Episode 13 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 13

Antiques challenge. Halfway through their road trip, Philip Serrell and Anita Manning travel from Frodsham in Cheshire to an auction in Easingwold in Yorkshire.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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This is beautiful!

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That's the way to do this.

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal - to scour for antiques.

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Joy.

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Hello!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners...

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-Sorry, sorry!

-..and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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SWING MUSIC PLAYS

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This week we've been traversing the country in the company

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of auctioneers Anita and Phil.

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Philip, did you put my coat and bag in the back?

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I've been doing television for 16 years

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and I've ended up as your lackey.

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-Do you love it?

-Oh, it's great.

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Philip Serrell and Anita Manning are both a little competitive.

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Don't let that Anita Manning anywhere near them.

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I wonder if I could give Phil Serrell a hammering with that.

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They've had plenty of fun too so far this week,

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pootling around the country in their beautiful 1970 Fiat 500.

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-It's a wee bit...

-IMITATES ANITA:

-It's a wee bit...

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..a wee bit dreich today,

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but there is sunshine in our hearts, Phil.

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-Speak for yourself.

-Is there sunshine in your heart?

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No, there's not.

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My heart is very much reflected in the weather at the minute.

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Yeah, Phil's heart was dampened a little at the last auction

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when a loss on his bureau left Anita to take the day.

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Having started out on this road trip with £200 each,

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Phil now has £191.80 to spend.

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After two auctions,

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Anita is storming out into the lead with £307.06.

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Listen, I'll tell you a couple of jokes later on and cheer you up.

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-They'll all be about bureaus.

-Thanks very much.

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All right, chaps, there's still a long way to go.

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It certainly is an epic journey.

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So far, our competitive experts

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have been whizzing around the north of England.

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They started their journey in Windermere in the Lake District

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and will take a 1,200-mile tour around the north of England

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and into Scotland before heading back south

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to finish up in Crooklands in Cumbria.

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Today's leg begins in Frodsham in Cheshire

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and will end up at an auction in Easingwold in Yorkshire.

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Golly gosh.

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-Here we are, Phil. Here we are.

-SHE LAUGHS

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Goodness gracious me. I'm going to unclip myself.

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-All right.

-Yep.

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-Don't buy any big bits of furniture.

-What was that?

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-What was that?

-Don't buy any big bits of furniture.

-What did you say?

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SHE LAUGHS He's such a joker.

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-Have a good day.

-Bye.

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Time to get the shopping underway.

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-Hi. Hello. How are you? I'm Phil.

-Morning. I'm fine.

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-Good to see you.

-Jan.

-What have you got there?

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It's just stuff that's just going out.

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You don't hang about, do you, Phil?

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That's a little silver-plated shoe.

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With a tape measure.

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-That's quite sweet, isn't it?

-Yep.

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It's a little compass.

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It's a little cauldron in ebony, but what on earth would you want...

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-A compass.

-..a compass?

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-You're not going to sort of pull it out of your pocket.

-No.

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It's a collectible, isn't it?

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-Just a sweet little thing.

-It's for show.

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Hang on to those two and you think what you can do them for.

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I mean, I think 30 to 50. They might do 50.

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They might not.

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Because I have to pay commission,

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I've got to try and buy them for just under that if I can.

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-So, have a think on and let me have a wander around.

-OK.

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Crikey. Blink and you miss it this morning.

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That's two items Phil has his eye on

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that haven't even made it onto the shop floor.

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While he checks out the rest of the shop,

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Anita is meandering towards the Cheshire village of Sandiway

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where her first shop awaits.

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-Hello.

-Hi.

-I'm Anita.

-Are you all right?

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-Oh, it's lovely to be here.

-Yeah, yeah.

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Well, there's plenty for you to see.

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Oh, there certainly is.

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I think I look like one of those 1960s lamps.

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Well, each to their own.

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In here we've got some lovely Lalique items.

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Rene Lalique was a French designer who started his work

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in the late 19th century.

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Known for using glass instead of precious stones

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to make fantastic jewellery more affordable,

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he created his work with glass further

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and soon became known the world over for his creations.

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This one here has a lilac tinge which is very attractive,

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and the other one is a clear-glass.

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They're both female figures.

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They're both slightly risque,

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which is always a plus in the auction room.

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Nice things.

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Time to get Andy round for a closer inspection.

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-These are both more modern pieces.

-They are.

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-They are very beautiful.

-Mm-hm.

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I like that one for the simplicity,

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but I think I love this

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because of the wonderful opalescent hue...

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-Yeah, yeah.

-..that it has.

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If I could be buying it round about for £80...

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-I'll do my best.

-..could you have a try at that?

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-Certainly, yes.

-Yeah.

-Yes, certainly.

-That's smashing.

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With a ticket price of £130, your best may well be required, Andy.

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All right, thank you. Bye-bye.

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-£95...

-95?

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..is she'll go to. Yeah.

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-Let me see it.

-There you go.

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-Let's go for it. 95.

-OK. All right.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thanks very much.

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This week's leader gets off the mark.

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-IMITATES ELVIS:

-Thank you very much.

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This is quite a fun thing, isn't it? Let's just put it up here.

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-It's blooming heavy, isn't it? Solid mahogany.

-It is solid.

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If I had to bet a pound on this,

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I would say that that's something that either the local undertaker

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or a blacksmith or somebody has knocked up in the village.

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-Yeah.

-And it's been designed like a shoebox or something like that.

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What's the best you could do and that for...?

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65 on it, isn't there?

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-DOG BARKS

-Oh...

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See? The dog's barking in approval.

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The best we can do on that would be £35...

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..which is a good price on that.

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It's wooden, but it's not a bureau.

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How's Anita feeling?

