Episode 26 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 26

Antiques experts David Barby and David Harper hit the road and travel all the way from Moy to Omagh in Northern Ireland.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 and one big challenge.

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I'm going to declare war.

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-Why?

-Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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Very good.

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-The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

-Oh!

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But it's not as easy as you might think

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-and things don't always go to plan.

-Push!

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So will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

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-Do you think I'd believe that?

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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In a week that promises slightly dubious weather

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but wonderful scenery and fabulous people,

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the Antiques Road Trip comes to you from Northern Ireland.

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Lough Neagh, the biggest freshwater lake in the British Isles.

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-Did you know that, David?

-I did.

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Sorry, I'd forgotten that you know everything.

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It's here our antique ambassadors, David Barby and David Harper,

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are about to charm a nation and hopefully make a profit.

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Look at this. It's one of the most romantic places in the British Isles

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and here am I with David Barby.

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I mean, my life doesn't really get any better, does it?

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-I hope your inclinations are honourable.

-Not at all.

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Freelance auctioneer and valuer David Barby is affectionately known as Dolly,

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not out of any resemblance, though, to the toy.

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What are they for? I don't know.

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He has a passion for antiques that began at the tender age of 12.

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I've just asked what the bottom price is.

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Not to be outdone, David Harper started collecting when he was just five years old,

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or so he says.

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I am a treasure hunter.

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Today, he's living the dream as an antiques dealer, writer

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and thoroughly good egg.

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She's gorgeous and I wouldn't mind taking her home.

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The two Davids are starting this contest with £200 each

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and naturally, they're both hoping to have the luck of the Irish.

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Are you going to try and beat me on this, Mr Barby,

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or are you going to play the gentleman and just let me win?

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I shall play the gentleman, always.

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Do you think I'd believe that?

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This week we're travelling from Northern Ireland,

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heading south towards the county of Meath,

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then across to the north coast of Wales

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and once again heading south,

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ending our trip in Llanelli.

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Today, we're en route to the village of Moy

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and our journey concludes with auction number one in Omagh.

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As for our experts' mode of transport,

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what could be more glamorous than a Triumph TR3?

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If I was to close my eyes a little bit,

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I'd think I was with some beautiful blonde.

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-Indeed?

-Not for long but...

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Known to the locals as The Moy,

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back in the 1700s, this village was just a handful of cottages and a pub,

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most of which are still standing

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and have been transformed into an antiques business

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that's been in the same family for three generations.

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What's more, it has room after room of gorgeous collectables,

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so what better place for our boys to make a start?

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-David...

-Come on!

-David, best of luck.

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Oh, sorry. Sorry. Best of luck. Of course.

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Of course I mean that. BARBY GRUNTS

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-Do you want me to help you out?

-Yes, thank you.

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Anything to delay you.

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Now, while David Harper gets Dermot to give him the grand tour

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of what used to be the entire village of Moy...

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Look at this. This is my idea of heaven.

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..Lawrence, his father, is looking after our Mr Barby in the main shop.

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Can you tell me the price of the Crown Devon?

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-£220.

-Oh! Goodness me.

-For the two.

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That takes up almost all my money.

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In other words, time for a much cheaper plan B -

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this Georgian window panel.

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This is the one here.

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It's an individual over-door, yes. That's a genuine Georgian one, yes.

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So this would have been... Oops.

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-That would have been across the top.

-Of course, yeah, yeah.

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-Yes.

-So we've got quite a lot of damage here.

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Yes, it needs some of the wood replaced, yeah.

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You've got layers of paint, there.

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So this is probably what? Regency, George IV?

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Yeah, around George IV, yeah.

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-So what's your price on it?

-£35.

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-£35. Is that your very, very best?

-That's it, finito, on that one.

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Is it? I rather like that.

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For now, it's a strong maybe

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because today, David Barby is a man with a game plan.

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I'm looking for something that is unique,

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unusual, quirky.

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There's some decent stuff here. Lovely, lovely, lovely.

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I'm happy if I just sort of play the middle ground.

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I don't really mean that.

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I'd love to win but it depends how the day goes by.

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As for David H, his tactic is to spend lots.

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-So this is an oil burner?

-An oil burner, yeah.

-Oil burner.

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A good thing, in copper, bit of brass.

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-Nicely patinated.

-That's right.

-Good thick glass.

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-Imagine that illuminated. That, in a garden, would look the business.

-Yeah.

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-Early 20th century.

-1910, something like that.

-It would be.

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It has to be, yeah.

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-What sort of money...?

-The trade price on that is 35 quid.

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Can it be 30 quid?

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-30 quid. Go on. Good luck with it.

-Good man. Nice to do a deal quickly.

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Man after my own heart. Fantastic.

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I love doing deals, Dermot. Show me some more. Let's continue.

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Well, the boys are going great guns today

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and across the courtyard, David B has already found something else,

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though he has just one question.

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-What are they?

-They're Scottish but I'm not sure what they were used for.

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-They're both the same?

-Mm-hm.

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-Yeah, two pieces.

-How much are they?

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We'd do the two of them for £60.

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-They're quite unusual.

-They are but I don't know what they're for.

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And even more surprising, nor do I.

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It's a chance that somebody will know at the auction

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-but I think they're Churchill.

-Rubbish.

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Probably dating from the early part of the 20th century,

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so I think they're interesting enough.

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-What's the best you can do on these, Lawrence?

-On these, it's £60.

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-Oh, come on.

-For the two of them.

-This one's got damage.

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-For the two, £50.

-I think you can afford to knock some more off

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-because you don't know what they are.

-That's where the hidden value is.

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Maybe these will make a lot more money.

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-Would you do 40 for the two, please?

-OK, 40 for the two. OK.

-OK.

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Can I pay for those later?

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There might be something else here. I'm getting excited.

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Someone else who's excited is David Harper,

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who might just have found his next purchase.

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So we have here a set of six, certainly 19th century, prints

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but mounted in a really unusual way.

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I love the shape of them and they could work -

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you've got to use your imagination - in a modern room

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with a little bit of regilding on the frame,

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that would look really jazzy.

