Episode 29 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 29

David Barby is after something quirky, while David Harper is going for the killer deal as they shop from Aberystwyth to the auction in Shrewsbury.


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0:47:500:47:57

The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each

0:48:010:48:04

and one big challenge!

0:48:040:48:06

I'm declaring war.

0:48:060:48:07

Why?

0:48:070:48:09

Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

0:48:090:48:13

The aim is to trade up

0:48:130:48:16

and hope each antique turns a profit.

0:48:160:48:18

But it's not as easy as you might think, and things don't always go to plan.

0:48:190:48:24

Will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

0:48:240:48:28

Think I believe that?

0:48:280:48:29

This is the Antiques Road Trip!

0:48:290:48:31

Today we're in Wales with, appropriately, the two Davids!

0:48:350:48:39

David Barby and David Harper. Although neither, of course, is a saint.

0:48:390:48:46

I think I'm lost.

0:48:460:48:48

-I'm lost without my sat nav.

-What do you call her?

-Harriet.

0:48:480:48:51

David Harper is a dealer with a taste for the finer things in life.

0:48:510:48:56

These can make thousands, can't they? I'll give you 200 quid for it.

0:48:560:49:00

While co-driver David Barby does the shopping and is an auctioneer.

0:49:000:49:04

There's nothing he likes more than to go for a song!

0:49:040:49:07

-#

-I want a dream lover so I don't have to dream alone.

-#

0:49:070:49:13

Ooh, flat!

0:49:130:49:15

David B has led all week, but David H is catching up fast!

0:49:160:49:20

So how are you feeling, Mr Barby, still in the lead?

0:49:200:49:23

I feel very relaxed about it.

0:49:230:49:26

Well, don't feel too relaxed because somebody's nipping at your heels!

0:49:260:49:30

-Yapping, I would say!

-Yapping!

-Ruf! Ruf!

0:49:300:49:33

Hmm. They began with £200 each

0:49:330:49:36

and David Barby goes into today with a very respectable £726.05 to spend.

0:49:360:49:43

While the other David has almost as much with £674.98.

0:49:430:49:48

This week, we're travelling from Northern Ireland, heading south towards the county of Meath

0:49:520:49:57

then across to the north coast of Wales

0:49:570:49:59

and once again heading south, ending our trip in Llanelli.

0:49:590:50:04

Today's show starts out in Aberystwyth

0:50:040:50:06

and heads for an auction in Shrewsbury.

0:50:060:50:09

In the mid-19th century a fine pier and a railway were built

0:50:110:50:15

making Aberystwyth a Victorian tourist boom town.

0:50:150:50:20

Back in the Middle Ages, though, when the English were much less popular,

0:50:200:50:24

Aberystwyth Castle was once the stronghold of the Welsh freedom fighter, Owain Glyn Dwr.

0:50:240:50:30

We have to try and mix and blend with the natives.

0:50:300:50:33

-You're ingratiating yourself?

-Yes, just like you do rather nicely.

0:50:330:50:37

So I have a Welsh phrase book.

0:50:370:50:40

I've written down one of your favourite phrases.

0:50:400:50:43

Please, just... Just for me cos I'd love to hear you say it.

0:50:430:50:47

In English, how do you do it?

0:50:470:50:49

"Is that your very, very best?"

0:50:490:50:51

Wonderful. Now, in Welsh,

0:50:510:50:53

you say, "Hoffet ti dawnsio?" Say that.

0:50:530:50:58

Hoffet ti dawnsio?

0:50:580:51:00

Not in a Chinese accent, a Welsh one. Try again.

0:51:000:51:03

Hoffet ti dawnsio?

0:51:030:51:04

-Dawnsio.

-Dancho.

0:51:040:51:06

Hoffet ti dawnsio.

0:51:060:51:07

-Hoffet ti dawnsio.

-Exactly.

0:51:070:51:09

I want you to look into the vendor's eyes and stare at them with that twinkle that only you have,

0:51:090:51:15

-and say...

-Hoffet ti dawnsio?

0:51:150:51:18

You naughty boy!

0:51:180:51:19

-Music to my ears.

-Knowing you, it's probably a swear word.

0:51:190:51:24

David Barby starts his shopping a few hundred yards from the sea front.

0:51:250:51:29

-This looks interesting! Hello. David Barby.

-Hello.

0:51:290:51:32

On a mission to find something unusual, idiosyncratic or even downright odd!

0:51:320:51:39

Let's see the quirky things.

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Yes, quirky. That's what he's after.

0:51:410:51:44

How about some Japanese jade snuff trays, suggests dealer David.

0:51:440:51:48

Or maybe a huge gramophone horn.

0:51:480:51:51

Mmm. Nice.

0:51:510:51:52

-How much is that?

-About 400.

0:51:520:51:55

-I haven't got that sort of money!

-Expensive and quirky.

0:51:550:51:58

-Keep your hat on!

-That really has got some style.

0:51:580:52:00

So has this, and quite a price, too,

0:52:010:52:04

at £125 a fork!

0:52:040:52:06

I love the social history behind it.

0:52:060:52:09

You'd pass your bread roll on the end of this, rather than taint it with your fingers.

0:52:090:52:14

-That's rather nice. What's the very best you can do on that?

-I can do a lot on that. 85.

0:52:140:52:19

Ooh! Too much.

0:52:190:52:21

75, then.

0:52:230:52:25

Is that the very best you can do?

