Episode 8 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 8

Antiques challenge. Duelling auctioneers Charles Hanson and Raj Bisram travel through Dorset and Somerset before heading for an auction in Bridgwater.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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I don't know what to do. HORN HONKS

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..with £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game. THEY LAUGH

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Roadtrip.

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Yeah.

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Today, our well-read experts are on the road to a literary destination.

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Dorchester. It's Thomas Hardy country.

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I actually studied Hardy at school in English literature.

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I had to do the Mayor Of Casterbridge which, of course,

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-is all set in and around the Dorchester area.

-Really?

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Yes, for Raj, Charles and their Triumph Herald,

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the only way really is Wessex. Ha!

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-Gorgeous.

-Isn't it gorgeous?

-It is, it's absolutely...

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You're not bad yourself either.

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THEY LAUGH

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Derby dandy Charles Hanson is an auctioneer

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and a runaway Roadtrip champion.

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-Round three.

-BELL RINGS

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Then there's Raj Bisram.

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Auctioneer and poker player. I wouldn't say he's cheap but...

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I'm beginning to think that everything I buy is a fiver.

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Raj, from Kent,

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has so far turned his £200 stake into a very respectable £363.04

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While Charles, who began with the same sum,

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has already managed to double it, with £411.04 to spend today.

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But it's not all about profit. There is the car to think of too.

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-Shall we give it a name?

-Yet, I think so.

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Let's call it Bella.

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-Bella is a perfect name for our car.

-Bella?

-Ciao, Bella.

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-OK.

-Which means hi in Italian.

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Si, si.

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Our journey starts out at Corsham in Wiltshire

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and takes in most of the southwest of England before ending up,

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around 900 miles later, in Crewkerne in Somerset.

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But today we begin in the Dorset town of Dorchester

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and head west towards an auction in Somerset, at Bridgwater.

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Now, much as I'm sure Raj would like just to hang out in the town where

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Thomas Hardy spent most of his life,

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he is also desperate to beat Charles.

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So the antique centre it is. Relax.

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You don't have to park the bus.

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-Look at that.

-It's huge.

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Just park next to it.

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Handbrake is on.

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Always a good idea, that.

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-Morning, sir.

-Good morning.

-How are you?

-I'm very well, thank you.

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-Your name is?

-Martin.

-I've been here before, haven't I?

-You have.

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-Meet my colleague Raj.

-Hello.

-Good to see you.

-Nice to meet you too.

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-Nice big place you've got here.

-It is.

-Thank you.

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-Is this all fresh stuff?

-A lot of it.

-All fresh.

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-Yeah, he's into fresh.

-Is he?

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I don't mind if it's a bit old. THEY LAUGH

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Well, whatever takes your fancy.

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Martin can negotiate on behalf of the several dealers who own

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all these items.

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I quite like...

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There is a lovely little pot lid on the bottom shelf down here.

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"St James' Clipper Ship - Sovereign of the Seas."

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It could be new, it could be 1980s.

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If it's an early one with a maritime interest,

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it could be ripe for auction.

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-Martin?

-Yes.

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Hang on...

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-I just wonder, you've got a little pot lid over here.

-Uh-huh.

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Ooh, Raj!

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I wonder how much it is.

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The best on it is 32.

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Naughty.

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-OK.

-I'll be with you in a sec.

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That's Raj!

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Yes.

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He's everywhere.

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The real Martin.

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Would you mind? Thanks a lot.

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It's not overly old, but on the back here, you'll see it reads,

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"English porcelain, Staffordshire."

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And this would probably be from the 1960s.

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The other thing I liked was this fork here.

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Almost what appears to be a bread fork, or perhaps a toasting fork.

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Or pickles.

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-It almost looks to be like 17th century.

-Sure.

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I don't think it is.

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-We've got here for example the old...

-I would say needlework.

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-Needlework, exactly.

-You find some really odd pieces made in bone.

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You never know quite what they are for.

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The ticket price is ten pounds.

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What could it be, five pounds?

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-No, I think it's worth a little bit more than that.

-Yeah.

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-Two pound apiece.

-Two, four, six, eight.

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Would you do the group for six pounds?

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Call it seven and I will shake your hand.

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For seven pounds...

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Well, I'm off and running.

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-Worth a go.

-Yeah, worth a go.

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That didn't take too long.

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Trousers up. I'm off.

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Now, where has that Raj got to?

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-I keep being drawn to this area.

-Right.

-There is a few things.

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A nice little nest of drawers.

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They are either called collectors' drawers or spice drawers.

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This one is late 19th century. They are very, very useful.

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Very, very saleable.

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Because of the little tabs on it, and it's French,

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it looks like it might even be an apothecary one.

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It's priced at £175. You see, if that could be about 50 or £60...

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Are we way too off?

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-Unlikely. Highly unlikely.

-Yeah?

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£100 best price.

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Yeah, it's not quite enough, is it?

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I wonder whether, if I put a few things together in this section,

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-we could then renegotiate with them?

-We can have a go.

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Yeah, we can have a go. There are a few things down here.

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-There is the three antique brass spoons.

-Right, yeah.

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-These three, I quite like those.

-They are nice.

-Yeah.

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-They are a bit different.

-Sure.

-And also, I quite like the Dalton beaker.

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I was just checking to see if the rim is silver.

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And it looks like it is.

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So that would be one, two, three different lots in this section.

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OK, so ticket price would be 175, 36 on the spoons, 59 on the beaker.

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All right, leave it with me and let me see what I can do for you.

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Would you?

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It looks like he's about to spend a serious amount of money.

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Mainly so he can get his mitts on those drawers.

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Good news?

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The three pieces - 150.

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Very best I could do, I'm afraid.

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Can I ask you to go back to them one more time then, OK?

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150 and will they throw that in as well?

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-The wooden bowl?

-Yeah. The wooden ball as well.

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It's very rustic. I can see this in a Somerset farmhouse, full of fruit.

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-It's got £22 on it.

-Give me a minute.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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Hang on, chaps. Look who's here.

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Sorry, guys. Sorry.

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Yeah, give them a moment, Charles. I think a deal is in sight at last.

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Give me another fiver and we're done. 155.

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155.

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-We have a deal.

-Excellent.

-We got there, thank you.

-Well done.

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He's being spied on, and he knows it.

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Are we agreed on £350?

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-Yeah?

-350 would be fantastic.

-I've spent all my money.

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If I don't make £1,000 on this, I should give up my job.

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He's just spent 360. I don't know what on.

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But that's one, you know, mean spend. That's frightening.