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But proper things. 19th century. Probably 1860, 1880.

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There's potential but they've got to be cheap.

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Bear in mind there's six of them.

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Oh, no, this is a very bad start to this conversation, Dermot.

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The best I'll do for you is 50 quid.

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50 quid.

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Dermot, give us them for 40.

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-45.

-Good man. Fantastic.

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I love doing business with you. I love it.

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Right, OK, another one in the bag. Show me some more.

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My goodness, at this rate, the boys will be done in time for elevenses.

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Actually, I could murder a biccy.

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I've just spotted this, which I think is an interesting composition.

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It's 19th century.

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What I like about it is the feature of the woman

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and then this figure going at an angle across, which is unusual,

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as though somebody else is straining to look out from behind the curtain.

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I rather like that. Oh, and of course, she has a naked breast,

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so it may well have been put in an attic

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rather than upset anybody's sensitive nerves,

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because it has got an exposed breast.

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Cleaned up, I think that would be quite good

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but there's damage across here.

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I would hope it would be round about £50.

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Lawrence, I just spotted this as I came through the door.

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I know it's got damage on it.

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-What's the best price you can do?

-£40.

-£40.

-Mm.

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-That's allowing for its condition and whatever restoration has to be done to it.

-OK.

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-Lawrence.

-David.

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-Thank you very much indeed.

-OK.

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Right. Oh, I'm quite pleased.

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Perhaps there's something in the air.

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# I've heard people say... #

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Because at this very second, David H...

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# Too much of anything is not good for you, baby... #

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..is also now thinking...

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She's a bit of all right, isn't she?

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..about naked women.

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She's gorgeous. Not only is she lovely to look at because she's a lovely shape

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-but she's very contemporary and you could put her...

-That's right.

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-..in a traditional house and jazz it up.

-That's right.

-Couldn't you?

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-Or a very modern place.

-Very modern, yeah.

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This rather saucy painting, that has David so excited,

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is an amateur copy of Daniel O'Neill's work,

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an Irish artist now deceased,

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though while the original did sell for 50,000 euros,

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I think this canvas is worth a bit less.

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Erm, what sort of money is she, then? I wouldn't mind taking her home.

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-Say something like...

-30 quid? 20 quid?

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-50 quid, 50 quid.

-Really?

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-45.

-You couldn't put it on my bill at 20 quid?

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-Say 30?

-25 quid.

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-Let me take her home for 25 quid.

-OK.

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Good man, good man.

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Gosh, we're never going to stop. Come on, Dermot.

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Let's go.

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As for David B, he's done and dusted,

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so that's one Georgian overlight, a pair of pottery figures,

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possibly Churchill, possibly not, and one very tasteful nude.

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-So what's the total?

-115.

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-I'll give you 110.

-Oh, dear.

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-110.

-OK, 110, OK, OK.

-Thank you very much.

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Jammy old devil.

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-I hope you do well.

-So do I.

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So do I. Otherwise I'll be back.

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Though for now, David's headed south.

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His next stop is Milford,

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a small mill town that used to belong to the McCrum family,

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who famously produced some of the world's best Irish linen.

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Today, their family home, although protected, lies derelict,

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but their story is still being told, thanks to the Milford House Museum,

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housed in what used to be one of the workers' cottages.

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-Welcome to Milford House Museum.

-Thank you.

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And it was founded by Stephen McManus,

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whose family, back in the 19th century,

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used to be weavers employed by the McCrums.

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Where is your interest in this? Where did it all begin?

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Well, it all began when I was 15

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and I set up a charity called the Milford Buildings Preservation Trust

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to protect and preserve Milford House for the benefit of the nation

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and from that, the collection developed.

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The family gave us back the remaining possessions that they had

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and it was from them that the collection started.

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The head of the family was Robert McCrum,

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a man bordering on genius,

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who, of course, pioneered a new type of linen - double damask.

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When we say that Milford linen is superior to any other linen in Ireland or, indeed, in the world,

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we're not joking.

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-Why do you say that?

-If you look at this napkin here,

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you can see that the design is printed on both sides of the fabric,

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so it looks exactly the same on each side.

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Because he invented it and he patented it,

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he had the monopoly on the industry in Ireland

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until he died in 1915.

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Robert McCrum's design revolutionised the linen industry

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and soon he had two factories and 1,000 employees,

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who helped make him a very rich man.

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But he wasn't the only member of the family to change the world.

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For a start, his daughter Harriet was a founding member of the Irish suffragette movement.

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This is a copy of a portrait of Harriet McCrum.

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We can't say she was a great beauty - she wasn't.

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She was close friends with Millicent Fawcett,

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-who was a founding member of the suffragette movement in England.

-Right.

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Both ladies preferred to do the hard work and let someone else take the credit.

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And this magnifying glass here was a wedding present

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from Millicent Fawcett to Harriet McCrum

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and you can see it's inscribed,

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"H McCrum with M Fawcett's love and care."

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That's a lovely little present.

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Meanwhile, Harriet's brother William was the black sheep of the family,

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preferring to gamble in Monte Carlo rather than run a linen factory.

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But he too has a claim to fame,

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for in 1890, in the park just outside this museum,

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he invented the penalty kick rule.

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In the 19th century, there were no rules in football.

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Games could last an average four days - four days at a time.

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-An average of seven men died playing football a year.

-Really?

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But when he invented it, the penalty kick was laughed at.

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But he was a goal keeper and my theory behind it is

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that he was very into acting and amateur dramatics.

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Goal keepers don't do much in the game

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-and so for a few seconds, he's the most important person in the game.

-Right.

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-And if he wins the game, then he's even more important.

-Oh, right.

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Today, he's even more famous than his father was.

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-REFEREE'S WHISTLE BLOWS

-And naturally, if one visits this world-famous site,

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how can you resist reliving a piece of footballing history?

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Barby takes the run-up...

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He kicks... This is...

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GLASS SMASHING

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..a criminal offence. Time to go, I think.

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As for David Harper, he's gone well and truly off the beaten track,

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to a place appropriately called Countryside Antiques.