0:52:250:52:28

Go on. 25 quid.

0:52:310:52:32

-25.

-Yeah.

0:52:320:52:34

£100 off, a slap round the chops, and then...

0:52:350:52:39

-I think it's got a little fracture down the side.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:52:390:52:43

It's a gaping hole!

0:52:430:52:45

Ah, here we go!

0:52:450:52:47

I've been told if I use a certain expression like...

0:52:470:52:50

Hoffet ti dawnsio? Um...

0:52:500:52:53

I don't think you'd get very far!

0:52:540:52:57

In other words, is that the very best price?

0:53:000:53:02

-Yes, I think 25 is...

-Even with that damage?

0:53:020:53:06

-You quoted that before the damage was noticed.

-Go on. 20 quid, then.

-20 quid.

0:53:060:53:11

-OK, it's a deal. Thank you very much indeed.

-Pleasure.

-Thank you.

0:53:110:53:15

And after finally forking out (ha!) David spies something that might go with his first buy.

0:53:150:53:21

That was from my attic, so that could be any price.

0:53:210:53:24

This would have been in a picnic hamper

0:53:260:53:29

and you might have taken this out with your Bentley.

0:53:290:53:32

In there, you would have a burner.

0:53:320:53:34

And then this little kettle would stand on that.

0:53:340:53:40

So that's ten pounds.

0:53:400:53:42

I'm really not sure where David got that from.

0:53:420:53:45

But it seems to have been OK'd, and now he's had another idea.

0:53:450:53:49

I like this, David, because it's the same period as the kettle.

0:53:490:53:53

I'd like to think that Mum and Dad had unpacked the picnic

0:53:530:54:00

and brought the baby's dish along.

0:54:000:54:02

-So they could make his rusks.

-Rusks, yes!

-Or porridge.

0:54:020:54:07

And feed him whilst on the picnic.

0:54:070:54:09

We have the alphabet round the edge which is rather nice.

0:54:090:54:12

And then this delightful golfing scene here.

0:54:120:54:17

Hmm. The Golly image,

0:54:170:54:19

which used to feature on a well-known brand of jam,

0:54:190:54:22

and in books by Enid Blyton, is now regarded as an offensive caricature.

0:54:220:54:27

But such items do have a value

0:54:270:54:29

as pieces of social history.

0:54:290:54:31

-I'd like to buy the two to go together.

-Right. OK.

0:54:310:54:36

-I think they should go together.

-I think it would be fun, yes.

0:54:360:54:39

-It would be fun.

-We paid 20 for that one.

-20?!

0:54:390:54:43

-It's been here ages!

-It hasn't been here ages.

0:54:430:54:46

I came on holiday when I was 12 and saw that!

0:54:460:54:48

And wanted it ever since!

0:54:480:54:51

We could do a deal perhaps with the kettle. How about that?

0:54:510:54:54

And the...

0:54:540:54:56

Hmm. How about 30 quid for the kettle?

0:54:560:54:59

Oh, no, no, no, no, no.

0:54:590:55:02

-You mentioned ten on it originally.

-20 quid with the kettle.

0:55:020:55:06

15.

0:55:060:55:07

15 with the kettle.

0:55:070:55:09

-Yeah, go on, then. 15.

-£15.

-You waited all those years to buy it!

0:55:100:55:14

And while David Barby is busy buying...

0:55:150:55:19

-How's my Welsh?

-I think... Keep at it. Keep at it!

0:55:190:55:22

Thank you very much!

0:55:220:55:24

Iechyd da!

0:55:240:55:26

..David Harper's meanwhile taken the Triumph north around Cardigan Bay,

0:55:260:55:30

driving from Aberystwyth to the seaside resort of Borth.

0:55:300:55:35

Very rarely is a business described as antique shop and pub,

0:55:350:55:39

but that's what they have here.

0:55:390:55:41

Hello!

0:55:410:55:43

-Hello.

-Hello, there. I'm David.

-How do you do?

0:55:430:55:46

Very nicely, thank you! The shop and the inn below

0:55:460:55:49

have been in Sarah Pugh's family for generations. And it shows.

0:55:490:55:52

A delightful clutter that requires a fine toothcomb to find a bargain.

0:55:520:55:57

Or unearth a pocket general.

0:55:570:55:59

That's a typical model of Napoleon.

0:55:590:56:02

Don't you think it's strange that we made models of him

0:56:020:56:06

in celebration of his greatness.

0:56:060:56:08

It's quite a rarity. How many enemies of a nation

0:56:080:56:11

can you think of that the victors for many years after he's been vanquished,

0:56:110:56:17

actually make models of him and sell them as mementos.

0:56:170:56:21

Yes, but how would he fare in a "general" sale(!)

0:56:210:56:25

A bargain hunter doesn't need to conquer a continent, though, just move a moggy!

0:56:260:56:30

OK. Anything else. Excuse me, is this your sales assistant here?

0:56:300:56:34

-She doesn't like people buying jewellery!

-Oh. What's she called?

0:56:340:56:38

-Merle.

-Merle, what's your very best price?

0:56:380:56:42

Miaow!

0:56:420:56:43

Unable to view the cabinet, David studies the place where his cash would have gone.

0:56:430:56:48

Wow, isn't that beautiful?

0:56:500:56:52

-Is that for sale?

-No!

-Really?

-No!

0:56:520:56:55

-Sure?

-Absolutely. It's been in the family. The pub.

0:56:550:56:58

-I'd definitely buy that.