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Wow!

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He's fibbing, Charles.

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-You know, sometimes when you eavesdrop, it doesn't pay off.

-No.

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-No.

-No.

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That'll teach you, Charles.

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Now it's his turn in that corner. Anything left?

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Wow.

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Goodness me, there is some really good things over here.

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I love these early sticks.

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What I love about these sticks and their reeded, tapered form

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is the fact that they will date to around 1760.

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What I love about them

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is that tactile quality of handling something that is 250 years old.

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And we haven't got the one, we've got the pair.

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And I love them even more because you, today, can buy a good

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pair of mid-18th-century gilded brass candlesticks for £30.

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Hey, Martin.

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-Hi, Charles.

-I love these candlesticks.

-Right.

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How much could they be for the pair?

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£30. We could probably squeeze to 25, Charles.

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They are really nice. Yeah. I think they are charming.

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You wouldn't do 20, would you?

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20...

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-Go on, why not. The sun is shining today.

-Good man.

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Tell me, Martin. This big wooden dish here, has it got some age?

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I don't think it's got a massive amount of age.

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Oh, dear. Come on, Martin, speak up.

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It's sold, Charles, unfortunately. You've just missed out on it.

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Oh, no! Charles, I'd like to step in here at this point.

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Highly embarrassing.

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Who bought it? I love it. Did you really buy it?

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-Yeah.

-Put it there. Really?

-Yeah.

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-Make an offer, make an offer.

-It's gorgeous.

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-I'll make a small profit on it.

-Get out of here.

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Yeah, let's get out of here. £27 in total, sir.

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But that's enough shopping for a while.

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Time to travel south to Dorset's Jurassic Coast

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on the Isle of Portland.

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Look at that view! Wow!

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Where Charles has come to Portland Bill, the southernmost

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tip of Dorset, to visit the disused Old Higher Lighthouse.

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-How do I get up?

-Through the door there.

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Although the lighthouse has now been closed for over a century...

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Crikey. It's a bit steep.

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Fran Lockyer, the current owner,

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can tell Charles about a controversial earlier resident -

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Marie Stopes.

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-Pleased to meet you. Do have a seat.

-What an amazing landscape you have.

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It is, isn't it?

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The Jurassic Coast, with its incredible fossils, was the

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reason that Marie Stopes - a leading paleobotanist - came here in 1923.

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But her name is justly famed worldwide for her

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work in a different field. Family planning.

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How did it all begin?

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How did she get into the whole subject of birth control?

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She worried about women having to have

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so many children that were unplanned. And she was very keen to alter that.

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So she went into contraception.

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She gained popularity, in the first instance, with the books she wrote.

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She wanted them to be cheap so the poorest people could buy them.

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And that brought her fame

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until, of course, the Catholic Church got involved.

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They didn't like what she was doing one little bit.

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Stopes' book, Married Love, and the sequel, Wise Parenthood,

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published around the end of the First World War,

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reflected her belief that there should be equality in marriage.

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Those caused quite a furore but sold well

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and were soon reprinted several times.

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Emotion came into it. Caring came into it.

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-How to look after your partner.

-Married Love.

-Yeah.

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-That's an interesting title, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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But what's so amazing is the fact that she herself was so naive.

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Originally.

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Her first marriage was never consummated and she had it annulled.

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So really, she had no experience of her own at all,

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just this overwhelming desire to help women with huge families.

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Together with her second husband,

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Stopes opened Britain's very first family planning clinic in 1921.

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Run by midwives and doctors,

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the London clinic offered free advice on contraception.

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Even going back to 1900,

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what contraception was there in the Victorian times?

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Nothing at all?

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LAUGHING: You'd be surprised.

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Back in Egyptian times, there was natural sponge.

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That would have been used. Lemon juice. Balloons, children's balloons.

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All manner of strange things.

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The Mothers' Clinic was soon followed by other Stopes clinics,

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which opened in the '30s and '40s, against sizeable opposition.

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By which time, Marie Stopes had come here to recover after

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defeat at the lengthy libel trial to protect her reputation.

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She spent every penny defending this right. It didn't work against her.

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-No.

-Because the women realised that there was something there for them.

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And they just flocked to the clinics.

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Away from the headlines, Stopes restored the old lighthouse

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and amongst all fossils,

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soon rediscovered her love of palaeontology.

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And then she decided that the island should have its own museum.

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-Of fossils?

-That's right, yes.

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And she donated this lovely old cottage which was called

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-Avis's Cottage, because it's in Thomas Hardy's book.

-Wowee.

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It was a lovely museum. For the size of the island, it's fantastic.

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-Is it far away?

-No, a couple of miles.

-Can I give you a ride?

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-In the car.

-In the Herald.

-Will I freeze to death?

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Marie Stopes became the first curator of the Portland Museum

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in 1930.

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Let's go to this museum.

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Once a rising star of the study of fossil plants

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and the author of influential works, Stopes donated

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several of the artefacts here, including a megalosaurus toe bone.

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Knowing a bit about antiques of course, we know of Portland stone.

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And I can see around me now some wonderful carved Portland stone.

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Even the floor we are standing on.

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Obviously, through the quarrying, a lot of the fossils got exposed.

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You've gotten the ammonites, there is a nice one down there.

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I think what she wanted to do was bring to the attention of local

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people what they were actually sitting on.

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The museum part of it and the palaeontology and all that,

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has never made any headlines or anything.

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-It's always been the birth control.

-Yes.

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And really, this needs to be brought out

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because she was a pioneer in this as well.

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Yeah, what an amazing lady she was.

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And what an amazing legacy she left Portland.

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Meanwhile, in another part of Portland,

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right next to Chesil Beach, Raj is still combing.

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-Hello there.

-Hello.

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-I'm Raj. And you are?

-I'm Pete. Pleased to meet you.

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Nice to meet you.

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-Nice little shop you've got here.

-Thank you very much.

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Pete has certainly got quite a collection crammed in here.

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Although it's hard to see beyond the Triumph and the Beezer.

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-That's a lovely old Triumph, isn't it?

-Yeah, it's a 1958 3TA.

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-Is it running?

-There is a problem with the clutch at the moment.

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Which I just haven't had time to look at.

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-But, yeah, the engine does run.

-Not that I can afford it,

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but how much would something like that go for?

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In this sort of condition, you are looking around about the 2,000 mark.

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I've seen something else. A pinball machine.

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Ah, Charlie's Angels, bless 'em.

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I'm sure they would be big in Bridgwater.

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-How much have you got on it?

-On that one, I've got 350 on it.

