Episode 14 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 14

Antiques challenge. Anita Manning and Philip Serrell embark on the penultimate leg of their journey, which begins in Northumberland and finishes at auction in Carlisle.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

-This is beautiful.

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That's the way to do this.

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal - to scour for antiques.

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-Joy!

-Hello!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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HE LAUGHS

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-The handbrake's on!

-This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today is the fourth instalment of our road trip with auctioneers

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Anita Manning and Phil Serrell.

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Get out of here!

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Do you not like being caressed by a beautiful Scottish girl, Philip?

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-Your knees are irresistible!

-I know.

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A lot of people have said that through the years. Nothing else.

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-Just my knees.

-Quite.

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Ha!

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Anita was knocked off her winning pedestal after

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she blew the budget on the last leg.

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It could have been a lot worse, Phil. Could have been a lot worse.

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Now Phil's in front after totting up a series of sizeable

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profits at the last auction, including over £100 on a pub table.

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You've done well. Congratulations.

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SHE LAUGHS

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The trusty 1970s Fiat 500 is their chariot this week.

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-I think I'm quite... I'm getting to like this car.

-Oh, that's wonderful!

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-You mean you're growing into it?

-I think it's growing into me.

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Our Road Trip pals started off with £200 each.

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So far, Anita has had a journey of ups and downs.

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She has £258.30 for the day ahead.

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Phil, meanwhile, has found his stride

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and has a rather sizeable £399.40 stuffed in his back pocket.

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Anita and Phil are making a monster 1,200-mile tour which

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kicked off in stunning Windermere in the Lake District.

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They will travel around the North of England and dip into Bonnie Scotland

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before heading back south to end in the village of Crooklands in Cumbria.

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Today's journey begins in the village of Amble in Northumberland,

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and we will auction in Carlisle in Cumbria.

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Hello! What's going on here?

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I love this bit of the coastline. It's glorious, isn't it?

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The skies are blue, the water's lapping gently on the shore.

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Cor, they don't half treat themselves, do they?

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-Are you getting all romantic?

-With you, darling, any time!

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-I'm getting back to the car.

-Oh, Phil, you spoilsport!

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We'll have to keep an eye on you, though.

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Anita's playing catch-up now, and nestled here,

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in the village of Amble, is her first shop of the day.

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And they love a bit of vintage in here.

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-Hi, I'm Anita.

-Hello, Anita. I'm Tony. Very nice to meet you.

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Oh, it's lovely to meet you. Lovely to meet you.

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I can see all these wonderful things over here and I can see all these

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wonderful cakes here!

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The cakes look delicious, but it's antiques we're after.

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With eagle-eyed precision, Anita finds something. Hey, snazzy shoes!

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I think this is quite a sweet little thing.

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It's a little three-legged milking stool,

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but what I like about this is the illustration.

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The Widecombe Fair took place in Dartmoor and it started,

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I don't know, early 1800s. And it's still going on today.

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And this little stool might have been sold as a souvenir at the fair.

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And what we have here is this rather naive painting.

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-What's that all about?

-Well, I'll tell you.

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It could have been sold at Widecombe Fair,

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but it certainly is related to the 19th-century ditty of the same

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name, where the

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poor old horse met a sticky end after carrying six people to the fair.

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Oh, poor old love!

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Anyway, ticket price is £23. Anything else, my dear?

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I think that this has got bags of style.

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It's a table lamp and a little cabinet.

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So we're getting away from heavy, clumsy furniture

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into something which had what we call the New Look.

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The New Look began with Christian Dior's Spring collection in 1947.

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It startled the fashion world and resulted in a transformation

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in design within the home and workplace.

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It's priced at £72.

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Now, it says on here that it will need rewiring,

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and items like this do need rewiring and it can be quite costly,

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but I wonder if I might be able to get a deal with Tony

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because it needs this done.

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Only one way to find out...

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I thought that this lamp-cabinet affair...

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-Oh, OK.

-..was very good fun.

-Yes.

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It's the type of thing that the city slickers

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would like in their 1950s interiors.

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I mean, I remember the 1950s...

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Surely not, Anita(!)

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Remember, it's priced at £72.

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-On the ticket, it tells us that it needs rewired.

-Yes.

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Is there a drop-dead price that you could sell that for?

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Simply because of the rewiring issue?

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Do you want to make me an offer?

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-An offer that you can't refuse?

-Yes!

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THEY LAUGH

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I would be looking to pay maybe round about £40 for it,

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-but I don't know if you can come down that far...

-Yes, yes.

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-I could come down to probably about £50.

-50?

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How would you feel about that?

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I know... I mean, to me, it's certainly worth that,

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-but I have to sell it in auction, you know?

-Yes, yes, of course.

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And it's got that thing on it.

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Um... How about 45? Would that...

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-45 sounds fine to me.

-Is that all right, are you sure?

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Yes, that's fine.

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-Oh, thank you very much!

-Good luck with that.

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What about the milking stool, then?

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But there was something else that I liked the look of,

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and it was this little novelty milking stool.

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-Ah, yes.

-What's the best that you can do on that?

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Well, we've got 23...

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I could do a special price for, what, £12 for that?

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Put it there! Lovely. £12, I'm delighted with that.

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I think that it's just an absolutely fun thing.

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Good work, Anita.

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The 1950s lamp and cabinet for £45 and the little milking stool for £12.

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That's lovely, thank you very much.

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-It's been lovely.

-Thank you.

-Bye-bye!

-Bye.

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Phil is easing into this leg. He's journeyed northwards

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to the coastal village of Bamburgh in Northumberland.

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The area boasts one of the largest castles in the country.