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I'm feeling a little French, a little continental today.

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I bought a lovely piece of French glass,

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and I can see these Art Deco clocks.

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There are two here, and they are probably French as well.

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And we've got this one here,

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a garniture which is the clock and two side ornaments.

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It has this wonderful Art Deco geometric shape,

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and it's only £35.

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It's marked as a project piece

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as on closer inspection it's in need of some serious TLC,

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but Anita is keen, so Andy is back on the phone

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to see if there's a deal to be done.

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I always say to myself,

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"Don't buy anything which is defective

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"because it will struggle in the auction,"

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and I've just maybe bought a clock which has glass missing,

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a hand missing, a foot missing

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and a couple of wee chips on the garniture.

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I might've got carried away there.

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That's not like you.

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Hi, Anita. Yes, she'll take £25.

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25, that's great. That's great. That's smashing.

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That's a ten-pound discount and Anita has another item.

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Anything else catch your eye, old girl?

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This is a little Edwardian pendant made between 1900 and 1910.

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People were moving away from the elaborate decoration

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of Victorian jewellery into something simpler,

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and to this little pendant here, which is made of nine carat gold,

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is studded with this lovely peridot -

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this green stone -

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and encrusted with tiny, tiny, delicate little sea pearls,

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and the drop is a lovely luminous blister pearl.

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With a ticket price of £140,

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time to get onto the dealer.

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Ali, it's Anita from the Antiques Road Trip

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and I have absolutely fallen in love

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with the little peridot and sea pearl pendant.

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I mean, would 85 buy it?

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Oh, that's great. Oh, that's great! Oh, I'm so happy.

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Thank you very much on that. Bye-bye.

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Well...

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£85.

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-Well done.

-Oh, thank you very much.

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Straight out of the traps, Anita has three items for £205,

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a figure Mr Serrell can only dream of.

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But our Phil also has three things under his watchful gaze -

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the ebony miniature compass,

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the silver pincushion with wind-up tape measure

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and the mahogany box.

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Any chance of a deal on the lot maybe? Stand by.

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Can I give you 60 quid for the three and I'll love you forever.

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Just say it. The words you're looking for are, "Yes, Philip."

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-HE MOCKINGLY SOBS

-Do you know what?

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Just cause it's you, I will.

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Oh, you're an angel. Thank you so much.

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I better pay you, haven't I?

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-I think you better.

-I better pay you and run before I get thrown out.

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-You've got a really good deal there.

-You've given me a top deal.

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Oh, yes, she has. Take it and run, Phil.

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Anita has nipped north to Warrington where she's meeting Craig Sherwood

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who is going to help her uncover the secret past

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of some everyday items.

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Behind each one is a history that not only entertained

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but influenced cultures, principles and whole societies.

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-Hi!

-Hello, Anita!

-I'm Anita.

-Pleased to meet you.

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Board games have been around for at least 5,000 years.

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The Romans and Vikings helped spread games of strategy

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across Europe and beyond.

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The game of chess developed in India

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and later spread to Europe in the sixth century.

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Such games were played mainly by adults.

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There were games of skill that developed the mind

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and were used to teach military strategy.

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Some games were designed for children,

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but even then their purpose was not as an idle pastime

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but as part of their education.

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Now, I remember snakes and ladders as a wee girl,

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and it was a favourite game.

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Surely, that's a fairly modern board game.

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Not at all. Snakes and ladders is quite an ancient game.

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We don't know exactly how old it is,

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but we believe that snakes and ladders may actually go back

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to the second century BC.

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Mm-hm. And where did it come from?

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It originally came from India,

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and the original idea of the game was to teach people

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Hindu ideas of karma and rebirth.

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If you lived a good life, a good and virtuous life,

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you were sent into the heavens on a ladder.

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If you lived a life full of sin and depravity,

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you slid down the snake back to the demons and the hells.

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Now, one interesting thing about these early Indian sets

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were there were always more snakes than ladders.

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It was always harder to live a good and virtuous life

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than it was to fall into sin and depravity.

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Returning colonial families brought the game to Britain

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in the latter half of 19th century.

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A flavour of its Indian roots remained in the artwork,

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giving a sense of the exotic in a time of empire,

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but the game itself was adapted to fit the Victorian lifestyle.

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If you land on this one, which is 95 and stealing,

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you will slide down this slippery slope to...prison.

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Absolutely.

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The Victorians replaced the Hindu ideas of karma and rebirth

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with their own Christian moral virtues.

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And interestingly, when it moved to Britain,

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the number of snakes and ladders became balanced,

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so it became 50-50 whether you ascended to heaven

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or fell into depravity.

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Advocating a virtuous life through games

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has long been part of their history,

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and as board games became a regular feature in households

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at the turn of the 20th century, inventors continued the tradition

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using games to promote their own principles.

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Now, there's a game that's instantly recognisable - Monopoly.

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Yes.

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Do you know, it was never one of my favourites.

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I always felt that Monopoly was about greed and acquisition

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and getting things off of other people.

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Well, it is now, but would you believe it

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that it was originally designed to teach people

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the principles of socialism?

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In 1904, an American called Lizzie Magie

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received the patent for The Landlord's Game.

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Lizzie was a trailblazer.

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At the turn of the century, a young, single woman,

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she worked as a stenographer, was a published writer,

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an outspoken feminist and believed in progressive economics.

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She wanted to do something to ease what she saw

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as great inequalities in society.

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At the age of 26,

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she decided that she could use a board game to open people's minds

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to a more socialist way of thinking.

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Her game, like the later versions,

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featured money, deeds and properties, but it had some very different rules.

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Her game promoted a theory that land should belong to everyone.

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She hoped the game would demonstrate

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that rent made property owners richer and their tenants poorer.