-I know!

-Those can make thousands.

0:56:580:57:02

I'd give you 200 quid for that. No questions asked.

0:57:020:57:05

What do you think of the show so far?

0:57:050:57:08

"Rubbish!"

0:57:080:57:10

After failing to buy the till, or anything else for that matter,

0:57:120:57:16

David Harper is now heading inland through the spectacular scenery

0:57:160:57:21

of the Ystwyth Valley, where they used to mine lead, zinc and silver,

0:57:210:57:25

travelling from Borth to Rhayader.

0:57:250:57:28

The oldest town in mid-Wales dates back to the fifth century

0:57:320:57:37

but the place really got on the map when, in 1843,

0:57:370:57:41

the locals rioted over road tolls.

0:57:410:57:44

Many were dressed up in drag and became known as Rebeccaites.

0:57:440:57:49

Anxious to finally start spending after drawing a blank in Borth,

0:57:490:57:53

David is determined to shop here.

0:57:530:57:56

-So what's this building?

-This is the old courthouse.

0:57:560:58:00

-The magistrates' bench used to be there.

-Magistrate, eh?

0:58:000:58:03

-Through where the books are there's two holding cells.

-No.

0:58:030:58:07

Is that where you put customers that don't pay?

0:58:070:58:09

I do!

0:58:090:58:11

The courthouse holds many of the usual suspects,

0:58:110:58:14

and for the right price, any of these items can get an early release. But which ones?

0:58:140:58:19

So, what have you got?

0:58:190:58:22

Gin, Bourbon, sherry, scotch, brandy and vodka.

0:58:220:58:25

-Are they all the same?

-They are.

0:58:250:58:27

So probably 1960s, but you've got that Victorian shape.

0:58:270:58:31

It's very 1880s in its shape, a classical thing.

0:58:310:58:35

I can tell you, if they were in silver, they would be hundreds of pounds.

0:58:350:58:40

But they're in pewter.

0:58:400:58:43

But the thing is, on six liquor bottles, they'd look the biz.

0:58:430:58:47

-Yeah.

-What kind of money are they?

0:58:470:58:49

Lots of money. £20 for the six.

0:58:490:58:53

Ooh, Robin.

0:58:530:58:54

Robin, honestly.

0:58:540:58:57

It's a bargain, isn't it?

0:58:570:58:59

-20 quid.

-It can be more.

0:58:590:59:01

I don't know I if I dare ask if they can be less?

0:59:020:59:05

-No, they couldn't be less.

-I'll have to have them.

-I think so.

0:59:050:59:08

Good man. Thank you. I'll have those.

0:59:080:59:10

Six labels later and Harper is in the hunt.

0:59:100:59:14

That's a cracking thing, Robin.

0:59:140:59:16

I think that's 1835, 1840, with a later top.

0:59:160:59:19

-Can I take the glasses off?

-Certainly can.

0:59:190:59:22

This symbol was first used in 3000 BC

0:59:220:59:25

and has been associated with everything from religion and magic to politics.

0:59:250:59:29

What kind of money is it?

0:59:290:59:32

To you, about £80.

0:59:320:59:35

80 quid.

0:59:350:59:38

-That couldn't be 50, could it?

-No, it couldn't be 50.

-It couldn't?

0:59:380:59:41

-It couldn't.

-Under any circumstances?

-Under any circumstances.

0:59:410:59:45

All right. What could it be under any circumstances?

0:59:470:59:51

70.

0:59:520:59:53

It's a good thing. 60?

0:59:540:59:57

No. It's pushing it at 60.

0:59:581:00:01

-I couldn't replace it for that.

-65?

1:00:011:00:04

65 is there.

1:00:041:00:07

-Yeah, OK.

-Shall we do a deal at 65?

-It's a deal at 65.

-Thank goodness. I love spending money here.

1:00:071:00:12

Not content with table and labels,

1:00:121:00:16

David goes looking for more.

1:00:161:00:18

Look at that!

1:00:181:00:21

That is a Japanese Satsuma ware.

1:00:221:00:25

What a grand, impressive thing!

1:00:251:00:29

Robin, what money is the Satsuma?

1:00:291:00:31

-It's got some damage on it, unfortunately.

-Has it?

1:00:311:00:34

Yeah, on the lions. This one here.

1:00:341:00:37

Oh, yeah, missing its tail. Yeah.

1:00:371:00:40

There you go. There's the male version. That's the Dog of Fo, or Shishi dog.

1:00:401:00:45

The Dogs of Fo are there to protect the owner.

1:00:451:00:48

-Yeah.

-You own it and they're scaring me away!

1:00:481:00:50

What would it cost for me to own it?

1:00:501:00:52

-£40. There you are.

-40 quid.

-Yes.

1:00:521:00:55

Blimey, that is a gift.

1:00:551:00:57

Tell you what, if you dress that up, put it in someone's living room

1:00:571:01:01

or dining room or hallway, and it would look £4,000-worth.

1:01:011:01:07

-It can be!

-Really, Robin? Can it?

1:01:071:01:09

Do you mind? I do want to spend big(!)

1:01:091:01:11

-Take 30 quid for it.

-No, come on!

1:01:111:01:15

-I'll spin you a coin, 30 or 40.

-Go on, then.

-Good man.

1:01:151:01:18

I love spinning coins. You call.

1:01:181:01:19

Heads.

1:01:191:01:22

Yes!

1:01:221:01:24

-Marvellous!