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Not just a magnificent landmark,

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this castle was once the centre of a revolutionary social movement.

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Before the NHS and the welfare state,

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Bamburgh Castle played host to a utilitarian society,

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providing health care, education and the country's first lifeboat station.

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Phil is meeting with curator Chris Calvert to find out more.

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-Hi, I'm Philip.

-Hi, I'm Chris. How're you?

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You know, I don't know this part of the world,

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-but this is just absolutely stunning, isn't it?

-Beautiful.

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In 1758, local man and vicar Dr John Sharp became the head

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of the Crew Trust, set up by the owners

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of the castle to manage affairs.

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He was given full control of running the estate

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and, as a great philanthropist, he set about creating

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a much-needed life support for the people of Bamburgh.

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-If that a windmill?

-It certainly was in its heyday, yes.

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What's a castle doing with a windmill?

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We go back to the Crew Trustees - when they owned the castle,

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John Sharp realised that corn was getting very expensive

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and he got the Crew Trustees to agree to buy in corn

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he could then sell to the poor people - corn at a reasonable cost.

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And then from that came the windmills so that they could then

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come up and they could grind their own corn for free in the windmill.

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Free education was next on his agenda.

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A local school was set up within the castle,

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teaching children who would have otherwise no access to learning.

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They are the original schoolbooks, yeah, from the 1700s.

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There are two schoolbooks here... Obviously mathematics was very big.

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-Division and logarithms?

-I know, very complicated isn't it?

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So we've got logarithm...

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Well, this is all mathematical, really, isn't it?

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What else did they teach here?

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They taught reading, as well, and writing.

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But they were taught practical skills as well, later on,

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so they were taught sewing and they were taught spinning,

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hence the spinning wheel that we have here.

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So it was always an industry for life, wasn't it?

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It is, giving them life skills. I mean real life skills.

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And I can see, clearly, all our mathematical stuff here,

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we've got the children's chairs and we've got the spinning wheel

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that they worked on, but why have we got a sedan chair here?

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Well, it's normally associated with the aristocrats and the gentry

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for getting carried around town in,

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but this one was actually used as an ambulance.

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In 1772, Dr Sharp opened a surgery here,

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providing free medical care and supplies.

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By the end of the decade,

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the surgery was treating over 1,500 patients a year.

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The original surgery and dispensary hasn't survived,

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but Dr John Sharp is still very much present.

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The painting embodies everything he did here, really,

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with his plans for the castle, the development of the castle,

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the surgery, the dispensary...

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The poor people there either

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thanking him for the treatment they've received

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or maybe beseeching him to take their children into the school.

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And through the window over his shoulder there,

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-you can see that there's ship foundering.

-Oh, yeah, yeah!

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Dr John Sharp was troubled by the shipwrecks

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on the perilous Bamburgh coastline.

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Determined to make the seas as safe as possible, he created a pioneering

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coastguard system thought to be the first of its kind in the world.

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So if there was a ship that was in distress...

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..the coastguard, Sharp's coastguard saw it, and I mean

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if it was sinking or whatever, did they help them, or what happened?

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Yes, they had a system of signals using these guns here.

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These are actually the guns used.

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And they would signal to the villagers with the smaller gun

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and then had a larger gun that was used to signal to the ships

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-that help was on its way.

-And what sort of help would it have been?

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Manpower, basically.

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So any sailors that were injured or whatever,

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what would have happened to them?

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Well, they were treated here and any sailors that unfortunately drowned,

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their funerals and their coffins

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were paid for by the Crew Trustees here.

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Where did all the money come from to fund this?

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He put up a lot of it himself.

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But the Crew Trustees did have quite extensive lands, as well.

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The lifeboat station was successfully managed until the 1860s,

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when it was taken over by the RNLI.

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Not only did Dr Sharp begin the quest to make our seas safe,

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but he also created a miniature welfare state

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that lasted at Bamburgh for over 100 years.

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Chris, it's been absolutely fantastic.

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You'd better show me out, because this place is so big,

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I've got to go and find that dreadful little car.

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CHRIS LAUGHS

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Anita's travelled south west to the Northumbrian town of Corbridge.

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It's here, in the very heart of Hadrian's Wall country,

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that romantic novelist Catherine Cookson lived.

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Our very own leading lady is going for a nosy

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in Corbridge Antiques Centre.

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-Alison is holding the fort here today.

-Hello, I'm Anita.

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-Hello, nice to meet you.

-Ah, it's lovely to be here.

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-And I can't wait to have a look around.

-Yeah.

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If there's anything I want to ask you about,

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can I give you a wee shout?

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-Yeah, of course, I'll just be here.

-OK, thank you. Thank you.

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With over 30 dealers here,

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Anita should be able to snaffle up something.

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We know how she loves to shop.

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I absolutely adore this mirror.

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It's so beautiful.

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It's an Art Nouveau mirror, made probably between 1900-1910.

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We have our geometric feel to it, but, at the same time,

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we have these wonderful, naturalistic inlays

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of perhaps a sandalwood or an exotic wood.

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The whole thing is an absolute harmony and if I had...

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..a four-figure sum, I would definitely go for it.

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This is actually a Liberty mirror and it's priced at £1,800.

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Shame you've only got a little over 200.

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But I've already seen something that I quite like.

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Great!

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Down here, it's made of pine

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and it's a little Art Deco doll's three-piece suite.

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I think it's quite a nice little thing.

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I think I might ask her about it.

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It's been quite simply made,

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maybe by an amateur carpenter or maybe even by an apprentice.

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But it's got that 1930s, 1940s Art Deco look about it,

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which I think's quite charming.

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If that was life-sized, I wouldn't mind it myself.

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Yeah!

