Episode 28 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 28

David Barby and David Harper have crossed the Irish Sea to Wales. The competition heats up as they travel from Prestatyn to Criccieth.


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-The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge.

-I declare war!

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques?

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-Very good!

-The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit,

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-but it's not as easy as you think and things don't always go to plan.

-Push!

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Will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Making friends and money everywhere they go, David Harper and David Barby are on a journey to see

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-who knows the business of antiques the best.

-We've got plenty of money to spend.

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-I do want to spend.

-Spend big.

-I'm cautious, David!

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I've been there and lost it before.

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So far this week, David Barby, also known as Dolly,

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-can't seem to put a foot wrong.

-I have to applaud there. Well done.

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Two auctions in, he's transformed his initial stake of £200

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into a fabulous £707.95.

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David Harper, meanwhile, is obsessed with both winning this contest

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and buying anything to do with the female form.

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She's gorgeous. I wouldn't mind taking her home.

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Despite his passion, he's still in second place with £592.82.

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You're slightly ahead by about 100 quid.

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£100 is a lot of money.

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Today the boys are trying a new tactic, basing their important decisions on their star signs.

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-Right. Mars is pushing me to take a decision I am loath to take.

-Good! Make it expensive!

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-Be fearless it said!

-In other words, David Barby, "Spend your money!"

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-I told you Harper is obsessed.

-Which one are you?

-Cancer.

-The crab.

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No, kind, caring, loving. And honest. Right, here we go.

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"Life is going to get a little faster, but keeping up is key."

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In other words, spend money on fantastic items, make some profit and beat Barby.

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My wallet is burning a hole in my pocket. Let's spend, come on.

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This week we're travelling through Ireland, north and south,

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then across to Wales, ending our road trip in Llanelli.

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Today we kick off in Prestatyn, gateway to the coast of north Wales.

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And our journey concludes with auction number three in the town of Criccieth.

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Popular with holidaymakers over the last two centuries,

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sunny Prestatyn became famous for its beach, clean seas and promenade entertainers.

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In fact, visiting for a cheeky bathe was considered a must for good health by city-dwelling Victorians

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though its latest visitors are much more concerned with retail therapy.

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-Oooh!

-Right, will you drop me off and I'm going to go shopping?

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-You mean I'm going to drive this car?

-I'm going to get out and you're going to drive this car.

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-It sounds simple enough.

-Thank you.

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-Ohh...

-Come on.

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-Where are you going? Over there?

-There.

-Best of luck, David.

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-Spend the lot!

-I will!

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But there's a reason why we don't let Barby drive.

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This could take a while. He's good, isn't he?

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So let's move on to David Harper's first shop,

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aptly named Presents With A Difference. How much for that?

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hi. My gosh, this is a bit of an Aladdin's cave.

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A mixture of all sorts. A bit of nostalgia, a bit of mod.

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That's quite bonny.

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This is quite interesting. The first item I'm drawn to is an attractive woman.

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I've got a problem with attractive women. I can't help myself.

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-Is there a cure?

-Oh, please. Somebody stop him.

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-If there is a pill for it, I don't want it.

-How about an injection, then?

-She's lovely.

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Almost looks like an ancient cameo behind some sort of glass. It's got a 3-D feel.

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Birmingham, 1937.

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So just at the tail end of Art Deco.

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Geoff...talk to me. About that.

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-Could that be horrifically cheap?

-Not horrifically, but I could do you 27.

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Really? 20 quid?

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-OK, I'll squeeze to 20. That's dead tight.

-Good man. OK.

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Thank you very much. My first purchase of this leg.

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Having managed to finally start the Triumph, David Barby is slowly making his way south,

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which brings us to Rhuddlan, a rather peaceful town with a very turbulent past,

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but that's because continual battles between the Britons and the Saxons

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made plundering, pillaging and razing to the ground rather common.

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It's also here at Rhuddlan Castle where constitutional power over Wales was given to the English

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in 1284.

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And speaking of Englishmen, one more has just arrived at Downsby Antiques

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and is trying to strike a deal with young Philip.

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I love a bit of Macintyre pottery.

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It's beautiful, but it's damaged.

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That...

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is a firing crack underneath.

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Cos when I take the lid off...

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it's not through to the base.

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If it's been repaired and they've used a silicon-type glaze on it,

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it's not a fired glaze. It's an artificial one, false one.

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-You can actually feel it on your teeth or with your tongue.

-Yeuch!

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-Let's go with the gnashers.

-Watch your teeth.

-Don't worry, they're false.

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No, they're not!

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Now what Macintyre pottery is most famous for is launching the career of William Moorcroft,

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who, as Head of the Art Pottery Department in the 1890s,

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was responsible for some of the company's finest designs,

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-such as this tasty example of Florian Ware?

-What's the best you can do?

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30. And that's a deal.

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20.

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-You've docked me right down. 30.

