Episode 18 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 18

Christina Trevanion and Thomas Plant continue their adventure in north Wales. Starting in Ruthin, Denbighshire, they head for an auction in Colwyn Bay, Conwy.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 18. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

0:00:020:00:04

This is beautiful!

0:00:040:00:05

That's the way to do this.

0:00:050:00:06

..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal - to scour for antiques.

0:00:060:00:12

Joy.

0:00:120:00:13

Hello!

0:00:130:00:14

The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction,

0:00:140:00:16

but it's no mean feat.

0:00:160:00:18

There'll be worthy winners...

0:00:190:00:22

-Sorry, sorry!

-..and valiant losers.

0:00:220:00:23

So, will it be the high road to glory

0:00:230:00:26

or the slow road to disaster?

0:00:260:00:27

The handbrake's on!

0:00:270:00:29

This is Antiques Road Trip.

0:00:290:00:31

Yeah!

0:00:340:00:35

SWING MUSIC PLAYS

0:00:350:00:38

On this third leg of the trip,

0:00:380:00:40

it's all about North Wales for Christina Trevanion and Thomas Plant.

0:00:400:00:45

# Bread of Heaven

0:00:460:00:48

-BOTH:

-# Feed me now or never more

0:00:480:00:51

# Never more. #

0:00:510:00:52

All right, all right, all right. That's enough of that.

0:00:520:00:55

Quite.

0:00:550:00:56

This trip started out in Ireland...

0:00:570:00:59

I think it's the most beautiful antique shop I've ever been into.

0:00:590:01:02

..with varying degrees of success.

0:01:020:01:05

-Just pulled it down and it locked.

-Now you've broken it.

0:01:050:01:09

They'll now finish their trip in Britain,

0:01:090:01:11

along with their 1962 Bedford van,

0:01:110:01:14

which was manufactured before it was compulsory to fit seatbelts.

0:01:140:01:17

Both our auctioneers began with £200.

0:01:210:01:24

After losing at both auctions so far, Thomas has just £136.94...

0:01:260:01:32

..meaning Christina has taken the lead and has £278.91.

0:01:340:01:40

So, you must be feeling like sort of Rockefeller there.

0:01:420:01:45

Ah, so flush.

0:01:450:01:46

-Can you lend me some money?

-Nope.

0:01:460:01:47

-Nope.

-Nope.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:01:470:01:51

-You have kept the faith.

-Yeah.

-You've bought antiques.

-Yeah.

0:01:510:01:54

-You haven't wavered.

-Failed.

0:01:540:01:56

-And you've done brilliantly.

-Failed.

0:01:560:01:58

Oh, no, you haven't.

0:01:580:01:59

After setting off from Cashel, in Tipperary,

0:02:020:02:05

they roamed around Ireland before hopping across

0:02:050:02:08

to North Wales, from where they'll travel through to England,

0:02:080:02:11

finishing up over 700 miles later in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire.

0:02:110:02:17

Today's leg begins in the picturesque town

0:02:170:02:20

of Ruthin, in Denbighshire,

0:02:200:02:22

and heads for auction in Colwyn Bay, Conwy.

0:02:220:02:25

We are in Wales where it rains. It does nothing else but rain.

0:02:290:02:34

It does...

0:02:340:02:35

The sun shines in Wales.

0:02:350:02:37

I've not seen it.

0:02:370:02:38

Sun or not, these two are certainly excited this morning.

0:02:390:02:43

MUSIC: Delilah by Tom Jones

0:02:450:02:47

-BOTH:

-# Why, why, why, Delilah... #

0:02:470:02:50

I don't know any more. I don't know really any more.

0:02:500:02:52

-# My, my, my, Delilah

-Delilah... #

0:02:520:02:56

There's a 13th-century castle in Ruthin,

0:02:590:03:01

around which the gorgeous town grew.

0:03:010:03:05

Christina's first stop today is in a former cinema.

0:03:060:03:10

Oh, wow.

0:03:110:03:12

Oh, my goodness.

0:03:140:03:15

Onto something already?

0:03:170:03:18

There's an awful lot of stuff in here, isn't there?

0:03:180:03:21

My gosh.

0:03:210:03:22

Oh, wow! Look at that!

0:03:220:03:24

It's a little salt and pepper cruet in the form of two gavels...

0:03:240:03:28

which is perfect!

0:03:280:03:29

Thomas and I are both auctioneers. That's amazing.

0:03:290:03:31

She's working fast this morning.

0:03:310:03:34

Best track down a Mr Andy Stow.

0:03:340:03:38

-Hello.

-Hello, Christina.

-Hello, my love.

0:03:380:03:40

Andy, I've already seen something I love.

0:03:400:03:42

Well, no, I don't love it. It's sort of, you know, OK.

0:03:420:03:46

Smoothly done, Christina.

0:03:460:03:48

So, what I saw, Andy, was this...

0:03:480:03:51

which I thought was a bit of fun.

0:03:510:03:54

That is fun!

0:03:540:03:55

So, you've obviously got salt and pepper

0:03:550:03:57

and you've got the stand for them to go on as well.

0:03:570:03:59

-Is there any maker's mark?

-No, I don't think so.

0:03:590:04:02

That's got a bit of corrosion on there from the salt,

0:04:020:04:06

so obviously...

0:04:060:04:07

But unfortunately, it's very rare

0:04:070:04:09

to find them without that corrosion, isn't it?

0:04:090:04:11

-Absolutely.

-Because of the very nature of salt itself.

0:04:110:04:13

They're priced at £35, so as we wait to hear back from the dealer,

0:04:150:04:19

Christina browses on.

0:04:190:04:21

Hey, I like this. What's this, Andy?

0:04:240:04:28

It's, in a sense, a dentist's chair, basically.

0:04:280:04:32

Really?

0:04:320:04:33

Well, it could be whatever you want it to be.

0:04:330:04:36

I was thinking it might be a barber's chair, in which case...

0:04:360:04:39

It is. It is actually a barber's chair.

0:04:390:04:40

As a dentist's chair, it's making me feel a bit nervous.

0:04:400:04:43

And what price have you got on it?

0:04:430:04:45

Well, I've got 230 on it.

0:04:450:04:46

-SHE LAUGHS

-You're joking.

0:04:460:04:48

For you, 150 quid.

0:04:480:04:50

Generous. One to think about, then.

0:04:510:04:53

There's a bit too much in here to tempt me.

0:04:550:04:59

I could be here all day. You might have to kick me out.

0:04:590:05:01

There's word back on the gavel cruet set.

0:05:010:05:05

Right, OK. So, 25, potentially, on that.

0:05:050:05:10

150 on that.

0:05:100:05:11

Do I like that chair as much as that, Andy?

0:05:110:05:13

-I think you love it.

-Is it... Ooh, I like that.

0:05:130:05:17

-HE LAUGHS

-Hello!

0:05:170:05:19

THEY LAUGH

0:05:190:05:21

That was a very subtle entrance!

0:05:210:05:24

Yeah, I'm just on my way to the pond.