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Me too, Anita.

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And it's a snip at £14.

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Is there any movement on that, Ali?

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-Could do the set for £12.

-£12?

-Yeah.

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-I think I might take that.

-Yeah?

-I think I might take that.

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It has a kind of simple, naive look about it,

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-but I find that quite charming.

-Yeah.

-So, £12?

-Yeah.

-Thank you.

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-Thank you very, very much.

-Thanks.

-Thank you.

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£12 secures the little Art Deco-style three-piece suite.

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-Thank you very much.

-Bye-bye!

-Bye.

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As for Phil, he's journeyed south to the city of Newcastle.

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Phil hasn't started shopping yet - maybe this fair city

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can tempt him with something different

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to his usual rusty offerings. Ha!

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Stand by.

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-Hello, Philip, how you doing?

-Yeah, good to see you. You are?

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I'm Giuseppe and this is Fern Avenue Antiques Centre. Welcome.

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You've got some stuff, you, haven't you?

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So what's cheap, then, Giuseppe, what's cheap?

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We've got a pair of canaries up there, so they're double cheap.

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Yeah, great, great, great.

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Geddit? Hoo-hoo!

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But Phil doesn't want a pair of birds -

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he's got his eye on something else.

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Giuseppe, what's that trunk underneath there, how much is that?

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Er, we'll get it out.

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It's one of the cleanest ones...

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..that I've ever had.

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-All the original address there, come via Dieppe to Newhaven.

-Yeah.

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Unusual to have the key.

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There we go.

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PHIL GASPING

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140 quid.

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Are you all RIGHT there, Phil?

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Undecided on the trunk, he moves on.

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-25, Scottish Masonic.

-That's quite nice.

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No great age, how do you know it's Scottish?

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Well, because it's shaped like a thistle.

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And it's a firing glass.

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-Right.

-So you would drink your toast

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and then it would be... banged on the table.

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And that is why it's got such a thick bottom,

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if you'll pardon the expression.

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-That might be a possibility.

-OK.

-That might well be a possibility.

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Masonic items can be very sought-after at auction.

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That could be a good choice, Phil.

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-This is a Masonic jewel.

-Right.

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It's no big deal, but it's just a nice little Masonic jewel.

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It's priced at £18.

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Well, I might be interested, perhaps, if I could...

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-Do a deal on...?

-On the two, yeah.

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Both belong to different concessions,

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but I'm sure we could do something.

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-That your problem, my friend.

-GIUSEPPE LAUGHS

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Not mine.

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Mmm, charming!

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The Masonic jewel is another possibility,

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and Phil's got his eye on another big wooden trunk.

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Uh-oh!

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What's that one up there, then? How much is that one?

0:17:420:17:45

That one's cheap and cheerful, 40 quid.

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What?! Can I have a look at it, please?

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You certainly can.

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I'm struggling now.

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-I'm being deadly serious, I want you to explain to me...

-Yeah?

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..why there is £100 in difference between that one

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and the first one I looked at.

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-Sometimes you can buy things right.

-You bought that right?

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-I bought that right.

-I'll give you 30 quid for it.

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35.

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You know those... That little bit of Masonic glass?

0:18:110:18:14

-And that little jewel thing?

-Yeah.

-Could I buy...

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-..the three bits off you for 60 quid?

-Which three?

0:18:200:18:23

The glass, the jewel and that trunk.

0:18:230:18:25

No.

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There wasn't an ounce of emotion there, was there?

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Just nothing at all.

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-I'll meet you in the middle.

-What's that, 65?

-65.

0:18:340:18:37

-Giuseppe, you've been as good as gold, mate.

-Thank you very much.

0:18:370:18:40

£65 and three, you're a gent.

0:18:400:18:41

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-No problem, best of luck.

0:18:410:18:43

-Bye-bye, now.

-Phil now has two lots.

0:18:430:18:46

£30 for the Masonic firing glass and jewel and £35 for the wooden trunk.

0:18:460:18:52

This signals the end of a very busy day.

0:18:540:18:57

It's time for our weary duo to turn in and get some shut-eye.

0:18:570:19:02

Nighty-night.

0:19:020:19:04

Anita's in command of the Fiat 500 this fair morning.

0:19:130:19:17

Uh-oh.

0:19:180:19:19

One of the joys about this road trip - all road trips -

0:19:200:19:24

-is that you work with your old mates, don't you?

-Oh, yeah, I know.

0:19:240:19:28

And those friendships stay true.

0:19:280:19:30

Although I do have to say,

0:19:300:19:32

not convinced your driving's got any better!

0:19:320:19:35

Get over!

0:19:350:19:37

He's a rascal.

0:19:370:19:38

Let's have a refresher on their shopping trip thus far.

0:19:410:19:45

Anita has three lots.

0:19:460:19:48

The 1950s standard-lamp and cabinet combo, the milking stool

0:19:480:19:53

and the Art Deco three-piece miniature suite for a doll's house.

0:19:530:19:57

This gives Anita £189.30 for the day ahead.

0:19:570:20:01

As for Phil, he has two lots,

0:20:020:20:04

comprising the two 19th-century Masonic items

0:20:040:20:09

and the wooden trunk.

0:20:090:20:11

He has a rather lovely £334.40 left.

0:20:110:20:16

Do you know what?

0:20:170:20:19

We have traversed from one side of England to the other side.

0:20:190:20:22

-I don't know how that happened.

-And where are we now?

0:20:220:20:24

Bonnie Scotland!

0:20:240:20:26

Aye!

0:20:260:20:28

That's right, Anita. They've crossed the border

0:20:280:20:30

and Phil is going for a shop in the town of Moffat in Dumfriesshire.