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Well... Oh, I can't believe it.

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Full of fantastic stuff.

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Absolutely and this unlikely shop is owned by Stanley,

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who used to be a farmer but after a spot of heart trouble

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decided to become an antiques dealer instead.

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And then we got bigger and bigger as we went along.

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-This is what happens.

-This is what happens.

-It's a disease.

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It's worse than the heart disease.

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It causes heart disease, this business.

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Come on, then, show me. What have we got? Let's have a look.

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Or more to the point, what hasn't Stanley got,

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from Japanese Noritake to Mouseman furniture.

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-That's not £100, is it?

-Well, it would be a deposit.

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I'm afraid David Harper can't get any of it

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at the rock-bottom prices he's so fond of.

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They're quite interesting, aren't they?

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I think they're Irish. I'm not 100% sure.

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-Let's see. You could be right. Romany.

-They could be Romany.

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If you trace the Romanies back, you actually get to India.

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If you keep going east, that's where they started,

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so they've always got that Indian sort of influence.

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So it could be Romany.

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So you carry two of them. What are you going to carry two of them for?

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-Beer.

-Beer. One of them each.

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-You and I could have a great party.

-It would be.

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-Fill them up.

-Fill them up.

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-What, I mean... There's a pair of them.

-There's a pair of them.

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-What kind of...? What sort of...?

-100.

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-100. Take 50 quid and be...

-I can't. I'd be happy to get 60 for them.

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I'm getting no money out of them.

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-Stanley, I'm going to give you £60.

-Thank you very much.

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Thank you very much. They're fantastically whacky. I love them.

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Love them. I've almost blown all my money.

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Well, in that case, it's hats off to Stanley

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and time for our esteemed experts to call it a day.

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Did you spend all your money? You were going to do that, weren't you?

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I do want to spend all my money. I want to blow every single penny.

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As they sun hides behind several enormous grey clouds,

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the two Davids are none the less excited about the day ahead.

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All I can say is it's lovely countryside.

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I think the only way to see Ireland is by open-top car.

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This is the way to do it.

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So far, David Barby has spent £110 on three auction lots

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and still has £90 up his finely tailored sleeve.

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David Harper, on the other hand, has gone a bit mad,

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parting with £160 for four auction lots.

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Mind you, he says he's determined to spend every penny.

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Cheeky!

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Is this your policy? You're going to blow it on each occasion?

0:17:130:17:16

I might. I'm going to try it this time on our first leg out

0:17:160:17:19

and if it all goes disastrously wrong, I may change tactic.

0:17:190:17:22

The boys' first stop today is Armagh,

0:17:220:17:25

known to many as the city of saints and scholars.

0:17:250:17:28

And that's a story which begins in the mid 400s

0:17:290:17:33

when Christianity first spread to Ireland

0:17:330:17:36

and St Patrick established his principal church right here,

0:17:360:17:40

thus making this the island's ecclesiastical capital,

0:17:400:17:44

although it's since been destroyed and rebuilt 17 times.

0:17:440:17:48

As for our story,

0:17:480:17:49

that begins a few streets away at the Shambles Market,

0:17:490:17:53

where David Barby is about to have his world rocked.

0:17:530:17:57

Hold on. Now, this is the first time ever

0:17:570:18:00

you've stepped onto the holy ground of a car boot. Am I right?

0:18:000:18:04

-I've been to one of these country house car boots.

-Yes.

0:18:040:18:08

-So I expect this is something similar.

-Very similar.

0:18:080:18:11

You might find some Rembrandts

0:18:110:18:13

-and some really good early George I oak furniture.

-Just what I want.

0:18:130:18:17

OK, good luck to you. You go in that direction and I'll go in that direction.

0:18:170:18:21

Whilst David's new to the cut and thrust of the car boot sale,

0:18:210:18:25

he's loving it,

0:18:250:18:27

approaching every nuance as if he's narrating a nature documentary.

0:18:270:18:30

Well, this is the most extraordinary place I've been to.

0:18:320:18:35

It's all at a car boot sale. It's amazing what's being sold.

0:18:350:18:39

And the people are so interesting as well.

0:18:390:18:42

They're all out there to get a bargain.

0:18:420:18:44

I hope I can find one.

0:18:440:18:46

Even more surprising, this eclectic market place

0:18:460:18:49

is also having a strange effect on David Harper.

0:18:490:18:53

Five pounds. It should be 25 quid, that. It's madness.

0:18:530:18:56

It's so cheap it's probably illegal.

0:18:560:18:59

What?! Oh, right. He almost had me, there.

0:18:590:19:03

And true to form, he's now going on

0:19:030:19:06

to squeeze the pocket money out of an 18-year-old stallholder.

0:19:060:19:09

Two cracking bits of Murano.

0:19:100:19:13

Now, what would your price, to me, be for these?

0:19:130:19:17

-20.

-20 on that and how much for that?

-20.

-20.

0:19:170:19:21

So here we are, here's the great example of Murano,

0:19:210:19:24

made on the island of Murano just off the coast of Italy.

0:19:240:19:28

It's interesting because in Murano, they've been making glass for hundreds of years,

0:19:280:19:32

even a couple of thousand years,

0:19:320:19:34

and many, many moons ago,

0:19:340:19:37

to avoid any glassblowers, glass artisans ever leaving the island,

0:19:370:19:42

the threat was that, "If we train you on this island,

0:19:420:19:45

"you become a master glassblower,

0:19:450:19:47

"you leave this island and take those skills elsewhere,

0:19:470:19:50

"if we catch you, we'll kill you."

0:19:500:19:52

It's a great story and they're still making there today.

0:19:520:19:55

What about doing a bulk-buy deal here?

0:19:550:19:58

-I'll go for 35.

-35?

-35.

0:19:580:20:00

25?

0:20:010:20:02

Huh! He's shameless.

0:20:020:20:04

-I'll go to 32.

-Do 30 and we've done a deal.

0:20:040:20:08

-All right.

-Good man, good man.

0:20:080:20:10

OK, fantastic.

0:20:100:20:12

David Barby, meanwhile, is going down the ceramic route.