0:05:240:05:26

THEY LAUGH

0:05:260:05:29

Boys' toys, isn't it?

0:05:290:05:30

What's on your pond yacht.

0:05:300:05:31

On that, with the stand and everything, erm...

0:05:310:05:35

110.

0:05:350:05:37

What's going to make me more money, Andy - that or your chair?

0:05:370:05:40

-I'd say the chair.

-Really?

0:05:400:05:42

Can you match him on the price for the chair?

0:05:420:05:44

-Uh, watch my lips. No.

-Oh, Andy!

-Sorry, darling!

0:05:440:05:48

Andy's best on the chair still £150.

0:05:510:05:55

£150.

0:05:550:05:57

-Or double the value and call it a tattooist's chair.

-A what?

0:05:570:06:01

-Tattooist.

-That's a brilliant idea!

0:06:010:06:03

It's a tattoo... Yeah. What about can we do £150...?

0:06:030:06:08

-I'll give you your £150 for this...

-Yeah.

0:06:080:06:11

..but I would like the salt and pepper as well.

0:06:110:06:14

-Go on.

-Oh, Andy. You're a legend. Thank you.

0:06:140:06:17

So, that's 25 for the cruet set and £125 for the dentist's

0:06:190:06:24

or barber's or tattooist's chair.

0:06:240:06:27

Crikey, it's only Ruthin's mayor Anne Roberts come to say hello.

0:06:270:06:32

That's a bit of bling, girl.

0:06:320:06:34

It's 18-carat... It's 18-carat gold!

0:06:340:06:36

-Is it all 18-carat gold?

-Yeah.

0:06:360:06:38

-Is it for sale?

-No!

-ANDY LAUGHS

0:06:380:06:41

Whilst Christina makes friends in high places,

0:06:410:06:45

Thomas has headed north

0:06:450:06:47

to the former quarrying village of Penmaenmawr.

0:06:470:06:49

Lying on the edge of Snowdonia,

0:06:510:06:53

this pretty coastal settlement is home to Perry Higgins Antiques,

0:06:530:06:58

owned by Michael King.

0:06:580:07:00

-Hello. I'm Thomas.

-How do you do?

-Very well, thank you.

-Good.

0:07:060:07:09

This is amazing.

0:07:090:07:11

Indeed. Certainly a lot to see in this 15,000-square-foot showroom.

0:07:120:07:18

-Leg irons, I think.

-What have we got these for?

-Well...

0:07:180:07:21

-Some bad customers?

-Yeah, yeah. Keep them in here.

-Yeah?

0:07:210:07:23

Keep them in here long enough with them on them,

0:07:230:07:26

then they might buy something.

0:07:260:07:28

Well, put them back.

0:07:280:07:30

Michael's been round the block. It's best behaviour in here, Thomas.

0:07:320:07:36

I don't want too much ticket turning going on in here,

0:07:360:07:39

you know, with you.

0:07:390:07:40

-Well, I haven't turned over any tickets.

-You have.

0:07:400:07:42

You're going to get a habit and turn all these tickets.

0:07:420:07:45

You don't like that?

0:07:450:07:47

-I loathe ticket turners coming in the shop.

-Do you?

0:07:470:07:50

Is that what you call them - ticket turners?

0:07:500:07:52

Ticket turners, yeah.

0:07:520:07:53

-You're not a wi-wo, are you?

-What's a...?

0:07:530:07:56

Walk in, walk out.

0:07:560:07:58

-HE LAUGHS

-Walk in, walk out! Wi-wo.

0:07:580:08:00

-Wi-wos.

-No, I won't be walking in, walking out.

0:08:000:08:03

Right, OK.

0:08:030:08:04

-Promise.

-I'll put the leg irons on if you do.

0:08:040:08:07

I like you, Michael.

0:08:070:08:09

-It doesn't stop, does it?

-No.

0:08:100:08:13

I mean, it's room after room!

0:08:130:08:15

I'm seeing a few things. I quite like your stick stand.

0:08:150:08:19

-It's not dear.

-It's not dear?

-No, I don't think so.

0:08:190:08:22

How much is it? I don't know.

0:08:220:08:23

Look who's ticket-turning now.

0:08:230:08:25

You've got the drip tray.

0:08:250:08:27

-You've got a four and a two next to it.

-Yeah.

0:08:270:08:30

Couldn't be the other way around, could it?

0:08:300:08:32

No, but it's close. I'll do it at 30 quid.

0:08:320:08:34

25?

0:08:340:08:36

Hmm.

0:08:360:08:37

-26.

-£26.

0:08:370:08:40

Makes a deal, doesn't it?

0:08:400:08:41

I think in Wales they need stick stands

0:08:410:08:43

to put their umbrellas in...

0:08:430:08:44

-They certainly do.

-..with drip trays.

-Yeah.

0:08:440:08:46

That's awesome. Done.

0:08:460:08:49

-Can we go outside now?

-Yes.

0:08:490:08:51

Out the back of the shop,

0:08:510:08:52

Michael also has an architectural salvage yard.

0:08:520:08:55

-I like these terracotta pots.

-Yeah.

-Were they a lot of money?

0:08:550:08:58

They cost me about 80 quid.

0:08:580:09:00

Have you got any sort of cheaper pots?

0:09:000:09:02

-What are those green ones there?

-Those are cheap, yeah.

-Yeah?

0:09:020:09:05

-These are concrete ones, are they?

-Yeah, they're concrete.

-Yeah.

0:09:050:09:08

How much is a pair of those?

0:09:100:09:12

I want about 35 quid each for them. I'll do 40 quid.

0:09:120:09:15

-Could you do them for 30?

-Oh!

0:09:150:09:18

-Have you got some money in there?!

-Honestly, I know I look like...

0:09:180:09:21

You must have some money in there. £32 and take them. Go on.

0:09:210:09:24

All right. You've got a deal. £32.

0:09:240:09:28

You're a star.

0:09:280:09:29

That's the pair of reconstituted green painted planters

0:09:290:09:33

and an Art Nouveau umbrella stand for £58.

0:09:330:09:37

You're a star and you've been really kind.

0:09:370:09:39

-Thank you very much.

-You've been really kind.

0:09:390:09:41

-I know I've been hard work, so...

-Very hard work.

-Yeah.

0:09:410:09:43

Don't hold back, Michael.

0:09:430:09:45

Christina has taken a break from shopping

0:09:460:09:49

to head half an hour down the coast to Caernarfon.

0:09:490:09:52

The town is known for its imposing 13th-century castle.

0:09:560:09:59

Christina is here to meet

0:09:590:10:01

Caernarfon Castle's guide John Sherlock.

0:10:010:10:04

-Hello, John.

-Hello, Christina.

-My goodness. Lovely to meet you.

0:10:040:10:07

And you. Croeso, as they around here.

0:10:070:10:09

Indeed, Croeso.

0:10:090:10:11

Croeso i Castell Caernarfon.

0:10:110:10:13

The castle dates to a time when Wales was in turmoil.

0:10:140:10:17

Battles raged between the Welsh royalty

0:10:170:10:21

and the invading English king.