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The original idea of the game was that all the players

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would put money into the centre rather than pay one another,

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the landlords, the rent,

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and at various points during the game,

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all the players would take money out from this community chest

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and it was distributed for the common good.

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That sounds much better than the game it is today.

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How did it change into this sort of capitalist thing then?

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Well, 30 years later,

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a gentleman by the name of Charles Darrow played the game.

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Now, he liked the game,

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but he didn't like the principles underlying it.

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So, he rewrote the rules so it became

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all about becoming as rich as possible

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and bankrupting all of the other players.

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He changed the name to Monopoly

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and it became one of the most popular games in the world.

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The popularity of board games continues to grow,

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and to this day, the simple items that have been

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at the heart of family lives for so long

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continue to sell in their millions.

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Thank you very, very much, Craig.

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It's been very interesting.

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Thank you, Anita.

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Now back to our own contest.

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Phil is out and about in Barnton

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in search of his next bargain

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at Northwich Antiques Centre.

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Hello.

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Hi. Philip. How are you?

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Welcome. My name is David.

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This is interesting.

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This is an old...

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..time recorder's clock,

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so when you went to work, you went to clock on.

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Time recorders were introduced into large factories in the 1880s.

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These machines stamped a worker's timecard

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with the exact time they started and finished work,

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and then they were paid accordingly.

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The only issue with that for me,

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if you look at this here, it's been completely cleaned off.

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That old pub table is interesting.

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Nice table.

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There's another one.

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This is quite nice. I quite like these old pub tables.

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A lot of them, the value is in whose mark is here,

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so you can get some with Queen Victoria,

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you can get some with WG Grace,

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and they're really, really collectible.

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This one is fairly standard. They're pub tables.

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You know, now they get used...

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outside as garden tables.

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What does David have to say about it?

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-The pub table, I quite like that. It's an old one.

-It is, yeah.

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-It's Victorian. Copper-topped.

-Yeah.

-Big iron base.

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-We've got it up for 125...

-Right.

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..but...willing to come down a little bit.

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-It's not a little bit, David.

-Well, what you talking about?

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Well, I've got to put this into auction,

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so if I see that making £50 to £80,

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I've got to try to buy it for 40 quid.

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-40?

-Mm.

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-Perhaps...

-Well, think about it. Let's just think about it.

0:17:260:17:29

Let's just have a look.

0:17:290:17:30

Not only is David very accommodating

0:17:300:17:32

in the face of your discount request, Phil,

0:17:320:17:34

but you've also got him doing all the carting, you cheeky beggar.

0:17:340:17:37

Are they both the same price, this one and that one there?

0:17:370:17:40

-Yes.

-Can I have a look at the...

0:17:400:17:42

Do you mind if we get it out and have a look?

0:17:420:17:44

-By all means.

-I'm sorry to be an absolute...

0:17:440:17:46

-That's OK.

-..pain.

0:17:460:17:49

Someone's painted a Britannia flag on this one, haven't they?

0:17:510:17:54

Sounds like he prefers the first table,

0:17:540:17:56

but will David take his £40 offer?

0:17:560:17:59

-That one, yeah?

-Blimey. That was a quick deal.

0:18:000:18:03

David generously accepts and Phil gets the table at an £85 discount.

0:18:030:18:08

-Tell you what, you've been really kind to me. Thank you.

-OK.

0:18:100:18:12

That's another item for Phil,

0:18:120:18:14

and it ends a very productive day all round.

0:18:140:18:18

Time for a well-deserved kip, you two.

0:18:180:18:21

Nighty-night.

0:18:210:18:22

The sun is shining and the roof is down

0:18:230:18:26

on our glamorous Italian icon.

0:18:260:18:28

You know what they say, Anita, don't you?

0:18:280:18:31

The sun always shines on the righteous.

0:18:310:18:34

The sun is shining on me this morning.

0:18:340:18:36

I know, but it's shining on me as well.

0:18:360:18:39

HE CHUCKLES Things are looking bright all round.

0:18:390:18:42

Anita made a hefty spend yesterday,

0:18:420:18:44

parting with £205 for a Lalique figurine,

0:18:440:18:48

an Art Deco clock garniture and a nine carat gold pendant.

0:18:480:18:53

In his bid to regain ground,

0:18:530:18:56

Phil picked up a silver-plated pincushion and miniature compass,

0:18:560:19:00

a 19th-century mahogany box and a copper-topped pub table

0:19:000:19:04

all for £100.

0:19:040:19:07

Wow.

0:19:070:19:08

This morning, Anita is bound for the village of Sabden

0:19:080:19:12

in the scenic Ribble Valley.

0:19:120:19:14

Try and buy something really expensive.

0:19:160:19:18

I think I'll have to be a wee bit careful now.

0:19:180:19:21

-(Get out of here.)

-Bye!

-Bye.

0:19:210:19:23

Anita's heading into Pendle Antiques Centre where owner Walter awaits.

0:19:230:19:28

-Watch out, Walt.

-Good morning.

0:19:280:19:30

-Oh, hi, Anita.

-Hello!

-Nice to see you.

0:19:300:19:32

Oh, it's lovely to be here.

0:19:320:19:34

And this is an extraordinary building, fascinating.

0:19:340:19:38

What was it before?

0:19:380:19:40

It was an old cotton mill, originally built in 1856.

0:19:400:19:44

From Lancashire mill to antiques haven,

0:19:440:19:47

jam-packed with all sorts of treats and trinkets.

0:19:470:19:50

Careful, Anita.

0:19:510:19:53

One of the lovely things about antique hunting

0:19:530:19:57

is looking at things, and you really don't know what they are,

0:19:570:20:01

and you've got to work it out for yourself.