0:20:300:20:34

What will he uncover in here?

0:20:400:20:41

-Morning, Phil.

-Oh, hi.

0:20:450:20:47

You've got a bloomin' room full of stuff here, haven't you?

0:20:470:20:50

A wee bit of everything, yes.

0:20:500:20:52

A wee bit... I love that, "A wee bit of everything!"

0:20:520:20:54

SHE LAUGHS

0:20:540:20:55

And he's off. On the hunt.

0:20:550:20:57

You often look at these and think that these are like glass dumbbells,

0:21:020:21:06

but, in fact, at the end of the 19th century, these would have sat

0:21:060:21:09

on the dining table and they're for resting your knife on.

0:21:090:21:13

They're always that shape, sometimes they're silver,

0:21:130:21:16

sometimes they're silver-plated...

0:21:160:21:18

But a lot of them are glass, so next time you see these,

0:21:180:21:21

what they aren't is little glass dumbbells. But they're knife rests.

0:21:210:21:26

Glad you cleared that one up, Phil, thank you.

0:21:260:21:29

What is he on to now?

0:21:290:21:31

I quite like that. That's just a company seal.

0:21:320:21:36

And one of the requirements, if you were an incorporated company,

0:21:360:21:40

was that... I think you had your business articles,

0:21:400:21:43

but you also had THE company seal.

0:21:430:21:46

That's a precursor of a publishing package on a computer.

0:21:460:21:51

That's priced at £79, which is a whole load of money.

0:21:510:21:54

But it's a bit of fun, isn't it?

0:21:540:21:57

That's a possibility, isn't it, you know?

0:21:570:21:59

Phil's seeks out the lovely Linda to find out more.

0:21:590:22:03

So that... I just thought that was quite nice.

0:22:030:22:05

I don't know what on earth you'd ever do with it.

0:22:050:22:08

It is nice. I mean, as you say, probably not a lot of practical use.

0:22:080:22:13

-No, but I just think it's sort of...

-It's very decorative.

0:22:130:22:16

Yeah, it is, isn't it?

0:22:160:22:18

I think at auction, that might be £40-£60 worth.

0:22:180:22:21

What would be the very best you could do that for?

0:22:210:22:23

Bottom line on it, 30.

0:22:230:22:25

OK.

0:22:250:22:26

-I think I'd like that.

-Certainly.

0:22:280:22:30

I think I'd like that, but I'm going to leave it there,

0:22:300:22:33

because there's a couple of other things

0:22:330:22:35

-I want to look at on the way out.

-OK.

0:22:350:22:36

He sounds keen.

0:22:360:22:38

And Linda's treating him to a special part of the shop. Ooh-ah!

0:22:380:22:42

If you want to come through here, we'll go upstairs.

0:22:420:22:45

-So, Linda, this is sort of the hidden storage area?

-It is.

0:22:450:22:47

This is where all the old antiques go to die.

0:22:470:22:50

Blimey.

0:22:500:22:51

Lord above.

0:22:510:22:53

So this is basically where things just get brought up until...

0:22:530:22:57

either they go out or get sent auction.

0:22:570:23:01

I like the ladders, how much are they?

0:23:010:23:03

I think we actually use them, dare I say!

0:23:040:23:07

SHE LAUGHS

0:23:070:23:08

This is not a shop, it's a museum! Actually, it is a museum, isn't it?

0:23:080:23:11

Well, the floor downstairs, yes.

0:23:110:23:13

So the ladders are definitely not for sale?

0:23:130:23:16

I think they're definitely still in use.

0:23:160:23:19

-Do you know, I don't think those confirm to health-and-safety rules.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:23:190:23:23

I think they're dangerous.

0:23:230:23:25

You don't want to be clambering up stuff like that.

0:23:250:23:29

I think Linda might see through that, Phil, heh!

0:23:290:23:32

After a snoop about, he's just got one thing on his mind.

0:23:320:23:36

I've spoken to my husband, who's the one who uses the ladders,

0:23:360:23:40

and he said depending on what you're prepared to offer,

0:23:400:23:44

he might let you have them.

0:23:440:23:46

It'll be 30 quid, something like that.

0:23:460:23:49

30...

0:23:510:23:52

35?

0:23:530:23:55

So if I did 60 for the stamper thing and the ladders,

0:23:550:23:58

how would that grab you?

0:23:580:24:00

I suppose we could. Seeing as it's you.

0:24:000:24:02

You're an angel. You're an angel, thank you so much.

0:24:020:24:05

Success! £30 for the ladders and £30 for the seal press.

0:24:050:24:10

Anita has journeyed south to the village of Ecclefechan

0:24:180:24:22

in Dumfries & Galloway.

0:24:220:24:24

Anita's in for a real treat, because this rural village

0:24:280:24:32

is birthplace to local legend Thomas Carlyle.

0:24:320:24:35

Little-known now, Thomas rose from obscurity to become one

0:24:370:24:41

of the 19th century's most prominent thinkers, rubbing shoulders

0:24:410:24:45

with intellectual giants such as Charles Darwin and Alfred Tennyson.

0:24:450:24:49

As a published author of both history and philosophy,

0:24:510:24:54

he courted admiration from around the world,

0:24:540:24:57

but also attracted controversy,

0:24:570:25:00

as some of his work became associated with slavery and the Nazis.

0:25:000:25:04

Anita is meeting with David Heal

0:25:060:25:09

to find out more about this formidable man.

0:25:090:25:12

David, tell me about this place.

0:25:120:25:15

Thomas's father and his uncle were the local stonemasons in this

0:25:150:25:19

village and they built this house around about 1794.

0:25:190:25:24

What sort of family were they?