0:10:210:10:23

The ruthless Edward I was determined

0:10:230:10:26

to enforce his supremacy throughout the British Isles,

0:10:260:10:28

starting with Wales.

0:10:280:10:30

He attacked in 1277,

0:10:300:10:31

building a chain of castles throughout North Wales,

0:10:310:10:34

and this impenetrable fortress in Caernarfon was to be his grandest.

0:10:340:10:40

The ensuing power struggle changed Wales's future forever.

0:10:410:10:45

-It just looks, for a castle, so daunting.

-Absolutely.

0:10:470:10:51

Really formidable, doesn't it?

0:10:510:10:53

If you are trying to attack it from this side,

0:10:530:10:56

you'd struggle to find a way in.

0:10:560:11:00

It looks totally impenetrable.

0:11:000:11:02

Edward's castles were symbols of power,

0:11:050:11:08

designed to kill any unwelcome visitors

0:11:080:11:10

who dared to enter.

0:11:100:11:12

Welcome to the impressive King's Gate.

0:11:120:11:14

Very elegant, you might think.

0:11:140:11:16

Yes, quite.

0:11:160:11:17

But where you're actually standing now is what would have been known

0:11:170:11:20

as the killing zone.

0:11:200:11:21

This area featured a series of doors that could trap potential enemies

0:11:220:11:27

and then be attacked through the arrow slits on either side.

0:11:270:11:31

Then we've got right up above us what were called the murder holes,

0:11:340:11:38

and what they would've used those for

0:11:380:11:40

is dropping anything down on people invading the castle.

0:11:400:11:44

-OK.

-And by anything, I mean stones, hot sand, boiling water...

0:11:440:11:51

even human effluent.

0:11:510:11:53

So, it looks like a really nice, pretty entrance,

0:11:530:11:56

but actually, it's not really designed to be...

0:11:560:11:59

-Not at all.

-No. No. OK.

0:11:590:12:01

It's said that Edward felt the best way to cement his authority

0:12:030:12:07

was to have his child born at the castle.

0:12:070:12:10

So, did Edward I ever live here then?

0:12:110:12:13

Well, he didn't actually live here, but he did engineer for his wife,

0:12:130:12:18

Eleanor of Castile,

0:12:180:12:20

to give birth to what he hoped would be a boy...

0:12:200:12:23

-And therefore his son and heir.

-..within in the castle...

0:12:230:12:25

And therefore his son and heir.

0:12:250:12:27

..who could then be made Prince of Wales.

0:12:270:12:31

What you see here in front of you is obviously the finished article.

0:12:310:12:34

At that time, this would've been a building site.

0:12:340:12:36

So, poor old Eleanor is dragged here on horse and cart heavily pregnant.

0:12:360:12:40

Well, this is all how the story goes,

0:12:400:12:42

that she gave birth to what was a boy who they named Edward,

0:12:420:12:48

and he became the first English Prince of Wales,

0:12:480:12:53

the tradition of which comes right up into the present day.

0:12:530:12:55

The present day.

0:12:550:12:56

The English legal and administrative system

0:12:580:13:01

had already been enforced in Wales,

0:13:010:13:03

but Edward II's new title sent a potent message of domination

0:13:030:13:08

over the Welsh.

0:13:080:13:09

Once complete, this imposing symbol of strength remained safe

0:13:090:13:13

from Welsh rebellion for a century.

0:13:130:13:16

Were they ever attacked?

0:13:160:13:18

Yes, probably most famously about 100 years later

0:13:180:13:22

in 1404 by the infamous Owain Glyndwr,

0:13:220:13:26

who was striving to retake the Welsh prince's

0:13:260:13:30

back to the Welsh.

0:13:300:13:32

Owain Glyndwr led the Welsh revolt attempting to gain independence

0:13:330:13:38

from the English.

0:13:380:13:40

They seized forts throughout North Wales one by one,

0:13:400:13:44

then they reached Caernarfon.

0:13:440:13:46

Edward may have been long gone, but the attacking Welsh army

0:13:490:13:53

was thwarted by his clever architectural features.

0:13:530:13:56

If you just look up the top here,

0:13:560:13:58

you can see weathered remains of a stone head,

0:13:580:14:01

and they actually go all the way around.

0:14:010:14:05

And so if you were looking from down below...

0:14:050:14:07

-They look like heads with helmets on, don't they?

-That's right.

-Yeah.

0:14:070:14:10

Oh, my goodness. That's very clever.

0:14:100:14:12

So, the people attacking would've thought

0:14:120:14:14

there would've been troops up here, and in fact there were only 24.

0:14:140:14:17

24 people.

0:14:170:14:18

Despite being guarded by so few, the castle withstood Glyndwr's army.

0:14:180:14:23

This was a turning point in the rebellion, and by 1415,

0:14:230:14:28

England regained power over Wales.

0:14:280:14:31

In 1536, an agreement was signed formalising the union

0:14:310:14:35

between the two countries.

0:14:350:14:37

Had Caernarfon not withstood those attacks,

0:14:370:14:41

the history of Wales and England could be very different.

0:14:410:14:44

Thomas has made his way back up the coast

0:14:490:14:51

to the charming seaside town of Rhos-on-Sea.

0:14:510:14:54

Thomas's next stop is Shawna Peters Antiques,

0:15:000:15:04

run by...Shawna Peters!

0:15:040:15:06

Ha! No surprises there then.

0:15:060:15:08

-Hello.

-Hi.

-I'm Thomas.

0:15:090:15:12

-How do you do?

-How do you do?

0:15:120:15:14

Thomas has some serious catching up to do on this trip.

0:15:160:15:20

What am I going to buy which is going to make me loads of money?

0:15:200:15:23

That is the million-dollar question.

0:15:230:15:26

I do like my glass.

0:15:260:15:28

You've got some lovely Vaseline glass, haven't you?

0:15:280:15:31

It's fabulous.

0:15:310:15:32

This is Vaseline here, this glass, with this very yellow top to it.

0:15:320:15:39

If you put a Geiger counter against it, it would tick.

0:15:390:15:42

It's got a bit of uranium in it.

0:15:430:15:45

Vaseline glass glows bright green under UV light

0:15:450:15:50

courtesy of the uranium oxide it contains.

0:15:500:15:54

It is radioactive, but the amounts are so small it's harmless.

0:15:540:15:57

It's named Vaseline because of its colour and oily tinge.

0:15:570:16:01

I like going on my hands and knees. You never know what you might see.

0:16:030:16:07

Oh, yes. He's leaving no stone unturned in here.

0:16:080:16:11

That's pretty, isn't it?

0:16:150:16:16

Enamel flower set with some sort of paste-set jewels.

0:16:180:16:24

If you were a lady and you were out for an evening,

0:16:240:16:28

want to do more of your rouge, out this would come, wouldn't it?

0:16:280:16:31

-Yeah.

-Really pretty with that floral design.

0:16:310:16:34

-But it's just gilt metal.

-Faberge.

0:16:340:16:37

Well, I wish, with the sort of filigree around it.

0:16:370:16:40

It does look quite beautiful.