-20. 20. It's been here a long, long time.

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-You want rid of this.

-No, I don't.

-Can we split the difference at 25?

-Go on, then.

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It's my first buy in Wales. That's good, I like that.

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As for the other David, he's uncovered a national treasure.

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It's Cliff Richard's jacket!

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-In yellow!

-Geoff?

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-Is Cliff's jacket for sale?

-Yes, but I won't take less than £10,000.

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Ah. Well, that's the end of that conversation, then.

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It brings a lot of people in to see it. Little ladies come in and stand in front to have their photo taken.

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And they often buy something. It's a good publicity pitch.

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-A bit out of my budget, then.

-Yeah, I wouldn't come down.

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Looking to retain his lead,

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David Barby's now putting together what he fancifully is calling his collection of curiosities.

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You put matchsticks or toothpicks there and put them on the table.

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These are typical German sort of 1930s,

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that sort of period. Great wood carvers, particularly in Bavaria.

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All those figures that come out of Oberammergau. This is all part and parcel of that. What's the price?

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-35 for the pair.

-Oh. That's a fortune.

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Time to wheel out the Barby stare.

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-We can deal on that. They've been here a while.

-See what I mean? Scary.

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-We can deal on that. 25.

-Works every time!

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David Harper, meanwhile, has found a Chinese incense burner

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and is employing his trademark tactic - talk the dealer into submission. Any old tripe will do.

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Oh, Geoff, look. She's had her ear bitten off.

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-Can you see?

-I didn't even notice that.

-That's a good and a bad thing.

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Looking at the patination, it has aged, so that isn't recent.

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That indicates it has got some age.

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Can it be 25 quid?

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Make it my bottom line of 35, only because you've seen that break.

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-I'll do what every good dealer should do and that's compromise. Meet in the middle.

-32, innit?

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-All right, I'll stand for 30.

-Good man. Thank you very much.

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I think this just might be the item to watch. Well done, Harper.

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Marvellous. Thanks again. Absolute delight, thank you. And your very glamorous assistant.

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Down, boy, down! As for Barby's collection of curiosities, he now has a Victorian gaming ball

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and he's not finished yet.

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Often biscuit manufacturers, and this is a McVitie and Price of Edinburgh biscuit box,

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would sell biscuits in novelty containers that often had a dual purpose.

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This one here looks like a French commode. You take the biscuits out, you eat them and it's a jewel box.

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So it has a multiplicity of uses.

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It's really an oddity.

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We all love an oddity, don't we? But this means more haggling.

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-28.

-Oh, Lord.

-Here we go. Thus far, for the toothpick holders and gaming ball,

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the lads have agree £26, so let the battle of the biscuit tin begin.

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-Come down on that one, please.

-26 and 20, that's 46.

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-For the three.

-Come down to 40, please.

-I can't.

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-Yes, you can.

-No...

-Just one little word.

-You're getting cheeky.

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-Just say "yes".

-No. A nicer word is "no".

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-It's not.

-46. And you get a bargain for those.

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-Let's go for 42, please. And it's a deal.

-45 and it's a deal.

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-42.

-No, 45.

-42.

-45.

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Goodness me, we'll be here all day!

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43. Please...43. Thank you very much indeed.

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-God, you strike a hard bargain!

-You're the hard one.

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Nice dealing with you.

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-Is it really?!

-Yes!

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A few miles down the road, we find David Harper, who is obsessed with winning this contest.

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And now he's even seeking divine intervention.

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# Hallelujah! Hallelujah! #

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Which brings him to St Asaph, the smallest ancient cathedral in England and Wales,

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-although one of the most important.

-Chris.

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-Wow, it's echoey. My gosh.

-Welcome, David.

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-I'm Chris Potter, Dean of the cathedral. Good to have you here.

-Thank you. What a cathedral!

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-It's amazing, isn't it?

-This astounding building has been standing since the 13th century

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and was once the seat of Bishop William Morgan, who translated the Bible into Welsh,

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one single act that has been credited with saving the Welsh language and its culture.

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Elizabeth had commissioned it. She said people in Wales should have a bible in Welsh

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largely because they were flocking to the Roman Catholic church. She wanted to encourage Protestantism

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and thought, "If they've got this and read it with the English version, they'll learn English."

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The opposite happened. It actually embedded the Welsh language and it's still flourishing.

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So, in 1588, one thousand copies of Morgan's Welsh edition of the Old Testament were published,

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one of which takes pride of place here in St Asaph.

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-So this is it.

-The actual copy.

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He'd finished it in 1587, then spent a whole year down in London with the printers

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-because they didn't understand Welsh.

-So he was proofreading it.

-Yes.

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-He had to do the whole thing there and oversee every detail.

-Doing it in just a year is quite a feat!

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Faded and grubby, I'm afraid. The beginning of the New Testament. 1588.

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-And we've got the lion here.