-It's not a fix?

1:01:241:01:26

So, £30 to David Harper. Meanwhile, back in Aberystwyth,

1:01:281:01:32

there's a museum dedicated to the history of Ceredigion,

1:01:321:01:36

or Cardiganshire.

1:01:361:01:38

David Barby has come to the beautiful old Coliseum theatre to take a look.

1:01:381:01:44

-Hello, David, welcome to Ceredigion Museum. I'm Michael, the curator.

-Pleased to meet you.

1:01:441:01:49

The theatre was built for Variety in 1905

1:01:491:01:53

and later converted to a cinema.

1:01:531:01:55

It became a museum in 1984.

1:01:551:01:58

-That's the piano that was used during silent films.

-My mother, in Rugby,

1:01:581:02:03

played the piano at the cinema where they showed silent movies.

1:02:031:02:08

But to keep us quiet at home, she would play Hearts and Flowers,

1:02:081:02:12

which was often the one she'd employ during love scenes or melodramatic scenes when looking at the screen.

1:02:121:02:19

Upstairs, they still have the mighty projector that last fired up

1:02:191:02:23

for The Lady and the Tramp in 1977.

1:02:231:02:26

Although most of the exhibits are much older and focus on the domestic lives of local people.

1:02:261:02:32

Michael, what do we have here?

1:02:321:02:34

-A very fine collection of indigenous Welsh chairs.

-Those are Windsor chairs!

1:02:341:02:39

We now think that these actually pre-date the English examples.

1:02:391:02:43

-Really?

-They look very uncomfortable

1:02:431:02:46

but they are made out of local materials by the people who sat on them.

1:02:461:02:51

Something that's undoubtedly made in Wales

1:02:511:02:54

is the proper Welsh stove-pipe hat.

1:02:541:02:56

Although you may think it's as old as the Druids,

1:02:561:03:00

it was only invented around 1830 as an early form of branding.

1:03:001:03:03

This is something that the better-off women wore.

1:03:031:03:07

If you went to market and you wanted to buy good quality food from a Welsh-speaking person,

1:03:071:03:13

the chances are they'd be wearing a Welsh hat.

1:03:131:03:16

The festivals of music and literature known as Eisteddfod

1:03:171:03:21

first took place in the 12th century

1:03:211:03:23

and their revival in the 19th coincided with the rise in Welsh nationalism.

1:03:231:03:29

-What does Eisteddfod mean?

-It's a meeting place, really.

1:03:291:03:32

-It's where everybody meets to share their skills and enthusiasm...

-It's a gathering.

-Yes.

1:03:321:03:38

That's a lovely concept.

1:03:381:03:40

All that talk of music and the old theatre seems to have had quite an effect on David Barby,

1:03:401:03:46

someone never likely to suffer from stage fright.

1:03:461:03:49

-#

-Keep the home fires burning

1:03:491:03:54

-#

-Though your hearts are yearning

1:03:541:03:58

-#

-Though your lads are far away

1:03:581:04:02

-#

-They dream of home...

-#

1:04:021:04:05

I do believe he's had a glass of sherry!

1:04:051:04:09

-#

-..through the clouds are shining

1:04:091:04:13

-#

-Till the dark clouds inside out

1:04:131:04:17

-#

-Till the boys come home!

-#

1:04:171:04:21

Hmm. And on that bum note...

1:04:211:04:23

Day Two of our trip in a Triumph.

1:04:231:04:26

From the coast of Wales to the English border.

1:04:261:04:28

Is it "Shrows-bury" or "Shrewsbury"?

1:04:281:04:31

-Depends where you come from. I'd say "Shrows-bury".

-You say "Shrows-bury" and I'll say "Shrewsbury".

1:04:311:04:37

Yesterday, David and David both bought three things.

1:04:371:04:41

David Barby spent £35 on a mix of quirky dining-related items.

1:04:411:04:47

While David H weighed in with £115

1:04:481:04:53

on some labels, a table and a giant Japanese incense burner.

1:04:531:04:57

Heads.

1:04:571:04:59

Yes, Robin, I've got it!

1:04:591:05:01

But what will today's jaunt do for the two Davids

1:05:011:05:04

as they make for that auction in Shrewsbury - or is it Shrows-bury?

1:05:041:05:08

Actually, both are perfectly acceptable.

1:05:081:05:11

Starting out once more in Rhayader

1:05:111:05:13

where David Harper deposits David Barby.

1:05:131:05:17

-Hello!

-Good morning.

-David Barby. What's your name?

1:05:181:05:22

-David Carnan.

-Another David! Good, we have something in common!

1:05:221:05:26

David Barby's found one antique already and hopes to buy big today and so stretch his lead.

1:05:271:05:33

I think I ought to invest around 200-plus.

1:05:331:05:36

With what I've bought so far, I stand a chance of making a small profit.

1:05:361:05:41

A nibbling away at the amount of money I've got.

1:05:411:05:44

But I'd like to buy something a bit different and just boost the price.

1:05:441:05:48

But tactics are on hold while he enjoys himself!

1:05:481:05:52

This is really a very interesting shop.

1:05:521:05:56

-What's that? I suppose it's a reproduction?

-A cocktail shaker.

1:05:561:06:00

-I don't think it is, no.

-I think it's as brand-new as...

1:06:001:06:04

-Look at the inside of that.

-It's never been used.

1:06:041:06:06

No staining, nothing.