0:20:120:20:16

After all, this slipper pan is the perfect opportunity

0:20:160:20:19

for some lavatorial humour.

0:20:190:20:21

This piece here is a Grimwade, a Grimwade piece.

0:20:210:20:27

I like Grimwade pottery and I've just asked what the bottom price is.

0:20:270:20:31

-CYMBAL CRASHES

-Huh! That's one.

0:20:310:20:33

-50p.

-50p?

-Pee being the operative word.

0:20:330:20:37

-CYMBAL CRASHES

-That's two.

0:20:370:20:39

Hasn't been used for ages.

0:20:390:20:41

-CYMBAL CRASHES

-That's three

0:20:410:20:43

and that's probably enough.

0:20:430:20:44

-For 50 pence. I've got to buy it for 50 pence, haven't I?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

0:20:440:20:48

I've bought something! Oh! I've bought something.

0:20:480:20:51

-Thank you very much.

-You're very welcome.

-Not at all.

0:20:520:20:54

-I'll give you a pound.

-And there's your change.

-Thank you.

0:20:540:20:58

-And there's an Irish luck penny.

-An Irish luck penny.

0:20:580:21:01

It's traditional when you buy something, you get a bargain,

0:21:010:21:05

you get a luck penny back.

0:21:050:21:06

What have I done?

0:21:070:21:09

With only £10 left in his pocket, David Harper is calling it a day

0:21:090:21:13

and is headed to the Armagh public library, founded in 1771

0:21:130:21:18

by the Archbishop Robinson,

0:21:180:21:20

who thought of it as the healing place of the soul

0:21:200:21:23

and filled its shelves with his collection of rare 17th and 18th century books.

0:21:230:21:28

-Welcome. It's a delight to have you here.

-Thank you.

0:21:280:21:31

-I'm David.

-I'm Carol.

-Carol. Thank you very much.

0:21:310:21:34

You should feel very much at home here

0:21:340:21:37

because Archbishop Richard Robinson, who had this lovely library built,

0:21:370:21:41

-was from Yorkshire.

-A fellow Yorkshireman.

-Yes.

0:21:410:21:45

A wonderful collector. A wealthy man in his own right.

0:21:450:21:48

And he set to and he bought and acquired books, manuscripts,

0:21:480:21:53

prints, gems, coins.

0:21:530:21:56

-It was a very subtle way of saying, "I have money..."

-Yes!

0:21:560:21:59

"..and I want to show you that."

0:21:590:22:00

Robinson's ultimate aim was to have a university in Armagh,

0:22:000:22:04

so he started by building a library and each of the books he introduced

0:22:040:22:08

was stamped with his own personal book plate.

0:22:080:22:11

But whilst he died in 1794, his collection continues to grow,

0:22:110:22:17

containing everything from theology to literary classics.

0:22:170:22:22

This is a first edition of Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels.

0:22:220:22:26

It's known as Gulliver's Travels. The title is Travels Into Several Remote Nations Of The World.

0:22:260:22:31

-That's the original title?

-That's the original title.

0:22:310:22:34

I didn't know that.

0:22:340:22:36

And then it's by, you see, this surgeon, Lemuel Gulliver,

0:22:360:22:41

-and we shorten it to Gulliver's Travels...

-Of course.

0:22:410:22:44

The first edition, 1726,

0:22:440:22:46

and this is the actual edition in which Swift chose to make changes

0:22:460:22:52

in the margins, ready for a further print run.

0:22:520:22:56

-There actually have been...

-This particular one?

-Yes.

0:22:560:22:58

That's what's so special for us.

0:22:580:23:00

-There are areas here where we can actually show...

-Oh!

0:23:000:23:04

..in some cases, a little change, in others, more...

0:23:040:23:07

-Does that mention Lilliput, there?

-Yes.

-And he's made a change?

0:23:070:23:11

The fact that Lilliput has been underlined is fascinating.

0:23:110:23:15

If I may show you another one where he was just putting in...

0:23:150:23:19

Binding is what's printed and it should have been bending.

0:23:200:23:25

-Ah!

-So he was frustrated to find

0:23:250:23:27

that there were several printing errors like that.

0:23:270:23:30

Swift was so frustrated, in fact, he even fired the publisher.

0:23:300:23:35

Wow. Carol, we're having a real feast here, aren't we?

0:23:350:23:38

I'm glad you're saying that. That's great to hear.

0:23:380:23:41

We thought you might like to see this as well.

0:23:410:23:44

It's a 1614 copy of Sir Walter Raleigh's The History Of The World.

0:23:440:23:50

-No!

-Raleigh wrote this while imprisoned in the Tower in London.

0:23:500:23:54

He had fallen out of favour with Queen Elizabeth.

0:23:540:23:58

She was very angry to learn that he had married one of her ladies in waiting in secret.

0:23:580:24:02

-Not the done thing.

-No, indeed.

0:24:020:24:04

He was imprisoned for quite a number of years

0:24:040:24:07

and it was during that time that he wrote The History Of The World.

0:24:070:24:10

Now, whilst David Harper's in no particular rush,

0:24:100:24:14

David Barby still has more shopping to do.

0:24:140:24:16

His next stop is Cookstown, which was founded around 1620

0:24:160:24:21

when ecclesiastical lawyer Dr Alan Cook leased the land

0:24:210:24:26

from the then Archbishop of Armagh.

0:24:260:24:29

It's also the location of the Saddle Room Antiques

0:24:290:24:32

and the man in that snazzy tie is Christopher.

0:24:320:24:35

-I'm looking for bargains, so I hope you've got some.

-I hope so!

0:24:350:24:39

Well, if anyone can sniff one out, it's Barby.

0:24:400:24:43

-An old jelly mould.

-A late Victorian white-glazed jelly mould.

0:24:450:24:50

-The ones that are collectable are the salt-glazed ones.

-Yes.

0:24:500:24:53

But what I like is this still can be used.

0:24:530:24:56

That's £18.

0:24:560:24:58

What's the best on that one?

0:24:580:25:00

-Eight.

-Can you do it for five?

-OK.

