Episode 15 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 15

Antiques challenge. Anita Manning and Philip Serrell begin the final leg of their journey in Castle Douglas in Kirkcudbrightshire.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 15. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

0:00:020:00:04

-This is beautiful!

-That's the way to do this.

0:00:040:00:06

With £200 each, a classic car, and a goal -

0:00:060:00:10

-to scour for antiques.

-Joy.

0:00:100:00:13

The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

0:00:130:00:18

LAUGHTER

0:00:180:00:19

There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

0:00:190:00:22

Sorry!

0:00:220:00:23

So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

0:00:230:00:28

The handbrake's on!

0:00:280:00:29

This is Antiques Road Trip.

0:00:290:00:32

Yeah.

0:00:330:00:35

We're starting the final leg of this road trip

0:00:380:00:41

in beautiful Dumfries & Galloway in Scotland.

0:00:410:00:43

And Philip's keen to get going.

0:00:430:00:46

Anita, fire up the Fiat.

0:00:460:00:48

ENGINE SPLUTTERS

0:00:480:00:51

-That sounds poorly, doesn't it?

-Phil, it's not going to start.

0:00:530:00:56

We had this on the first day, didn't we?

0:00:560:00:58

And now it's the last day, and the thing's haunting us.

0:00:580:01:00

-What will we do? I mean, you're a man.

-Really?

-Can you can fix it?

0:01:000:01:04

Oh, yeah, leave it to me.

0:01:040:01:06

Good luck with that.

0:01:060:01:08

So, Philip - diagnosis, please.

0:01:130:01:16

Now, that's dead. It might be the fan belt.

0:01:160:01:18

-Have you got any stockings on? Have you?

-None of your business.

0:01:180:01:21

Well, no, if you take them off

0:01:210:01:23

you can replace the fan belt with a pair of ladies' stockings.

0:01:230:01:25

We can't hang about, Phil.

0:01:250:01:27

We've got to carry on to the next shop, come on.

0:01:270:01:31

Let's go, close it up.

0:01:310:01:33

I'm just hopeful. Leave the keys in it because someone might nick it.

0:01:330:01:37

-Give me your hand.

-Here we go.

0:01:370:01:39

Our two auctioneers, Philip Serrell and Anita Manning,

0:01:420:01:45

have had quite a week of it.

0:01:450:01:46

So, it all comes down now to the final leg.

0:01:460:01:49

-70, 80, 90...

-This is looking good.

0:01:490:01:52

They set out with £200 each.

0:01:520:01:55

Although Anita raked in big profits at the start of the week...

0:01:550:01:59

I think you've brought the right thing to this room

0:01:590:02:02

and I don't think I have.

0:02:020:02:03

..Philip's fought back, winning the last two auctions.

0:02:030:02:06

150, right across that side.

0:02:060:02:08

I knew that would do well.

0:02:100:02:12

On this final stretch, Anita has £294.24 at her disposal.

0:02:120:02:18

Philip, however, has £469.58 to spend.

0:02:200:02:25

Earlier this week they set off from the Lake District

0:02:250:02:28

and travelled north.

0:02:280:02:29

They've dipped into Scotland, before returning south back over the border

0:02:290:02:33

into England, and will end their trip in Crooklands, Cumbria.

0:02:330:02:37

This leg kicks off in Castle Douglas, in Kirkcudbrightshire,

0:02:390:02:43

and finishes this week's auction in Crooklands.

0:02:430:02:46

In 1792, and incredibly wealthy Scot named William Douglas,

0:02:510:02:56

decided to build his very own town,

0:02:560:02:58

and modestly named the place after himself.

0:02:580:03:02

Must be a local tradition.

0:03:020:03:03

Guess the name of the owner of Philip's first shop.

0:03:030:03:07

-Hazel, how are you, my love?

-I'm very well.

0:03:070:03:09

-How are you?

-Long time since I was here.

-Three, four years.

0:03:090:03:13

Well, it is full by the looks of things.

0:03:130:03:15

Right, I'm going to go down here and see what I can find.

0:03:150:03:18

-That's fine.

-All right?

-You carry on.

0:03:180:03:20

The shop is packed, quite literally, to the rafters.

0:03:220:03:25

Look at that!

0:03:250:03:26

Those look like they're old military binoculars, don't they?

0:03:300:03:33

Yeah, they do.

0:03:330:03:35

You're right.

0:03:350:03:37

They're a pair of First World War German-issue army binos,

0:03:370:03:41

priced at £45.

0:03:410:03:44

What's the best you can do on those?

0:03:440:03:46

-30, bottom.

-Try again.

0:03:460:03:48

No.

0:03:480:03:49

I'll tell you what, I think there's

0:03:490:03:51

a bit of room for manoeuvre there, isn't there?

0:03:510:03:53

Go and put them up by the counter, Hazel.

0:03:530:03:55

And we'll have a look at those.

0:03:550:03:57

-We'll speak later.

-We can talk later.

0:03:570:03:58

-We can perhaps do a little bit of a package deal here.

-OK.

0:03:580:04:01

I'll put them at the desk.

0:04:010:04:03

One contender, and still time for another nosy around.

0:04:040:04:08

-I like that.

-Nice little table.

0:04:130:04:16

Well, it's not always been a table, has it?

0:04:160:04:19

If you imagine no top on this and,

0:04:190:04:22

like, a broom handle up there, and then...

0:04:220:04:25

Your pull-screen on the top.

0:04:250:04:27

A screen there like that,

0:04:270:04:29

and the screen was designed to keep the heat off

0:04:290:04:32

the lady of the house's face so that her make-up didn't melt.

0:04:320:04:36

It's a plausible theory.

0:04:360:04:38

That base is probably 1860.

0:04:380:04:41

And then if you look at the top, this white fleck in this mahogany

0:04:410:04:48

indicates to me that that is probably Edwardian.

0:04:480:04:50

-How much is it, Hazel?

-75.

0:04:500:04:53

I tell you what I'll do, I'll give you...

0:04:530:04:55

£60 for the binoculars and the table.

0:04:570:05:00

I think you're going to give me

0:05:030:05:05

£70 for the binoculars and the table.

0:05:050:05:08

Why do you think that?

0:05:080:05:09

Because you're so nice and you've a lovely smile,

0:05:090:05:11

and you're going to do it, I know you are.

0:05:110:05:13

-Hazel, you're full of it.

-Absolutely.

-65 quid.

0:05:130:05:17

Thank you, Hazel.

0:05:170:05:18

Hazel's been very generous.

0:05:180:05:20

The First World War German binoculars for £25,

0:05:210:05:24

and this occasional table for 40.

0:05:240:05:26

Hazel, as ever, it has been a pleasure.

0:05:280:05:29

-Thank you very much.

-You're an angel.