0:16:400:16:42

What's your very best on that one?

0:16:420:16:44

25.

0:16:450:16:46

Ooh. That's very good, isn't it?

0:16:460:16:49

-Could I offer to 20?

-SHE LAUGHS

0:16:490:16:51

-You just said that was good!

-HE LAUGHS

0:16:510:16:55

Truthfully, I've spent a little bit of money today

0:16:550:16:57

and then Christina's thrashing me and I need all the help I can get.

0:16:570:17:02

-Was that a nod?

-OK.

0:17:030:17:06

-OK?

-Yeah.

0:17:060:17:07

-Oh, you're a sweetheart.

-I know.

-Thank you very much.

0:17:070:17:10

Very generous, Shawna. Deal done at £20 for the Art Nouveau compact.

0:17:100:17:15

I'm pleased with what I bought today. Tomorrow is another day.

0:17:150:17:19

And on that note, night-night, antiquers.

0:17:200:17:24

Another day dawns in North Wales.

0:17:280:17:30

-Bore da, Thomas.

-Bore da, Christina.

0:17:330:17:36

-Oh, well done.

-Do you like the roll of the R?

0:17:360:17:39

Impressive.

0:17:390:17:41

So far, Thomas has gathered three items for auction -

0:17:410:17:44

an Art Nouveau umbrella stand, two reconstituted planters

0:17:440:17:48

and an Art Nouveau enamel compact - all for £78,

0:17:480:17:52

leaving him £58.94 to spend today.

0:17:520:17:57

Christina has just two items so far -

0:17:570:17:59

the versatile chair and a novelty cruet, costing £150.

0:17:590:18:04

She still has £128.91 left.

0:18:050:18:10

So, yesterday, my tactics were to not spend a huge amount of money,

0:18:100:18:15

but unfortunately, I sort of accidentally did.

0:18:150:18:18

-What did you spend?

-I spent over half what I had left.

-Oh, great.

0:18:180:18:21

-I've spent half my money as well.

-Oh, really?

0:18:210:18:23

-But then again, I had to.

-Oh.

0:18:230:18:24

You've got to be in it to win it, though, Thomas.

0:18:260:18:29

Oh, look how beautiful it is.

0:18:290:18:31

Well, it is beautiful. It's very green and...

0:18:310:18:35

Lush.

0:18:350:18:36

-Oh, grass!

-Grass!

0:18:360:18:38

See, this makes me feel at home.

0:18:380:18:40

Having grass growing down the middle of the road

0:18:400:18:42

is just heaven, isn't it?

0:18:420:18:43

-It's very rural, as one would say.

-Very rural.

0:18:430:18:46

The auction awaits in Colwyn Bay.

0:18:480:18:50

But the first stop today is for Thomas

0:18:530:18:55

at the small village of Llanystumdwy.

0:18:550:18:58

Here we are. Enjoy.

0:19:000:19:02

-Good luck.

-See you soon. Have fun.

0:19:020:19:04

-Bye!

-Bye!

0:19:040:19:06

Christina is charging further down the Llyn Peninsula

0:19:060:19:10

the market town of Pwllheli,

0:19:100:19:12

home to Christina's first shop of the day.

0:19:120:19:16

-Hello.

-Hello there. Hi. How are you?

-Rodney Adams, I assume.

0:19:160:19:18

-No, I'm John Adams. That's my father.

-Oh.

0:19:180:19:21

John and his father have three different units in the town.

0:19:210:19:25

Plenty of choice, Christina.

0:19:250:19:26

Oh, John, is this Caernarfon?

0:19:280:19:30

-Uh, yeah. Yeah.

-What have we got?

-The name's on the back.

0:19:300:19:33

They're all scenes from early parts of Wales. Minton.

0:19:330:19:38

Wow. Oh, my goodness. And how much have you got on those?

0:19:380:19:42

A couple of hundred quid.

0:19:420:19:43

Really nice...but out of my budget, sadly.

0:19:430:19:46

-Sorry.

-Never mind. Let's move on.

0:19:460:19:48

Hey, this looks more like my cup of tea.

0:19:480:19:50

Yes, the box of treasures.

0:19:500:19:53

Up until this point, John,

0:19:530:19:54

I haven't actually seen any love spoons.

0:19:540:19:57

-You've got lots of love spoons.

-That's a bit of a soft spot of mine.

0:19:570:20:00

-Oh, is it?

-Yeah.

-What's that?

0:20:000:20:02

I think they denoted how many children you wanted.

0:20:020:20:06

-Oh, really?

-Yeah, yeah.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:20:060:20:09

The traditional craft of making love spoons from wood

0:20:090:20:13

dates back to the 17th century.

0:20:130:20:16

They were hand-carved as a token of affection

0:20:160:20:19

and often given to girls by their admirers.

0:20:190:20:23

These are interesting.

0:20:230:20:25

Yes, they are. They've just come in.

0:20:250:20:27

They're a pair of little taper stick holders

0:20:270:20:29

on little onyx bases.

0:20:290:20:31

Those are quite fun.

0:20:310:20:32

"PHV and Co Made in England."

0:20:320:20:34

OK, so, probably about what, 1940s, 1950s?

0:20:340:20:38

Probably, yeah.

0:20:380:20:40

These candlesticks were designed to hold tapered candles.

0:20:400:20:44

Well, I like those. Can I go down in the cellar?

0:20:440:20:46

Yes.

0:20:460:20:47

Also leaving no stone unturned.

0:20:470:20:51

Oh, this is rather beautiful.

0:20:510:20:52

Locally-built ship in case, £40.

0:20:590:21:02

Yes, I'm actually selling it on behalf of somebody,

0:21:020:21:05

and that's what they want for it as a goodwill gesture.

0:21:050:21:07

All the rigging and so on is right, as it were.

0:21:070:21:12

OK. But it is quite bright, isn't it?

0:21:120:21:14

But it certainly looks like it's a galleon in full sail

0:21:140:21:17

-off the Welsh coast.

-Yeah.

0:21:170:21:20

-Let's take that one upstairs.

-OK.

0:21:200:21:23

She's even checking out John's other shop across the street.

0:21:230:21:26

That's nice.

0:21:260:21:28

-It is. It's a lovely thing, that.

-Hmm.

0:21:280:21:30

It's got quite a sort of naive feel about it, hasn't it?

0:21:300:21:33

It's a pipe rack. What's on that, John?

0:21:330:21:35

Uh...

0:21:350:21:37

it has to be 60 quid.

0:21:370:21:39

Oh, my goodness.

0:21:390:21:41

Is there a deal afoot?

0:21:410:21:43

-So, I like the taper sticks.

-Right.

0:21:430:21:46

-I like the ship.

-Right.

0:21:460:21:47

And I like this.

0:21:470:21:49

So, what can our sort of best prices be on these, John?

0:21:490:21:53

The taper sticks I can do for 30.

0:21:530:21:57

-I'm selling that on behalf of somebody.

-Right.

0:21:570:22:00

That thing, it has to be 40, which is sensibly priced.

0:22:000:22:04

OK. All right. And then the rack.