0:25:240:25:26

They were a close-knit family. Father was very hard-working,

0:25:260:25:29

a deeply religious man, and Mother very supportive of the family,

0:25:290:25:35

and particularly Thomas.

0:25:350:25:36

Despite Thomas' humble background, his parents focused on his education.

0:25:360:25:42

After a period of teaching,

0:25:430:25:44

Thomas realised that he wanted to become a writer full-time.

0:25:440:25:49

Following a move to London with his wife, Jane, he wrote his first

0:25:490:25:52

major work in 1837 on the history of the French Revolution.

0:25:520:25:56

It became THE authority of events

0:25:560:25:59

and put Thomas firmly on the intellectual map.

0:25:590:26:02

So there he was in London, the book was a success,

0:26:030:26:07

what was next for Carlyle?

0:26:070:26:09

That put him on the map as far as the public was concerned

0:26:090:26:12

and for future writings, they were all popular.

0:26:120:26:15

It enabled him, the income coming in, to travel,

0:26:150:26:19

to research the rest of his writings and to improve the family's general

0:26:190:26:24

standard of life, because certainly the first four or five years,

0:26:240:26:28

Jane had to be pretty frugal with things

0:26:280:26:31

and control the purse strings.

0:26:310:26:33

This weighty account of the French Revolution wowed Victorian readers.

0:26:330:26:38

They loved Carlyle's revolutionary, dramatic style of writing.

0:26:390:26:44

It also inspired one of the world's greatest works of fiction.

0:26:440:26:48

It sounds like a wonderful time.

0:26:480:26:50

Of course, Dickens was influenced by Thomas.

0:26:500:26:55

Dickens lived fairly close at one point in time

0:26:550:26:58

-and the two families became great friends.

-Mm-hm.

0:26:580:27:00

And Charles Dickens and Thomas were

0:27:000:27:02

great friends for the rest of their lives.

0:27:020:27:04

And of course, Dickens, with his Tale Of Two Cities...

0:27:040:27:08

Used Thomas's History Of The French Revolution as his research material.

0:27:080:27:12

Thomas went on to publish ground-breaking ideas

0:27:130:27:16

in maths, history and philosophy.

0:27:160:27:18

After studying the impact of great leaders,

0:27:180:27:21

he developed a theory that history is shaped by individuals

0:27:210:27:25

and that true progress can only take place under the control of great man.

0:27:250:27:30

He wrote a book called Heroes And Hero Worship,

0:27:320:27:35

relating to several of these men.

0:27:350:27:37

He felt that these "supermen" really guided history

0:27:370:27:43

and everyone should...

0:27:430:27:45

Should take a lead from some of them, certainly.

0:27:450:27:48

As Thomas' fame grew worldwide, so did the controversy surrounding him.

0:27:480:27:54

His ideas at that time didn't always find favour.

0:27:540:27:59

They didn't.

0:27:590:28:00

His first main friend, JS Milne in London,

0:28:010:28:04

fell out with him round about 1840

0:28:040:28:07

because of Thomas's views on slavery,

0:28:070:28:10

that he didn't join the abolitionist cause at all - quite the opposite.

0:28:100:28:14

He really wanted to restore slavery, but in a different form.

0:28:140:28:17

These views, expressed in the years following the abolition of slavery

0:28:190:28:22

throughout the British Empire, would tarnish his reputation.

0:28:220:28:26

But he continued to publish.

0:28:260:28:29

One of his last major works, on Frederick the Great,

0:28:290:28:32

focused on his established ideas of the hero.

0:28:320:28:36

It's said that Hitler was reading a copy of the book in his bunker

0:28:360:28:40

at the end of World War II.

0:28:400:28:42

Tell me a little about the latter part of his life.

0:28:440:28:47

Well, he was on his travels in 1866 and while he is

0:28:470:28:51

away from home in Edinburgh, Jane unfortunately died

0:28:510:28:55

and that had a very drastic effect on Thomas's health.

0:28:550:28:58

It deteriorated to the point

0:28:580:29:00

that he almost became a recluse and he had to be looked after.

0:29:000:29:04

Thomas was heartbroken and retired from public life.

0:29:040:29:08

Before his death at the age of 85, Thomas was such a revered writer

0:29:080:29:13

and historian that he was offered a burial place at Westminster Abbey.

0:29:130:29:17

Thomas being Thomas, however, turned that down.

0:29:170:29:20

-LAUGHING:

-Always controversial!

0:29:200:29:22

Absolutely.

0:29:220:29:23

He made it perfectly plain he didn't want to be buried in

0:29:230:29:26

Westminster Abbey, he wanted to be buried in Ecclefechan,

0:29:260:29:28

alongside his parents.

0:29:280:29:30

To the very end, Carlyle remained true to his roots

0:29:300:29:34

and although at times a contentious figure, people from all over

0:29:340:29:37

the world continue to visit this humble little cottage in Ecclefechan.

0:29:370:29:42

Still in Dumfries & Galloway,

0:29:480:29:50

our pair are heading for the village of New Abbey.

0:29:500:29:53

-So we've got one last shop between us, haven't we?

-Yes.

0:29:530:29:57

-I know what you could buy.

-What?

0:29:570:29:59

-IN MOCK SCOTS ACCENT:

-A nice wee brooch!

0:29:590:30:01

Philip!

0:30:010:30:03

The mischief-makers are sharing their last shop of the day.

0:30:030:30:06

Bit of a tight squeeze there, Phil!

0:30:080:30:10

After you, my dear.

0:30:100:30:12

-Ah, thank you, darling! What a gentleman.

-After you.

0:30:120:30:15

Well, he can be, sometimes.