0:05:290:05:31

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much indeed. Thank you.

0:05:310:05:35

Good job, Philip.

0:05:350:05:37

Anita, meanwhile, has made her way

0:05:400:05:43

ten miles south-west to Kirkcudbright.

0:05:430:05:45

She's come to see why this picture-perfect harbour town

0:05:450:05:49

is so highly regarded in the art world,

0:05:490:05:52

and why locals will be forever indebted to one pioneering artist,

0:05:520:05:56

whose generous legacy has left

0:05:560:05:58

a unique collection hidden within his former home.

0:05:580:06:01

-Hello.

-Hello, Anita. Welcome to Broughton House and Garden.

0:06:030:06:06

-Lovely to have you here.

-Oh, it is wonderful to be here.

0:06:060:06:08

This is a fabulous house. Tell me a bit about it.

0:06:080:06:13

The home of artist Edward Atkinson Hornel from 1901 until 1933.

0:06:130:06:17

He was a local lad made good,

0:06:170:06:19

and he is the foundation of

0:06:190:06:21

Kirkcudbright's reputation as an artists' town.

0:06:210:06:23

-I can't wait. Can we go in?

-Of course, come on.

-Let's go.

0:06:230:06:26

Edward Hornel was born in 1864.

0:06:300:06:34

He grew up in Kirkcudbright,

0:06:340:06:36

before studying at art school in Edinburgh and Antwerp.

0:06:360:06:39

After completing his studies, he felt creatively inspired,

0:06:390:06:43

ready to take on the establishment

0:06:430:06:44

and rebel against the traditional way of painting.

0:06:440:06:48

He became friends with like-minded artists,

0:06:500:06:53

including John Lavery, James Guthrie and George Henry.

0:06:530:06:57

They became known as the Glasgow Boys.

0:06:570:07:00

It was almost like an explosion of new ideas, new thought,

0:07:000:07:04

about making art about real people, real places and real things.

0:07:040:07:07

Glasgow was becoming a very, very prosperous city.

0:07:070:07:10

Ordinary people had more money to buy art

0:07:100:07:12

and they wanted to see themselves reflected in that.

0:07:120:07:15

At first, critics derided their work,

0:07:150:07:18

but the public loved

0:07:180:07:19

the Glasgow Boys' new and exciting approach to art.

0:07:190:07:23

They were soon regarded as Scotland's own Impressionist artists.

0:07:230:07:28

Within a few years,

0:07:280:07:29

their exhibitions were shown around the world to much acclaim.

0:07:290:07:33

The Glasgow Boys' achievement was to be the most significant art movement

0:07:330:07:38

in Britain since the romantic artists of Turner and Constable.

0:07:380:07:43

So, they were rejecting the establishment's idea

0:07:430:07:49

of painting, drawing, and art.

0:07:490:07:52

Yes, very much so.

0:07:520:07:53

And Hornel's work was highly decorative.

0:07:530:07:55

And beautiful colour harmonies.

0:07:550:07:57

Wonderful sense of movement in his paintings.

0:07:570:08:00

Was that at the time when he became successful,

0:08:000:08:03

or financially successful?

0:08:030:08:05

That's really the start of his financial success

0:08:050:08:07

and making his name as a painter.

0:08:070:08:09

While some of his contemporaries were moving to the big cities

0:08:090:08:13

to find fame and fortune, in 1901 Hornel bought

0:08:130:08:17

one of the grandest properties in his hometown of Kirkcudbright.

0:08:170:08:22

As other artists came to visit, they too fell in love with the town.

0:08:220:08:27

It really was a sort of a snowballing effect.

0:08:270:08:30

Hornel was part of the core of that,

0:08:300:08:32

that attracted other artists to come here,

0:08:320:08:34

and it became a very successful place.

0:08:340:08:36

-It must've been a wonderful place to go about in those days.

-Oh, yes.

0:08:360:08:39

You would be hobnobbing with artists every time you

0:08:390:08:41

walked down the street.

0:08:410:08:42

It is said the quality of light in Kirkcudbright

0:08:420:08:45

was the main draw for many artists.

0:08:450:08:48

A favourite subject for Hornel was the local people.

0:08:480:08:50

One of his most recognised works is

0:08:500:08:53

Brighouse Bay, Wild and Burnet Roses, from 1919.

0:08:530:08:58

And this one here, so typical of his work, with these wee girls.

0:08:580:09:03

-Were these wee girls local girls?

-Yes, they were.

0:09:030:09:06

And in latter days they came back as old ladies to visit,

0:09:060:09:10

and their relatives still do get in touch to say,

0:09:100:09:12

"Oh, it was my great-auntie",

0:09:120:09:14

-or, "It was my granny that used to pose for him."

-Aw.

0:09:140:09:16

Hornel was a passionate collector.

0:09:170:09:20

From pottery to sculpture, to books.

0:09:200:09:22

His library is still one of the world's biggest collections

0:09:220:09:26

of works by Robert Burns.

0:09:260:09:28

It cost him tens of thousands of pounds in today's money,

0:09:280:09:31

and includes an incredibly rare first edition of Burns poems.

0:09:310:09:36

That is a very warming thought,

0:09:360:09:39

not only did he love Kirkcudbright and the people of Kirkcudbright,

0:09:390:09:44

but I'm sure the people of Kirkcudbright did,

0:09:440:09:47

and still do, love him.

0:09:470:09:49

Very much so. He was a benefactor for the town in many ways.

0:09:490:09:52

Hornel died in 1933.

0:09:530:09:56

Today his work sells for tens of thousands of pounds.

0:09:560:09:59

Yet he bequeathed his own art collection, his home,

0:09:590:10:03

and other contents to the people of Kirkcudbright.

0:10:030:10:06

Today, Broughton House is a library

0:10:060:10:09

and art gallery open to anyone

0:10:090:10:11

wishing to appreciate the life works

0:10:110:10:13

of one of Scotland's greatest artists.

0:10:130:10:16

The next stop is across the border in Cumbria.

0:10:220:10:24

In the small village of High Hesket.

0:10:240:10:28

During the First World War, the Government took control

0:10:280:10:30

of breweries in the area, to stop the drunkenness of locals

0:10:300:10:33

working in the munitions factories at Gretna Green.

0:10:330:10:37

Licensing hours imposed on pubs still exist in some form today.

0:10:370:10:42

Both our experts will be shopping in the Cumbria Curiosity Shop,

0:10:450:10:48

but Philip arrives first.

0:10:480:10:50

25 dealers trade from here.

0:10:500:10:52

Philip soon spots something he likes.

0:10:540:10:57

-What are those there? Are they portals?

-Yeah, brass portals.

0:10:570:11:01

-And how much are they?

-£70 each.

0:11:010:11:05

Aye, aye, Captain.