-Yes.

-And the Welsh dragon. Is that right?

-That's right, yes.

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-Can you understand any of this?

-Just a little bit. I'm not a native Welsh speaker.

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-So read me something interesting.

-Here is just the last bit of 1 Corinthians, 13.

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The famous chapter on love. READS IN WELSH

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"And these three remain: faith, hope and charity, and of these three, the greatest of these is charity."

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That will tie in very nicely with my journey. Faith, hope - I live on hope -

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-and we're doing it for charity.

-Perfect.

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The impact of this book is undeniable, having been used to teach successive generations

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how to read and write in Welsh, making William Morgan a national hero.

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As our whistle-stop tour of north Wales continues,

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David Barby's en route to Colwyn Bay, the second of our seaside resorts on this leg.

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Also popular with the Victorians, its calling card is its pier,

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built in 1900, and currently undergoing a little work.

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But that's not important right now as David's found a treasure trove.

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And Frank has plenty to show our man Barby,

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such as this gorgeous Burmese table. Ticket price £500.

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-It's Burmese.

-Is that the best you can do on that?

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-I'd do it for 450.

-I can't see me getting that back in auction, can you? In a rural auction?

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You... You'd have to have just that kind of customer there.

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Well, David does have a wallet stuffed full of cash and it is such a fascinating piece.

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Well, this is the sort of furniture that would have been brought back, late-19th, early-20th century,

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by people in colonial service.

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And it's more of a conventional 19th-century table,

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but it's embellished in a sort of Anglo-Burmese style.

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If you want different, it's there.

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That's perfectly true. I want to cogitate.

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Though just a few moments of cogitation later...

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-I like that.

-Yes.

-That's useful.

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Right. Let's talk about the two objects.

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So as well as the table we also have one Arts and Crafts magazine stand. Your move, Frank.

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The very best price for the two is 500 for the two.

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I must confess, I'm worried about the table, whether it's going to achieve the price I pay for it.

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And I think that is... It's doubtful. Frank, could you do the two for 430.

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I couldn't do that, sir. As much as I'd love to sell them to you and see what they bring, I couldn't do that.

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I really couldn't. 475 for the two. I'll do you a deal. And I think it'll do well.

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Oh, my. What's a much-loved antiques expert to do, eh?

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Have a little think, dear.

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This is a difficult thing.

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I love the table.

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But £450 he's asking. I don't think it's going to make a profit. Oh, dear, oh, dear.

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-What do I do?

-Well, as the old adage goes, if in doubt, go without.

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My horoscope today said I should be fearless and brave.

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Go for it.

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-Good luck to you.

-Could I have your name and address, telephone number...

-I'll buy it back off you!

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But for now Frank's offering a discount -

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both the table and the magazine stand for £450. I'd say old Barby must be rather pleased.

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What have I done?! What have I done?

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I spent £450!

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Oh, dear. Perhaps we'll find out in tomorrow's stars?

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As a new day dawns, filled with possibilities,

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the two Davids are once again looking for guidance from a newspaper astrologer.

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-Have you seen your horoscope?

-What does it say? "Be cautious with your money. No impulsive buying.

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-"Double the caution alert."

-Well, that's a shame.

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Because David Barby's been living life on the edge, spending an unbelievable £518

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on four auction lots. As for David Harper, despite talking the talk...

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Is there anything wrong with it?

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..he's only parted with £50 for two auction lots.

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-I wonder what his horoscope has to say about that.

-"Make sure everyone is happy.

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-"Stop going over old ground. Look at new turf."

-There you go.

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-Cancerians. Lovely people.

-That was Piscean!

-You read the wrong one! It didn't sound like me!

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Our first stop today is Llandudno, widely known as the queen of the Welsh resorts.

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That's because it was yet another seaside favourite of the Victorians

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and even now the traditions of the day are alive and well - Punch and Judy are still performing

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and there's been continuous donkey rides for more than 125 years.

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And yes, I know, that's a seagull.

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Travelling at a similar speed is David Harper, who is keen to explore Trinity Trove Antiques,

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which has just recently opened for business.

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-Hello. Peter Wright.

-Lovely to meet you. This is your place?

-A new shop, open about seven or eight weeks.

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-Have you?

-So it's a new venture. Thoroughly enjoying it so far.

-Brave man!

-Everybody's said that!

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Now being a newbie, Peter's probably never dealt with the likes of David Harper before,

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so I sincerely wish him all the best.

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-Nice plate. It's quite basically painted. Nice butterfly there.

-Yeah.

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Great potential age. Lovely colour. It has damage, but it's got the yellow painted in there.

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Yellow painted on any Chinese porcelain is always quite exciting.

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There are periods in Chinese history where yellow was only set aside for the Emperor or his entourage.

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It was illegal to use yellow during certain periods in China. That's always a bit exciting.

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I'm very confident that is at least 19th century.

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It could even be 1750.