0:30:150:30:16

Anita's visited Admirable Antiques before.

0:30:160:30:19

-Hello, guys!

-Hello!

-It's lovely, lovely, lovely to see you!

0:30:190:30:22

I've brought my wee pal along today.

0:30:220:30:25

I've brought my wee pal along, as well.

0:30:250:30:27

ANITA LAUGHS

0:30:270:30:28

Phil's got over £270 to play with.

0:30:300:30:33

On the way in, there was a curling stone.

0:30:330:30:36

I'm in Scotland, it would be a real shame not to buy something Scottish.

0:30:360:30:39

Unfortunately, it didn't look like it's got a handle with it,

0:30:390:30:42

but I'm going to go and have a word with the boss man.

0:30:420:30:45

Ian's the man.

0:30:450:30:47

-When I came in, you've got a curling stone out there...

-Oh, yes.

0:30:470:30:50

..that doesn't have a handle on it.

0:30:500:30:52

-You have another handle, have you?

-Unfortunately not.

0:30:520:30:54

You haven't got anything else like that? That's peculiarly Scottish?

0:30:540:30:57

-I've got a tiny one that you might be interested in.

-Can I have a look?

0:30:570:31:02

Blimey, that is a tiny one.

0:31:020:31:04

And there we are.

0:31:040:31:05

-And is that...

-An exact copy.

0:31:050:31:07

-Miniature.

-These are from Ailsa Craig, aren't they?

0:31:080:31:11

-Indeed, yes.

-Is it a granite?

0:31:110:31:13

It is a granite, yes.

0:31:130:31:14

From the mid-19th century, the island of Ailsa Craig

0:31:140:31:18

in the Firth of Clyde has been quarried for granite.

0:31:180:31:21

It's one of only two sources for the production of curling stones.

0:31:210:31:26

And what's your ticket price on that?

0:31:260:31:28

-65.

-Oooh-hoo!

0:31:280:31:30

-What's the best you can do on it?

-50.

0:31:300:31:33

That's just way too much money for me.

0:31:330:31:35

And how much is this stone without the candle in it?

0:31:350:31:38

75, but I could perhaps do you a package for the two.

0:31:380:31:41

-Honestly, I think 50 is my limit.

-Mm-hm.

0:31:410:31:44

-If you could do that, I'll have them.

-OK.

0:31:440:31:47

-OK.

-You're a gentleman, thank you very much indeed.

0:31:470:31:51

A little-and-large set of curling stones for a generous deal of £50.

0:31:510:31:55

Phil might have finished shopping,

0:31:560:31:58

but Anita's on the prowl to spend her cash.

0:31:580:32:01

She's got just under £200 in her purse and she looks determined.

0:32:010:32:05

In Victorian times, Staffordshire figures, or "flatbacks" as they're

0:32:060:32:11

called, would grace the mantelpiece of every Victorian kitchen.

0:32:110:32:17

Flatback figures are so-called because they're

0:32:170:32:20

generally flat on the back and are undecorated there.

0:32:200:32:24

There were often placed against a wall or chimneybreast

0:32:240:32:27

in a Victorian house to add some interest.

0:32:270:32:30

Now, Staffordshire figures would often command

0:32:310:32:35

high prices in the saleroom. But they have gone out of fashion.

0:32:350:32:40

That one's possible.

0:32:420:32:44

What's Anita got her eye on now?

0:32:440:32:48

She loves a trade.

0:32:480:32:50

So, the girls want their boyfriends out of their T-shirts,

0:32:500:32:54

out of the sloppy joes

0:32:540:32:56

and into a nice, crisp white shirt

0:32:560:32:59

with a lovely pair of stylish cuff links.

0:32:590:33:03

So cuff links are doing well and I quite fancy these.

0:33:030:33:07

Time to talk money.

0:33:070:33:08

The combined ticket price for the two items is £52.99.

0:33:090:33:13

I've found two things really that I like.

0:33:150:33:18

What I would like to pay for the two is probably...

0:33:180:33:22

..in the region of 25-30.

0:33:250:33:29

-32.

-£32 for the two?

0:33:290:33:32

Let's go for that.

0:33:330:33:34

Thank you very, very much.

0:33:340:33:37

Yeah, nice work, Anita.

0:33:370:33:39

£27 for the Staffordshire flatback and £5 for the dapper cuff links.

0:33:390:33:43

That completes this late shopping trip.

0:33:430:33:47

And Anita has a total of five items as well as the last two she's

0:33:470:33:51

just picked up. There's the 1950s standard-lamp and cabinet,

0:33:510:33:55

the milking stool, and the little doll's house three-piece suite.

0:33:550:33:59

Anita was canny with her cash - she spent £101.

0:33:590:34:04

Phil had a tidy budget to play with and also bought five items -

0:34:050:34:09

his Masonic lot, the wooden trunk, the 19th-century seal press,

0:34:090:34:14

the set of ladders and the little-and-large curling stones.

0:34:140:34:19

Phil spent a total of £175.

0:34:190:34:23

Now for the juicy bit. Ha!

0:34:240:34:26

What do they think of each other's items?

0:34:260:34:28

I love the company seal!

0:34:280:34:30

I think it's fabulous.

0:34:300:34:32

It's a giant!

0:34:320:34:34

Got to make a profit on that.

0:34:340:34:36

The two bits that I really love are

0:34:360:34:38

the Uncle Tom Cobley Widecombe Fair stool

0:34:380:34:40

and that really little three-piece suite.

0:34:400:34:42

I think that's really cute.

0:34:420:34:44

The shopkeeper's ladder is a smashing item - it won't fly,

0:34:440:34:48

but it's a good solid profit for him once again.