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-That's not a bad price.

-No.

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But I need something with a nice big profit in it.

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Point me in the right direction. What have you got?

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We've got a lovely old garden plough here.

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Fantastic. What's the best on it, Pete?

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I think I've got about 70 on it, but the best I could do on it,

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I should think, is about 35.

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Not much of a gardener, I fear.

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-I keep looking at that sign.

-The Firestone?

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-Yeah. Is it a heavy one?

-No, it's not heavy. But it is original.

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How much could it be?

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30. I can't do masses off it, but I can certainly do it for 25.

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My fear is on this, Pete, it's too gone.

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The paintwork here is very, very flaky.

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The motoring signs that do fetch the money

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are always usually in good condition.

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Yes, yeah, but in this condition, you can see it is original.

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I think, for the moment, I'm just going to put it down, if that's OK.

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Feels final to me.

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What's he got down there?

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This is a 19th-century mahogany writing slope.

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And it's something that is incredibly out of fashion today. Hm.

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But it's in not bad condition.

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It's got a little bit of veneer missing on the front here.

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£30 Pete's got on it.

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It's about what it's worth.

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Table a bid, Raj?

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It's pretty run of the mill, but at the right price,

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you know, there might be a small profit.

0:15:350:15:37

What's the best you can do on it?

0:15:370:15:39

-I can do 25.

-Oh! You're a hard man, aren't you?

0:15:390:15:43

You're a hard man.

0:15:430:15:44

25. I was hoping you were going to say more like 15.

0:15:440:15:48

You know what I'm going to say now.

0:15:490:15:51

-You're going to say 20, aren't you?

-Yes.

0:15:510:15:53

There is going to be a small profit in it,

0:15:530:15:56

but nowhere near enough for me to catch up.

0:15:560:15:59

Will you take 18?

0:15:590:16:00

Go on, then.

0:16:020:16:03

We have a deal.

0:16:030:16:05

Hey! We got there.

0:16:050:16:06

Another flying start for the new boy.

0:16:060:16:09

Now, time to get back to Bella, the Herald.

0:16:100:16:13

It's a coastal car, it's a coastal route,

0:16:130:16:16

and it almost feels like sitting on a towel.

0:16:160:16:19

Buonanotte, Bella.

0:16:190:16:21

Today's lesson is in history.

0:16:230:16:25

In what year did Queen Victoria die?

0:16:250:16:28

-1901.

-1901.

0:16:290:16:32

In what year did Brian Clough take over Derby County?

0:16:320:16:37

I think it was 19... Oh, dear.

0:16:370:16:40

..69?

0:16:400:16:41

Was it that early?

0:16:410:16:42

1967, actually. Know your answers, Raj.

0:16:420:16:46

Fortunately, he was much more sure footed with his shopping yesterday,

0:16:460:16:50

picking up some spoons, a wooden bowl, a beaker,

0:16:500:16:54

a writing slope and some spice drawers for £173.

0:16:540:17:00

-We have a deal.

-Excellent.

0:17:000:17:01

Leaving almost £200 in his wallet.

0:17:010:17:03

While Charles managed only some candlesticks

0:17:030:17:06

and some bone implements for £27.

0:17:060:17:09

Trousers up, I'm off.

0:17:090:17:11

So he still has just shy of £400 to spend today.

0:17:110:17:15

What year was the French Revolution?

0:17:150:17:17

THEY LAUGH

0:17:170:17:19

Later, they will be making for an auction in Somerset, at Bridgwater.

0:17:190:17:23

But their next stop is back in Dorchester.

0:17:230:17:26

-Here we go.

-Just by the front door. Thanks a lot.

0:17:290:17:32

-Have a great day's buying.

-I hope so.

-Yeah.

-I need to.

0:17:320:17:35

In your own time, Charles.

0:17:370:17:38

I can't open the door, Raj.

0:17:380:17:40

-There we go. I'm out!

-Fantastic.

-I'm free.

0:17:400:17:44

-Good luck.

-See you later.

-Goodbye.

0:17:440:17:46

-Hello, sir. How are you?

-John Burton.

-John, Charles Hanson.

0:17:470:17:51

Good to see you.

0:17:510:17:52

So, John, what I'm looking for are things which are market fresh.

0:17:520:17:56

-I'm hoping I can be first on.

-We've just had a new lot come in.

0:17:560:17:59

-Have you?

-Yeah, we cleared a big attic.

0:17:590:18:02

Lots and lots of boxes that haven't been touched since '52.

0:18:020:18:05

-Tell me they're not wrapped in 1952 paper?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:18:050:18:08

-So nobody has seen it. Not for the last 50 years.

-Wonderful!

0:18:080:18:11

That news has definitely perked him up.

0:18:110:18:13

There we go. It's a bit cheeky.

0:18:130:18:15

I wonder how long it'll take him to pick up the scent.

0:18:150:18:19

That's a really good box. It says "Sorrento. Souvenir."

0:18:190:18:22

And if you were visiting Sorrento back in the 1890s,

0:18:220:18:26

you may have picked up this box.

0:18:260:18:28

What puts me off is the fact we've got this split here.

0:18:280:18:32

But it is 120 years old. Is it priced?

0:18:320:18:36

Yes, it is. £50. Could be a mental note for later.

0:18:360:18:39

Right up his street. As is that.

0:18:390:18:42

On one Roadtrip, I was very lucky to try on Henry VIII's

0:18:420:18:46

armour at the armoury in Leeds.

0:18:460:18:48

This is quite similar, but, of course, it's later.

0:18:480:18:52

This is probably mid-20th century. But it's decorative.

0:18:520:18:55

-And it's complete. And I might just give John a quick call. John.

-Yeah.

0:18:550:19:00

May I just have a quick word with you? Tell me about your treasure.

0:19:000:19:03

I don't really know much about it, if you want the truth.

0:19:030:19:06

-It came out of an attic. It was in a big box.

-Hold on. From that attic?

0:19:060:19:10

From the attic, yeah.

0:19:100:19:12

Sniffed it out.

0:19:120:19:14

It's complete with what appears to be a bit of an ashtray sword.

0:19:140:19:20

It's not all quite in true historical context, but even so...

0:19:200:19:25

Tell me, John, does much more come with this?

0:19:250:19:28

-Just those leggings over there.

-Another pair of leggings.

0:19:280:19:31

-Can I just bring them over?

-Yeah.

0:19:310:19:32

-Did this all come from the same?

-Yeah, yeah. All from the same.

0:19:320:19:36

Goodness me! Aren't they wonderful!