0:20:010:20:04

Our dealer here has got these two things,

0:20:040:20:08

and he's at a loss to know what they are,

0:20:080:20:11

so he's named them a pair of wood things

0:20:110:20:16

with a question mark there.

0:20:160:20:17

-SHE LAUGHS

-That's good.

0:20:170:20:20

A pair of wood things!

0:20:200:20:22

The question is, is there anything you'd like to buy?

0:20:220:20:25

Now, this is an interesting set of chairs here.

0:20:290:20:32

These are in the style of Arne Jacobsen,

0:20:350:20:40

a Danish designer.

0:20:400:20:43

In the 1950s, he perfected the design of chairs

0:20:430:20:49

where the back of it was made of one piece of moulded plywood.

0:20:490:20:56

This was a ground-breaking design.

0:20:560:20:59

This 1980s plastic set is priced at £120.

0:20:590:21:04

With just rover 100 left in your pocket,

0:21:040:21:07

can you sweet-talk the dealer?

0:21:070:21:09

Hiya, Philip. I have a young lady here who would like a word with you.

0:21:090:21:14

OK, just a sec.

0:21:140:21:15

Hey, Philip. Did you hear Walter calling me a young lady?

0:21:170:21:20

SHE LAUGHS

0:21:200:21:23

I'm looking at these orange plastic chairs of yours,

0:21:230:21:26

which I've got really quite excited about.

0:21:260:21:28

Can I make you an offer of £70?

0:21:280:21:33

Oh, you're an absolute darling.

0:21:350:21:37

Thank you. Bye-bye.

0:21:370:21:39

£70.

0:21:420:21:44

Great. I'm happy.

0:21:440:21:45

Let me shake your hand.

0:21:450:21:46

-Thank you, darling, for being my go-between.

-Oh, you're welcome.

0:21:460:21:50

Excellent work, Anita.

0:21:500:21:52

Some stackable design classics winging their way

0:21:520:21:55

to a Yorkshire auction.

0:21:550:21:56

Meanwhile, Phil is toddling west towards Preston

0:21:580:22:01

where he's headed to the Museum of Lancashire.

0:22:010:22:04

Stephen Bull is on hand to give him

0:22:040:22:06

the lowdown on an incredible discovery.

0:22:060:22:09

In 2011, local stonemason Darren Webster

0:22:110:22:14

was scouring a field ten miles up the coast from Morecambe

0:22:140:22:18

with his metal detector.

0:22:180:22:20

Little did he know he was about to make a significant discovery

0:22:200:22:23

that would open a new window into the life of Viking Britain.

0:22:230:22:28

When he dug down into the ground,

0:22:280:22:30

what he found was some sort of lead container, like a lead pouch.

0:22:300:22:35

And he lifts this up out off the ground

0:22:350:22:37

and almost immediately it's apparent there's other things underneath.

0:22:370:22:41

Did he know what he got?

0:22:410:22:43

For the first few seconds, probably not.

0:22:430:22:47

But it began to leak, which must've been quite spectacular.

0:22:470:22:50

Yeah.

0:22:500:22:51

As coins began to spill from the container,

0:22:510:22:54

the significance of the discovery became clearer.

0:22:540:22:57

Buried just a few inches beneath the surface was a collection

0:22:570:23:00

of 200 silver items, including coins and jewellery

0:23:000:23:05

that were later dated to around 980 AD.

0:23:050:23:09

What became known as the Silverdale Hoard

0:23:090:23:12

is the third-largest haul of Viking treasure

0:23:120:23:16

ever discovered in Britain.

0:23:160:23:18

Stephen, my history is really, really sketchy,

0:23:180:23:21

but the Vikings are Scandinavian, aren't they?

0:23:210:23:24

Essentially, yes. Norway, Denmark, parts of Sweden.

0:23:240:23:28

So, I'd always thought that they'd sort of...

0:23:280:23:30

if they were going to come anywhere in to this country,

0:23:300:23:32

it'd be on the east coast, not on the west coast.

0:23:320:23:34

And you're right.

0:23:340:23:35

They did originally come to the east coast of England,

0:23:350:23:38

but they worked their way around the north,

0:23:380:23:41

through Scotland, Scottish islands,

0:23:410:23:43

down to the Isle of Man and also to Ireland.

0:23:430:23:47

Britain was no stranger to invaders.

0:23:480:23:51

In the eighth century,

0:23:510:23:52

nearly 400 years after the Roman army had left,

0:23:520:23:56

Vikings began their first attacks on British shores.

0:23:560:24:00

For nearly 70 years,

0:24:000:24:02

these fearsome warriors plundered all along the east and west coasts.

0:24:020:24:06

Then in 866, a huge Viking army landed intent on conquest.

0:24:090:24:15

They decimated the northern kingdoms of England and captured York.

0:24:150:24:19

The Anglo-Saxon King Alfred was forced to make a truce.

0:24:190:24:23

The Vikings were granted their own area to settle in -

0:24:230:24:26

this large section of the country became known as Danelaw.

0:24:260:24:31

The Silverdale Hoard was buried for safekeeping near the coast

0:24:310:24:35

of modern-day Lancashire,

0:24:350:24:37

which at that time was part of a Viking kingdom.

0:24:370:24:40

We have some ingots of silver,

0:24:400:24:44

and these are literally pieces of silver of set weights

0:24:440:24:48

that could be used as a method of exchange.

0:24:480:24:51

Or you could actually melt them down and turn them into a...

0:24:510:24:53

-A Viking bullion almost, isn't it?

-Absolutely.

0:24:530:24:56

-That's just what they are.

-Yeah.

0:24:560:24:57

-And what about the coins?

-The coins?

-They're fascinating.

0:24:570:25:01

This one is a Carolingian one.