0:22:040:22:06

That can be 50.

0:22:060:22:08

So, can we negotiate on these, then?

0:22:080:22:10

They're nice,

0:22:100:22:12

but they're chipped...

0:22:120:22:15

..and they probably need re-plating.

0:22:160:22:18

What are you offering?

0:22:180:22:19

I would like to give you £50 for the ship and the tapers.

0:22:200:22:25

Put a fiver on top of that and then we'll have a deal on that.

0:22:250:22:28

-OK. 55.

-Deal it is.

0:22:280:22:31

-Deal it is. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-It's been a pleasure.

0:22:310:22:34

That's £55 for the silver-plated taper sticks

0:22:340:22:37

and the ship in the case.

0:22:370:22:39

In Llanystumdwy,

0:22:410:22:43

Thomas has come to the childhood home of a radical social reformer

0:22:430:22:47

who became one of the greatest statesman of the 20th century.

0:22:470:22:51

He not only laid the foundations for the welfare state we have today,

0:22:510:22:56

but is the man often credited

0:22:560:22:58

for winning the First World War for the Allies.

0:22:580:23:01

Thomas is here to meet curator Emrys Williams.

0:23:010:23:04

Good morning.

0:23:040:23:05

Prynhawn da. Croeso.

0:23:050:23:07

David Lloyd George, Britain's only ever Welsh prime minister,

0:23:090:23:13

moved to this cottage as a baby.

0:23:130:23:15

After the death of his father, it was his uncle, Richard Lloyd,

0:23:150:23:18

who helped raise and educate the young David.

0:23:180:23:21

He instilled a set of values in his nephew

0:23:210:23:24

that would stand throughout his life,

0:23:240:23:26

in part by turning his cobbler's workshop

0:23:260:23:29

into a hotbed for debate.

0:23:290:23:30

-It was like a debating society.

-Oh, right. Yes.

0:23:310:23:35

And soon, Lloyd George became politically aware.

0:23:350:23:42

Ah. So, it gave him an education,

0:23:420:23:44

a work ethic and a passion for politics.

0:23:440:23:47

-Yes.

-Debates.

-Yes.

-What's fair, what's right.

0:23:470:23:49

-Yes.

-Interesting.

0:23:490:23:52

After training as a solicitor,

0:23:520:23:54

Lloyd George steered his passion for fairness into politics,

0:23:540:23:58

first as a Liberal MP and then as a member of the cabinet.

0:23:580:24:01

It was here he tackled social justice

0:24:030:24:06

as he'd always wanted.

0:24:060:24:07

He created the welfare state we take for granted today.

0:24:070:24:12

It was a revolutionary feat.

0:24:120:24:14

So, he became chancellor of the Exchequer.

0:24:150:24:17

-What did he do with that?

-Yes.

0:24:170:24:19

Well, the first thing he did in 1908

0:24:190:24:22

was to introduce the Old-Age Pensions bill.

0:24:220:24:26

-So, there wasn't an Old-Age Pensions bill before that.

-No.

0:24:260:24:30

And then Lloyd George in 1909

0:24:300:24:33

formulated his great People's Budget,

0:24:330:24:37

the budget he declared was to wage war against poverty,

0:24:370:24:42

sickness and ill health.

0:24:420:24:43

Mm-hm.

0:24:430:24:44

He also went on to introduce national insurance,

0:24:440:24:48

designed as a safety net for anyone who became unemployed

0:24:480:24:52

or needed cash for medical treatment.

0:24:520:24:55

It predated the NHS,

0:24:550:24:57

which wouldn't come to fruition for another 37 years.

0:24:570:25:01

Such forward thinking. How did he become prime minister?

0:25:010:25:05

The Great War broke out in 1914.

0:25:050:25:08

In 1915, there was a shell shortage

0:25:080:25:13

and the king created a new post.

0:25:130:25:16

Lloyd George became the first minister of munitions.

0:25:160:25:20

The scandal threatened to defeat the Allies,

0:25:220:25:24

but by building munitions factories across the country

0:25:240:25:27

and utilising a previously untapped female workforce,

0:25:270:25:31

Lloyd George rearmed the British forces

0:25:310:25:34

and solved the crisis within months.

0:25:340:25:36

He was then the obvious choice to take over as prime minister

0:25:360:25:40

in a Liberal-Conservative coalition in 1916.

0:25:400:25:44

What did he do to move the war forward for us?

0:25:440:25:48

He galvanised everybody.

0:25:480:25:50

"We are going to win."

0:25:500:25:52

But the problem was that military strategy

0:25:520:25:57

was in the hands of the generals.

0:25:570:26:00

Lloyd George's dynamic leadership boosted morale.

0:26:030:26:07

With his newly formed war cabinet,

0:26:070:26:10

he coordinated the Allies under one command

0:26:100:26:13

and helped orchestrate American involvement.

0:26:130:26:15

This proved to be a major turning point in history.

0:26:150:26:18

-The Americans came into the war.

-1917.

-Yes. And the war was won.

0:26:210:26:27

And Lloyd George is now regarded by historians

0:26:280:26:32

and biographers as the man who won the war.

0:26:320:26:36

He remained prime minister until resigning in 1922,

0:26:380:26:42

but continued to be an active political figure.

0:26:420:26:45

Lloyd George returned to Wales in 1944 and died a year later.

0:26:450:26:50

He will be remembered as one of the greatest social reformers

0:26:520:26:55

of his time and a revolutionary leader.

0:26:550:26:58

Meanwhile, Christina has motored the Bedford van north to Llandwrog.

0:27:020:27:07

Christina's next shop is based in a former RAF base.

0:27:090:27:14

Hello!

0:27:140:27:15

-Hi.

-Nice to meet you. Are you Mr Kill?

0:27:150:27:18

No. Martin Lewis, I am.

0:27:180:27:20

-It's a great name, though, isn't it?

-It's wonderful, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:27:200:27:23

-You sound like a bit of a secret agent.

-Assassins, yeah.

0:27:230:27:26

-Yeah, very possibly. Are you an assassin, Martin?

-No.

0:27:260:27:29

-No, you don't look like an assassin.

-No, no, no.

0:27:290:27:31

Christina has just under £75 left, so get looking.

0:27:310:27:36

Oh, nice vintage telephone.

0:27:360:27:38

Unfortunately, it doesn't work.

0:27:380:27:40

Oh, that's a shame. So you've got it...

0:27:400:27:42

-It's been out on a few film sets.

-Has it?

-It has.

0:27:420:27:44

-So, a famous telephone.

-I think it is, yeah.

-That's lovely.

0:27:440:27:47

It's a 164 series, and 47 indicates the date, doesn't it? So 1947.

0:27:470:27:52

-Yeah.

-That's a good early one, that one.

-It is, isn't it? Yeah.

0:27:520:27:55

Hello.

0:27:550:27:56

-Have you got any bargains for me?

-I have.

-Oh, good.

0:27:560:28:00

Let's go looking for them.

0:28:000:28:02

Martin took over the business seven years ago.

0:28:020:28:05

This part of the shop was the former RAF officers' mess.