0:11:050:11:07

Phil still has £404.58 to spend.

0:11:070:11:12

Let's put that one down there.

0:11:120:11:14

I think a pair of those would make 80-120 at auction.

0:11:150:11:18

-That's what I think it would make.

-Right.

0:11:180:11:21

Which means I've got to try and buy them

0:11:210:11:23

for just under the "£80 the two" mark.

0:11:230:11:26

-I'll do them for 85.

-Right. Job's a good 'un.

0:11:260:11:30

Well done, Phil. First deal bagged before Anita arrives.

0:11:300:11:35

Speak of the little devil.

0:11:350:11:36

Anita has £294.24 in her purse.

0:11:400:11:44

What's this?

0:11:440:11:46

I think it's a magazine rack.

0:11:460:11:48

It is made of pine.

0:11:480:11:50

What I like most about it is this leather on the front.

0:11:500:11:55

And it's been beautifully done.

0:11:550:11:57

We've got the little cottage here and the huntsman with the hounds.

0:11:570:12:01

It's rather a nice thing.

0:12:030:12:05

It's priced at £28.

0:12:050:12:08

I'm going to have a go at that.

0:12:080:12:11

Meanwhile, Phil's found a stag and a dealer called Martin.

0:12:110:12:15

Right, I've been building up for this, now, for a long time,

0:12:180:12:21

and I just want ask you one question.

0:12:210:12:23

This isn't a little "dear", is it?

0:12:240:12:26

Oh, just a little bit dear.

0:12:260:12:30

Priced at £250.

0:12:300:12:32

-So this is a coal-painted Viennese bronze, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:12:340:12:37

And that refers to the process in which it's made. I like that.

0:12:370:12:41

I tell you what. Let's put him down, because I like him a lot.

0:12:410:12:45

-We'll have a deal on that.

-Yes.

0:12:450:12:47

But I'd like to go and have a look at that little table over there.

0:12:470:12:50

Let's go have a look, thank you.

0:12:500:12:51

Anita's found Ben.

0:12:510:12:53

Are you able to negotiate a deal on this with me?

0:12:530:12:57

I'm sure I can come down a little bit.

0:12:570:12:59

I'd be looking round about the £20 mark or...

0:12:590:13:02

-20.

-Yeah.

0:13:020:13:04

Could you do 16?

0:13:040:13:06

-Go on, then.

-Oh, OK, that's great.

0:13:060:13:09

That is great.

0:13:090:13:11

£12 knocked off the ticket price,

0:13:110:13:12

and this magazine rack becomes Anita's first buy today.

0:13:120:13:16

Back to Philip and that table.

0:13:160:13:18

Martin's asking £140 for it.

0:13:180:13:22

-We've got a drawer here, haven't we?

-We have.

0:13:220:13:24

Does that look like, to you, that it's 1760?

0:13:280:13:33

I actually would have thought that's a bit more modern.

0:13:330:13:36

OK, so I don't...

0:13:360:13:37

I don't like that.

0:13:370:13:39

That bothers me.

0:13:390:13:40

And to you. OK.

0:13:450:13:47

There's silver-tongued Serrell,

0:13:490:13:52

serenading a dealer over there.

0:13:520:13:56

-You can just see where that's been done that many times.

-It has.

0:13:560:14:00

-And you've got that line there.

-He's looking very serious.

0:14:000:14:03

He's nodding his head.

0:14:030:14:05

But I'm not convinced that top and bottom have always, always,

0:14:060:14:13

always been together.

0:14:130:14:16

Oh, I can't look at it.

0:14:160:14:18

OK, this is my one offer, OK? I'll give you £140 for the two.

0:14:180:14:23

That's my one offer. No more. That's it finished.

0:14:240:14:28

Well, you've got to have a percentage to win this game,

0:14:280:14:33

-and I think that should give you about that.

-You're a gentleman.

0:14:330:14:37

Thank you very much indeed. Thank you. Thank you.

0:14:370:14:39

Crikey. That's the £250 bronze stag for just £100,

0:14:390:14:44

and £100 off this gateleg table.

0:14:440:14:48

Meaning, with the portals, he's spent £225 in total.

0:14:480:14:52

Anita's not finished either.

0:14:550:14:58

This is a rather sweet wee box.

0:14:580:15:01

This little pillbox look like the sort of thing

0:15:010:15:03

made for a Georgian lady, although it may date from a bit later.

0:15:030:15:07

It's made up a yellow metal, not gold. There is no hallmark on it.

0:15:070:15:13

But what I do like about it is the lapis inset

0:15:130:15:18

on the lid and the bottom.

0:15:180:15:21

And I love lapis lazuli. It's the most beautiful colour,

0:15:210:15:25

that wonderful singing blue,

0:15:250:15:27

and for me, it is the stone that makes this little box.

0:15:270:15:32

Lapis lazuli is a semiprecious blue stone.

0:15:320:15:35

Probably most famously used in the funeral mask

0:15:350:15:38

of the young pharaoh, Tutankhamen.

0:15:380:15:42

Priced at £25, but is Ben open to another deal?

0:15:420:15:46

I quite like this wee box. What's the best that you can do on that?

0:15:460:15:50

-How's about 20? Is that all right?

-20 is wee bit much on it.

0:15:500:15:54

Can you come down another wee bit?

0:15:540:15:58

18, I can do. The best on that.

0:15:580:16:00

18, yeah, we'll go for that. That's lovely.

0:16:000:16:04

So, that's the pillbox and magazine rack for £34.

0:16:040:16:08

-Thank you very, very, very much.

-Thank you very much. Pleasure.

0:16:080:16:11

Oh, hello, Phil. How you doing?

0:16:110:16:13

-How are you, all right?

-Yeah, I'm fine.

0:16:130:16:15

Time for Phillip to pay up.

0:16:150:16:18

20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90...

0:16:180:16:24

This is looking good. To me, this is looking very, very...

0:16:240:16:28

-He's had a good day.

-That's about £600 of goods for 225. Top man, Ben.

0:16:280:16:33

-Have you done all right?

-I am happy as well.

-Come on.

0:16:330:16:36

You spent all that money?

0:16:360:16:38

-Yeah, it's good, isn't it?

-Great.

-What a top shop this is.

0:16:380:16:41

-So, how much did you spend?

-About 30-odd quid.

0:16:410:16:45

30-odd quid?

0:16:450:16:47

Well done, both of you. After all that walking today, a rest beckons.

0:16:470:16:52

Sadly, the little Fiat's still struggling.

0:16:520:16:55

But what will tomorrow bring? Nighty night.

0:16:550:16:59

Good morning. And good news.

0:17:030:17:06

The car is dead. Long live the car!

0:17:060:17:08

A shiny 1969 Triumph Herald keeps our pair on the road today.