0:19:360:19:38

Could the mannequin come with the lot as well, John?

0:19:390:19:42

Yeah. Yeah.

0:19:420:19:43

Can I ask you how much it could be?

0:19:430:19:45

-As it's you, 40 quid.

-Don't say that!

0:19:450:19:48

Let me go for a walk on, and what I may just do is make you

0:19:480:19:53

an offer if I get a bundle of bits and pieces together.

0:19:530:19:56

OK, all right.

0:19:560:19:58

Now for the cabinet.

0:19:580:19:59

These are nice.

0:19:590:20:00

If there is a section of the market today which I think is really

0:20:000:20:03

performing well, it's collectors' sections.

0:20:030:20:06

And the market also is particularly strong for fountain pens.

0:20:060:20:10

This one is a vintage Conway Stewart pen of the 1950s. A bit plain.

0:20:100:20:15

They are reflective in terms of artistic

0:20:150:20:18

quality for the decades they represent.

0:20:180:20:21

And you've got here a really almost rich lapis lazuli

0:20:210:20:25

and metallic oxide fountain pen here.

0:20:250:20:28

Which is beautifully mounted there with a 14 carat gold nib.

0:20:280:20:32

John, tell me, these fountain pens, where do they come from?

0:20:320:20:35

-The attic.

-They didn't.

-They did.

-Out the same attic?

0:20:350:20:38

The same attic.

0:20:380:20:39

That motherlode again, eh?

0:20:390:20:41

There is eight pens in total. To an old mate...

0:20:410:20:43

That could be £60.

0:20:430:20:45

-Look at me.

-£60.

-Look at me, how much?

0:20:450:20:47

-40.

-Why did I say that?! £40. £40! OK.

0:20:470:20:52

Highly excited. Is there still more?

0:20:520:20:55

Goodness me, John. This is a dirty buckle.

0:20:550:20:57

-There you go.

-Brilliant.

0:20:570:20:59

If I just rub this hallmark, I think we'll see what might be

0:20:590:21:04

lurking. There is a date letter, which is an X. So this was made...

0:21:040:21:09

I'll test you. It was made three years before Queen Victoria died.

0:21:090:21:13

What year?

0:21:130:21:14

Now, who was paying attention earlier?

0:21:140:21:17

18...

0:21:170:21:18

-I don't know. '97.

-'98.

0:21:200:21:21

Unlucky, John.

0:21:210:21:23

-Often we call these nurses.

-Yeah, nurses.

0:21:230:21:25

It's quite a masculine buckle. More for a man, isn't it, really?

0:21:250:21:28

-Would your wife wear that?

-Probably. Although she is very feminine.

0:21:280:21:31

-I'm pleased to hear it.

-THEY LAUGH

0:21:310:21:33

And the best price on that, John, would be how much?

0:21:330:21:36

45.

0:21:360:21:37

Blimey, if he buys all this, it will match Raj's efforts yesterday.

0:21:370:21:41

Just when I came over here before, this here is a phonograph,

0:21:410:21:46

which is the forerunner to the record player.

0:21:460:21:49

Within these rolls here, you've got records which can be played.

0:21:490:21:55

He, John. I've just seen this Edison Standard phonograph.

0:21:550:22:00

-It is missing its horn, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:22:000:22:03

Thomas Edison was also partly instrumental in evolving

0:22:030:22:08

-telephone communications.

-Yeah.

0:22:080:22:10

Yeah, the man who once said genius was 1% inspiration

0:22:100:22:14

and 99% perspiration was responsible for thousands of patents.

0:22:140:22:18

Including this one in 1877. Now, when did Victoria die?

0:22:180:22:22

That lifts up like that. Look at that! Look at that.

0:22:220:22:25

-Look at the handle inside.

-Under there. Oh, yes, yes, yes!

0:22:250:22:28

-Obviously, John, the rolls would come with the phonograph.

-Yeah.

0:22:280:22:32

-How much could it be?

-£80.

0:22:320:22:35

It's just the condition. We are lacking the horn and...

0:22:350:22:38

-I could do it for less.

-Could you? What's the best price on that?

0:22:380:22:42

-60.

-OK, so what's the plan then, Charles?

0:22:420:22:45

I do like the knight in shining armour. I think it's not bad

0:22:450:22:47

and it's a great statement piece for a saleroom.

0:22:470:22:50

I do like the pens I saw earlier on. I like the buckle.

0:22:500:22:54

I like the phonograph. I like the box. I like everything.

0:22:540:22:57

Come on, Hanson, play it safe. But at the same time, go wild.

0:22:570:23:01

Good grief.

0:23:010:23:02

I don't know whether you perhaps want to get a pen

0:23:020:23:04

and paper out and then we can do some maths.

0:23:040:23:07

-How much?

-240.

-Yeah.

0:23:080:23:11

Time for Charles to have a turn.

0:23:110:23:13

-So that's actually...

-220.

-220.

0:23:130:23:17

180.

0:23:170:23:18

Getting better. A bit more?

0:23:180:23:20

-170.

-Oh, don't! Ah! You wouldn't meet me halfway at 160, would you?

0:23:200:23:25

-Yeah, go on.

-Are you sure?

0:23:250:23:26

-Yeah.

-Sold. 160.

-Thanks a lot.

0:23:260:23:30

So, he got them all.

0:23:300:23:32

And now has the tricky task of sorting them into lots.

0:23:320:23:35

Now, while Charles heads for a lie down, Raj has headed east,

0:23:390:23:43

making his way to the village of Tolpuddle,

0:23:430:23:46

where the courage of six farm workers changed the world.

0:23:460:23:50

-Oh, Nigel.

-Hello, Raj.

-Nice to meet you.

-Welcome to Tolpuddle.

0:23:500:23:53

Thank you very much.

0:23:530:23:54

The story began on this very spot in the 1830s when some labourers,

0:23:540:23:58

who had just endured several cuts to their already pitiful wage,

0:23:580:24:02

met under the ancient sycamore to form a union.

0:24:020:24:05

They just didn't know how to survive. Trade unions were lawful.

0:24:050:24:10

Had just been made lawful. And that was the way forward.

0:24:100:24:13

But we'd have to do it secretly.

0:24:130:24:15

If the employer found out too soon, he could pick us off.

0:24:150:24:19

So they took an oath of solidarity, of secrecy with one another.

0:24:190:24:23

Who actually led them?

0:24:230:24:25

George Loveless was the main character.

0:24:250:24:27

He was a Methodist lay preacher, farm worker,

0:24:270:24:31

taught himself to read and write, clearly a clever man, good speaker.