0:28:050:28:09

-Ooh, what's in here?

-That's our junk room.

0:28:090:28:11

Ooh! Magic words. Like music to my ears.

0:28:110:28:15

-This is most people's favourite place.

-So, what have we got?

0:28:150:28:18

We've got some old ladders. We've got...

0:28:180:28:19

-That's an old butler's tray stand, isn't it?

-It is.

0:28:190:28:22

Yep.

0:28:220:28:23

-That's quite fun. Have you got the top for that?

-No.

0:28:230:28:26

What's on that, Martin?

0:28:260:28:28

30.

0:28:280:28:29

-£30 for a butler's tray stand.

-Hmm.

-I like that.

0:28:290:28:32

OK. So, butler's tray stand there. £30.

0:28:320:28:36

Does Martin have something else to tempt Christina?

0:28:360:28:39

Have a look at that.

0:28:390:28:41

-What do you think?

-How did I walk straight past that?

0:28:410:28:44

-So, that is an old wheelbarrow.

-It's for carrying slate.

0:28:440:28:48

So, you would've quarried your slate and put it on that,

0:28:480:28:50

stacked it up so it didn't slide off the front.

0:28:500:28:52

-That's right.

-You've got that guard on there as well.

-Yeah.

0:28:520:28:55

That's quite fun, isn't it?

0:28:550:28:57

-IT SQUEAKS

-It comes with the squeak.

0:28:570:28:59

-Does it?

-Yeah.

-A free squeak?

0:28:590:29:01

-It comes with a free squeak.

-How could a girl refuse?

0:29:010:29:04

IT SQUEAKS

0:29:040:29:06

You could use it for maybe outside. Plants, that sort of thing.

0:29:060:29:10

It's almost decorative, isn't it?

0:29:100:29:12

-So, how much have you got on it?

-40.

0:29:120:29:15

IT SQUEAKS NOISILY Blimey, Christina.

0:29:150:29:18

-I do like it, but I don't like it for £40, I'm afraid.

-OK. Try me.

0:29:180:29:23

-I was sort of thinking £10 or £20, to be honest...

-Oh!

0:29:230:29:26

-I couldn't possibly take...

-..as a nice outside piece.

0:29:260:29:28

What would be your absolute death on it?

0:29:280:29:31

You can have it for 25.

0:29:310:29:32

-I'm happy to go with that.

-I'll throw the squeak in.

0:29:320:29:35

You're too kind.

0:29:350:29:36

£25 for the slate barrow with added squeak.

0:29:370:29:41

Ha! Thomas meanwhile is back on the hunt.

0:29:420:29:44

He's headed to the stunning harbour resort of Barmouth

0:29:440:29:48

on Snowdonia's west coast

0:29:480:29:50

and to his final shop -

0:29:500:29:52

Fron House Antiques, run by Jamie Howard.

0:29:520:29:56

-Hello.

-Hello.

-I'm Thomas.

-Jamie.

0:29:560:29:59

Jamie sources his eclectic mix of items both locally and overseas.

0:29:590:30:04

What's Thomas onto?

0:30:040:30:05

So, what we have is a bamboo shaft, a parasol - or umbrella -

0:30:050:30:11

and on the top is surmounted by the most exquisite

0:30:110:30:15

chubby chick in silver.

0:30:150:30:18

-And it's made by Briggs.

-It's a good London maker.

0:30:180:30:21

Good London makers of all this gear.

0:30:210:30:23

Yes, you have £185. I have nowhere near £185.

0:30:230:30:27

Less than £60, actually.

0:30:280:30:30

You've got some lovely things here.

0:30:300:30:32

Oh, that's naughty, Jamie, your little erotic cheroot holder.

0:30:320:30:38

It's a little Stanhope, which is a lens,

0:30:380:30:42

and the lens has a print on the back,

0:30:420:30:45

and that print then gets magnified as you look through the lens.

0:30:450:30:49

It's titchy, but you place it up to your eye

0:30:490:30:52

and you fill your eye with the scene.

0:30:520:30:55

This one has somebody on the beach in not many clothes.

0:30:550:31:01

And it's a cheroot holder. I think it's a cool thing.

0:31:010:31:03

A cheroot would be a sort of a rolled up cigarette

0:31:030:31:06

you'd put in here and smoke it.

0:31:060:31:08

Ticket price is £58.

0:31:090:31:10

-How about 20?

-Can I offer you 15?

0:31:130:31:16

-How about 18?

-Perfect.

0:31:160:31:18

Swift business. Anything else?

0:31:180:31:20

What a cool thing.

0:31:230:31:25

It's quite decorative, isn't it?

0:31:250:31:26

A garden windmill.

0:31:260:31:28

Look at that.

0:31:290:31:30

I just like the visuality of it.

0:31:300:31:32

Could be a sort of gardening theme with your pair of planters, perhaps.

0:31:320:31:37

"Please shut the gate."

0:31:370:31:39

That's a heavy bit of stone there, isn't it?

0:31:400:31:42

I wonder if I could buy the stone and the windmill.

0:31:420:31:45

HE LAUGHS

0:31:450:31:47

Sort of garden lots, aren't they?

0:31:470:31:49

Time to bring back Jamie, eh?

0:31:490:31:50

You've got a few things down here I quite like.

0:31:500:31:52

-First of all, I like the windmill.

-It's quirky.

0:31:520:31:54

Could be Dutch. It's fun.

0:31:540:31:56

-It's not that old.

-No, it's not.

0:31:560:31:58

And just talk me through the stone.

0:31:580:32:00

-It's fun.

-I've got 40 quid left.

0:32:000:32:03

-40 quid left.

-And I want to spend 40 quid with you.

-OK.

0:32:030:32:06

So, 18 on the cheroot holder and 40 on these two?

0:32:060:32:11

-Yeah. Cos this will be a lot.

-We could have a deal at that.

0:32:110:32:15

-Could we?

-All right?

-Thank you very much.

0:32:150:32:17

OK.

0:32:170:32:18

And with that, shopping is complete.

0:32:180:32:20

Let's take a gander at our experts' treasures.

0:32:200:32:23

Along with the stone, windmill and cheroot holder,

0:32:240:32:29

Thomas bought an enamel compact,

0:32:290:32:32

the garden planters and an Art Deco umbrella stand

0:32:320:32:35

all for £136.

0:32:350:32:39

Christina spent £230 on the chair...

0:32:390:32:43

a gavel cruet set,

0:32:430:32:45

a pair of taper sticks,

0:32:450:32:47

a ship in a box and a borrow with a squeak.

0:32:470:32:51

So, what do they think of each other's lots?

0:32:510:32:54

She's bought one dangerous item,

0:32:540:32:56

the big barber's-cum-tattooist's chair.

0:32:560:32:58

Three figures on it. A lot of money.

0:32:580:33:00

What I absolutely love is her cruets as gavels.

0:33:000:33:04

We're both auctioneers, we both love those.

0:33:040:33:06

I think Thomas has done exceptionally well.

0:33:060:33:08

I think the compact that he bought was particularly lovely.