0:25:030:25:06

I would like that for £5.

0:25:060:25:08

That would go nicely with another ceramic object I've bought.

0:25:080:25:11

OK, yes.

0:25:110:25:13

Mm. Jelly and nobody's business. What an intriguing combination.

0:25:140:25:19

Though he's not done yet.

0:25:190:25:21

His next acquisition might just be this stick stand, circa 1900.

0:25:210:25:26

On the stick stand, I see you've got £78.

0:25:260:25:29

I would do that for 35.

0:25:290:25:32

35. Your very best at 35?

0:25:340:25:37

Erm...

0:25:370:25:39

Could you do it for round about 20?

0:25:390:25:41

-OK.

-£20? That man could charm the skin off a snake.

0:25:420:25:48

What I like about it is it's still got its original drip tray.

0:25:480:25:52

The maker's mark is a callipers at the bottom.

0:25:520:25:55

It's an interesting piece of social history.

0:25:550:25:57

The sort of house this would have come from would be a comfortable residence

0:25:570:26:01

where there would have been servants.

0:26:010:26:03

This would have been in the hall

0:26:030:26:05

because only people of a certain wealth could afford walking canes, umbrellas or parasols.

0:26:050:26:10

You'd date this probably round about the beginning of the 20th century.

0:26:100:26:14

Which is David's way of saying he'll take it.

0:26:140:26:17

For £10, it's very good. Thank you very much.

0:26:170:26:20

-What did you say?

-20. It's 20.

-Nice try.

-That's great.

0:26:220:26:26

With the shopping done,

0:26:260:26:28

it's time for David and David to reveal to each other

0:26:280:26:32

what they've bought.

0:26:320:26:33

-Can I start first?

-Of course.

-Would you mind?

0:26:350:26:38

Right, I think you're going to like this.

0:26:380:26:40

-Clap your eyes on that.

-That is very good.

0:26:400:26:43

I think it's amazing that they can reproduce things like this.

0:26:430:26:47

Oh, stop it. Stop it! You know 100% that is not a reproduction.

0:26:470:26:53

It's a trawler's lamp, for goodness' sake.

0:26:530:26:56

Erm, I look inside and I can't see any age to it.

0:26:560:27:01

It's this sort of thing here, where's there isn't any workmanship.

0:27:010:27:05

-Look, it comes out.

-It's a pin. You've just pulled my pin out.

0:27:050:27:09

-Final verdict?

-I think it's reproduction.

0:27:090:27:12

Now, David, what do you think of these?

0:27:150:27:17

-What do you think they're for?

-Do you know what they're for?

-No.

0:27:170:27:21

I was hoping you were going to tell me.

0:27:210:27:23

But I tell you why I bought them.

0:27:230:27:25

First of all they're the Britannia Pottery Company, Glasgow.

0:27:250:27:29

-That's good.

-Glasgow.

-Yeah.

0:27:290:27:31

These figures are caricatures of Churchill

0:27:310:27:34

and people do collect anything to do with Churchill.

0:27:340:27:37

OK, get rid of them. I don't like them.

0:27:370:27:39

Hmm! Someone's a little jealous.

0:27:390:27:42

Right, David Barby, we've got a set of six 19th-century prints.

0:27:420:27:49

Very, very dirty, obviously.

0:27:490:27:52

What are your thoughts on those?

0:27:520:27:54

-I think they're great social history.

-Yeah.

0:27:540:27:56

-I do like them. I like anything to do with the countryside.

-Yes.

0:27:560:28:00

-Good to have six.

-And hunting - hunting is very popular.

0:28:000:28:04

Right, get your second item, then.

0:28:040:28:07

What on earth have you been...?

0:28:090:28:11

I don't actually think that I want to touch it.

0:28:130:28:16

Oh, it's perfectly clean.

0:28:160:28:18

-It smells completely fresh.

-Nice.

0:28:190:28:21

-Just explain to me...

-What?

-..exactly what it is.

0:28:210:28:25

-This is a douche pan.

-What does that mean?

0:28:250:28:28

This means that either male or female would sit on it here,

0:28:280:28:32

so that the hand could go in there to then wash the...

0:28:320:28:36

I haven't tried it.

0:28:370:28:39

Thank the Good Lord.

0:28:390:28:40

It's a talking piece.

0:28:400:28:42

It's good to have visitors to come along to ask you what it is

0:28:420:28:45

-and then for you, so eloquently, to explain.

-Or possibly demonstrate.

0:28:450:28:49

And if you think that's odd, he's teaming it up with a jelly mould.

0:28:510:28:55

The only reason I bought this is because it's white, to go with this.

0:28:550:28:58

-So that's a fiver's worth?

-Yeah. You hit the nail on the head.

-Excellent.

0:28:580:29:02

Let me get something else.

0:29:020:29:04

-What do you think about these? They're one lot.

-Yes.

0:29:040:29:08

Good shape. Nice heart shape.

0:29:080:29:10

Czechoslovakian.

0:29:110:29:13

Erm... Probably made, oh, about five years ago.

0:29:130:29:17

Based on, let's say, Murano glass.

0:29:170:29:20

Well, that's how I described them, as Murano.

0:29:200:29:23

-That's not Murano.

-OK. Would you say that's Murano?

0:29:230:29:26

I think it comes from the same source.

0:29:260:29:29

I tell you why I don't think it's Murano

0:29:290:29:31

because with this fleck, if it was Murano,

0:29:310:29:33

-you'd have a gold element in it.

-Ah.

0:29:330:29:36

And it has not got that and that always distinguishes it, in my book,

0:29:360:29:41

-from, let's say, a host of other glass being produced.

-OK.

0:29:410:29:46

Well, listen, let's just agree that they're Murano-esque, whatever.

0:29:460:29:51

No. They're either Murano or they're not, David,

0:29:510:29:55

and I'm thinking the latter.

0:29:550:29:57

-OK. Don't say anything.

-You'll have to stand up.

0:29:570:30:00

Well, it's a stick stand.

0:30:000:30:02

Circa 1900.

0:30:030:30:05

Might be described as Victorian but it's more 1900, 1910.