0:34:480:34:52

Game on, eh?

0:34:520:34:53

Yeah.

0:34:530:34:55

Anita and Phil are crossing the border once more

0:34:550:34:57

to auction in the city of Carlisle in Cumbria.

0:34:570:35:00

I think a wee bit of sartorial might be the thing for you.

0:35:020:35:07

I'd like to see a nice white shirt, pair of cuff links,

0:35:070:35:11

your hair combed, your face shaved...

0:35:110:35:15

I'm clean-shaven, this is like a baby's bottom!

0:35:150:35:18

SHE LAUGHS

0:35:180:35:20

Yeah, give the fellow a chance, Anita.

0:35:200:35:24

Let's hope lovely Carlisle will give them lots and lots of profits.

0:35:240:35:27

H&H Auctions is their penultimate battleground.

0:35:270:35:32

Stand by.

0:35:320:35:33

Don't drive straight in! Stop!

0:35:330:35:36

ANITA LAUGHS

0:35:360:35:38

What a carry-on, eh?

0:35:380:35:39

Dear me! I feel like I've been welded into that thing.

0:35:390:35:43

-Well...

-Penultimate auction!

-Yeah, I've got a lot to make up, Phil.

0:35:430:35:48

Can you do it?

0:35:480:35:49

Fingers crossed.

0:35:490:35:51

The best of luck to you both.

0:35:510:35:53

Our auctioneer today is Stephen Farthing.

0:35:540:35:57

What does he think of Anita and Phil's lots?

0:35:570:36:00

If you've seen the joke with the Two Ronnies, the four candles joke,

0:36:020:36:06

it's identical to the sort of ladder

0:36:060:36:08

that you would see in that old DIY shop

0:36:080:36:10

and I'm sure a lot of people will recognise that.

0:36:100:36:12

It'll probably go for the £50-£60 mark.

0:36:120:36:14

Continental silver cuff links, um, yeah. They're very plain,

0:36:140:36:17

very simple and very stylish.

0:36:170:36:20

So, again, I'm hoping that they might do well.

0:36:200:36:22

Make yourself comfortable, the auction is about to begin.

0:36:240:36:27

HAMMER BANGS

0:36:270:36:28

First up are Anita's stylish cuff links.

0:36:280:36:30

5, 8, 10 on the books.

0:36:300:36:32

10 bid, at 10 I'm bid, 10 for the pair.

0:36:320:36:34

-12 at the back.

-Yes!

-Right at the back, £12 bid.

0:36:340:36:37

At £12, at £12 bid, right at the back at £12.

0:36:370:36:41

HAMMER BANGS

0:36:410:36:42

Tidy little profit there, Anita. Great start.

0:36:420:36:45

That's not bad.

0:36:450:36:46

-That was short and sharp.

-Yeah.

0:36:460:36:49

Next are Phil's curling stones.

0:36:490:36:52

Straight in at £10 on the books.

0:36:520:36:54

10 bid. At £10 I'm bid, 10 on the books, 12, 12 bid,

0:36:540:36:57

at 15 bid, at 15, 18, 18, 20 bid,

0:36:570:37:01

at 22, 25, 28, 30...

0:37:010:37:04

-It's climbing.

-..30, at 32, 35, 38, 40.

0:37:040:37:10

-It's getting there, Phil.

-40 bid, at £40, at £40 in

0:37:100:37:14

-All done at £40.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:37:140:37:16

Despite that series of bids, it's a loss, Phil.

0:37:160:37:19

Not too bad, though.

0:37:190:37:21

I'm not going to count my chickens and my sheep and my "cooows"...

0:37:210:37:26

Or your "dugs".

0:37:260:37:27

Next, Anita's three-piece suite for a doll's house.

0:37:270:37:31

A nice little lot there.

0:37:310:37:33

There we are, we are straight in at 5, 8, 10 on the books,

0:37:330:37:36

again, 10 bid, commission bid at 10, 12 at the back, 12 in, at £12,

0:37:360:37:40

right at the back at 12. 14, new bidder. At £14, 16.

0:37:400:37:45

-Come on!

-18, £18 on my right, £18 in.

0:37:450:37:49

HAMMER BANGS

0:37:490:37:50

It's a miniature-sized profit, but it all adds up.

0:37:500:37:54

I'd sort of kind of settle for that, really.

0:37:540:37:57

-ANITA CHUCKLES

-Yeah!

0:37:570:37:58

Back to Phil and his big wooden trunk.

0:37:580:38:02

Next!

0:38:020:38:03

A bit of interest in this one.

0:38:030:38:04

Lot 62, so we start the bidding, four bids,

0:38:040:38:07

we'll start the bidding at 20, 25-30 on the books.

0:38:070:38:10

30 bid, at 35, 40, 45, I'm out at 45.

0:38:100:38:16

-Lady's bid 50.

-50!

0:38:160:38:18

-55...

-Thank you, Lord, thank you.

-Front row, lady's bid. 65, then.

0:38:180:38:22

All done. 65.

0:38:220:38:24

HAMMER BANGS

0:38:240:38:25

That's more like it, good on you, Phil.

0:38:250:38:28

Big, hulking furniture scores well with this audience.

0:38:280:38:31

-Well done!

-Never any doubt, never any doubt in my mind at all.

0:38:310:38:35

I knew that would do well.

0:38:350:38:37

Phil's currently in the lead, Anita.

0:38:370:38:40

Can your Staffordshire flatback show him who's boss?

0:38:400:38:43

-Commission bids at 20, 25, 30, 35...

-Yes!

-Well done, you!

0:38:430:38:50

-38, 40.

-Yes!

0:38:500:38:51

-42, 44.

