37:040:37:06

26, 28, 30.

0:37:060:37:09

2. 34. 36. 38.

0:37:090:37:12

-40. 2.

-Yes, yes.

0:37:120:37:15

46, 48. 50.

0:37:150:37:19

-You've got a gift, you have.

-Yes.

-2?

0:37:190:37:21

No, at £50. Sell it at £50, then.

0:37:210:37:24

Bit more, bit more.

0:37:240:37:26

-GAVEL BANGS

-1252.

0:37:260:37:27

-Well done, chief.

-Yep, doubled its money.

0:37:270:37:30

How will his Hulks fare?

0:37:300:37:32

-What were they priced at originally?

-110.

-And they cost you 25.

0:37:320:37:37

-Yeah.

-Crikey me. I like your style.

-It's the way I smile.

0:37:370:37:41

Again, a couple of bids here.

0:37:410:37:43

-I've got 40 and 5. £48.

-Wow, it's good.

-50 anywhere?

0:37:430:37:47

50 there is. 2 anywhere? 52. 55, sir? Yes? No.

0:37:470:37:53

55. 58. 60. 2. 65.

0:37:530:37:57

68. 70.

0:37:570:37:59

2 anywhere? £70. 2 anywhere?

0:37:590:38:02

-Come on, come on.

-Selling them at £70.

0:38:020:38:05

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yours, sir.

0:38:050:38:07

Not quite the smash he was after. But not bad.

0:38:070:38:11

You're like the ocean around here, so calm and serene

0:38:110:38:13

in your profit-making machine, in which you are.

0:38:130:38:16

Because I know I'm up against admiral of the fleet.

0:38:160:38:20

I tell you what. Hanson's walking the plank at this rate.

0:38:200:38:25

Enough. Time for Raj's chess gambit instead.

0:38:250:38:29

35, 38 here. 40 anywhere?

0:38:290:38:32

-Profit anywhere.

-Yes, good. 38's OK.

-40 anywhere?

0:38:320:38:35

40 there is. 2. 44. 46 anywhere?

0:38:350:38:40

Sell it then and £44.

0:38:400:38:43

GAVEL BANGS

0:38:430:38:44

-I salute you.

-Rightly so, another profit.

0:38:440:38:47

Now, what about Charles's china part one?

0:38:470:38:50

-I've got 38, I got £40 here.

-Let's go.

-2 anywhere?

0:38:500:38:53

42 there is. 44. 46.

0:38:530:38:56

-48. 50.

-Oh, Charles.

-2. 54.

0:38:560:39:00

56, 58. 60 anywhere?

0:39:000:39:04

-Ooh.

-So, at £58 here. 60 anywhere?

0:39:040:39:08

-One more!

-At £58.

0:39:080:39:11

-GAVEL BANGS

-1252.

0:39:110:39:13

That's good, that's very good.

0:39:130:39:15

Yep, not bad for the makeweights of the deal.

0:39:150:39:18

Time for Raj's blue and white. It might not be Ming but here goes.

0:39:180:39:22

15. I've got 18. 20 is there?

0:39:220:39:25

-Come on.

-20 there.

0:39:250:39:27

I've got 2. 24. At 24 here. 26 anywhere?

0:39:270:39:31

That's good.

0:39:310:39:33

Selling then at £24.

0:39:330:39:35

-GAVEL BANGS

-At least it's a profit.

0:39:350:39:38

But how will Charles' big buy fare?

0:39:380:39:41

The first of his three pairs of tea bowls.

0:39:410:39:44

Bids on the book, yes.

0:39:440:39:46

-35. 38 here.

-I'm in trouble.

0:39:460:39:48

40. There is 2.

0:39:480:39:49

44. 46. 48. 50. And 2. 55.

0:39:490:39:54

-58. 60.

-Here we go. Yep. Profit.

0:39:540:39:57

65, 68, At 65. 68. 70.

0:39:570:40:01

And 2. 75. 78.

0:40:010:40:05

-80. And 2.

-Charles.

0:40:050:40:07

85, 88. 90.

0:40:070:40:11

No? At £88. 90 anywhere?

0:40:120:40:15

Two fat ladies at 88.

0:40:150:40:17

Sell them at £80 then.