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Ha! But now for the moment of truth.

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Can Peter hold his own in the dog eat cat world of negotiation?

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-What kind of money...?

-That's 15.

-15 quid, eh?

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It's a good-looking thing. That has got a bit of mileage.

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-Could that be a tenner?

-It can.

-Well, I'll have that first of all, Peter. Thank you very much.

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-But we won't stop there.

-You've got that to go with it.

-I think Peter needs to toughen up,

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preferably before David finds something else he wants to buy.

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It looks the biz.

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Backtracking just a little, David Barby's headed in the opposite direction on this road trip

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in order to visit the fabulous Bodelwyddan Castle.

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While there's been a house on this site since the 1460s,

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the current residence is most famous for its association with the Williams family,

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proud owners for more than 200 years.

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-Hello.

-Hello, David. Welcome to Bodelwyddan Castle.

-And you're...?

-Kevin Mason.

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-I'm so impressed, first by the exterior and then this hall.

-It's a wonderful entrance.

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-And what about this floor?

-That is the coat of arms of the Williams family.

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-The two foxes crossing. Something about cunning comes to mind.

-"Strength and cunning" is the motto.

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That's the family motto.

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By the late 1920s, the upkeep on such a grand house became too much for the Williams family

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and finally they were forced to sell. So for the next 60 years it was a girls' boarding school.

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And when they moved on in the 1980s, restoration began and the castle was transformed into a museum.

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This is the first of our galleries.

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-This is the Watts Hall of Fame.

-And what does that imply?

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All of the portraits on the walls here are all by George Frederick Watts. It's his hall of fame.

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-The artist who painted Hope.

-That's right. He created this hall of fame himself.

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He decided who was to be the sitter.

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From around 1850 he started this series and he wanted to create a record of who he felt was important.

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Oh, right. I should be reading Eminent Victorians!

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Watts chose subjects from a great variety of vocations.

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Thus there are statesmen and military heroes, poets such as Tennyson and Browning,

0:22:350:22:40

not to mention philanthropists, reformers, novelists and artists.

0:22:400:22:46

-But wait - there's more!

-Here we are in the sculpture gallery.

0:22:460:22:50

Originally it was a drawing room that was created by the Williams family in the 1830s.

0:22:500:22:56

In the fashionable Gothic style. Ladies coming into this room

0:22:560:23:00

-would look at those curtains. They're absolutely incredible.

-Amazing.

0:23:000:23:06

They're actually reproduction from the 1980s

0:23:060:23:10

as part of the whole reconstruction, to act as a backdrop for the collections.

0:23:100:23:15

-No expense was spared.

-How much would they have cost in the 1980s?

0:23:150:23:20

Well, I understand that the curtains on the ground floor cost in the region of £160,000.

0:23:200:23:26

£160,000?! How much now? An unbelievable amount!

0:23:260:23:30

Well, today it would be closer to half a million pounds

0:23:300:23:35

and if you think that's over the top, just wait until you see the family silver.

0:23:350:23:41

-Here is the Williams centrepiece.

-Hence the gloves.

-Very much so.

0:23:410:23:45

What date is this? Mid-18th century?

0:23:450:23:48

This dates from 1730. It is the oldest extant example of a table centrepiece.

0:23:480:23:54

Oh, this is wonderful. So if I was at a dining table,

0:23:540:23:58

round about 1730 onwards, and they didn't have electricity or gas at that time,

0:23:580:24:04

the candles would have lit whatever was on offer. So piles of fruit here.

0:24:040:24:10

-What about these little salvers? Would they have sweet meats?

-Sweet meats...

-Candied fruits.

0:24:100:24:16

-And then we have condiments there.

-Mm.

-Right.

0:24:160:24:20

-I would point out the coat of arms in the centre.

-It matches the tile - the crossed foxes.

0:24:200:24:26

-Very much a family heirloom, passed from generation to generation.

-I think I could afford 150.

0:24:260:24:32

-Well, you might have to come forward with a little more than that.

-Kevin, thank you very much indeed.

0:24:320:24:39

Worth a go, I suppose. And Barby's not our only expert trying it on.

0:24:390:24:45

-You know who has found himself a little bit of local history.

-Welsh costumes. How interesting.

0:24:450:24:51

That's early 19th century, that shape. Mid-19th century.

0:24:510:24:56

-It looks very Puritan. So made in England.

-Yes.

0:24:560:25:00

But made for the tourist market in Wales.

0:25:000:25:04

So probably bought, under normal circumstances, by someone who might live in Staffordshire.

0:25:040:25:10

Goes to Wales on his holidays, circa 1850, comes back with a novelty piece to show his friends

0:25:100:25:17

what the Welsh look like in that far-off land.

0:25:170:25:21

-And he takes it to probably a mile away from where it was first made! Brilliant!

-Yes.

0:25:210:25:27

-What I love about these novelty things is you often see spelling mistakes.