0:25:010:25:03

We're talking about Eastern France or Western Germany.

0:25:030:25:09

So, that's a 1,000-year-old silver coin from Western Europe.

0:25:090:25:14

Yes.

0:25:140:25:15

At the start of the Viking age,

0:25:150:25:17

coins were valued only for their weight in silver or gold.

0:25:170:25:21

It was common for coins brought back from other countries

0:25:210:25:24

to be found together, and currency from anywhere could still be used.

0:25:240:25:28

So, that there, in Viking times would that have been a week's wages,

0:25:280:25:32

a month's wages, a year's wages?

0:25:320:25:34

Very often, people didn't get wages.

0:25:340:25:37

They were supplied with goods or materials or supplied...

0:25:370:25:41

-Barter.

-..with the goods back.

-Yeah.

0:25:410:25:43

But I would've thought we're talking a chicken there for a single penny.

0:25:430:25:46

Really?

0:25:460:25:47

Amongst the collection is what is known as hacksilver -

0:25:470:25:51

large pieces of jewellery that were divided into smaller pieces

0:25:510:25:54

to make up exact weight of silver for trading.

0:25:540:25:57

The various coins from locations as far as modern day Baghdad

0:25:570:26:02

shows that the Viking world was vast.

0:26:020:26:05

Scandinavian travellers traded as far away

0:26:050:26:08

as Russia and Newfoundland.

0:26:080:26:11

Which is your favourite piece out of the hoard?

0:26:110:26:13

It may look insignificant, but coin number one is a coin

0:26:130:26:18

of somebody called Harthacnut.

0:26:180:26:21

Now, we didn't know a Viking ruler of the name Harthacnut

0:26:210:26:28

before this particular hoard was found, so...

0:26:280:26:31

-He's rewritten history.

-He has rewritten history.

0:26:310:26:34

Although little else is currently known,

0:26:340:26:36

this discovery confirmed that a previously unknown ruler

0:26:360:26:40

significant enough to be named on a coin

0:26:400:26:43

controlled a large section of this country.

0:26:430:26:46

This opens a new chapter not just in Lancashire's history,

0:26:460:26:50

but for all of Britain.

0:26:500:26:51

And all this comes from a guy perhaps on a Sunday morning

0:26:510:26:55

with his hobby going out metal detecting.

0:26:550:26:58

That's it.

0:26:580:26:59

I'm just going to go and dig a field up. I'll be back in a minute.

0:27:000:27:03

The Vikings remained as settlers and invaders for 200 years.

0:27:040:27:08

Their final action in this country was their defeat in battle

0:27:100:27:13

just a few weeks before Norman forces invaded in 1066.

0:27:130:27:18

The collection is now on display not far from where it was buried

0:27:200:27:24

over 1,000 years ago by the people

0:27:240:27:26

who once controlled this part of Britain.

0:27:260:27:28

Back on the road and our pair are reunited

0:27:360:27:39

as they head for the city of Lancaster.

0:27:390:27:41

Look at that there. How can you beat that for scenery?

0:27:410:27:44

It's love... Keep your eye on the road.

0:27:440:27:46

She's right.

0:27:460:27:47

On the banks of the River Lune, Lancaster was once a Roman frontier

0:27:470:27:50

defending the area from marauding Scots.

0:27:500:27:53

Ha!

0:27:530:27:54

Ironic that, because today our own forager from the north

0:27:540:27:57

only has antiques on her mind.

0:27:570:27:58

This is one of the biggest antique centres in the UK.

0:27:580:28:01

-It's massive, isn't it?

-Very, very busy.

0:28:010:28:04

It's certainly sizable,

0:28:040:28:05

so it's up to father and son Alan and Jimmy to help our pair navigate.

0:28:050:28:09

Somewhere or other,

0:28:110:28:12

there's going to be an absolute steal of a bargain,

0:28:120:28:15

and all you've got to do is find it.

0:28:150:28:17

Lovely to see you. Thanks for coming.

0:28:200:28:23

Doesn't say much, does she?

0:28:230:28:24

Just like that. It's just like that. Not like that. Like that.

0:28:270:28:30

SHE LAUGHS

0:28:350:28:38

This is not an umbrella.

0:28:380:28:41

An umbrella keeps the rain off of you.

0:28:410:28:45

This is a parasol, and a parasol is a fashion statement.

0:28:450:28:51

Now, costume and textiles are really quite hot

0:28:510:28:57

in today's market,

0:28:570:28:59

so I think it might be quite a nice thing to go for a parasol.

0:28:590:29:05

Now, this one is rather big.

0:29:050:29:10

But this one, it's small, it's dainty...

0:29:140:29:21

and it's sweet.

0:29:210:29:23

I mean, what is this parasol doing?

0:29:240:29:27

Absolutely nothing except being a wee bit glamorous.

0:29:270:29:34

Speaking of glamour,

0:29:340:29:36

what has our sophisticated Mr Serrell found?

0:29:360:29:39

So, this is an old boot scraper.

0:29:390:29:41

It would've been outside someone's front door, wasn't it?

0:29:410:29:44

-Well, yeah.

-You just put your foot on there and just do that.

0:29:440:29:47

Yes, that's for scraping.

0:29:470:29:48

But I think the curve underneath was to actually put your boot

0:29:480:29:53

underneath and help to loosen it.

0:29:530:29:55

Oh, right. Right.

0:29:550:29:57

So, it helped you get it off as well as scrape it clean.

0:29:570:30:01

You see, at auction, I think that's going to make £30 to £50.

0:30:010:30:04

I've got to try it for £20, £25.

0:30:040:30:06

That's where... Which is tough, but can we just...

0:30:060:30:09

-Let's put it back there.

-Yeah.