0:40:170:40:18

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yours, madam.

0:40:180:40:20

But they're still great value, they're still great value.

0:40:200:40:22

More of that, and he'll do fine.

0:40:220:40:24

The second lot.

0:40:240:40:26

I've got 50, and I've got £60.

0:40:260:40:28

2 anywhere? 62, 65. 68, 70.

0:40:280:40:32

2. 75. 78.

0:40:320:40:35

80. 2. 85.

0:40:350:40:37

88. 90. At 88.

0:40:370:40:40

-90 anywhere?

-Two fat ladies again, it's two fat ladies.

0:40:400:40:44

-At £88 then.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:40:440:40:46

I've now got four fat ladies.

0:40:460:40:48

Yep, very respectful. He's set fair for a big profit

0:40:480:40:50

if this pair delivers.

0:40:500:40:53

£40 for them somewhere? 40 bid. 2 there is.

0:40:530:40:56

-44. 46.

-We're warming up.

0:40:560:40:58

50. 2. 55. 58.

0:40:580:41:02

60. 2.

0:41:020:41:04

-Oh, no.

-65.

0:41:040:41:06

68. 70.

0:41:060:41:08

No?

0:41:080:41:10

70. At £68. Oh, no. 70 anywhere?

0:41:100:41:12

At £68 then.

0:41:120:41:15

-GAVEL BANGS

-I didn't make six fat ladies.

0:41:150:41:18

No. I think in "Mingo" that's called saving grace. Strangely enough.

0:41:180:41:22

Raj's big spend, the oyster dish.

0:41:220:41:24

I'm not going to make a loss on it but it's a lovely thing.

0:41:240:41:28

-It could make a loss, let's be honest.

-Sorry?

-It could make a loss.

0:41:280:41:32

-Sorry.

-It could make a loss.

0:41:320:41:33

30, 34 here.

0:41:330:41:35

-Well done, profit.

-No, no, not yet.

-Put it there, you've done it.

0:41:350:41:38

36 there is. 38, 40. 2 anywhere?

0:41:380:41:42

-At £40 here. 2 anywhere?

-It's worth more than 40.

0:41:420:41:46

-You've done it.

-It's worth more than 40.

0:41:460:41:48

Well done.

0:41:480:41:49

-GAVEL BANGS

-Thanks for coming.

0:41:490:41:51

Definitely worth shelling out for.

0:41:510:41:53

Raj is just in front on this auction.

0:41:530:41:55

But it's never over until the cobbler's cobbled.

0:41:550:41:59

-Couple of bids with me. 40 and 45.

-That's good, I'm happy.

0:41:590:42:05

48. 50 anywhere?

0:42:050:42:06

50 anywhere?

0:42:060:42:09

50 here. And 5, sir? 55.

0:42:090:42:12

-58 anywhere?

-I'm really pleased.

0:42:120:42:15

Sell it at £55 then.

0:42:150:42:18

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yours, sir.

0:42:180:42:19

Profits all round.

0:42:190:42:21

So, who's coming out on top today?

0:42:210:42:24

The competition is sparking. Come on, I'm sparring, let's go.

0:42:240:42:28

Charles began with £317.46.

0:42:280:42:31

After paying auction costs, he made a profit of £93.58.

0:42:310:42:36

So, he still leads overall with £411.04.

0:42:360:42:41

But Raj wins the day.

0:42:410:42:43

Having started out at £259.58,

0:42:430:42:47

he made, after paying auction costs, a profit of £103.46,

0:42:470:42:52

leaving him with £363.04 to spend next time.

0:42:520:42:56

Wow.

0:42:560:42:57

You're on the road now.

0:42:570:42:59

You're showing me the way.

0:42:590:43:01

And the way is Dorset.

0:43:010:43:03

Next on Antiques Road Trip, a little of what you fancy.

0:43:050:43:09

-He's into fresh.

-Is he?

-I don't mind if it's a bit old.

0:43:100:43:14

And, not everyone's cup of tea.

0:43:140:43:16

It's not minging. But, in fact, this is Ming.

0:43:160:43:20

It's leg two for auctioneers Charles Hanson and Raj Bisram as they take their Triumph through Somerset, Dorset and Hampshire before ending at an auction in Swanmore.