0:24:310:24:36

And he has been seen as the leader of this union.

0:24:360:24:39

It must have been a movement throughout the village.

0:24:390:24:42

We think that hundreds of people would have been involved,

0:24:420:24:44

even though only six were arrested.

0:24:440:24:46

The local landowners, led by Squire Frampton, were desperate to

0:24:470:24:50

put an end to the Friendly Society of Agricultural Labourers.

0:24:500:24:54

They were told by the Home Secretary that

0:24:540:24:56

although trade unions were now lawful,

0:24:560:24:58

an obscure act designed to combat naval mutinies might be invoked.

0:24:580:25:03

If Frampton could catch them taking a secret oath, then

0:25:030:25:06

he could arrest them, and that's what happened. They were arrested.

0:25:060:25:10

Marched into Dorchester.

0:25:100:25:12

Put on trial. And it was a trumped-up charge.

0:25:120:25:16

They were sentenced to the harshest punishment

0:25:160:25:18

of seven years transportation in Australia.

0:25:180:25:21

Why Australia, why not here?

0:25:210:25:23

It was Britain's dumping ground.

0:25:230:25:25

Many, particularly poor people, who were caught stealing a handkerchief

0:25:250:25:29

or poaching were dispatched to what would have been a life sentence.

0:25:290:25:33

Cos very few people could ever afford to come back.

0:25:330:25:36

So James Brine, James Hammett, Thomas Stanfield

0:25:360:25:40

and his son John, George Loveless, and his brother James were taken in

0:25:400:25:44

chains from Dorchester to the prison hulks in Portsmouth Harbour.

0:25:440:25:48

They were kept in dreadful conditions.

0:25:480:25:51

And the poor conditions made George Loveless ill.

0:25:510:25:54

He eventually was transported later.

0:25:540:25:56

And as he left in chains, he handed a relative a piece of paper. And

0:25:560:26:00

on it, was written the famous poem that we still recite about liberty.

0:26:000:26:05

"God is our guide

0:26:050:26:07

"No swords we draw

0:26:070:26:08

"We kindle not war's battle fires

0:26:080:26:10

"By reason, union, justice, law

0:26:100:26:13

"We claim the birthright of our sires."

0:26:130:26:16

And the famous section at the end.

0:26:160:26:18

"We raise the watchword Liberty

0:26:180:26:20

"We will, we will, we will be free!"

0:26:200:26:23

But that's not the end of the story,

0:26:230:26:24

because George Loveless was heard. And when the men were still

0:26:240:26:27

on their long voyage, the public were responding to their fate.

0:26:270:26:31

The word got out and the fledgling trade unions right

0:26:310:26:35

around the country realised this was a challenge to their very existence.

0:26:350:26:39

Even before they had got going.

0:26:390:26:41

And within days, people started organising

0:26:410:26:44

meetings in Huddersfield, petitions from Cheltenham.

0:26:440:26:48

And within weeks, they planned this huge protest,

0:26:480:26:52

the like of which they had never seen before.

0:26:520:26:55

Their peaceful march through London, one of the first of its kind,

0:26:550:26:58

concluding with the delivery

0:26:580:27:00

of an 800,000-strong petition to Parliament.

0:27:000:27:03

-So many people for six farm workers?

-Well, quite.

0:27:030:27:07

In the days where there was no Twitter or Facebook,

0:27:070:27:10

how they actually managed to all get there

0:27:100:27:12

and marshal such a large number of people is astonishing.

0:27:120:27:17

And you can understand why it really did frighten the government.

0:27:170:27:22

And it didn't stop there.

0:27:220:27:24

No, because while voluntary donations supported

0:27:240:27:26

the martyrs' families, legal and political challenges were pursued.

0:27:260:27:30

And after a few years, the government relented -

0:27:300:27:32

first pardoning the martyrs and then bringing them home.

0:27:320:27:36

They must have come back as heroes.

0:27:360:27:39

They arrived in Plymouth, in triumph.

0:27:390:27:42

And unions recreated this grand march.

0:27:420:27:45

They became symbols of the right of people to form a union

0:27:450:27:50

and the freedom to organise people at work.

0:27:500:27:52

Now, where has Raj's rival got to?

0:27:560:27:59

Somerset, that's where.

0:27:590:28:02

Taking a route north and west to Crewkerne,

0:28:020:28:05

the delightful town that's mostly built with the gorgeous

0:28:050:28:08

Hamstone of nearby Ham Hill.

0:28:080:28:10

-Hello, sir.

-Afternoon.

-How are you doing?

-Fine, thanks.

0:28:120:28:15

-You are Charles, yes?

-Hanson, the name's Hanson, yeah. Charles.

0:28:150:28:18

-And your name is?

-Anthony Bucke.

0:28:180:28:20

-What a fantastic centre you've got here.

-Thank you.

0:28:200:28:23

It is certainly big. Almost 100 traders.

0:28:230:28:26

I need more eyes.

0:28:260:28:27

But Charles doesn't really need an awful lot more.

0:28:280:28:31

Careful! Oh, God.

0:28:320:28:34

Now walk away. Slowly.

0:28:340:28:37

There must be plenty squirreled away in here.

0:28:370:28:39

What really excites me is this dish down here.

0:28:390:28:43

This little, octagonal dish is hand-painted in blue.

0:28:430:28:47

But actually, it's also gilt outlined. It's not minging.

0:28:470:28:52

OK, it might be because it's broken.

0:28:520:28:55

But in fact, this is Ming. This is true Ming porcelain.

0:28:550:29:01

Made pre-1644. And it could be yours for 500 pence.

0:29:010:29:08

Astonishing. Almost 400 years old.

0:29:080:29:11

And next door, for just a few more pounds...

0:29:110:29:13

We've got some English Staffordshire porcelain circa 1820.

0:29:130:29:17

Some Chinese Qianlong cups from circa 1780.

0:29:170:29:21

Some small Kangxi Chinese dishes from 1700.

0:29:210:29:27

And then, almost rolling home, we have a Derby dish here.

0:29:270:29:34

Pre-1795. For £12 each.

0:29:340:29:38

And what I'm really tempted to do is grab him.

0:29:380:29:43

And almost make a bundle of joy and put the Ming plates with the

0:29:430:29:49

two Kangxi dishes and the three Qianlong period cups,

0:29:490:29:53

and then maybe put the Derby dish in there as well.

0:29:530:29:57

And just see if I can acquire this wonderful lot

0:29:570:30:01

for a right old good price.