0:30:090:30:11

Tough indeed. Its ticket price is 68.

0:30:110:30:15

Back with the glamorous parasol, Anita has called in Jimmy.

0:30:150:30:19

-Hi.

-Hi, Anita.

0:30:190:30:20

I had a look at this parasol here. Quite liked that.

0:30:200:30:24

-OK.

-It's small, it's dainty.

-Yeah.

0:30:240:30:27

And I think it just...

0:30:270:30:29

I think there's quite a bit of age to it as well, isn't there?

0:30:290:30:32

-Yeah.

-It's...

0:30:320:30:33

-What I do have, though, is damage there.

-Right. OK.

0:30:330:30:37

-And in textiles, damage is very important.

-Yeah.

0:30:370:30:41

And I think I've had a repair here.

0:30:410:30:43

In fact, I have had repair.

0:30:430:30:45

-There.

-Yeah.

0:30:450:30:47

Let me see if it suits you.

0:30:470:30:49

Probably not as well as you, to be honest.

0:30:490:30:51

-Aw!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:30:510:30:53

-So, it's priced at £44 at the moment.

-But it is damaged.

0:30:530:30:57

-Yeah, I'm taking on board exactly what you're saying.

-Mm-hm.

0:30:570:31:01

How's £25 sound?

0:31:010:31:03

Would 22 buy it?

0:31:030:31:05

Go on, then.

0:31:050:31:07

-Shall we do it?

-Yeah. Absolutely.

-OK.

0:31:070:31:08

-That's great.

-I'll be sad to see it go cos I like twirling it myself.

0:31:080:31:12

-SHE LAUGHS

-I saw it first!

0:31:120:31:15

That's half price for the parasol.

0:31:150:31:18

What has Phil found?

0:31:200:31:21

I quite like these. They're different, aren't they?

0:31:210:31:24

Yeah, very authentic.

0:31:240:31:25

-These would've been sat in an office.

-Correct.

0:31:250:31:27

I'm not actually sure that these drawers all match,

0:31:270:31:31

but I kind of think it doesn't matter.

0:31:310:31:34

They're that shabby side of shabby chic, aren't they?

0:31:340:31:37

Well, I don't know how much they are cos there's no price,

0:31:370:31:39

but, I mean, I think...

0:31:390:31:41

HE TAPS Easy, Phil.

0:31:410:31:45

I don't think that base has got anything to do with it, has it?

0:31:450:31:47

-It just does the job.

-It does the job, exactly.

0:31:470:31:50

-The stone wrought-iron step thing that we saw earlier...

-Yes.

0:31:500:31:54

-..and these chests...

-Right.

0:31:540:31:56

..now, I think these two will make 30 to 50 at auction,

0:31:560:31:59

and I think the stone scraper thing will make 30 to 50 at auction,

0:31:590:32:04

which means I've got to try and buy this little pile for 20 quid

0:32:040:32:07

if I can and the stone thing for 20 quid if I can,

0:32:070:32:09

which is the two for 40.

0:32:090:32:11

How is that going to...?

0:32:110:32:13

Well, I think we could do 50, Phil.

0:32:130:32:17

45, would that squeeze you?

0:32:170:32:19

-45 is probably the right price.

-You're a gentlemen.

0:32:190:32:22

Thank you ever so, ever so much.

0:32:220:32:24

Phil gets the boot scraper and the filing cabinets for £45.

0:32:240:32:29

Now, where would we find Anita?

0:32:320:32:35

I'm just looking at a nice Victorian brooch.

0:32:350:32:38

Now, I wanted to spend all of my money,

0:32:380:32:42

but I still have £10.06 left.

0:32:420:32:46

This brooch here, Victorian brooch...

0:32:460:32:50

It won't be gold. It will be pinchbeck or rolled gold

0:32:500:32:53

with a very nice citrine in the middle.

0:32:530:32:57

It's priced at £18.

0:32:570:33:00

What I'm going to do is I'm going to say to Jimmy,

0:33:000:33:03

"Can I buy that for £10.06?" and see what happens.

0:33:030:33:09

Only one way to find out.

0:33:090:33:11

-Can I have a wee look at that one?

-Absolutely.

0:33:110:33:13

It's been...

0:33:130:33:15

They've polished it and cleaned it up beautifully.

0:33:150:33:18

-Not gold. Rolled gold or pinchbeck.

-Yeah.

0:33:180:33:21

It's priced at £18.

0:33:210:33:23

That's the only thing.

0:33:230:33:25

I've got £10.06.

0:33:250:33:29

Can I buy this for £10.06?

0:33:290:33:33

As long as you add the six pence to the ten pounds, we've got a deal.

0:33:330:33:36

-Oh, that's great.

-Thank you.

0:33:360:33:38

I've spent every single penny, and that's what I wanted to do.

0:33:380:33:42

With that bold move from Anita, all our shopping is done.

0:33:420:33:47

Phil spent £145 on a silver-plated pincushion

0:33:500:33:54

and miniature compass,

0:33:540:33:55

a 19th-century mahogany box, a copper-topped pub table,

0:33:550:34:00

a wrought-iron boot scraper and a set of vintage drawers.

0:34:000:34:05

Anita cleared out every last penny of her £307.06,

0:34:070:34:12

picking up a Lalique figurine,

0:34:120:34:15

an Art Deco clock garniture,

0:34:150:34:17

a set of plastic chairs,

0:34:170:34:20

a Victorian parasol

0:34:200:34:21

and a gold pendant that she's now pairing with her yellow metal brooch.

0:34:210:34:25

What do they say about their opponent's finds?

0:34:280:34:32

If you're going to buy a piece of French glass, you buy Lalique.

0:34:320:34:35

It's the best, and Anita has done just that.