0:30:070:30:10

They used to sell well. Nice drip pan.

0:30:100:30:12

Erm, that is worth £20.

0:30:120:30:14

-That's how much I paid for it.

-Well done. It's not bad, is it?

0:30:150:30:19

I think these are probably Tibetan. They're possibly used for milk.

0:30:230:30:29

Now, the lovely chap I bought them off was convinced

0:30:290:30:32

that they're Irish and made for the travelling community.

0:30:320:30:37

-They're superb quality.

-Yes. They're very well made.

0:30:370:30:40

-They're flamboyant.

-Yes. I rather like those.

0:30:400:30:42

-One overlight.

-OK.

-I think it's George III.

-It could be Georgian.

0:30:430:30:48

So it would have gone above the door of an important house.

0:30:480:30:51

-Borrowed light.

-Yeah.

-Bring the light in.

0:30:510:30:53

Erm, now, these things, architectural antiques, of course,

0:30:530:30:56

were very good news, weren't they, when there was a property boom?

0:30:560:31:00

-Yeah. But people are still doing renovations.

-Yes, yes.

0:31:000:31:04

If there was a property boom, you'd get 200 quid for that.

0:31:040:31:07

Needs lots of work but a good thing.

0:31:070:31:09

And now for the adult portion of our antiques.

0:31:090:31:12

OK, Mr Barby, tell me what's going through your mind?

0:31:120:31:16

-David?

-Yes?

-Get on with it.

0:31:170:31:19

Well, it is quite an extraordinary image.

0:31:210:31:24

-Do you like it?

-No. No, I don't like it.

0:31:240:31:27

-I can't believe it.

-I find this leg awkward.

0:31:280:31:31

It's not a natural pose.

0:31:310:31:34

I think the breasts are OK.

0:31:340:31:37

Oh, yeah, they're OK, I've got to say. They're all right.

0:31:370:31:41

But it's modern art and I find it difficult to appreciate modern art.

0:31:410:31:44

OK, all right, OK.

0:31:440:31:45

She's a beauty. She's a beauty. Get some taste.

0:31:450:31:49

HE MOUTHS

0:31:490:31:51

Right, David, what do you think of this?

0:31:510:31:54

Mm. I like her.

0:31:540:31:56

I do.

0:31:570:31:59

-I think it's after a Victorian artist called Alma-Tadema.

-Yes.

0:31:590:32:03

-He painted sort of Pompeian beauties.

-1860, 1880, 1890.

0:32:030:32:08

But what I like about this

0:32:080:32:10

is that the artist has put a Victorian face

0:32:100:32:12

and this little bit of eroticism was allowed because of the classical subject.

0:32:120:32:17

-You could get away with it.

-Yeah.

-Absolutely.

0:32:170:32:19

I think that, restored, would be several hundreds.

0:32:190:32:22

-I paid 40.

-40. It's for nothing. It's absolutely for nothing.

0:32:220:32:27

That, I'm afraid, is the killer buy.

0:32:270:32:30

Now, as if I can't guess, what do our experts really think?

0:32:300:32:34

Very surprised, in fact horrified,

0:32:340:32:36

that Mr Barby didn't like my painting of a nude lady.

0:32:360:32:41

I mean, come on, who can say, hand on heart, they don't fancy her?

0:32:410:32:45

She's fantastic.

0:32:450:32:46

I think the worst object of all was the painting of the female nude

0:32:460:32:51

after O'Neill.

0:32:510:32:53

I thought it was absolutely dreadful.

0:32:530:32:55

Dreadful.

0:32:550:32:57

After starting off in Moy,

0:32:570:32:59

David Harper and David Barby end the first leg of their road trip

0:32:590:33:03

in county town of Omagh.

0:33:030:33:05

One of the oldest towns in Ireland,

0:33:050:33:08

Omagh traces its origins back to the year 792,

0:33:080:33:12

when all that existed was a single abbey.

0:33:120:33:15

Since then, there's been rebellion, war, and, oh, yes, it's also been burned to the ground

0:33:150:33:20

in the name of William III.

0:33:200:33:22

But right now, it's biggest problem is traffic,

0:33:220:33:24

courtesy of guess who?

0:33:240:33:27

We're going to have to put our foot down. I know you don't like it.

0:33:270:33:31

-Don't you put your foot down!

-Hold onto your horses, baby!

0:33:310:33:34

-Let's go.

-That's fast enough. Oh, my God!

0:33:340:33:38

Assuming Barby can cope with speeds in excess of 30mph,

0:33:390:33:43

our next stop is Viewback Auctions.

0:33:430:33:47

Though before auctioneer Geoffrey Simpson gets things underway,

0:33:480:33:51

how does he rate the chances of our two Davids?

0:33:510:33:54

I wouldn't book any holidays on the strength of what they're selling

0:33:540:33:58

but none the less, I think they'll possibly show a little profit.

0:33:580:34:02

The most interesting article for me

0:34:020:34:05

is the architectural window,

0:34:050:34:07

which is typically Irish Georgian.

0:34:070:34:11

It's a pity that's there's only one

0:34:110:34:13

but it does show that the guys have an eye for something good.

0:34:130:34:16

I'm not so happy with the fox-hunting prints.

0:34:160:34:20

They seem to be a little bit too scruffy.

0:34:200:34:23

They have potential, perhaps, if they were cleaned up a bit and reframed.

0:34:230:34:26

The most exciting lot for me are the pair of Churchillian Britannia Pottery vases

0:34:260:34:32

or jugs or whatever they are called.

0:34:320:34:35

I think they should do well. They should make a good few pounds.

0:34:350:34:39

Our experts began this journey with £200 each

0:34:390:34:43

and over the last two highly competitive days,

0:34:430:34:45

David Harper has splashed out a total of £190 on five auction lots.

0:34:450:34:51

As for David Barby, he's kept a little more in reserve,

0:34:510:34:55

spending £135.50, also for five auction lots.

0:34:550:35:00

Mark you, he does have a secret weapon,

0:35:000:35:02

thanks to his new-found love of car boot sales.