0:17:080:17:13

This is the type of car that a guy would take a gal out on

0:17:140:17:20

for a hot date.

0:17:200:17:22

Shall we pretend that you're taking me on a hot date?

0:17:220:17:25

Hey, no time for romance. The final auction is drawing ever closer.

0:17:280:17:32

Let's remind ourselves what's been bought so far.

0:17:320:17:35

Yesterday, Anita bought two items.

0:17:360:17:38

A lapis lazuli pillbox and a pine magazine rack.

0:17:380:17:42

Meaning, she still has £260.24.

0:17:420:17:45

As for Phil, he spent big, buying five items.

0:17:470:17:50

A pair of German army binoculars, a mahogany table,

0:17:500:17:54

a pair of portals,

0:17:540:17:55

and oak gate-leg table.

0:17:570:17:59

and a bronze stag.

0:17:590:18:00

He has £179.58 in his pocket.

0:18:010:18:06

Do you feel confident in your lead?

0:18:080:18:10

-I'm going to try and spend, spend, spend.

-Go for broke.

0:18:100:18:13

That's the spirit!

0:18:130:18:16

The first stop is the Cumbrian town of Cockermouth,

0:18:160:18:20

so named as it's where the confluence of the River Cocker

0:18:200:18:24

flows into the River Derwent.

0:18:240:18:26

-Perfect, perfect, darling.

-There we are. You have a good day.

0:18:260:18:30

-Have a great time. Bye.

-Bye, now.

0:18:300:18:33

The lady in charge of Anita's first shop is Gwenda,

0:18:330:18:36

who's been in the antiques biz for well over 30 years.

0:18:360:18:40

Hello.

0:18:400:18:42

How are you? Welcome back to Cockermouth.

0:18:420:18:44

It's lovely to see you again and to be back in this Aladdin's cave.

0:18:440:18:50

Yeah, there's lots here. Better get to it.

0:18:500:18:52

Ah, found something?

0:18:570:18:59

I must say that I'm not particularly drawn to football things

0:18:590:19:03

but I quite like this item.

0:19:030:19:05

It's an inkwell and we have a lid which opens here,

0:19:060:19:12

and inside would have been a glass or a porcelain inkwell.

0:19:120:19:15

It's missing but...

0:19:150:19:16

It wouldn't be much to get a new one there.

0:19:160:19:20

I think this is probably from the 1930s or '40s.

0:19:200:19:23

Because these long shorts are not what footballers are wearing now.

0:19:240:19:29

And I think I might have a wee go at that.

0:19:290:19:34

-Gwenda!

-Yep?

0:19:340:19:37

-You know, Glasgow's daft about football.

-Yeah.

0:19:370:19:40

I'm not football-daft myself,

0:19:400:19:43

but I was kind of drawn to that we thing because I liked the figure.

0:19:430:19:47

It sports a ticket price of £45.

0:19:470:19:49

What can Gwenda do?

0:19:490:19:50

How about 32?

0:19:500:19:53

How about 32?

0:19:530:19:55

-Let's go for that. That's smashing. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:19:550:19:58

I think that's a great thing.

0:19:580:20:01

That's a swift deal. And still plenty more to see.

0:20:010:20:04

This plaque looks like it could tell a story.

0:20:050:20:08

Gwenda, I quite like this.

0:20:080:20:11

It's an image of the Carmanian.

0:20:120:20:14

Workington? Is that near here?

0:20:140:20:16

Yes, it's six miles up the road and it was a very busy port.

0:20:160:20:20

-So this is maybe of local interest?

-Very much of local interest, yeah.

0:20:200:20:25

The Carmanian was a cargo ship built just down the road

0:20:250:20:29

and launched in 1897.

0:20:290:20:31

While returning from when Buenos Aries in 1916,

0:20:310:20:35

she was sunk by a German U-boat.

0:20:350:20:37

This plaque commemorates not only the ship,

0:20:370:20:39

but a once-thriving local industry, too.

0:20:390:20:43

Priced at £95.

0:20:430:20:44

But what's Gwenda's best?

0:20:440:20:47

I'll come down to...

0:20:470:20:49

-68. But that is the absolute...

-68, 68.

-..bottom line on it.

0:20:510:20:56

I can't even negotiate further than that.

0:20:560:20:58

-You can't? You definitely can't?

-No, I can't, no.

0:20:580:21:00

-You couldn't come to 60?

-I really couldn't.

0:21:000:21:02

-OK, I'm going to go for that.

-You're going for that one?

-68.

-Yes, 68, OK.

0:21:020:21:06

-That's absolutely fine.

-Let's shake on that.

0:21:060:21:09

-Thank you very much. Thank you.

-OK, right, okie-doke.

0:21:090:21:11

With the footballer inkwell, Anita's spent a total of £100.

0:21:110:21:16

-Thank you very much.

-OK. It's been lovely being here.

0:21:170:21:21

Thank you. Bye-bye. OK, bye now.

0:21:210:21:23

Well done, Anita.

0:21:230:21:25

Meanwhile, Philip's headed to the Cumbrian coast and to Whitehaven.

0:21:280:21:32

This picturesque tourist town was

0:21:320:21:34

once one of the biggest shipbuilding ports in the country.

0:21:340:21:37

And there was one family at the centre of Whitehaven's boom period.

0:21:380:21:43

An entrepreneurial spirit saw their fortunes soar,

0:21:430:21:47

and helped to make Whitehaven so famous.

0:21:470:21:51

Philip's meeting Celia MacKenzie.

0:21:510:21:54

Hi, I'm Philip. How are you?

0:21:540:21:56

Welcome, Philip. Welcome to The Rum Story, here in Whitehaven.

0:21:560:21:59

Whitehaven - it would've been a real buzzy place,

0:21:590:22:01

wouldn't it, back in about 1760?

0:22:010:22:03

It grew very rapidly in population.

0:22:030:22:06

From about 1,000 to about 9,000 people, within about 70 or 80 years.

0:22:060:22:12

A huge shipbuilding industry, talented, able sailors,

0:22:120:22:17

and an established connection with trade ports

0:22:170:22:20

in Africa and the New World,

0:22:200:22:21

made Whitehaven the perfect location for merchants to run their empires.

0:22:210:22:26

The Jeffersons were one of the big families around here.

0:22:260:22:29

They were not just merchants,

0:22:290:22:31

they didn't just focus on their own commercial activity,

0:22:310:22:34

but they also supported the town and made it grow.

0:22:340:22:37

Generations of Jeffersons captained

0:22:370:22:39

cargo ships around the world,

0:22:390:22:42

but when Henry Jefferson married

0:22:420:22:45

his family's fortunes changed forever.

0:22:450:22:47

The oil painting behind me is Henry as a young man

0:22:470:22:51

Beside him is his wife,

0:22:510:22:54

a lady called Anne Tweedie,

0:22:540:22:56

who was the daughter of

0:22:560:22:58

a plantation owner

0:22:580:23:00

on Antigua.