0:34:350:34:37

I hope for her sake the people of Yorkshire really appreciate it too.

0:34:370:34:41

Phil Serrell has bought well this time.

0:34:410:34:44

The boot scraper is just down his street,

0:34:440:34:48

and I think he could double his money on that.

0:34:480:34:52

So, with hope in their hearts, it's off to the auction.

0:34:530:34:56

After starting this leg in Frodsham,

0:34:560:34:58

our pair have zipped their way through Cheshire and Lancashire

0:34:580:35:02

and are ending up in Easingwold in North Yorkshire.

0:35:020:35:05

All this rural travel seems to agree with our pair.

0:35:050:35:09

A big moo-cow!

0:35:090:35:10

Aw! Now here's the ducks. I like ducks.

0:35:100:35:12

Cock-a-doodle-doo! Cock-a-doodle-doo!

0:35:120:35:16

Once they've finish playing in the farmyard,

0:35:160:35:19

it's time to do battle at the auction.

0:35:190:35:22

This should be fun, Philip.

0:35:220:35:24

-SHE LAUGHS

-Here we go again. Into the coliseum.

0:35:240:35:27

The lions are waiting for me. Look. Oh, no!

0:35:270:35:32

Summersgills Auctions are family-run affair

0:35:320:35:34

and have been striking the gavel in Yorkshire since 1959.

0:35:340:35:37

Auctioneer Tim Summersgill is taking care of proceedings today,

0:35:370:35:41

but before the off, what does he make of our pair's lots?

0:35:410:35:45

The clock garniture set is a nice lot.

0:35:450:35:47

It fits well in with our items that we sell.

0:35:470:35:50

I would say that would do quite well.

0:35:500:35:52

I'd say probably 50 to 100.

0:35:520:35:53

The filing drawers are an unusual lot.

0:35:530:35:56

It's not normally what we sell, but you just never know. That's it.

0:35:560:35:59

So, we've got the internet, so let's see how it goes

0:35:590:36:01

and hope we go very well.

0:36:010:36:03

Both experts have five lots,

0:36:050:36:08

but leader Anita has risked all her cash.

0:36:080:36:12

Will she regret it?

0:36:120:36:13

First lot. Keep your fingers crossed.

0:36:160:36:19

Our first lot of the day is Anita's parasol.

0:36:190:36:23

Bit of interest straight in on this one at £20. £20 bid on this one.

0:36:230:36:26

22 there. 24. 26. 28. 28. 30 just in time. At £30 at the back.

0:36:260:36:32

A feeling of deja vu at the moment.

0:36:320:36:35

No-one else come in. We're selling. £30. 61.

0:36:350:36:38

Ha! A great profit to start us off.

0:36:380:36:41

Not a big profit.

0:36:410:36:42

-No, no, no.

-Fair. Fair.

-Just another little profit. Well done, you.

0:36:420:36:47

Next up is Phil's mahogany box.

0:36:470:36:50

Bids all over, so we're straight in at £90 for this one.

0:36:500:36:52

-Oh!

-£90 bid on this. 95 anywhere else?

0:36:520:36:55

On commission at £90.

0:36:550:36:58

All out in the room?

0:36:580:36:59

£90. You beauty.

0:37:010:37:03

Going for a maiden commission bid,

0:37:030:37:06

that great profit has sure floored Phil.

0:37:060:37:09

-I'll settle for that. That's really good, isn't it?

-That's fabulous.

0:37:090:37:13

Yeah.

0:37:130:37:14

Anita got carried away with the clock.

0:37:140:37:16

Let's hope the bidders do the same.

0:37:160:37:18

-Straight in at 25 on this one.

-25.

-25 bid on commission.

0:37:180:37:21

28 anywhere else?

0:37:210:37:22

28. 30 there. 32. 34 here.

0:37:220:37:26

34 on commission. 35 now on the internet.

0:37:260:37:29

-36. 45 now on the internet.

-The internet's interested.

0:37:290:37:34

50 anywhere else?

0:37:340:37:35

On the internet at 45.

0:37:350:37:38

There was no need to worry, as Anita lands another profit.

0:37:380:37:43

-I'm happy with that.

-Oh, yeah, yeah.

-Are you happy for me?

0:37:430:37:45

Oh, I'm over the moon. Absolutely over the moon.

0:37:450:37:48

Always good to see some friendly support, eh, Phil?

0:37:480:37:52

They caught his eye at the counter,

0:37:520:37:54

but will his compass and pincushion bring him a profit?

0:37:540:37:58

20 straight in. £20 bid on this. 25 anywhere else?

0:37:580:38:02

-25. 28 here.

-Good, good, good.

0:38:020:38:04

Just in time at 30. Right at the back at £30.

0:38:040:38:07

Your bid, sir, at £30.

0:38:070:38:10

Aw. No gain, no pain.

0:38:100:38:12

It's a small loss after costs,

0:38:120:38:15

but there's plenty of time to make that back.

0:38:150:38:18

Never mind. You're a mere man.

0:38:180:38:21

Sometimes you do make mistakes, you know. You can't help it.

0:38:210:38:25

Hey, let's hope there's no mistake

0:38:250:38:26

with your Danish-design-inspired chairs then, Anita.

0:38:260:38:30

Bids on these, straight in at 50 on these.

0:38:300:38:32

£50 bid. 55. 60 on these.

0:38:320:38:34

70 there. 75. 80. £80. 90, sir?

0:38:340:38:39

Your bid at £80. Last chance.

0:38:390:38:43

That's OK.

0:38:430:38:44

Yeah, yeah, yeah. It's just another little profit, isn't it?

0:38:440:38:47

Certainly is. Another profit then for Anita.

0:38:470:38:51

It's just a tiny, tiny little profit.