0:35:020:35:05

-Can I hold the lucky penny?

-No.

0:35:050:35:08

-Can I look at it?

-No.

0:35:080:35:10

-Not even look at it with my eyes?

-No.

0:35:110:35:13

Well, if you're quite ready, let the auction begin.

0:35:140:35:17

First up, it's David Harper's brass tankards,

0:35:180:35:21

-finely decorated, with a touch of Gypsy.

-Go on, pump them up.

0:35:210:35:25

-At 40. At 40. At £40 at the back.

-Come on.

0:35:250:35:27

At 40. At 45 here at the front. At 45.

0:35:270:35:30

-50 at the back, then. At 50, at 50, at 50.

-Come on.

0:35:300:35:32

At £50. Any advance on 50? And I sell.

0:35:320:35:35

Oh, dear. We've stalled already.

0:35:350:35:38

-No, no, no, no, no.

-At £50. At £50. At £50.

0:35:380:35:41

-£50 and it's once, £50 and it's twice.

-Don't sell them.

0:35:410:35:43

-All finished at £50. Mr X.

-Mr X has just nicked them off me.

0:35:430:35:49

Needless to say, Mr X has paid a lot less than our Mr Harper

0:35:490:35:53

and that's a £10 loss before commission.

0:35:530:35:55

-I can't believe it.

-I think he knows what they are.

0:35:550:35:58

Next, it's the David Barby ceramic collection.

0:35:580:36:01

Not available in shops.

0:36:030:36:05

It's still a bizarre combination, if you ask me,

0:36:050:36:08

a jelly mould and a douche pan.

0:36:080:36:10

Who's going to give me £50 on the slipper pan and jelly mould?

0:36:100:36:14

40? 30? 20?

0:36:140:36:16

-Start me at 10.

-No, don't.

0:36:160:36:18

-Yes.

-Fiver? Fiver bid over here.

-A fiver?

0:36:180:36:21

At 10, at 15, 15. 20 down here.

0:36:210:36:24

-At 20, at 20.

-Someone's got taste.

-Any advance on 20?

0:36:240:36:27

-The lady's bid at 20.

-I can't believe it. Give me that penny.

0:36:270:36:30

-At 20 and it's twice.

-One more go.

-All done at £20. Lady's bid at 20.

0:36:300:36:35

Well played, Barby, well played.

0:36:350:36:37

Maybe there's something to that Irish luck penny after all.

0:36:370:36:40

Give me that penny. Let me just hold it for a while.

0:36:400:36:43

Actually, David, you may need it.

0:36:430:36:46

There's more than a few doubts over your so-called Murano.

0:36:460:36:49

We've got a heart-shaped Murano glass dish.

0:36:490:36:52

-He's mentioned Murano again. That's strange.

-It is.

0:36:520:36:55

-Who'll give me £30?

-Czechoslovakian.

-At 30, at 30, at 30, at 30, at 30.

0:36:550:37:00

-At 35.

-Yes.

-At 40. At £40. At £40.

-A bit of profit. Come on.

0:37:000:37:04

Give me the penny, give me the penny.

0:37:040:37:07

Sir, you realise these may be a little more modern than you think?

0:37:070:37:11

-Are you happy enough? At 40.

-That's good, that's good.

0:37:110:37:14

-At £40 it is, once.

-Come on.

-At £40 it is, twice.

0:37:140:37:17

All finished and done at £40.

0:37:170:37:20

Not bad, considering there's no way on earth they were Murano.

0:37:210:37:26

-Will you not let me hold the penny on my next...?

-No.

0:37:260:37:30

That's right, Barby, you hold onto it.

0:37:300:37:33

After all, your George III overlight is next.

0:37:330:37:36

This piece of glass is unique to this part of the world.

0:37:360:37:40

-That is true, that is true.

-You never mentioned that.

-It's true.

0:37:400:37:43

Who'll start me at £100?

0:37:430:37:46

-Start me at 50. 40?

-£1.

0:37:460:37:49

Ladies and gentlemen, 30. 20? £20 bid.

0:37:490:37:52

-At 20, at 20, at 20, at 20. At 30, at 30, at 40.

-Oh!

0:37:520:37:55

It's a pity there wasn't a pair.

0:37:550:37:57

We'd be flying into £400, £500.

0:37:570:37:59

He's very good.

0:37:590:38:00

-At £40 once, twice... All finished.

-I'm very disappointed.

0:38:000:38:04

-Sold to a gentleman who knows.

-You just can't stop making a profit.

0:38:040:38:08

Yes, and that's another £10 in the kitty.

0:38:080:38:12

But now, perhaps it's David Harper's turn to feel the lurve.

0:38:120:38:17

It's his thoroughly modern amateur copy of an Irish nude.

0:38:170:38:21

HE GASPS She's so beautiful.

0:38:210:38:23

Yeah, all right, calm down.

0:38:230:38:25

At £20. At 20, at 20, at 20, at 20. At 30.

0:38:250:38:29

-Yes. Come on.

-At 30, at 40, at 40, at 40, at £40.

0:38:290:38:32

-At £40. Any advance on 40?

-Come on.

-At 40, at 40, at £40.

0:38:320:38:35

-At £40 it is once, at £40 twice...

-Come on.

0:38:350:38:39

-All finished.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:38:390:38:40

-Well, she made a bit of profit.

-Yes, indeed

0:38:400:38:44

but perhaps the people of Omagh like their nudes a little more subtle.

0:38:440:38:49

So let's see if Barby can tempt them with a cheeky flash of breast.

0:38:490:38:53

-Start me at £100. £100. Anywhere?

-That is such a bargain.

0:38:530:38:57

£50, then, to start the bidding. 60, there, the gentleman.

0:38:570:39:00

At 70. At 70 to the lady. At 70, at 70 to the lady who knows.

0:39:000:39:03

-Oh, come on.

-At 70, at 70. Will I say 80?

0:39:030:39:06

It's that lady's at 90. Are you going to come again, sir?

0:39:060:39:09

At 90. It's the lady's bid. At £90 and I sell.

0:39:090:39:13

-Oh, Christopher Columbus.