1:06:061:06:08

It's a terrible game, isn't it?

1:06:101:06:12

How much is the Worcester jug?

1:06:121:06:13

Oh, mega dear.

1:06:131:06:15

-You'll tell me it's not Worcester, now!

-It's Worcester. How much is that?

1:06:181:06:22

-Has he not got a price on it?

-No.

1:06:221:06:24

And it's chipped, as well. I'll reject that one, thank you.

1:06:241:06:28

15 pencil sketches in there.

1:06:281:06:31

-Somebody on the Grand Tour.

-Yeah.

1:06:311:06:33

What's the date? 1848.

1:06:331:06:35

People didn't have cameras.

1:06:351:06:37

If they went on holiday, particularly abroad,

1:06:371:06:40

they would take a sketch pad

1:06:401:06:44

and they often had training to do quick sketches

1:06:441:06:47

of scenes they were looking at

1:06:471:06:48

and often they'd do a write-up at the side of what it was.

1:06:481:06:52

But this is by an amateur hand,

1:06:521:06:54

possibly a gifted female.

1:06:541:06:56

Oh.

1:06:561:06:57

The drawings are rejected, but here's something that could fly.

1:06:571:07:01

There's a nice First World War propeller.

1:07:011:07:03

This is a patent.

1:07:031:07:06

One that was manufactured as an example.

1:07:061:07:10

It's actually never been on a plane.

1:07:101:07:13

How much is that?

1:07:131:07:15

50 quid.

1:07:151:07:17

The very, very, very best.

1:07:171:07:19

That started at the very best. That's a bargain!

1:07:191:07:22

Oh, he's...

1:07:221:07:23

He's from my neck of the woods, as well. Birmingham.

1:07:231:07:27

-I'm a Scouser, from Liverpool.

-Well, that's close enough!

1:07:271:07:31

That is a possibility.

1:07:331:07:36

But I'd like it much reduced on that.

1:07:361:07:39

-How much?

-30.

1:07:391:07:42

-Go ahead. Seeing as it's you.

-OK.

-Seeing as it's a sale.

1:07:441:07:48

Meanwhile, David H is once again behind the wheel and headed for his final shop,

1:07:501:07:54

travelling from Rhayader to Llanidloes.

1:07:541:07:58

Hi, I'm David Harper.

1:08:011:08:02

-Mark. Nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you, too.

1:08:021:08:05

-So how a browse round and...

-I will. OK, Mark.

1:08:051:08:08

I'll give you a shout if we can do something. OK.

1:08:081:08:11

-What about the recumbent Buddha? Is it modern?

-He's the good luck Buddha of the shop.

1:08:111:08:16

The first thing I look at, I can't buy?

1:08:161:08:18

That's a great start!

1:08:181:08:20

Stumped again. Ah, well, as the Buddha says,

1:08:201:08:23

"To the one who endures, the final victory comes."

1:08:231:08:27

Nothing about nice things in cabinets, though!

1:08:271:08:30

OK. Think of the man who has absolutely everything.

1:08:301:08:34

He wants for nothing. What do you buy him for Christmas?

1:08:341:08:38

Well, the perfect gentleman's accessory, a really good pen.

1:08:381:08:43

He may not actually use it,

1:08:431:08:45

but a Parker pen with a 14-carat gold nib.

1:08:451:08:49

16 quid.

1:08:491:08:50

It's actually really cheap.

1:08:501:08:53

If you were to go to a vintage pen shop, I think that would make 50 quid, possibly?

1:08:531:08:59

-That's a really nice pen, Mark, isn't it?

-It is.

1:08:591:09:02

Could that be devastatingly cheap? Help me out.

1:09:021:09:05

-I'd go down to 12 on that.

-12.

1:09:051:09:07

I bet we could make it ten.

1:09:071:09:09

-I haven't got any change. Couldn't we?

-Let's have a look.

-I bet we could.

1:09:091:09:13

-Seeing as it's you.

-Good man. Thanks, Mark. Deal done. Thank you.

1:09:131:09:18

Come on, David, own up. These are just the sort of toys

1:09:181:09:21

you'd like to have yourself!

1:09:211:09:23

Let's have a look at this watch.

1:09:231:09:26

That's a really good quality, Swiss-made small manufacturer Roamer watch.

1:09:261:09:32

My first good watch, bought for me when I was 18, was a Roamer.

1:09:321:09:36

How much is it, Mark?

1:09:361:09:39

28 quid.

1:09:391:09:40

And so while David comes over all nostalgic,

1:09:401:09:44

the dealer himself arrives to hear his offer.

1:09:441:09:46

-Hello.

-Hello, I'm Clive. I'm the owner of the items in the cabinet.

1:09:461:09:51

-So if you're looking for a deal...

-You've called him, have you?

1:09:511:09:54

Good man. Right, let's have a look at this little watch.

1:09:541:09:58

What kind of money could that be?

1:09:581:10:00

-I could do that at £20.

-Could you?

-Yeah.

1:10:001:10:04

20 quid, eh?

1:10:041:10:06

Do you want to say 15 and be really happy?

1:10:061:10:09

Would that make you happy, Clive?

1:10:101:10:12

-Yes, go on, then.

-Sure?

-Yes.

-Good man. Thank you very much.

1:10:131:10:17

-The pen was yours, I believe?

-Yes.

1:10:171:10:19

So I owe you 25 quid.

1:10:191:10:21

-That's fine.

-There's 20 and five.