0:23:000:23:02

Quite a powerful combination.

0:23:020:23:04

They certainly were. She brought a dowry

0:23:040:23:06

of a sugar cane plantation,

0:23:060:23:08

and this is where the rum really started to come into it.

0:23:080:23:12

Henry and Anne had two sons,

0:23:120:23:14

Robert and Henry Jr.

0:23:140:23:16

They used their mother's inheritance

0:23:160:23:18

and father's merchant connections

0:23:180:23:20

to build one of Whitehaven's most successful businesses.

0:23:200:23:23

The Jeffersons had one advantage over their competitors,

0:23:230:23:26

as they owned the sugar cane plantations,

0:23:260:23:29

the raw material for rum.

0:23:290:23:33

They were wholesalers.

0:23:330:23:34

They actually distilled and blended the rum

0:23:340:23:38

here in these premises,

0:23:380:23:39

and we've got the original blending barrel,

0:23:390:23:42

which would hold the equivalent in today's values

0:23:420:23:45

of £250,000's worth.

0:23:450:23:48

Rum became the fashionable drink of the working class,

0:23:480:23:51

and with 50 coalmines in the local area,

0:23:510:23:53

and several hundred elsewhere in Cumbria,

0:23:530:23:56

sales of Jefferson's Rum went from strength to strength.

0:23:560:24:00

Jefferson's also manufactured rum for other companies

0:24:000:24:03

and secured some of the biggest contracts in the world.

0:24:030:24:07

It's reported that Jefferson's

0:24:070:24:09

were the first suppliers of rum to the UK Navy.

0:24:090:24:12

And that they were allowed a tot

0:24:120:24:15

or a supply of about half a pint a day

0:24:150:24:19

That doesn't bear thinking about.

0:24:190:24:21

The Jeffersons built a vast and powerful business from Whitehaven,

0:24:210:24:24

selling not only their own brand of rum,

0:24:240:24:27

but imported wine, port and champagne.

0:24:270:24:31

Who exactly were their clientele?

0:24:310:24:33

I've got a few documents here

0:24:330:24:35

that refer to a supply

0:24:350:24:38

-of product...

-White Star Line.

0:24:380:24:40

-..to the White Star Line.

-Titanic.

0:24:400:24:43

Absolutely. And this

0:24:430:24:44

is dated 27 May, 1907.

0:24:440:24:48

It doesn't actually state that they provided directly onto the Titanic

0:24:480:24:52

but they provided the White Star Line.

0:24:520:24:55

Despite Robert's death, the family business

0:24:570:24:59

continue to grow in Whitehaven,

0:24:590:25:02

even after other businesses abandoned the town

0:25:020:25:05

as it went into decline.

0:25:050:25:07

Henry Jr used his family's wealth

0:25:070:25:09

and influence to bring a hospital, banks and railways to the town,

0:25:090:25:13

attracting the very best names in engineering to do so.

0:25:130:25:17

So here we have got the prospectus for the new

0:25:170:25:20

Whitehaven and Furness Junction Railway.

0:25:200:25:23

The engineer they have here is one George Stephenson.

0:25:230:25:26

That's quite cool, isn't it?

0:25:260:25:27

It was something that was important to the local community.

0:25:270:25:30

-Right.

-They were an extremely wealthy family at the time.

0:25:300:25:33

They put their money to good use

0:25:330:25:36

in other projects around the area.

0:25:360:25:39

Leisure, commercial, and also

0:25:390:25:42

looking after the social welfare.

0:25:420:25:43

Six generations of Jeffersons built a business that

0:25:430:25:47

became the longest-running wine merchants in the country,

0:25:470:25:50

finally succumbing to the commercial pressures from supermarkets.

0:25:500:25:54

Henry Jr's great-great-great granddaughters

0:25:540:25:58

closed the doors in 1998.

0:25:580:26:00

But Jefferson's Rum lives on

0:26:000:26:03

and is one of the oldest brands of rum in the country.

0:26:030:26:07

Anita has made her way into the beautiful Lake District

0:26:120:26:15

National Park, and to Keswick.

0:26:150:26:19

For well over 200 years, the town

0:26:190:26:21

has been a popular holiday destination,

0:26:210:26:24

and occasionally visited by a shrewd antiques expert.

0:26:240:26:27

It is one of those days and Anita is headed to dealer Mark's shop

0:26:270:26:32

looking for a deal.

0:26:320:26:34

-I'm Anita.

-Hello, Anita. Nice to meet you.

0:26:340:26:37

I'm just looking at all this vinyl here.

0:26:370:26:41

-Oh, I like my records.

-Do you?

0:26:410:26:42

-Yeah.

-What I might do is concentrate

0:26:420:26:44

on the antiques

0:26:440:26:47

-and jewellery.

-Oh, yes.

0:26:470:26:48

I know you like your jewellery.

0:26:480:26:50

Uh-huh. If I need to ask any questions, or prices, give you a wee

0:26:500:26:55

-shout?

-Give us a shout, no problem.

-OK, thank you.

0:26:550:26:59

Anita still has £160.24

0:26:590:27:02

to spend, and,

0:27:020:27:03

true to form...

0:27:030:27:05

Look at all these lovely wee brooches.

0:27:050:27:09

I am very, very tempted with this cabinet.

0:27:090:27:12

We've got wonderful Victorian examples,

0:27:120:27:15

we've got everything that a girl might want.

0:27:150:27:19

But... I'm going to have a good look around

0:27:190:27:23

and not give into temptation just immediately.

0:27:230:27:28

She is showing restraint.

0:27:280:27:30

But she did spot something on her way in.

0:27:300:27:33

Looks heavy, though.

0:27:330:27:35

Oh! Oh, no!

0:27:350:27:37

Well, this certainly isn't a wee brooch.

0:27:370:27:41

But it's a very interesting object.

0:27:410:27:44

It is a book press.

0:27:440:27:46

I'm not exactly sure how this works,

0:27:460:27:49

but it is such a visually exciting

0:27:490:27:53

object, and it is part of our industrial history.

0:27:530:27:59

It sports John Christie's name.

0:27:590:28:01

A book publisher working in the late 19th century,

0:28:010:28:04

it is priced at £125.

0:28:040:28:07

I'm going to see what the dealer says about

0:28:070:28:10

and I'm going to see if I can do a deal on it.

0:28:100:28:14

Careful, Anita.

0:28:160:28:17

SHE LAUGHS

0:28:170:28:19

Would you like a hand with that, Anita?

0:28:190:28:22

Would you like a hand with that one?

0:28:220:28:24

And you wonder why I buy jewellery.

0:28:240:28:26

It is easy to lift up.