-Yes, costumes wrong...

0:25:270:25:33

-Loads of things are wrong! Can I make you an offer?

-You can.

0:25:330:25:37

-Bear in mind the ticket price is £25.

-A tenner?

0:25:370:25:42

-Can you do a little bit more?

-£10.50?

-Can you do 20?

0:25:420:25:47

Peter's catching on. He's got Harper on the ropes.

0:25:470:25:51

-That's a lot more, Peter. That's 100% more!

-But I'm trying to come out in a profit as well.

0:25:510:25:57

-Are we nearly there?

-I'll meet you halfway. 15 quid.

-OK.

-Good man. Thank you very much.

0:25:590:26:05

-That's two. Two pieces.

-That's a nice piece.

0:26:050:26:09

-We know it's 1850.

-I think Peter's going to be all right in this business.

0:26:090:26:14

Our next destination, the village of Penmaenmawr.

0:26:140:26:19

Try saying that three times fast. Penmaenmawr, Penmaenmawr...

0:26:190:26:23

Unlike the other seaside resorts in north Wales, Victorian tourists holidaying here shared the landscape

0:26:230:26:30

with the mining industry. In this small hamlet, the hardest granite in the kingdom was produced,

0:26:300:26:37

though today we're just here for the shopping.

0:26:370:26:41

This is a little child's chair. Mid-19th century.

0:26:420:26:47

Nice social history. Elm construction.

0:26:470:26:50

And some poor little chap's botty has worn away that and on the arms where he's been gripping.

0:26:500:26:57

And there's the little hole there. The pot was put underneath.

0:26:570:27:01

-There the child could "deef"-ecate.

-Oh. I thought it was "def"-ecate.

0:27:010:27:05

And there we have a repair, unfortunately.

0:27:050:27:08

But a nice little object. I like that.

0:27:080:27:12

£85. Well, I think it's expensive.

0:27:120:27:15

Now wash your hands. It's three times what Barby wants to pay.

0:27:150:27:20

Time to find Mick, the unsuspecting owner. You down there? No.

0:27:200:27:25

You've got a child's potty chair with the most terrible repair. What's the best you can do on that?

0:27:270:27:33

-What were you thinking?

-I'd like to see it around 40 quid.

0:27:330:27:37

40?

0:27:370:27:39

Don't think I can do it for that.

0:27:390:27:41

-Are you a gambling man?

-Why?

-I'll tell you what we'll do.

0:27:410:27:45

We'll do £60 or nothing for a toss.

0:27:450:27:48

Ohh...

0:27:480:27:49

I can't bear to look.

0:27:510:27:53

-What are you calling?

-Heads!

0:28:020:28:04

Oh, dear.

0:28:040:28:07

It's heads!

0:28:070:28:09

Dear, oh, dear! Mick, that is so good!

0:28:090:28:13

-Oh, my God.

-There we are.

0:28:130:28:15

Another satisfied customer!

0:28:150:28:18

I'll say.

0:28:180:28:20

That's one child's chair free of charge.

0:28:200:28:24

-I can't take it for nothing. I shall have to give you a...

-Very kind. I hope it's luckier!

0:28:240:28:31

-Do you want me to spit on it?

-Please. Thank you.

0:28:310:28:35

How disgusting!

0:28:350:28:37

Whilst poor old Mick isn't having the best of days, there's more bad news - here comes Harper!

0:28:370:28:43

He's in already!

0:28:430:28:46

-How did you do that?

-Welcome.

-Oh, are you the owner?

0:28:460:28:50

I am, indeed. I just bought the whole lot.

0:28:500:28:54

But not wasting any time, David Harper soon comes across this little gem.

0:28:540:29:00

There are a number of reasons why these miniature pieces were made, but the one I like the best is

0:29:000:29:06

when you get married, your father will give you a miniature chest of drawers on your wedding day.

0:29:060:29:12

The idea is that you go off on your honeymoon and when you get back that is replaced by a full-size one.

0:29:120:29:20

-What kind of money is that for me?

-What were you thinking of?

0:29:200:29:24

Horribly cheap would be 20 quid.

0:29:240:29:27

-That is silly ridiculous.

-Is it? Really ridiculous?

-Mm.

0:29:270:29:31

-Oh, David. Hang your head in shame, boy.

-£40.

0:29:310:29:36

-Put your hand...

-35.

0:29:360:29:39

38. Two pound for luck.

0:29:410:29:44

-38. Done.

-Good man.

-Thank you.

0:29:440:29:46

And with that it's time for the two Davids to reveal to each other what they've bought.

0:29:460:29:53

-Who's going to reveal first?

-You took so long, you ought to.

-Look away.

-I bet he looks back.

0:29:530:30:00

Harper's hologram pendant.

0:30:000:30:02

Right. This, basically, is a surround for a crown coin.