0:30:010:30:02

And if I can do, I think this little lot here has real Eastern promise.

0:30:020:30:07

So is that including East Midlands promise? Ha!

0:30:070:30:11

Time to have a word with Anthony.

0:30:110:30:13

-I've been digging. Anthony, take a seat.

-What have you got here?

0:30:130:30:17

This ensemble just oozes probably 300 years of history.

0:30:170:30:23

Five, two 12s are 24, 45... That's £50, isn't it? Yeah.

0:30:230:30:28

I mean, £40?

0:30:280:30:31

Yeah, I mean, I was hoping £25.

0:30:310:30:34

-Mm. That's like 50%.

-Look at me.

-50%. Look at you?!

0:30:340:30:39

HE LAUGHS

0:30:390:30:40

30 quid and it's yours.

0:30:400:30:42

-Yes.

-I'm OK. I'll take them. Thank you so much.

0:30:420:30:45

Thank you very much.

0:30:450:30:47

He did rather well with a similar assortment last time.

0:30:470:30:50

-Excellent. Seals the deal.

-Thank you so much.

-OK.

0:30:500:30:54

Providing he can get this to auction more or less intact.

0:30:540:30:57

Steady, Charles.

0:30:570:30:58

Meanwhile, back in Dorset, Raj - with just under £200 to spend -

0:31:020:31:06

takes our trip to beautiful Bridport.

0:31:060:31:08

-Hello there.

-Hi.

-Hi, I'm Raj.

-Hi, Raj. I'm Bill.

0:31:100:31:13

-Hello, Bill. Nice to meet you. And?

-Hello. I'm Frances.

0:31:130:31:16

-Hello, Frances.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:31:160:31:18

-What a lovely little shop you have here.

-Thank you.

0:31:180:31:20

Very, very pretty.

0:31:200:31:22

Our man splashed out yesterday,

0:31:220:31:24

so I reckon he might be a wee bit cautious here.

0:31:240:31:26

Kitchenalia, eh?

0:31:260:31:28

Not bowled over. Ho-ho. Who writes this?

0:31:280:31:31

I've seen a brass ladle over there.

0:31:310:31:33

Oh, yes.

0:31:330:31:35

It's a 19th-century English brass ladle. Used for serving soup, sauces.

0:31:350:31:42

It might even have been locally made. A lot of the local forges made them.

0:31:420:31:47

And if I can get this at the right price,

0:31:470:31:50

this will go with my other spoons. I do like this, Bill.

0:31:500:31:53

It's quite nice. It's got copper rivets.

0:31:530:31:56

-It's nicely made.

-Yeah, it is nicely made.

0:31:560:31:58

-What's the best you could do on that?

-The best I can do?

0:31:580:32:01

-Um, I'll do that for a fiver for you.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:32:010:32:05

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, I'm happy with that.

0:32:050:32:07

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Great. Thank you.

0:32:070:32:10

Swift, Raj. Anything else catch your eye?

0:32:100:32:14

I know they're not very old. These Regency-style wall brackets.

0:32:140:32:19

But I do like them. They are saleable.

0:32:190:32:22

That sort of very, very decorative item,

0:32:220:32:24

there's always a market for them, at the right price.

0:32:240:32:27

-Yes, there is.

-There's £35 on the ticket.

-For the pair.

0:32:270:32:31

-For the pair.

-Mm-hmm.

-What could you do them for?

0:32:310:32:34

-Oh, I think we could do them for 15.

-15?

-Yes.

0:32:340:32:39

-You need some help, don't you?

-I do need some help.

0:32:390:32:41

-Believe you me, I need lots of help.

-Right. Right.

0:32:410:32:44

-And you're happy with that?

-I'm very happy.

0:32:440:32:46

Let's shake hands on it. Thank you very much indeed.

0:32:460:32:48

Five pounds for the ladle. And 15 for the brackets.

0:32:480:32:52

-Right, yes.

-£20.

-Yes.

0:32:520:32:54

I've just remembered, actually, I know you said you've got spoons.

0:32:540:32:58

We've got another spoon that you might be interested in.

0:32:580:33:01

Didn't cost us much and I could throw it in for a couple of quid.

0:33:010:33:05

-You sure?

-Yeah. Yeah, absolutely.

0:33:050:33:07

-You sure you're happy with that?

-I'm happy with that.

0:33:070:33:09

I think it would go nicely with the others.

0:33:090:33:11

-I'm not going to say no to that. Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

0:33:110:33:14

So, £22 for another little pile.

0:33:140:33:16

But now we really must bring all the shopping to an end

0:33:160:33:19

and take a look at what's been bought.

0:33:190:33:22

Charles parted with £217 for a phonograph,

0:33:230:33:27

some porcelain,

0:33:270:33:28

some implements,

0:33:280:33:30

candlesticks,

0:33:300:33:32

a wooden box,

0:33:320:33:33

some fountain pens,

0:33:330:33:35

a buckle,

0:33:350:33:36

and a mannequin in armour.

0:33:360:33:38

While Raj spend £195 on some spoons and some ladles,

0:33:380:33:43

a writing slope,

0:33:430:33:45

a beaker,

0:33:450:33:47

a wooden bowl,

0:33:470:33:48

some spice drawers and some wall brackets.

0:33:480:33:50

So, what do they make of each other's items? Be honest.

0:33:500:33:53

I love the spice drawers.

0:33:530:33:55

I think they might make £100 on a really good day.

0:33:550:33:59

The knight's costume. What do I call him?

0:33:590:34:02

Sir Charles Hanson?

0:34:020:34:03

I just hope he gets knocked off his horse on this one.

0:34:030:34:05

I'm seeing more of a heavy spend by Raj,

0:34:050:34:09

and that will make the competition bubble and become quite volatile.

0:34:090:34:13

Would I rather have Charles' items or mine?

0:34:130:34:16

I'll stick with mine any day of the week.

0:34:160:34:18

After setting off from Dorchester in Dorset, our experts are now heading

0:34:180:34:22

for an auction on the edge of the Somerset Levels, at Bridgwater.

0:34:220:34:26

Are we not far from Cheddar Gorge?

0:34:260:34:28

Can you smell cheese?

0:34:290:34:31

Is that cheese? THEY LAUGH

0:34:310:34:34

No! Ha!

0:34:340:34:35

Welcome to Bridgwater, the port on the River Parrett

0:34:350:34:39

that's always been the industrial heart of Somerset.

0:34:390:34:42

At Tamlyns, established in 1878, business is brisk.