0:28:260:28:28

But I think this is a great object.

0:28:280:28:30

But I am struggling with the weight of it.

0:28:300:28:32

It is a bit heavy.

0:28:320:28:35

First of all, where did you get it?

0:28:400:28:42

-It is actually a family piece.

-Oh, no!

-It is a family piece, yeah.

0:28:420:28:46

Does that mean you are sentimental about it?

0:28:460:28:49

Not that sentimental, but it's a nice piece.

0:28:490:28:52

I remember that being in my dad's shed.

0:28:520:28:54

Oh, fabulous.

0:28:540:28:56

Do you know how that works?

0:28:560:28:59

I presume that is obviously

0:28:590:29:01

to rise and fall.

0:29:010:29:03

Would you put the whole book in?

0:29:030:29:05

To be honest, do you want to have a try?

0:29:050:29:08

I'll just pop that in.

0:29:080:29:10

Would this be for the final sort of...?

0:29:100:29:12

I think... I've never tried this.

0:29:120:29:13

I'm not an expert on this.

0:29:130:29:15

Let's see if this works.

0:29:170:29:18

Oh, there you go. Yeah.

0:29:180:29:20

So that just gives it that extra push just to bind

0:29:200:29:23

everything in.

0:29:230:29:24

I would like to be buying it for about 50 quid.

0:29:240:29:27

I'll be honest with you. I was thinking if I got 70 quid

0:29:270:29:30

for it you are not going to be far off on that.

0:29:300:29:33

I would be happy at 70 quid.

0:29:330:29:34

-I'm going to take a chance on it.

-Excellent.

0:29:340:29:37

Put it there. Thank you very much.

0:29:370:29:40

Mark has kindly knocked £55

0:29:400:29:43

off and Anita has her fifth and final lot for auction.

0:29:430:29:47

You're not putting it in your handbag, then?

0:29:470:29:50

No, I'm not. OK, bye-bye.

0:29:500:29:51

Thank you, Anita. Bye-bye.

0:29:510:29:53

Anita is done but Philip has one last opportunity

0:29:530:29:56

to shop.

0:29:560:29:58

In Cockermouth, not far from the River Cocker,

0:30:010:30:04

is Castle Antiques and Curios.

0:30:040:30:07

Philip has just under £180

0:30:070:30:10

left to spend.

0:30:100:30:12

Dealer Matt knows all about Phil's wily ways

0:30:120:30:14

as he has had the pleasure of his custom on a previous Road Trip.

0:30:140:30:19

-Matt, how are you?

-Hi, Phil.

0:30:190:30:21

-Lovely to see you again. Are you busy?

-Yeah, not bad.

0:30:210:30:24

I will just stop you straightaway.

0:30:240:30:26

I am not giving the game away here, but my hero.

0:30:260:30:31

-Leonard, yeah.

-I am a massive Star Trek fan.

0:30:310:30:35

-Could be the thing for you, then.

-Live long and hopefully prosper.

0:30:350:30:38

-Can we just have a look at him?

-Yeah, sure.

0:30:380:30:40

The man is a legend, isn't he?

0:30:400:30:42

And Leonard Nimoy just recently died, didn't he?

0:30:420:30:44

He dead, not too long ago.

0:30:440:30:46

Oh, look at it, the man is so cool.

0:30:460:30:49

In all seriousness, this is, what, a 1980s...?

0:30:490:30:51

Just to show my Trekkie knowledge here,

0:30:510:30:53

this would have been the journey home, The Wrath of Khan,

0:30:530:30:56

that would have come out, wouldn't it?

0:30:560:30:58

So how much is that, Matt?

0:30:580:31:00

£15.

0:31:000:31:01

I am not even going to bid you for that, Matt.

0:31:010:31:03

I've got my hero, look.

0:31:030:31:06

Hello, Spocky.

0:31:060:31:07

Lordy, that was quick.

0:31:070:31:10

He's boldly gone and got it.

0:31:100:31:13

He didn't even try to haggle.

0:31:130:31:15

That's a Road Trip first for Serrell.

0:31:150:31:17

I think Anita is going to absolutely love Mr Spock.

0:31:170:31:21

Because Mr Spock has got...

0:31:210:31:24

-IMITATES ANITA:

-A nice wee brooch.

0:31:240:31:27

Ha-ha, cheeky.

0:31:270:31:29

He may have bought a tatty piece of cardboard

0:31:290:31:32

rather than an antique,

0:31:320:31:33

but I have never seen Philip so happy.

0:31:330:31:35

Do you reckon James T Kirk had a bit of a fling with Uhura or not?

0:31:350:31:40

Lordy.

0:31:400:31:41

-Matt, you've been a star. Thank you very much indeed.

-No problem.

0:31:410:31:44

Phil leaves Cockermouth with a 1980s

0:31:440:31:47

cardboard Spock for £15.

0:31:470:31:50

Thank you once again very much indeed, thank you.

0:31:500:31:52

Come on, Spock, we better go see if

0:31:520:31:53

we can find the Enterprise, my friend.

0:31:530:31:55

It's parked round here somewhere.

0:31:550:31:57

Let's remind ourselves who bought what.

0:31:590:32:02

Philip parted with £305

0:32:040:32:06

for a pair of German army issue binoculars,

0:32:060:32:09

a mahogany table,

0:32:090:32:11

two brass portholes,

0:32:110:32:13

an oak gate-leg table,

0:32:130:32:15

a cold-painted bronze stag

0:32:150:32:17

and a cardboard Mr Spock.

0:32:170:32:20

What a mixture.

0:32:200:32:21

While Anita lavished £204

0:32:210:32:24

on a magazine rack, a pillbox,

0:32:240:32:26

an inkwell, a local plaque

0:32:260:32:29

and a Victorian book press.

0:32:290:32:32

What do they make of each other's buys?

0:32:320:32:35

Philip is a furniture man.

0:32:370:32:39

He HAS to buy furniture.

0:32:390:32:42

But he might not make any profit on them.

0:32:420:32:47

The lot that worries me more than any is that footballer,

0:32:470:32:50

because he could just turn out to be a match-winner.

0:32:500:32:52

Everybody's a Trekkie.

0:32:520:32:54

£15 for all that fun?

0:32:540:32:57

That's a bargain.

0:32:570:32:59

I just think it's all about, live long and prosper, Jim.

0:32:590:33:03

Tim, not Jim.

0:33:030:33:06

After setting off from Castle Douglas,

0:33:060:33:08

our pair will now boldly go

0:33:080:33:10

where experts have been before.

0:33:100:33:13

Not the final frontier but auction just outside Kendal,

0:33:130:33:16

in the village of Crooklands.

0:33:160:33:19

Hey, Fiat's back.

0:33:190:33:21

I'm so pleased that we are back in our own wee car again.