-At £90 once, £90 twice.

0:39:130:39:17

-Get it sold.

-Sold for £90. BA.

0:39:180:39:21

Get it done. Well done. Well done.

0:39:210:39:23

-Well and truly thrashed.

-I didn't have my penny in my hand.

0:39:230:39:26

Oh, dear! I feel so awful for you.

0:39:260:39:30

Yeah, poor old David. That's only £50 before commission.

0:39:300:39:34

Staying in the art world for just a little longer,

0:39:350:39:38

let's see if David Harper can lift his sagging profit margins

0:39:380:39:41

with these hunting prints.

0:39:410:39:43

Come on, now, babies. Six of them.

0:39:430:39:46

At £20. At 20, at 20, at 20, at 20, at 20, at 30.

0:39:460:39:50

At £30. Any advance on 30?

0:39:500:39:51

-At £30, at £30, at £30, at 30, at 30, at 30...

-Come on.

-..at 30.

0:39:510:39:55

At £30, at £30 it is.

0:39:550:39:57

So, just to summarise, we're at 30.

0:39:570:40:01

At 30, at £30, at 30, at 30, at 40.

0:40:010:40:03

-40. Come on. I paid 45. Come on.

-At 40, at 40.

0:40:030:40:06

-£40 once, £40 twice.

-No...

-All finished?

0:40:060:40:08

-At 40. Mr E.

-Oh! £5 loss.

0:40:080:40:12

And don't forget the commission.

0:40:120:40:15

David Barby's pottery figures now,

0:40:150:40:17

which, I'm afraid, are still proving to be something of a mystery.

0:40:170:40:21

I'm getting rather anxious about these.

0:40:210:40:24

I don't know what they're for, David.

0:40:240:40:26

I just bought them because they were Churchill.

0:40:260:40:29

We've had quite a lot of interest in these articles on the internet,

0:40:290:40:33

so who's going to give me £200?

0:40:330:40:35

-What?

-Start me at £100. £100 bid.

0:40:350:40:37

At £100. 120, 140.

0:40:370:40:40

140. 160. 160, 180.

0:40:400:40:44

-Come on, come on.

-At £180. At £200.

0:40:440:40:47

Oh, my! Whatever they are, I love them.

0:40:470:40:50

-At £220.

-No.

-At £240.

0:40:500:40:53

-I see a smile.

-Not from me.

-At £240. That's once.

0:40:530:40:58

At £240. Are you all finished and done? At £240.

0:40:580:41:01

-GAVEL BANGS

-And that's why they call David Barby "The Master". Bravo!

0:41:010:41:08

I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to applaud there. Well done.

0:41:080:41:11

Well, there you go.

0:41:110:41:12

Clearly, Barby's in the lead

0:41:120:41:14

but David Harper's hoping his ship's lantern

0:41:140:41:17

will finally get the bidders excited.

0:41:170:41:19

-Come on, boys.

-At £30 bid, at £30, at 40, at 40, at 40, at 40.

0:41:190:41:24

-At £40.

-I need so much more.

-I can't go up to 50 if I can't get no bids.

0:41:240:41:27

-Nobody wants the thing.

-He's trying hard.

-He's very good.

0:41:270:41:31

At 50, at 50. At 60! A-ha!

0:41:310:41:33

New blood! At 60, at 60, at 70.

0:41:330:41:35

-At £70 behind you, sir. At £70, at £70.

-You're doing well.

0:41:350:41:40

-At £70 it is once.

-Your day is here.

-At £70 it is twice.

0:41:400:41:44

-All finished at £70. Mr E.

-I'm delighted with that.

0:41:440:41:48

And so you should be, old boy. That's £40 profit before commission.

0:41:480:41:52

Mind you, it's a drop in the ocean compared to you know who

0:41:520:41:57

and it's time for his final lot, the 19th-century stick stand.

0:41:570:42:01

-Get your penny out.

-I have.

0:42:010:42:02

At 30. £30 bid. At 30, at 30, at 30. At 40, at 40, at £40.

0:42:020:42:07

-Who's going to give me 50?

-Nobody.

-At 40, at 40, at 40.

0:42:070:42:11

-At £40. I can't get more.

-Sell it, sell it.

0:42:110:42:14

-At £40 twice.

-Sell it, sell it.

0:42:140:42:16

-All finished, all done? At £40. And the code is Mr E.

-Gone. £40.

0:42:160:42:21

-Well!

-Well done, Barby.

0:42:220:42:24

Drinks on you, I think, although for some reason, the man's frowning.

0:42:240:42:28

-What are you moaning about?

-I only made £20 on that.

0:42:280:42:31

-I thought you paid 40 for it.

-20.

0:42:310:42:34

Just to get you worked up.

0:42:340:42:35

David Harper started this leg with £200

0:42:380:42:41

and after commission, made a rather modest profit of £6.80,

0:42:410:42:45

which means he ends the first leg with £206.80.

0:42:450:42:51

David Barby also started with £200

0:42:510:42:53

but after making an exceptional £217.10 at auction,

0:42:530:42:58

he now has £417.10 in the coffers and is very much in first place.

0:42:580:43:05

But, hey, we've only just begun.

0:43:050:43:07

I was well and truly, utterly, hammered, thrashed, killed,

0:43:070:43:11

drowned, whatever you want to call it.

0:43:110:43:13

Come on, Harper, pull yourself together.

0:43:130:43:16

There's still four days to go.

0:43:160:43:18

Right, hold on. You are going for a spin.

0:43:180:43:20

-Do be careful.

-HE LAUGHS MANICALLY

0:43:210:43:24

Aargh!!

0:43:240:43:25

Join us tomorrow in the sunny Republic of Ireland...

0:43:250:43:30

where David Harper gets a grip of the currency.

0:43:300:43:34

-I've only got 200 and something euros.

-OK, right.

0:43:340:43:37

She's not very impressed with me.

0:43:370:43:39

And David Barby gets a shock.

0:43:390:43:42

HE GASPS

0:43:420:43:43

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:44:050:44:07

E-mail [email protected]

0:44:070:44:08