-Yes!

-At 44, then, all done at 44. Commission paid.

0:38:510:38:56

HAMMER BANGS

0:38:560:38:58

Well done, Anita.

0:38:580:38:59

-Well done, you.

-I'm happy with that.

0:39:000:39:02

-I have to say, it sort of deserved that, didn't it?

-Yes. It did.

0:39:020:39:06

Can Phil take the lead once more with his lot of Masonic items?

0:39:080:39:12

A bit of interest again.

0:39:120:39:13

5, 8, 10, 12, 15 on the book, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, I'm out.

0:39:130:39:19

-All done at £26, then?

-Ouch!

-Another chance, 26...

0:39:200:39:25

HAMMER BANGS

0:39:250:39:26

Cor! Someone's got a good buy there.

0:39:260:39:29

-It didn't double its money then.

-I really thought it would.

0:39:290:39:32

That was a nasty thing to say!

0:39:320:39:36

Next, Anita's milking stool.

0:39:360:39:38

We'll start the bidding at 2, 5, 8 bid, £8 bid.

0:39:380:39:41

10, I'm bid 10. at £10.

0:39:410:39:44

In the room at £10, in the room and £10, 12 at the back, £12.

0:39:440:39:46

Aw, come on!

0:39:460:39:49

14, 16, 18.

0:39:490:39:52

-All done at £18 in.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:39:520:39:55

Another tiny profit, but you're still in the lead, Anita.

0:39:550:39:58

That's all right.

0:39:580:39:59

Well, it is, but it isn't, really,

0:39:590:40:01

because I thought that was worth a lot more than that.

0:40:010:40:04

I know, I know.

0:40:040:40:05

Can Phil's shop-style ladders help him bulk up his profits?

0:40:050:40:10

A bit of interest again.

0:40:100:40:11

-We'll start the bidding at 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 bid.

-Yes!

0:40:110:40:16

70. At 70 bid, at 70 bid.

0:40:160:40:19

-I must admit, that's huge....

-Yes!

0:40:190:40:21

99, 100, 110, 120, 130, 130 bid,

0:40:210:40:26

-lady's bid at 130.

-I'm pleased with that.

0:40:260:40:29

-Lady's bid at £130, then.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:40:290:40:33

Amazing result, Phil.

0:40:330:40:35

That huge profit has catapulted you into the lead.

0:40:350:40:39

That's probably the stairway to success, isn't it, really?

0:40:390:40:41

ANITA CHUCKLES

0:40:410:40:43

It's taking a step up, isn't it?

0:40:430:40:45

Oh! Enough of these terrible puns.

0:40:450:40:48

Now, Anita's 1950s standard-lamp and cabinet combo.

0:40:500:40:54

We're straight in at 20, 30, 40, 50 on the books.

0:40:540:40:57

50 bid, at £50. 55, I'm outbid 55.

0:40:570:41:00

I've 60, and 5, 70.

0:41:000:41:04

Lovely young blonde lady.

0:41:040:41:05

75, right in the corner at 75, then, at £75.

0:41:050:41:08

In the corner at 75, then... All done.

0:41:080:41:11

HAMMER BANGS

0:41:110:41:12

The 1950s look is definitely in vogue with the Carlisle bidders.

0:41:120:41:16

For something that does resemble a three-humped camel...

0:41:160:41:20

I think you've done very well. No, it's a cool thing.

0:41:200:41:22

No, it is. It's all a matter of taste, isn't it?

0:41:220:41:25

It certainly is, Anita.

0:41:250:41:26

Now their last item of the day, Phil's company seal press.

0:41:270:41:32

We're straight in at 20, 25, 30 on the books.

0:41:320:41:37

I'll take two, if it helps.

0:41:370:41:38

32, 35...

0:41:380:41:40

..38. I'm out at £38, it's in the room at £38.

0:41:410:41:45

-All done at 38?

-HAMMER BANGS

0:41:450:41:47

That's a good result, Phil.

0:41:470:41:48

Looks like the bidders like your style.

0:41:480:41:51

-Well done!

-I am quite pleased...

0:41:510:41:54

Let's get the sums done over a cup of tea.

0:41:540:41:57

Indeed we will, Anita.

0:41:570:41:59

Who will be the jubilant winner of this crucial leg?

0:41:590:42:02

Anita started out £258.30.

0:42:040:42:07

After auction costs, she made a profit of £35.94,

0:42:070:42:12

giving her a total of £294.24 for the final leg of the trip.

0:42:120:42:18

Phil started off with £399.40 and takes the crown today.

0:42:220:42:26

After auction costs, he made a profit of £70.18,

0:42:280:42:32

giving him a handsome sum of £469.58 to carry forward.

0:42:320:42:37

Well, I tell you what, I think you're still driving.

0:42:410:42:44

-Oh, for sure. Chauffeur!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:42:440:42:47

So I think you pulled ahead even more in this auction.

0:42:470:42:51

-Be my driver.

-SHE CHUCKLES

0:42:510:42:54

I thought you didn't like Anita's driving, Phil?

0:42:540:42:57

Bye-bye, you two!

0:42:570:42:59

Next time, a thrilling final leg of the Road Trip.

0:43:000:43:03

-Have you got any stockings on?

-None of your business.

0:43:030:43:05

Anita weighs in with some big antiques...

0:43:050:43:08

Well, this certainly isn't a "wee brooch".

0:43:080:43:10

-..and Philip's found his soul mate.

-My hero, look! Hello, Spocky!

0:43:100:43:15

Anita Manning and Philip Serrell embark on the penultimate leg of their journey, which begins in the village of Amble in Northumberland and finishes at auction in Carlisle in Cumbria.