0:30:020:30:09

-It was a crown coin holder. I don't think that thing in the middle...

-Has always been there?

0:30:090:30:15

-I'm not certain. It's rather like a hologram.

-It is.

-They didn't have those in 1930.

0:30:150:30:20

It's a drown coin holder.

0:30:200:30:23

-It's not.

-It is!

0:30:230:30:25

-You've told me nothing that I didn't know already.

-Oh, hang on to your knickers.

0:30:250:30:31

Close your eyes. And tell me about it.

0:30:310:30:35

It's a coffee pot.

0:30:350:30:37

There's something special about it. Look, you've got M.

0:30:370:30:41

-Yes.

-And then a number. Moorcroft.

-Very good. What's it worth?

0:30:410:30:46

-I think it'll go for something around 80.

-Well found, well spotted.

0:30:460:30:50

-Clock your eyes on that.

-Ah, yes.

0:30:500:30:54

Very nice. It has no pretensions.

0:30:540:30:57

It's a mug that would have been bought maybe as a christening, maybe as a souvenir. Good social history.

0:30:570:31:03

Oh.

0:31:030:31:05

-This is the cabinet of curiosities.

-It's some sort of gaming ball, but I've no idea what it is.

0:31:050:31:11

-Can I throw it?

-Not in this shop.

0:31:110:31:15

Maybe outside!

0:31:150:31:17

-And then I couldn't resist these.

-Toothpick holders.

0:31:170:31:21

-Yes. Wide open mouths with little teeth ready to be picked.

-They're brilliant.

0:31:210:31:26

And now, courtesy of David Harper, we're off to the Orient.

0:31:260:31:31

Out of here are pouring the spirits

0:31:310:31:35

-of your ancestors and mine.

-I like that immensely.

0:31:350:31:40

No Chinese reign mark, but that's good. When you come across Chinese bronzes with reign marks...

0:31:400:31:46

-Always suspicious.

-Always.

0:31:460:31:48

-I think you've done so well.

-It's a very good thing.

-Should fly.

0:31:480:31:52

-Though the best buy would have to be...

-It's a little 19th century Windsor child's chair.

0:31:520:31:58

-That's right. With the little pot.

-Isn't that sweet?

0:31:580:32:02

-I would say you paid £35 for that.

-No, I didn't.

-20, then.

-No.

0:32:020:32:07

-Come on!

-A pound.

0:32:070:32:10

-Pardon?

-£1.

0:32:100:32:12

-How did you pay a pound for it?!

-Because Mick tossed a coin.

0:32:120:32:17

-You tossed a coin for the chair?

-Yes. And I'm not a gambler.

0:32:170:32:21

Well, you should be! ..OK, Barby machine.

0:32:210:32:25

-Talk to me.

-Ah.

0:32:250:32:27

Never mind that!

0:32:270:32:30

-This is a nice little piece of Canton porcelain. There's been a whacking great repair.

-I like it.

0:32:320:32:39

-Don't you like it?

-Beautifully done.

-Yes.

0:32:390:32:42

Jolly nice. I like the design. I can't imagine you paid a lot.

0:32:420:32:46

-10 quid.

-A good piece for £10.

0:32:460:32:50

Very stylish. Very Christopher Dresser type of period.

0:32:520:32:57

You're bang on. You're bang on.

0:32:570:33:00

-I hope it hasn't got a Christopher Dresser mark on it.

-I haven't looked!

0:33:000:33:06

It would be quite rare to find a maker's mark and I'd be horrified... Oh, my gosh.

0:33:060:33:12

-WTS and Co. The Sunburst.

-Do you know, I did not look underneath?

0:33:120:33:17

-You must always look underneath! It's so rare to have a maker's mark!

-It's so good.

0:33:170:33:23

-Right. My final item. 1870-ish.

-Yes.

-Victorian.

0:33:230:33:28

-Like a Scottish or Welsh chest.

-It's a Scottish chest because of that top-heavy drawer.

0:33:280:33:34

There's a maker's name on this!

0:33:340:33:37

You should always look at the handles(!)

0:33:370:33:42

-So that's it. All my pieces bought and shown.

-You've got some strong pieces.

0:33:420:33:48

Finally, David Barby's big ticket item.

0:33:480:33:52

Ohh!

0:33:520:33:53

Don't say a word to me. I love it.

0:33:530:33:58

-Anglo-Indian.

-I would have said this was Burmese.

0:33:580:34:02

Just north of India, then. It's like saying English or Scottish.

0:34:020:34:07

Burma has nothing to do with India.

0:34:070:34:09

It said in my horoscope, "Be brave. Be fearless. Choose the right road." I paid £400 for this.

0:34:090:34:17

-It's got to make 500.

-It's going to be a struggle.

0:34:170:34:21

I think that's going to bomb.

0:34:210:34:23

Or...make you a hundred quid.

0:34:230:34:27

Who needs horoscopes, eh? Harper's quite the psychic.