1:10:211:10:25

That's it. I've hardly spent any money!

1:10:251:10:27

And with that less than tactful comment, we shift our gaze to David Barby,

1:10:271:10:32

who's struggling to spend his cash.

1:10:321:10:34

David has travelled from Rhayader to Newbridge-on-Wye, in search of that big purchase.

1:10:351:10:41

But despite a huge choice, things are not looking good.

1:10:421:10:47

Hmm.

1:10:491:10:51

I haven't seen anything yet

1:10:511:10:53

that will be suitable for the auction.

1:10:531:10:56

Eventually, David finds something to ponder upon.

1:10:561:10:59

But he's still not happy.

1:10:591:11:00

Well, it's a 1930s Jacobean revival cabinet, very fashionable at that time.

1:11:001:11:07

It's a floor-standing gramophone.

1:11:091:11:11

In the lower section you have storage for gramophones. It's got the original uprights.

1:11:111:11:16

And then you have the sound box, which is here.

1:11:161:11:20

It normally has a silk-lined screen. We haven't got that.

1:11:201:11:25

Then you've got the actual turntable here.

1:11:261:11:29

It's nicely dusty but not in particularly good working order.

1:11:311:11:34

Which is a shame, because he could have played something to suit his mood!

1:11:341:11:39

Gloomy!

1:11:391:11:40

HEART-RENDING VIOLIN SOLO

1:11:411:11:44

I'm quite, quite disappointed

1:11:501:11:53

that there is nothing there that I can buy and make a profit on at auction.

1:11:531:12:00

# I need a hero

1:12:101:12:11

# I'm holding out for a hero till the end of the night

1:12:111:12:15

# He's gotta be strong

1:12:151:12:18

# And he's gotta be fast

1:12:181:12:19

# And he's gotta be fresh from the fight

1:12:191:12:22

# I need a hero! #

1:12:221:12:24

David Harper is on his way from Llanidloes to Presteigne.

1:12:241:12:29

Straddling the River Lugg, a stone's throw from the English border,

1:12:291:12:35

the county town of Radnorshire has many fine buildings

1:12:351:12:39

and David has come to visit the old courtroom, known as the Shire Hall.

1:12:391:12:44

This 19th-century gem has been miraculously preserved

1:12:441:12:47

so that visitors like David can get a real sense of Victorian rural justice.

1:12:471:12:52

Oh, my goodness me. You're not the judge, I hope!

1:12:521:12:56

No, no. Not today.

1:12:561:12:58

-David Harper.

-Charles Kitely. I'm one of the trustees here

1:12:581:13:01

-and I helped to restore the building.

-My gosh,

1:13:011:13:04

-look at this place.

-That's the judge's seat up there.

1:13:041:13:08

And the witness box.

1:13:081:13:10

Radnorshire juries were famous. They'd let them off.

1:13:101:13:13

One judge saw a hare about to be got by a greyhound,

1:13:131:13:16

and he said, "The only thing that will save that hare is a Radnorshire jury!"

1:13:161:13:20

The building has been restored to its 1860s peak,

1:13:201:13:25

complete with original bats' wing burner gas lighting.

1:13:251:13:29

That is so stylish!

1:13:291:13:31

This is the only house in Britain that's still got open-flame gas burners to light it.

1:13:311:13:37

That is amazing!

1:13:371:13:39

So here we are in the judge's lodge.

1:13:411:13:43

-Gas lighting?

-No, that's oil lamps.

1:13:431:13:46

Oil. Of course. I can smell it.

1:13:461:13:48

Me, too. Not only the courtroom, but the entire building has now been returned to its previous condition.

1:13:481:13:55

Which means no electric lighting.

1:13:551:13:58

This is the dining room.

1:13:581:14:01

This furniture here and the chairs and table were laid for the house.

1:14:021:14:06

This is extraordinary. This is older than the house.

1:14:101:14:13

This is the jury box.

1:14:131:14:14

All the people who were eligible to be jurymen,

1:14:141:14:17

their names would be put in there on bits of paper.

1:14:171:14:20

And some "indifferent" person would put his hand in

1:14:201:14:25

-and pick out...John Jones.

-Really?

-William Thomas.

1:14:251:14:29

-Is that right?

-Yes, and then they had to serve.

1:14:291:14:32

Below stairs, things are also completely authentic, in every murky detail.

1:14:321:14:38

This is still working.

1:14:381:14:40

Oh, a water pump.

1:14:401:14:42

Look at that!

1:14:431:14:44

And then we get into the more sort of business end.

1:14:491:14:52

Folk accused of typical crimes like horse, and even duck, theft,

1:14:521:14:57

would spend an anxious time in the cells.

1:14:571:15:00

These, too, are now open to visitors.

1:15:001:15:03

If you look in the cell here,

1:15:031:15:05

I'm afraid we are going to have to keep you here...

1:15:051:15:08

Hey!

1:15:081:15:09

Ha-ha! That'll serve you!

1:15:091:15:13

Did David Barby put you up to that?

1:15:131:15:15

Very amusing(!)

1:15:151:15:16

Meanwhile, his co-defendant, David Barby,

1:15:161:15:19

has travelled from Newbridge-on-Wye

1:15:191:15:22

to Llangurig, where he arrives, a desperate man.

1:15:221:15:26

-Hello?

-Hello!

1:15:271:15:30

-David Barby.

-Hi, Dave. Mike Elliott.

-Hello, Michael, how are you?

-How are you?