0:33:210:33:25

Are you not happy about that?

0:33:250:33:27

No.

0:33:270:33:28

SHE LAUGHS

0:33:280:33:30

Not impressed with the car, eh, Philip?

0:33:300:33:32

Anita is in awe of your buying.

0:33:320:33:34

You haven't played it safe. You've gone out there,

0:33:340:33:37

you've spent money,

0:33:370:33:38

you bought big, you've scattered your cash.

0:33:380:33:41

Well, the thing is, I was £100-plus ahead of you.

0:33:410:33:45

And I think I spent £100 more than you.

0:33:450:33:48

-We could end up neck and neck at the end of this.

-We could.

0:33:480:33:52

It's certainly a close one.

0:33:520:33:53

Crooklands is located in the Lancaster Canal,

0:33:530:33:57

once used to transport coal

0:33:570:33:59

from one northern town to another.

0:33:590:34:01

Today's sale is at Eighteen Eighteen Auctioneers.

0:34:010:34:05

Our very, very last auction.

0:34:050:34:08

I'm terribly sad.

0:34:080:34:10

Now, I might need some help getting out of here.

0:34:100:34:12

Hang on, darling, I'll give you a wee hand.

0:34:120:34:15

Gordon Bennett!

0:34:150:34:16

Aw!

0:34:160:34:18

Do you want a piggyback?

0:34:180:34:20

SHE LAUGHS

0:34:200:34:21

I think I'll probably break your back.

0:34:210:34:23

One of the auctioneers here is young Rob Kerr.

0:34:230:34:26

Your thoughts, please.

0:34:260:34:28

I think the book press should do really well.

0:34:280:34:30

I like that piece a lot. A piece that I think may struggle,

0:34:300:34:33

you're probably looking at the furniture,

0:34:330:34:35

especially the gateleg table.

0:34:350:34:37

It is a big sale day,

0:34:370:34:39

so young Rob will be on the rostrum a little later.

0:34:390:34:42

For now, old hand Kevin Kendall

0:34:420:34:45

is wielding the gavel.

0:34:450:34:47

Last auction.

0:34:470:34:49

Yeah, it is.

0:34:490:34:51

-Good luck, though.

-And to you, too.

0:34:510:34:53

20!

0:34:530:34:55

First to go today is Anita's pillbox.

0:34:560:34:59

Start me at 30, then, for a quick start.

0:34:590:35:02

£30, thank you...

0:35:020:35:03

-£30 start.

-Straight into profit there.

0:35:030:35:05

35, 38...

0:35:050:35:07

-40 now.

-(Come on!)

0:35:070:35:09

42, 45, 48.

0:35:090:35:11

50, 5, 60.

0:35:110:35:14

£60, then, in the centre.

0:35:140:35:16

£60, are we all done this time? At 60...

0:35:160:35:19

Yes!

0:35:190:35:20

Bang on the money, isn't it?

0:35:200:35:22

-Yes.

-Isn't it?

0:35:220:35:24

Oh!

0:35:240:35:26

She's happy, more than tripling her money from the off.

0:35:260:35:30

What a great start.

0:35:300:35:31

Have I got you worried? Are you worried?

0:35:310:35:34

Yeah, yeah.

0:35:340:35:36

Next, Philip's German military binoculars.

0:35:360:35:39

Start with £20, then.

0:35:390:35:41

£20, thank you, sir.

0:35:410:35:43

You're away, Phil.

0:35:430:35:45

22, 25,

0:35:450:35:46

28, 30.

0:35:460:35:48

£30 now. 30 in the room.

0:35:480:35:50

I'm selling, all done,

0:35:500:35:51

at 30.

0:35:510:35:53

Philip's first profit, albeit a small one.

0:35:530:35:56

They all count.

0:35:560:35:58

You haven't lost any money.

0:35:580:36:00

Now the turn of Anita's magazine rack.

0:36:010:36:04

£10, thank you, £10 bid.

0:36:040:36:06

10, 12, 15.

0:36:060:36:08

£15 now.

0:36:080:36:09

£15, 18.

0:36:090:36:11

20, £20.

0:36:110:36:14

I'm going to sell if we are all done at 20.

0:36:140:36:17

Another profit.

0:36:180:36:21

I am not quite snapping at your heels

0:36:210:36:24

but I am...

0:36:240:36:26

Now Philip's favoured buy,

0:36:260:36:28

his cardboard Spock.

0:36:280:36:30

£20, start me, then. A bit of fun.

0:36:300:36:32

£20?

0:36:320:36:34

Mm, tough crowd.

0:36:340:36:35

Start me at 10, then, if you like.

0:36:350:36:37

Only £10 for a legend.

0:36:370:36:39

Where are the Trekkies?

0:36:390:36:40

£10? £10, thank you.

0:36:400:36:42

-£10 bid.

-We're away, we're away.

0:36:420:36:44

£10 bid. I feel like being beamed up now.

0:36:440:36:46

£10 bid. All done

0:36:460:36:48

at 10...

0:36:480:36:51

Oh, bad luck, Philip.

0:36:510:36:53

Ah.

0:36:530:36:55

Oh, Philip.

0:36:550:36:56

Now it is Anita's local commemorative plaque.

0:36:560:37:00

£30, thank you. £30 on the internet.

0:37:000:37:03

30 on the internet.

0:37:030:37:05

-32.

-Struggling.

0:37:050:37:06

38 now. 38. £40 now on the internet.

0:37:060:37:10

-There's interest on the internet.

-£40, and selling.

0:37:100:37:13

To the internet buyer then. Have you all done this time?

0:37:130:37:15

-At 40...

-BANGS GAVEL

0:37:150:37:18

-Bad luck, Anita! Your first loss.

-Stop smiling!

0:37:180:37:23

Sorry.

0:37:230:37:24

Philip's big buy is next - his stag set him back quite a bit.

0:37:260:37:30

-And I have got interest.

-Yes, yes.

-Starting with me at £50 only.

0:37:300:37:34

That's not bad.

0:37:340:37:36

50 bid. 5. 60. 5. 70. 5.

0:37:360:37:39

-Telephone... Phil...

-5. 95. 100.

0:37:390:37:44

Have to be 10 now.

0:37:440:37:47

110 now. 110. 110 on the telephone. Have you all done?

0:37:470:37:51

-At 110...

-BANGS GAVEL

0:37:510:37:53

A small loss after costs, but he's just about got away with it.

0:37:530:37:56

You get someone on the phone, you're always thinking -

0:37:560:37:59

-I wonder how far he might have gone.

-Yeah.

0:37:590:38:02

Next up, Anita's book press.

0:38:020:38:04

-I have got interest.

-Oh, oh, oh...

0:38:040:38:06

Start the bid with me at £30.

0:38:060:38:08

-£30 bid. 32.