0:34:420:34:45

But what does the auctioneer, Claire Rawle, make of our lots?

0:34:450:34:48

The mannequin with the knight's outfit on,

0:34:480:34:51

paired with the Victorian silver belt buckle. Very, very bizarre.

0:34:510:34:55

Haven't seen anyone trying it on yet.

0:34:550:34:57

So, is Bridgwater ready?

0:34:570:34:59

There's a wave of enthusiasm. Can you feel it in the air?

0:34:590:35:02

Yes.

0:35:050:35:06

Good answer, Raj.

0:35:060:35:07

Especially as your repro Georgian brackets are first.

0:35:070:35:11

-These I have to start at £30.

-Very good.

0:35:110:35:14

£30. Do I see two anywhere?

0:35:140:35:16

-At 30. All quiet in the room. At 30.

-Come on!

0:35:160:35:19

At 30. Come along. 32.

0:35:190:35:22

35 with me. Can't lose them for that, can you?

0:35:220:35:24

38? They're worth it. They're ever so pretty.

0:35:240:35:26

You absolutely sure?

0:35:260:35:28

They're going to sell here with me then at £35.

0:35:280:35:30

That's very good. Well played.

0:35:300:35:32

Yes, doubled your money and more.

0:35:320:35:34

Now for Charles' combination lot of implements and box.

0:35:340:35:38

I'll start this one away at £30. Here at £30.

0:35:380:35:40

-Do I see two anywhere?

-That's good. Come on.

0:35:400:35:42

-At £30 now. Two. At 32.

-Come on.

0:35:420:35:45

-35? 35.

-That's good.

0:35:450:35:47

-38.

-Go on.

0:35:470:35:49

Oh, go on. Treat yourself, Jed.

0:35:490:35:51

At £38. Bid at 38. Now 40.

0:35:510:35:53

£40 I have. Fresh bidder at 40.

0:35:530:35:55

Are you sure? At 40. I have straight ahead here.

0:35:550:35:58

At £40. It's going to be then. You all done?

0:35:580:36:01

40 it is.

0:36:010:36:02

Another decent profit.

0:36:020:36:04

Followed by the tureen they both wanted, but Raj came away with.

0:36:040:36:08

I have to start this straight in at £12.

0:36:080:36:11

£12. Do I see 15 anywhere?

0:36:110:36:13

At 15 at the back of the room.

0:36:130:36:15

-At 15. At £15.

-Oh, no. More.

0:36:150:36:17

And 18. 20.

0:36:170:36:20

22. 25.

0:36:200:36:22

28.

0:36:220:36:23

-You sure? At £28 here.

-It's worth more than that.

0:36:230:36:26

-At £28.

-Profit. Put it there.

0:36:260:36:27

At 28, it's going to be. You all done?

0:36:270:36:30

-It's profit. High five.

-No, no! No way.

0:36:300:36:34

Yes, another profit served up.

0:36:350:36:37

Time for a bit of Victorian high fidelity.

0:36:370:36:40

I reckon it's worth at least £30.

0:36:400:36:43

That makes a loss cos it cost me 40.

0:36:430:36:45

Well, fingers crossed.

0:36:450:36:47

£50 straight in please. £50. 50?

0:36:470:36:49

-No interest.

-Start me somewhere. Thank you. 50 I have.

0:36:490:36:52

-Great.

-At £50.

-Let's go.

0:36:520:36:53

Do I see five anywhere? Five?

0:36:530:36:56

60, either of you?

0:36:560:36:57

-60.

-Go on!

-It's a profit.

-65.

-Go on!

0:36:570:37:00

70, surely?

0:37:000:37:02

Don't miss it for... 70.

0:37:020:37:03

At £70.

0:37:030:37:04

-At £70.

-It's playing sweet music in Somerset.

0:37:040:37:09

-Gosh, it worked well for you.

-That's great.

0:37:090:37:11

With its horn, it might have done even better.

0:37:110:37:14

What will they make of Raj's Doulton?

0:37:140:37:17

20 surely to start me. 20? 20, surely.

0:37:170:37:20

-Come on!

-Who is going to start me?

-Five.

0:37:200:37:23

Five?!

0:37:230:37:24

-No, come on.

-Eight. At eight pounds. Ten.

-12. It's moving now.

-15?

0:37:240:37:30

Are you sure? I've got 15, 18. 20.

0:37:300:37:34

At £20 then. At 20. All done?

0:37:340:37:37

It's going to sell then at £20.

0:37:370:37:39

Thank you, sir.

0:37:390:37:41

What a bargain. You got a bargain there.

0:37:410:37:43

Now for Charles' slightly chipped porcelain pile.

0:37:430:37:47

Featuring a bit of Ming.

0:37:470:37:49

£20 straight in for it. 20?

0:37:490:37:52

OK. How about ten pounds straight in?

0:37:520:37:54

-Frightening, isn't it?

-Surely ten?

0:37:540:37:56

Ten I have from the hand at the back. Ten pounds. At 12.

0:37:560:37:59

-Hold tight.

-15. 18.

0:37:590:38:01

20. 22.

0:38:010:38:03

25. 28.

0:38:030:38:05

No? At £28. At 28. Now 30.

0:38:050:38:08

Yes, over there.

0:38:080:38:10

It works. Every time you ask for one more, someone puts their hands up.

0:38:100:38:14

-£30 it is then.

-Get it down. Get it down.

0:38:140:38:17

Well done, Mr Hanson. THEY LAUGH

0:38:190:38:21

After auction costs, it actually results in a bit of a loss.

0:38:210:38:25

Now, Raj's writing slope.

0:38:250:38:26

20 anywhere? Surely!

0:38:260:38:29

Come on, Bridgwater. You have a certain honour to keep up here.

0:38:290:38:32

Nobody? Where are you going to start me, then? Ten pounds.

0:38:320:38:36

-Oh, everyone wants it now. He was first. Ten. 12.

-15. Here we go. 18.

0:38:360:38:41

-Roll on.

-20.

-22. Oh, my goodness me.

0:38:410:38:45

25.

0:38:450:38:46

-At £25.

-One more, one more. I haven't finished yet.

0:38:460:38:49

-Fresh bidder.

-Thank you.

-At 28. Are you all done now?

0:38:490:38:52

It's going to sell at £28.

0:38:520:38:54

-£28.

-Good for you.

-Yeah.

0:38:540:38:56

We've still only had one loss so far.

0:38:560:38:59

But Raj is not going to catch Charles at this rate.

0:38:590:39:02

Even though he is having second thoughts about these.