0:33:080:33:11

He's been very clever. He's been very tactical.

0:33:110:33:14

If my chair bombs, which I slightly have a sad feeling that it might,

0:33:140:33:19

I think he might hold the stronger hand

0:33:190:33:21

in this little round here.

0:33:210:33:22

Hopefully that tattooist's chair - or the barber's chair -

0:33:220:33:25

dives at the auction and I retake the throne and make a profit.

0:33:250:33:30

After kicking off from Ruthin,

0:33:300:33:33

Christina and Thomas are now headed

0:33:330:33:35

towards their third auction

0:33:350:33:36

in Colwyn Bay.

0:33:360:33:37

Look at this view, Thomas.

0:33:390:33:40

I have to admit, I am going to be disappointed to leave Wales.

0:33:400:33:43

-That is stunning. Are you?

-Yes.

-What?

0:33:430:33:46

Cos it is beautiful.

0:33:460:33:47

That's it. It's gone.

0:33:470:33:49

We're now going to be shopping and selling in England, so boo-hoo.

0:33:490:33:52

Chin up, Thomas.

0:33:530:33:55

Whoo! I smell burning! I think I might change up.

0:33:550:33:58

Exciting. Go, Thomas!

0:33:580:34:01

-No, that ain't going to work.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:34:010:34:04

Oxygen!

0:34:040:34:05

Oh!

0:34:060:34:07

If the van makes it to auction, how do you think you'll fare, guys?

0:34:070:34:12

I've gone out there, I've spent every penny.

0:34:120:34:15

I've worked hard.

0:34:150:34:16

I've battled, I've fought. People should really feel for me.

0:34:160:34:20

-Think I'm going to rather bomb.

-No! Don't be ridiculous.

-Oh!

0:34:200:34:23

You got some lovely things.

0:34:230:34:24

What are you most anxious about?

0:34:240:34:26

I am most anxious about my chair.

0:34:260:34:28

-I think you'll be all right.

-Hmm.

0:34:280:34:30

Lying in the middle of the north Welsh coast,

0:34:320:34:35

Colwyn Bay has three miles of golden beaches.

0:34:350:34:38

-I am going to swing it around.

-Wow!

-Woohoo! Look at this!

0:34:400:34:42

Hey, that was a turning circle. I like it.

0:34:420:34:44

You know, I'm a bit impressed by this, but I do like this van.

0:34:440:34:48

-Oh, my goodness.

-I love it. I love it.

-Good parking, Thomas.

0:34:480:34:51

See? You know, Gifted now. Natural. In you go.

0:34:510:34:55

-Ladies first.

-Why, thank you.

0:34:550:34:56

Today's rostrum will be manned by John Rogers Jones

0:34:570:35:01

at this family-run auction room.

0:35:010:35:02

The Stanhope got plenty of attention from our porters, as you'd imagine.

0:35:040:35:09

The barber's chair, we have those occasionally and they seem to do OK.

0:35:090:35:13

The plinth on its own might fetch a bit of interest.

0:35:130:35:17

I don't know about the windmill.

0:35:170:35:19

Bit of a strange one, so I wouldn't envisage a great interest in that.

0:35:190:35:24

Let's see what the customers of Colwyn Bay think.

0:35:240:35:27

First up, it's Thomas's pair of planters.

0:35:280:35:31

40 for the pair on stands.

0:35:310:35:34

Start me at a tenner then.

0:35:340:35:36

Tenner. That's weird to start.

0:35:360:35:37

£5 only. Eight over there.

0:35:370:35:40

Ten is here. 12 there. 15.

0:35:400:35:42

-Well done. Well done. This is better.

-18.

0:35:420:35:44

18. 18 and the hand is up.

0:35:440:35:48

Still time to make that back, Thomas.

0:35:500:35:52

That's a good loss.

0:35:520:35:53

-That's half.

-That's a good loss.

-That's a good loss.

0:35:530:35:56

That's half the money gone.

0:35:560:35:58

Can Christina's slate barrow do any better?

0:35:590:36:02

Give me £50.

0:36:020:36:03

There's no justice if there's a bid at 50.

0:36:030:36:05

20 anywhere. Come on.

0:36:050:36:08

Look good in the front garden.

0:36:090:36:11

-A tenner.

-Yes, it would. Exactly.

0:36:110:36:12

Tenner I have. A tenner.

0:36:120:36:14

12. 15. 18.

0:36:140:36:16

-Oh, they're all over it now.

-20. 22.

0:36:160:36:19

25. 28.

0:36:190:36:21

30. 32.

0:36:210:36:23

35. New bidder.

0:36:230:36:24

Look at this. I don't believe it.

0:36:240:36:26

35 in the middle. 38 over there.

0:36:260:36:28

40. 42. 45, seated. 48, standing. 48. 50.

0:36:280:36:33

-Well done.

-50 on the left. I'm going to sell at 50 now.

0:36:330:36:36

That's really good.

0:36:360:36:38

-Oh, bravo. Magnificently done.

-Yeah, well done.

0:36:380:36:40

Well done, sir. Well done.

0:36:400:36:42

Christina's doubled her money.

0:36:420:36:44

Now it's back over to Thomas with his plinth and windmill.

0:36:460:36:50

Give me £40. 40.

0:36:500:36:52

Try me at 20 then.

0:36:540:36:56

-So heavy. It was so heavy.

-Eight, ten, 12.

0:36:560:36:59

See, now they're all over it.

0:36:590:37:01

15. 18. 20. 22. 25.

0:37:010:37:05

28. 28. 28.

0:37:050:37:07

All done?

0:37:070:37:09

Thanks for coming. Thanks for coming.

0:37:090:37:11

28.

0:37:110:37:12

Oh, Thomas.

0:37:130:37:15

-You're having a bad day.

-A bad day.

0:37:150:37:17

-It's OK. We're only two lots in.

-Two lots in.

-We'll be OK.

0:37:170:37:20

Already sort of lost a load of money.

0:37:200:37:22

It's Christina's ship in the box up now.

0:37:240:37:26

Give me £50. £50.

0:37:260:37:29

Try me at 30. Five. Where's eight now?

0:37:310:37:34

-Fiver. £5.

-I have eight.

0:37:340:37:36

Ten behind. 12. 15.

0:37:360:37:38

Rightly so. It's worth more than that.

0:37:380:37:40

15 behind you. Where's 18?

0:37:400:37:42

18. 20.

0:37:420:37:43

-Oh, here we go.

-22.

-22.

-25.

-25. Moving on.

0:37:430:37:47

It's still a loss.

0:37:470:37:48

28.

0:37:480:37:50

Are we all done at 28?

0:37:500:37:52

Fair warning at 28.

0:37:530:37:55

A good buy for someone.

0:37:580:38:00

I'm disappointed for your loss.

0:38:000:38:02

Thanks, but...?

0:38:020:38:03

Disappointed, but I'm pleased it didn't make more

0:38:030:38:07

than my plinth and windmill.

0:38:070:38:08

Well, at least he's honest.