0:34:270:34:31

But what do the boys really think?

0:34:310:34:34

The stress of buying something is unbelievable. I had a sleepless night after I bought the table.

0:34:340:34:41

I do think he's potentially dug himself into an incredibly big pit.

0:34:410:34:47

He could have created a black hole of Calcutta.

0:34:470:34:51

As regards David's items, I think they're very ordinary

0:34:510:34:55

except for the little bronze, which I particularly like.

0:34:550:35:00

I wouldn't be at all surprised if that doesn't make £300-£400.

0:35:000:35:04

Because I spent low, I've got every opportunity in not only winning this next leg,

0:35:040:35:10

but overtaking the Barby machine. I think the Barby machine is in big trouble.

0:35:100:35:15

After kicking off in Prestatyn, David Harper and David Barby conclude the third leg

0:35:150:35:21

in Criccieth.

0:35:210:35:24

Yes, it's another seaside resort,

0:35:240:35:27

though when Criccieth officially became a borough in 1284,

0:35:270:35:32

only Englishmen were allowed to settle within its boundaries.

0:35:320:35:36

Welshmen did infiltrate and in 1337 alone, three had to be evicted.

0:35:360:35:41

Today their immigration policy is much more liberal - after all, they let these two geezers in.

0:35:430:35:50

Look at that scenery! Have you got your Speedos with you? Cos we're going for a swim.

0:35:500:35:56

-I don't think so.

-First things first. We have an auction to go to,

0:35:560:36:01

making our next stop Rousell's, where auctioneer Stewart Davies is ready to get this party started.

0:36:010:36:08

-Nice suit.

-Quiet, please, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to not-so-sunny Rousell's today.

0:36:080:36:15

Lot number one is a selection of baskets...

0:36:150:36:19

David Barby started this leg with £707.95

0:36:190:36:24

and seems to have gone quite mad, spending £519 on five auction lots.

0:36:240:36:30

As for David Harper, he began with £592.82 and parted with the more moderate sum of £113,

0:36:320:36:40

also for five lots.

0:36:400:36:43

Now let the auction begin.

0:36:430:36:45

First up, it's David Harper's 19th century Chinese enamel plate.

0:36:460:36:52

Here we go. Anything Chinese is millions.

0:36:520:36:56

What have you got? 6. 8. 10. 12.

0:36:560:36:59

15. £15 with the hat here. I've got 16.

0:36:590:37:03

18. 20. 22.

0:37:030:37:05

25. 28.

0:37:050:37:07

£28. Are you all sure at 28? Number 69.

0:37:070:37:11

There goes David's plans for an early retirement.

0:37:110:37:15

-I'd have bought it, if that's some consolation.

-Great consolation(!)

0:37:150:37:20

Chin up, Harper. It's not millions, but a profit.

0:37:200:37:24

The joys of auctions.

0:37:240:37:26

Next it's Barby's Arts and Crafts magazine stand.

0:37:260:37:31

30 I have. At £30. And 5.

0:37:310:37:34

40. £40. 5. 50. 55.

0:37:340:37:37

60. 5. 70. £70 on the back.

0:37:370:37:41

-Am I missing anybody now? £70 up the back. Sold at 70.

-It's a trickle.

0:37:410:37:47

Well, perhaps more of a spurt than a trickle.

0:37:470:37:52

Meanwhile, David Harper's gambling on Chinese collectables.

0:37:520:37:56

His next lot, this rather ornate incense burner.

0:37:560:38:01

20 I'm bid. £20 I have. 25.

0:38:010:38:03

30. At £30 only. This is a bargain!

0:38:030:38:07

I'll take 2. 32. 35.

0:38:070:38:09

-Come on!

-At £35 only and going at 35.

-No, no...

0:38:090:38:13

What happened there, David?

0:38:130:38:16

David, what happened?

0:38:160:38:18

Oh, dearie me. After commission, that's all hope of a profit up in smoke.

0:38:180:38:24

Thank you. Thank you very much.

0:38:240:38:27

Time now for David Barby's collection of curiosities,

0:38:270:38:31

which includes this novelty biscuit tin, one gaming ball and a pair of grotesque toothpick holders.

0:38:310:38:38

Have we got 50 to start? £50.

0:38:380:38:40

-Oh, no!

-55. 60. The toothpick holders are worth more! 65. 70.

0:38:400:38:46

£70. £70 only. 75. At £75.

0:38:460:38:49

-This is so cheap.

-Sold at £75.

0:38:490:38:52

Not a bad return, though I think Barby was hoping for more. As usual.

0:38:520:38:56

-Don't smile.

-Why would I...? I'd be smiling if it sold for 20!

0:38:560:39:02

So far china hasn't done David Harper any favours,

0:39:020:39:06

but perhaps this Staffordshire mug can finally excite the locals.