1:15:301:15:34

This is a privilege. Thank you. To come into somebody's house that's also the dealer.

1:15:341:15:39

-There's few left.

-There's hidden treasures.

1:15:391:15:42

There are certainly plenty of treasures in Mike's crowded house.

1:15:441:15:49

The palpitations subside as David begins to feel at home.

1:15:491:15:53

This is so encouraging because there are things I feel I can actually buy.

1:15:531:15:58

-What's this little piece?

-That's only just come in.

1:16:011:16:04

I think it's for cigarettes or something, if you lift it up.

1:16:041:16:09

-Cigarettes, cuff-links.

-I think it's 1900 or something.

1:16:091:16:13

-Yes.

-That can be 35 quid.

1:16:131:16:15

Oh, sugars!

1:16:151:16:16

Why did I buy that kettle?

1:16:161:16:19

Come on, David. No regrets about yesterday.

1:16:201:16:23

A little box to think about, and next door, a slightly bigger box!

1:16:231:16:27

What is that, on its own, the small cabinet?

1:16:271:16:30

It's rosewood, but I can be £45.

1:16:301:16:33

It's a good bit of wood.

1:16:331:16:35

-I think that's got potential.

-Yes.

1:16:351:16:38

-This is the base of an etagere which is, in ordinary terms, a what-not.

-A what-not.

1:16:381:16:44

So above here, you'd have probably one, maybe three shelves.

1:16:441:16:48

It was intended for ornamental items, clocks, bijouterie, something like that.

1:16:481:16:54

-I'm going to have that one.

-Good.

-Thank you very much.

-Good. Pleasure.

1:16:541:16:58

-That's an interesting little clock, yes.

-Yes. Yeah.

1:16:581:17:02

-What price range are we looking at?

-Two and a half.

1:17:021:17:05

I think he means hundreds.

1:17:051:17:07

-That's the very best you can do?

-Yes, it does owe me more, I promise you.

1:17:071:17:12

Seriously.

1:17:121:17:13

Is that the very, very best you can do?

1:17:131:17:15

Well, the very best

1:17:151:17:17

would be £230.

1:17:171:17:19

Right.

1:17:191:17:20

-I saw that little box that you quoted, was it 30?

-35.

-£35 on it.

1:17:201:17:25

I think that is exquisite.

1:17:251:17:27

-It is.

-Absolutely exquisite.

-Super.

1:17:271:17:30

Well, at 250 quid, you might be able to marry the two.

1:17:301:17:34

-That is very tempting.

-Well.

1:17:361:17:38

That's cheap.

1:17:381:17:40

Tempting and cheap!

1:17:401:17:41

DRUM ROLL

1:17:411:17:44

Ooh, what have I done?

1:17:451:17:47

What a relief! David's finally splashed that cash.

1:17:471:17:51

And now he's discovered something Mike will probably never sell,

1:17:511:17:55

his karaoke machine!

1:17:551:17:57

-#

-I want a dream lover, cos I don't wanna dream alone.

-#

1:17:581:18:03

Keep singing like that and you'll always be alone!

1:18:031:18:06

And now, the two must, once again,

1:18:061:18:09

compare and contrast their respective purchases.

1:18:091:18:12

This might get tetchy!

1:18:121:18:14

-Oh, they're nice.

-I think they're American.

1:18:161:18:18

-What did you pay? Around £30?

-A bit less. 20.

-That's good.

1:18:181:18:22

That's a terrific amount less.

1:18:221:18:24

Very cordial. Perhaps they'll behave themselves today.

1:18:241:18:28

-What on earth is that? Part of a propeller?

-Yes.

1:18:281:18:31

-It's sort of got a Deco feel.

-It has got a Deco feel. I think it's a good piece of wood.

1:18:311:18:36

I wouldn't know about it, but I appreciate its historic interest

1:18:361:18:41

to anyone who has a bi-plane.

1:18:411:18:43

You're so damning in your comments!

1:18:431:18:46

Not so cordial.

1:18:461:18:48

Now for the vintage Swiss.

1:18:481:18:50

It's a very good quality, stylish gentleman's watch.

1:18:501:18:54

It is, indeed. I prefer this style of watch, actually.

1:18:541:18:58

It's not the modern bling, bling, in your face.

1:18:581:19:01

Oh. Like that.

1:19:021:19:04

This is very, very stylish.

1:19:041:19:06

Because it's very similar to your own watch!

1:19:071:19:10

What about the muffin fork?

1:19:131:19:15

-I think it's a thing of beauty with that twisty handle.

-It's all silver.

1:19:151:19:19

-Is the handle hallmarked?

-Yes. It's all silver.

1:19:191:19:21

Yes, there's the Queen's head. I would be happy to pay 45.

1:19:211:19:27

-It's yours!

-Really?

-I paid 20.

-That's very cheap.

1:19:281:19:33

David's bargain fountain pen.

1:19:331:19:35

I think that's a 14-carat mounted Duofold Parker pen.

1:19:351:19:39

-It says rolled gold up here.

-It does not!

1:19:391:19:42

-It does.

-Doesn't. That's a registration mark!

1:19:421:19:45

-It's a Duofold.

-I imagine you paid about 15 for it.

1:19:471:19:50

-I paid for that £10.

-Yeah.

1:19:501:19:52

The Edwardian eating lot. Item one.

1:19:521:19:55

It doesn't get me going.

1:19:551:19:57

I don't lust after it. I don't want to run away with it.