0:38:510:38:53

-IMITATES ANITA:

-It's a just a tiny little wee profit!

0:38:530:38:55

But there's time to catch up, Phil. Your boot scraper is next.

0:38:570:39:01

Three bids here, so we're straight in at 55 on this one.

0:39:010:39:04

-Get in.

-55 bid on it. 60 anywhere else?

0:39:040:39:07

£60 just in time. £60 here.

0:39:070:39:09

We're selling at £60. All out in the room? At 60 we sell.

0:39:090:39:14

That's a great profit for Phil.

0:39:140:39:16

-Well done.

-That'll do, won't it? That'll do.

0:39:160:39:19

It's one of Anita's big-money purchases.

0:39:200:39:23

Will it set pulses racing?

0:39:230:39:25

Straight in at £50 on this one. £50 on this.

0:39:250:39:28

Nice little lot at £50.

0:39:280:39:30

All done? 55. 60. Five. 70.

0:39:300:39:34

£70 there. All in at 70 to sell?

0:39:340:39:37

Last chance.

0:39:370:39:38

Uh-oh.

0:39:400:39:41

That's the first loss of the day for Anita

0:39:410:39:44

and opens the door for Phil.

0:39:440:39:45

It could've been a lot worse, Phil.

0:39:450:39:48

Our auctioneer thought these were unusual for his sale room,

0:39:480:39:51

but Phil is holding out hope.

0:39:510:39:53

I am like them - bang on trend.

0:39:530:39:55

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-Uh-huh.

0:39:550:39:56

Can tell that by the anoraks you wear.

0:39:560:39:59

91 is the Oriental light...

0:39:590:40:01

Bids again, so straight in at 45 bid on this.

0:40:010:40:03

-45. Well done.

-45. 48. 50.

0:40:030:40:06

Five. 60. Five. 70 at the back. 75. 80. 85.

0:40:060:40:11

-Oh, brilliant. Brilliant.

-90. 95. 100 for you, Sean.

0:40:110:40:15

All done at £100? All out?

0:40:150:40:18

Brilliant.

0:40:210:40:22

A fantastic 300% profit for Phil.

0:40:220:40:26

What's really mad about this business is that has just made

0:40:260:40:29

the same sort of money that a Victorian chest of drawers has made.

0:40:290:40:31

-Yeah.

-And that's madness, isn't it?

-Mm-hm.

0:40:310:40:34

Mad it may be, but it puts you right back in the running, Phil.

0:40:340:40:39

Anita's turn now with her pendant and brooch.

0:40:390:40:42

I mean, I wouldn't wish ill on you, Anita,

0:40:420:40:44

cos you're very dear and old friend of mine,

0:40:440:40:46

but it would be ever so nice if they paid 20 quid, wouldn't it?

0:40:460:40:49

Bids all over on these, so straight in at 90 again.

0:40:490:40:52

£90 on these. 95 anywhere else?

0:40:520:40:56

All done then? £90.

0:40:560:40:58

Don't miss them for a fiver.

0:40:580:41:00

Last chance.

0:41:000:41:02

Someone picked them up without a fight and for a great price,

0:41:020:41:05

and it's more good news for Phil.

0:41:050:41:08

-I was glad I bought them.

-Fair play to you.

0:41:080:41:10

You spent every penny, and I don't think you've lost...

0:41:100:41:13

It's a dangerous strategy, that,

0:41:130:41:14

and I don't think you've actually lost that much money.

0:41:140:41:17

Phil's final lot is his pub table.

0:41:170:41:20

Straight in at £40 on this one. £40. 45. 50.

0:41:200:41:24

Five. 60. Five. 70.

0:41:240:41:26

Five. 80.

0:41:260:41:28

90. 100.

0:41:280:41:30

110. 110 then.

0:41:300:41:32

-110.

-I'm surprised.

-Yeah.

0:41:320:41:34

120. 130. 130.

0:41:340:41:37

140, is it? 140. 150.

0:41:370:41:40

150 right across that side.

0:41:400:41:42

Well, well done, anyway.

0:41:440:41:46

Yeah, I should say so.

0:41:460:41:47

Phil is stunned, and it's a cracking profit.

0:41:470:41:50

What a great way to round up today's auction.

0:41:500:41:53

You've done well. Congratulations.

0:41:530:41:56

Let's go.

0:41:560:41:58

So, what does that do to this week's totals?

0:41:580:42:01

Anita made the daring move of spending all of her £307.06.

0:42:020:42:07

After costs, she made a small loss of £48.76,

0:42:070:42:12

taking her total to £258.30.

0:42:120:42:17

Phil's in the pink after today's display.

0:42:200:42:23

Starting off with £191.80,

0:42:230:42:26

he made a fantastic £207.60 profit after costs,

0:42:260:42:31

giving him the win today and swinging him into

0:42:310:42:34

the overall lead with a total of £399.40.

0:42:340:42:39

Well done, Phil.

0:42:390:42:40

I'm not used to these dizzy heights.

0:42:420:42:45

You've romped ahead athletically.

0:42:450:42:47

-It's all just turned the tables, hasn't it?

-It certainly has.

0:42:470:42:50

Forward to the next leg, Phil.

0:42:540:42:56

Cheerio!

0:43:000:43:01

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:040:43:07

romantic Anita turns up the heat...

0:43:070:43:09

Skies are blue, the water is lapping gently on the shore.

0:43:090:43:14

..but Phil's still out in the cold.

0:43:140:43:16

Wasn't an ounce of emotion there, was there?

0:43:160:43:18

Anita Manning and Philip Serrell are halfway through their road trip, and the third leg takes them from Frodsham in Cheshire to an auction in Easingwold in Yorkshire. Anita decides to blow her whole budget, but will she regret it?