0:38:080:38:10

Maybe it'll be third time lucky for Thomas

0:38:100:38:13

with his Art Deco umbrella stand.

0:38:130:38:15

15. Where's 18 now? 18.

0:38:150:38:17

-He's got a commission price.

-Where's two now? £20.

0:38:170:38:20

22. 25. 28. 30.

0:38:200:38:24

-32.

-Thomas! I told you.

-35. 38.

0:38:240:38:27

-32.

-Yeah.

0:38:270:38:28

40, new bidder. £40. £40.

0:38:280:38:30

42. 45. 48.

0:38:300:38:35

48, I have. Final call at 48.

0:38:350:38:38

Finally, a profit for Thomas.

0:38:400:38:42

-Brilliant.

-It's OK.

-£20 profit!

-It's marginal.

0:38:420:38:45

Take the winds why you can, eh?

0:38:450:38:47

Next it's Christina's gavel cruet set.

0:38:470:38:50

Ten to start. Ten I have. 12, lady. 15. 15. 18. 20. 22.

0:38:500:38:56

22, the gent.

0:38:560:38:58

All done at 22?

0:38:580:38:59

-This is making me a bit...

-Oh, oh!

-Final call.

0:38:590:39:01

A small loss to help close the gap.

0:39:040:39:06

-Mine just isn't going well any more.

-No.

0:39:070:39:10

-Start me at £20.

-Stop it.

-Yes!

0:39:100:39:12

-SHE LAUGHS

-Yes! Yes!

0:39:120:39:14

Next it's Thomas's enamel box.

0:39:150:39:17

Bit of interest in this. It starts with me at 25.

0:39:180:39:21

-Already profit.

-Straightaway.

-I know.

-Thomas, that's wonderful.

0:39:210:39:24

-It's good, yeah.

-32 with you. 35 with me.

0:39:240:39:27

-40 sees me out. £40. Anyone?

-Might...

0:39:270:39:30

-Very savvy buyers.

-Go on.

-£40. Where's two now?

0:39:300:39:32

42. 42. 45. 48.

0:39:320:39:36

-48. Where's 50 now?

-Go on. Make 50. Make me a happy man.

0:39:360:39:39

The hammer's up at 48.

0:39:390:39:42

Final call.

0:39:420:39:43

-Yes!

-Well done.

-Yes!

-£28 profit.

0:39:440:39:47

-Yeah, all right, all right.

-That is fantastic.

0:39:470:39:49

An amazing profit for Thomas, doubling his money.

0:39:490:39:51

Now let's see if Christina's taper sticks can do the same.

0:39:530:39:56

I've got a bit of interest. Starting me at £20.

0:39:560:39:59

20. Is there two anywhere? 22. 25.

0:39:590:40:02

-Good. Look.

-28.

0:40:020:40:04

-30 with me.

-Double money.

-Double money.

-Mm.

0:40:040:40:07

£30. I am going to sell at £30.

0:40:070:40:11

Have you finished?

0:40:110:40:12

Anybody else?

0:40:120:40:14

The hammer's up.

0:40:140:40:17

-Doubled your money. Well done.

-Brilliant.

0:40:170:40:19

Well done indeed.

0:40:190:40:20

Now it's Thomas's final item, the Stanhope cheroot holder.

0:40:200:40:24

50.

0:40:240:40:25

-Go on.

-It's fabulous.

-It's very rare.

0:40:250:40:27

Give me a tenner then. Ten.

0:40:270:40:30

12. 15.

0:40:300:40:33

18. 20. 22. 25.

0:40:330:40:37

-Instant profit.

-It is. It is profit.

0:40:370:40:39

25, lady. 28, new bidder.

0:40:390:40:41

30, seated. 32.

0:40:420:40:44

-Brilliant, Thomas.

-It's very good.

0:40:440:40:47

Final call at 32.

0:40:470:40:48

I'm now three profits in a row.

0:40:510:40:54

It could be just what Thomas needs.

0:40:540:40:56

But it all comes down to Christina's last item,

0:40:560:40:59

her biggest spend and riskiest buy -

0:40:590:41:02

the dentist or barber's or tattooist's chair.

0:41:020:41:06

Give me 100.

0:41:060:41:07

20 as a start.

0:41:100:41:12

-25 I have.

-20.

-25. 25.

0:41:120:41:14

30. 35. 40. 45. 50. 55. 60.

0:41:140:41:20

It's moving on. It's going to get to 100.

0:41:200:41:22

65. 70. 75. 80, new bidder.

0:41:220:41:24

New bidder. New bidder.

0:41:240:41:26

-90, new bidder.

-90, new bidder. New legs.

0:41:260:41:29

95, seated. 100 over there.

0:41:290:41:31

105.

0:41:310:41:33

You see 105? You can stop now. It's fine.

0:41:330:41:36

120 in front of me.

0:41:360:41:38

130 over there.

0:41:380:41:39

130. Are we all done at 130?

0:41:390:41:43

-We're going to sell.

-That's brilliant, Christina.

-140.

0:41:430:41:46

-140, standing.

-All done at 140?

0:41:460:41:48

She's back in the game with another profit.

0:41:500:41:53

I bought that thinking, "It's not going to make me a huge profit..."

0:41:530:41:55

-Got most of your money back.

-"..but it's funky!"

0:41:550:41:58

But has Christina done enough?

0:41:580:41:59

-Come on. Let's go.

-Yeah.

0:41:590:42:01

Christina set off this leg with £278.91.

0:42:030:42:07

After paying auction costs, she's down £8.60,

0:42:070:42:12

so she's still hanging onto her overall lead with £270.31.

0:42:120:42:18

Thomas began with £136.94

0:42:180:42:22

and after auction costs, he made £6.68,

0:42:220:42:26

leaving him £143.62 in his kitty.

0:42:260:42:31

Thomas has his first win of the week. Hurrah!

0:42:310:42:35

It wasn't a bloodbath.

0:42:350:42:37

What? Christina, you're still streets ahead.

0:42:370:42:40

Right. Have you got the keys?

0:42:400:42:42

-Are the keys in it?

-The keys are in it.

0:42:420:42:43

-Where are the keys?

-I left the keys in there.

0:42:430:42:45

-You left the keys in the van?

-Yeah. It's still there.

-Thomas!

0:42:450:42:48

-This is Colwyn Bay. It's honest!

-They are still here!

0:42:480:42:51

-Of course they are!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:42:510:42:53

Come on. Lead on!

0:42:530:42:54

Go!

0:42:540:42:56

There we go.

0:42:560:42:57

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:000:43:02

Thomas finds himself in a promising situation...

0:43:020:43:05

-So, this could be my lucky day.

-Once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

0:43:050:43:08

..while Christina takes things a bit more leisurely.

0:43:080:43:11

I really ought to start doing some more shopping, haven't I?

0:43:110:43:15

Christina Trevanion and Thomas Plant continue their adventure in north Wales. Starting in Ruthin, Denbighshire, they head for an auction in Colwyn Bay, Conwy. Christina visits Caernarfon Castle and Thomas finds out about Britain's only ever Welsh prime minister, David Lloyd George.