-It's a piece of history!

0:38:080:38:12

35. 8 on the net? 38. 40.

0:38:120:38:15

£40 bid now. 42. 48 on the net. £50 on commission now.

0:38:150:38:19

-55. 60.

-60!

0:38:190:38:20

£60 bid now. 60 bid. 60 bid.

0:38:200:38:23

65 in the room. 65. New bidder in the room.

0:38:230:38:26

-65. 70.

-5. Yes!

0:38:260:38:30

-75. 75.

-Yes!

-75.

0:38:300:38:33

-80.

-Yes!

-85.

-Yes!

0:38:330:38:36

-Are you all done this time? At 85...

-BANGS GAVEL

0:38:360:38:39

-See, that's just stood still, hasn't it?

-I'm very, very...

0:38:390:38:42

happy!

0:38:420:38:44

LAUGHTER

0:38:440:38:46

Ha-ha! Philip, not so happy.

0:38:460:38:48

Well done, Anita, another profit sees you streaking ahead.

0:38:480:38:51

-The money doesn't matter. I just...

-Can I just say something to you?

0:38:510:38:54

-What?

-It does!

0:38:540:38:56

Yes, it does! Will Philip's luck change with the start of Rob's shift?

0:38:560:39:01

The first of his two tables is next.

0:39:010:39:03

Start me, £70, for it please.

0:39:030:39:06

£70. 70...

0:39:060:39:08

30 will go, then.

0:39:080:39:10

Oh, dear, Philip.

0:39:100:39:12

Thank you very much, madam. £30 bid.

0:39:120:39:13

Are you all out in the room otherwise?

0:39:130:39:16

-£30, maiden bid.

-It's so, so cheap, isn't it?

0:39:160:39:19

BANGS GAVEL

0:39:190:39:21

That's Philip's third loss today.

0:39:210:39:24

Now, it's Anita's inkwell. Can it score her another profit?

0:39:240:39:29

And I have commission interest, so it's with me at £38.

0:39:290:39:33

£38 bid on commission.

0:39:330:39:35

40. 2. 5. 8. 50.

0:39:350:39:39

Commission's done. £50 in the room. Any further interest?

0:39:390:39:42

I will sell at the 50.

0:39:420:39:44

-All done.

-BANGS GAVEL

0:39:440:39:47

I'm happy at that.

0:39:470:39:48

And so you should be. It helps further increase your lead.

0:39:480:39:52

This is going to be a lot closer

0:39:520:39:54

than I'd like it to be, I think.

0:39:540:39:57

Yeah.

0:39:570:39:58

There's still only a few pounds in it at the moment

0:39:580:40:01

and your second table is up now.

0:40:010:40:03

£30. £30 somewhere.

0:40:030:40:05

They're not liking it, Philip.

0:40:050:40:07

20 then.

0:40:070:40:09

£20, thank you, sir. 20 bid. 22.

0:40:090:40:12

25. 28.

0:40:120:40:14

Somebody's holding a bid.

0:40:140:40:16

28, if there's no further interest...

0:40:160:40:19

SHE GASPS

0:40:190:40:20

BANGS GAVEL

0:40:200:40:22

This all helps Anita catch up, you know.

0:40:220:40:25

-I think I should probably stay away from furniture.

-Yeah.

0:40:250:40:29

Philip's portholes are our pair's final lot.

0:40:290:40:32

A big loss here may decide our Road Trip winner.

0:40:320:40:35

Start me £40, please.

0:40:370:40:39

Ouch.

0:40:390:40:40

No interest? £30, then. 30 for a start, please.

0:40:400:40:43

-Go on.

-20, then, I'll take.

0:40:430:40:45

Oh, Philip!

0:40:450:40:46

-Thank you, madam. £20.

-That is for nothing, really.

0:40:460:40:50

-Philip.

-Online now.

0:40:500:40:52

25 fresh bidder. Thank you, sir.

0:40:520:40:54

-28. Is it 30, madam?

-Am I still in with a chance?

0:40:540:40:58

-..No further.

-BANGS GAVEL

0:40:580:41:01

Well, this makes for an exciting finale, eh?

0:41:010:41:04

Is it possible Anita has pipped him at the post?

0:41:040:41:07

-Let's go and do the sums.

-I think it could be quite close.

0:41:070:41:10

Yes!

0:41:100:41:12

After five incredible auctions, the results are in.

0:41:120:41:16

Anita started with £294.24.

0:41:160:41:19

After auction costs, she made a profit of £5.10. Huh!

0:41:190:41:24

Meaning she ends the week with £299.34.

0:41:240:41:28

Philip set out with £469.58.

0:41:300:41:34

After fees, he made a loss of £109.84,

0:41:340:41:40

meaning his grand total is £359.74.

0:41:400:41:45

Although Anita's won this leg, Philip's crowned this week's

0:41:450:41:50

Road Trip winner and all profits from the series go to Children In Need.

0:41:500:41:54

The thing is, Philip, I made up a little bit,

0:41:540:41:57

but you've still come out really well, so congratulations, darling.

0:41:570:42:01

-It's been a good old week. You're driving.

-It's been fabulous.

0:42:010:42:04

-You're driving, my love.

-Off we go.

0:42:040:42:06

I'm never going to wash that cheek again.

0:42:060:42:09

There's just one last journey to make.

0:42:090:42:12

It's down memory lane.

0:42:120:42:14

It's been a fun old Road Trip.

0:42:210:42:24

You've got to be careful when Phil Serrell's about.

0:42:240:42:27

Oh! Try to keep your eye on the road, Phil!

0:42:270:42:29

With some big, big wins.

0:42:290:42:32

That'll make a fantastic bog roll holder.

0:42:320:42:35

And a few bruising blows.

0:42:350:42:37

I wonder if I can give Phil Serrell a hammering with that!

0:42:370:42:41

But what a week they've had!

0:42:410:42:43

If I was going to buy a classic car,

0:42:430:42:45

I'm not sure that I would buy one of these.

0:42:450:42:48

Forward, Macduff! And you're a lot better looking than Phil Serrell!

0:42:480:42:52

Thank you very, very much.

0:42:520:42:55

So long, you two.

0:42:590:43:02

Next time, a brand-new pairing hit the roads of Ireland.

0:43:020:43:06

Well done!

0:43:060:43:08

Christina Trevanion's in paradise.

0:43:080:43:10

I think this is the most beautiful antique shop I've ever been into.

0:43:100:43:13

-And Thomas Plant's in trouble.

-Just pulled it down and it locked.

0:43:130:43:17

Now, you've broken it.

0:43:170:43:19

Anita Manning and Philip Serrell begin the final leg of their journey in Castle Douglas in Kirkcudbrightshire, heading to a tense final auction in Crooklands in the Lake District.