0:39:020:39:05

I may have made a mistake with these pens.

0:39:050:39:07

You think the writing is on the wall?

0:39:070:39:09

-And I start straight in. I've got £55.

-Wow.

0:39:090:39:12

At 55. Do I see 60 anywhere? Bids with me here at 55.

0:39:120:39:15

-Come on, let's go.

-At 55 for the fountain pens.

0:39:150:39:17

-60. 65? No.

-Go on!

0:39:170:39:19

No? Bids here with me still. Are you all sure in the room?

0:39:190:39:22

It's going to sell it here at £65.

0:39:220:39:25

-Gordon Bennett!

-Well done. High five.

-Thanks a lot.

0:39:250:39:28

Thanks a lot.

0:39:280:39:30

No need to worry there, was there?

0:39:300:39:32

Now, can Raj's spoons plus his bargain ladles scoop up a profit?

0:39:330:39:37

£20. Nice early brass spoons. £20?

0:39:370:39:39

They are going to bomb. They are going to bomb.

0:39:390:39:41

Ten?

0:39:410:39:43

Ten surely somewhere! Ten pounds. Ten pounds I have.

0:39:430:39:45

At ten pounds. For the nice, early spoons. 12. 15.

0:39:450:39:50

At 15... Are you sure? That was short and sweet.

0:39:500:39:52

-18.

-The ladles...

-20.

0:39:520:39:55

-At £20.

-It's profit, isn't it?

-Oh, stop it. You and your profit.

0:39:550:39:58

All done? It's going to sell then at £20.

0:39:580:40:01

Is that a profit?

0:40:010:40:03

No, it's definitely a loss.

0:40:030:40:05

-What happened?

-I'm not sure.

-Look at me.

-I can't look at you. I can't.

0:40:050:40:10

Don't blame you.

0:40:100:40:12

Next, it's Charles' slightly odd lot of candlesticks and fork.

0:40:120:40:15

Not sure why.

0:40:150:40:16

Ten pounds anywhere for them?

0:40:160:40:18

-Thank you, ten I have. At ten pounds. Do I see 12 anywhere?

-Uh-oh.

0:40:180:40:21

And 12.

0:40:210:40:23

15. 18.

0:40:230:40:25

20.

0:40:250:40:26

-One more, go on.

-At 22. Fresh bidder.

0:40:260:40:29

-I made a loss.

-That's good. You've done well.

0:40:290:40:32

At 25 right at the back of the room.

0:40:320:40:33

-You're out not. You're all sure?

-You've done well.

0:40:330:40:36

-25 it's going to be.

-It's not bad.

0:40:360:40:38

-Uh! That's OK.

-Not bad.

0:40:380:40:39

Yep, they just made it.

0:40:390:40:41

But if Raj is going to catch him,

0:40:410:40:43

those spice drawers will have to make a pile.

0:40:430:40:46

I've got a bid of £20 on them. 22. 25. 28.

0:40:460:40:49

-Here they go. Listen.

-30. 32, 35, 38.

0:40:490:40:53

-40. 42. 45. 48.

-CHARLES COUNTS ALONG

0:40:530:40:56

-50. Five. 60. Five. 70.

-CHARLES COUNTS ALONG

0:40:560:41:00

You have put me off.

0:41:000:41:02

Shush, Charles!

0:41:020:41:03

-70. Five. 80. Five. 90. Five.

-Wow.

0:41:030:41:06

100. 110. 120.

0:41:060:41:08

-130. 130 here.

-That's amazing.

0:41:080:41:11

I've got £130. 140. 150.

0:41:110:41:14

-160.

-Oh, my goodness me.

0:41:140:41:15

170 there. At £170. Are you all done? Are you all sure?

0:41:150:41:19

-One more, one more.

-170...

0:41:190:41:22

Wow!

0:41:220:41:24

Goodness me!

0:41:240:41:25

Quite a double.

0:41:250:41:27

-That's massive!

-Yep.

0:41:270:41:30

Back in the game!

0:41:300:41:31

THEY LAUGH

0:41:310:41:32

Raj could win this auction.

0:41:320:41:35

It all comes down to Charles' final lot.

0:41:350:41:38

Mannequin, armour and belt buckle.

0:41:380:41:40

Start me straight in at £30, please. 30 anywhere?

0:41:400:41:43

Surely! Thank you, 30 I have. 32.

0:41:430:41:46

35. You are away, you're away.

0:41:460:41:48

38. 40. 42.

0:41:480:41:50

45. 48.

0:41:500:41:52

50.

0:41:520:41:54

55? No. At 55. Still the gentleman at 55.

0:41:540:41:57

-60. Fresh bidder.

-There you go. Stop worrying.

0:41:570:42:00

70. 75.

0:42:000:42:02

-80.

-Two more!

0:42:020:42:04

85. 90.

0:42:040:42:06

-95.

-Oh!

-Go on. Don't miss it for five.

0:42:060:42:09

At 100. See, it's done the trick. At 100.

0:42:090:42:12

It's going to sell at £100.

0:42:120:42:15

Good profit to end the day.

0:42:180:42:20

-After you.

-After you.

-Go on.

-No, no, after you.

0:42:200:42:24

THEY LAUGH

0:42:240:42:26

Just too polite. Raj started out with £363.04

0:42:260:42:31

and made, after paying auction costs, a profit of £51.82,

0:42:310:42:36

leaving him with £414.86 to spend next time.

0:42:360:42:39

Well done.

0:42:390:42:41

Charles began with £411.04.

0:42:410:42:44

After paying auction costs, he made a profit of £53.60.

0:42:440:42:50

So, clock this, he won by £1.78 and still leads over all. Ha!

0:42:500:42:54

-Fantastic!

-Will our Herald hark?

0:42:540:42:56

-ENGINE STARTS

-Yes, she will.

0:42:560:42:58

-Here we go.

-Here we go, Bella.

0:42:580:43:01

RAJ LAUGHS

0:43:010:43:04

-After you.

-Go on, after you.

0:43:050:43:07

Next time on Antiques Roadtrip, the boys hit the road again,

0:43:070:43:10

using their heads to hunt for bargains...

0:43:100:43:12

What do you think?

0:43:120:43:14

..and hidden treasures.

0:43:140:43:16

It's exciting. It's like land ahoy, or antiques ahoy.

0:43:160:43:19

They are everywhere.

0:43:190:43:20

Veteran Charles Hanson is halfway through a week of adventure with new recruit Raj Bisram. The duelling auctioneers travel through Dorset and Somerset before heading for an auction in Bridgwater.