0:39:060:39:10

At £10. 12. 15. 18. 20. 22. 25.

0:39:100:39:14

28. 30. £30 up there. At £30.

0:39:140:39:17

£30. I'm selling it, then, at £30.

0:39:170:39:21

Well done, David! You've doubled your money.

0:39:210:39:25

David Barby's Moorcroft jug is next. It's a quality piece.

0:39:250:39:29

Let's hope he gets a price to match.

0:39:290:39:32

-Should be in excess of £100.

-Yes!

-Have you got 80? 50 I'm bid.

0:39:320:39:37

£50. 60. 70. £80 I've got.

0:39:370:39:40

-At £80. £80. I think it's a bargain.

-So do I!

-85. 90.

0:39:400:39:44

-95.

-Oh...

-100.

0:39:440:39:47

-£100 I've got.

-That's a fabulous £75 profit before commission

0:39:470:39:53

and puts Barby firmly in the lead.

0:39:530:39:56

David Barby, well found. Well found.

0:39:560:40:00

Looking to catapult himself into first place,

0:40:000:40:04

-David H's next great hope is this miniature walnut chest.

-£50? 30 bid.

0:40:040:40:10

At £30. 5. 40. 5. 50. 5. 60.

0:40:100:40:14

5. 70. 5. 80. 5. 90.

0:40:140:40:17

-100. And 10. Any more?

-Come on...

-£110.

0:40:170:40:21

Heavens above! That's £72 profit before commission. Someone's happy.

0:40:210:40:27

-That's good.

-Thank you very much.

0:40:270:40:30

Now this HAS to clear a profit. A child's chair with somewhere to put the botty.

0:40:300:40:36

-264.

-That really is lovely.

-You only paid a pound.

0:40:360:40:40

No need to make an announcement!

0:40:400:40:43

£20 I'm bid. At £20. 25. 28.

0:40:430:40:46

-30. £30. 32. 35.

-No, stop...

-At £35.

0:40:460:40:51

Bargain basement. £35 and sold at 35. 102.

0:40:510:40:56

38 million per cent profit!

0:40:560:40:58

Mm, someone's good at mathematics(!)

0:40:580:41:01

Moving on to David Harper's 1937 hologram pendant,

0:41:030:41:07

all I have to say is...holograms were invented 10 years later.

0:41:070:41:12

20 I'm bid. At £20. Take me to 5. 25. 30.

0:41:120:41:17

At £35, fresh bidding. The ladies are out. £35.

0:41:170:41:21

-Come on.

-Sold at £35.

0:41:210:41:23

And there's a wee bit of profit in that, too.

0:41:230:41:27

Last, but by no means least, it's David Barby's Burmese table.

0:41:270:41:33

Thanks to the advice of a newspaper astrologer, he spent £400 on it.

0:41:330:41:37

And he's looking worried.

0:41:370:41:41

I can't bear the suspense.

0:41:410:41:43

-Yes, and neither can we.

-I have got various bids here.

0:41:430:41:48

I can start at £350. 350. I've got 360.

0:41:480:41:52

370. At £370, it's here. At 370.

0:41:520:41:55

-I think this is cheap.

-It IS cheap.

0:41:550:41:58

Are you sure? I'll take 5. 375.

0:41:580:42:01

At 375. It's like drawing teeth. At 375.

0:42:010:42:04

-Any more? At 375.

-Ohh!

0:42:040:42:08

-How do you feel?

-Scorched.

-It could have been worse.

0:42:080:42:13

Well, not much worse. That's a £25 loss, even before commission.

0:42:130:42:18

Well, David Barby, that's it. Another one done, dusted.

0:42:200:42:24

-We now need to do some figures.

-I have learnt my lesson.

-You were very brave. It's the best item.

0:42:240:42:30

-Well done, you. A cup of tea, on me.

-Something stronger!

0:42:300:42:34

So, "Who's won?" you ask.

0:42:340:42:37

Well, Harper thinks it's him. Obviously.

0:42:370:42:41

He started this leg with £592.82

0:42:410:42:45

and made a profit of £82.16,

0:42:460:42:49

giving him a new total of £674.98.

0:42:490:42:55

David Barby started with £707.95

0:42:550:43:00

and made a mere £18.10 profit,

0:43:000:43:04

but even though he's lost on this round, he hangs narrowly onto his lead

0:43:040:43:10

with £726.05.

0:43:100:43:12

You escaped by the skin of your teeth, David Barby!

0:43:120:43:17

But it was good fun!

0:43:170:43:19

Join us tomorrow when David Barby minds his language.

0:43:190:43:23

ATTEMPTS WELSH

0:43:230:43:26

I don't think you'd get very far!

0:43:260:43:29

And David Harper minds the cash.

0:43:290:43:32

I'd give you 200 quid for that.

0:43:320:43:36

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2011

0:43:480:43:52

Email [email protected]

0:43:530:43:55