1:19:571:20:00

-No.

-Do you know what I mean?

1:20:001:20:02

I think he does, David.

1:20:021:20:04

That came with this little object, to make baby's food

1:20:061:20:11

on the journey.

1:20:111:20:13

That's really sweet.

1:20:131:20:15

Harking back to the early 20th century.

1:20:151:20:18

It's full of, what shall I say, part of our social history.

1:20:181:20:21

-It is.

-In more ways than one.

-Absolutely. Very interesting.

1:20:211:20:25

David Harper's favourite buy.

1:20:251:20:27

Feast your eyes on that beauty.

1:20:271:20:31

It's hand-painted, hand-potted, and it's signed, by the way.

1:20:311:20:36

I tell you what, David Barby, you put that on a good period table

1:20:361:20:41

in a contemporary room, and it would look so modern.

1:20:411:20:45

That, brand-spanking new in some flash shop somewhere

1:20:451:20:48

would be hundreds of pounds

1:20:481:20:50

yet you can buy a real piece for 30 quid.

1:20:501:20:53

Antiques expensive? No.

1:20:531:20:55

I don't like it. I can't see the quality there, David.

1:20:551:20:59

Oh, dear. Here we go!

1:20:591:21:01

Right. Let's see how horrible I can be about something of yours.

1:21:011:21:05

I don't think I was horrible. I was non-committal.

1:21:051:21:08

Oooh!

1:21:081:21:10

Ooh, mind your back, David!

1:21:101:21:12

A little bit of rosewood.

1:21:131:21:15

A vast amount of rosewood.

1:21:161:21:18

1860.

1:21:181:21:20

-1870, maybe.

-I wouldn't say as late as that.

1:21:201:21:23

It's got no Arts and Crafts or aesthetic movement about it.

1:21:231:21:27

-OK. A nice quality piece of brown furniture.

-Not brown.

1:21:271:21:30

-It's not mahogany or oak. At the back...

-Sorry, what colour is it?

-It's rosewood.

1:21:301:21:34

-If you look at the back...

-Isn't that brown?

-No. It's got honey streaks in it.

1:21:341:21:39

Calm down, please!

1:21:391:21:40

It's 80 quid's-worth. 70 quid's-worth. £50-worth.

1:21:401:21:45

-I paid £40 for it.

-It's fine.

1:21:451:21:47

Another nice piece of rosewood.

1:21:471:21:50

This table is so similar to yours, it's unbelievable.

1:21:501:21:54

-Because of this, I think it's added great interest to it. How much did I pay?

-I think 45.

1:21:541:22:00

-45? No, I paid a bit more. 65.

-That's very, very good.

1:22:001:22:04

Liar! Finally, David Barby's treasure.

1:22:041:22:07

Ooh! I think that's a little sweetie.

1:22:071:22:11

-And it came with this?

-Came with that little box from the same house, according to the dealer.

1:22:111:22:17

I think it's really bonny. Really nice. I'd say 120 for the two. What did you pay?

1:22:171:22:22

-No, that's far too little.

-Come on.

-I don't even want to tell you.

1:22:221:22:26

-You have to tell me.

-I paid £250 for the two.

1:22:261:22:29

-Did you really?

-Yeah.

1:22:291:22:31

OK.

1:22:331:22:35

Is it me,

1:22:351:22:36

or is that clock ticking?

1:22:361:22:38

-I value your opinion, David.

-Thank you.

-I value your opinion.

1:22:401:22:44

Phew, I'm glad that's over!

1:22:441:22:46

I found the whole exercise today rather depressing.

1:22:461:22:52

David has that awful knack of putting in prices

1:22:521:22:56

obviously well under what I actually paid for them.

1:22:561:23:01

He gets horrified when I give a price, but I'm not being awful.

1:23:011:23:04

It's just that it's a risky one.

1:23:041:23:06

So we're both going to be hoping on that one, in opposite directions.

1:23:061:23:11

David does have that ability

1:23:111:23:13

of embellishing and making his objects sound absolutely wonderful

1:23:131:23:17

when in fact they're not.

1:23:171:23:19

I dislike intensely the late Japanese Satsuma pieces

1:23:191:23:25

because they are gaudy and fairground like.

1:23:251:23:27

After starting out on the Welsh coast at Aberystwyth,

1:23:271:23:31

this leg of our tour will conclude just over the English border

1:23:311:23:35

in Shrewsbury. That's how I pronounce it.

1:23:351:23:38

The English and the Welsh have fought over the place for years,

1:23:381:23:42

but the county town of Shropshire escaped the bombs of World War II

1:23:421:23:45

and currently has well over 600 listed buildings.

1:23:451:23:48

Street names such as Bear Steps, Dog Pole and Grope Lane

1:23:481:23:52

have remained unchanged for centuries, too.

1:23:521:23:55

David B and David H are crossing the River Severn

1:23:551:23:58

for a general sale at Hall's auctioneers.

1:23:581:24:00

I'm fearful that I shall make a loss today.

1:24:001:24:03

David Harper has spent £140 on five lots.

1:24:051:24:08

I've hardly spent any money. David will hit the roof!

1:24:081:24:11

While David Barby has, as promised,

1:24:111:24:14

lavished a whopping £355 also on five lots including this 19th-century time-piece.

1:24:141:24:21

Ooh, what have I done?

1:24:231:24:25

So, while the good people of Shrewsbury take a peek at the lots,

1:24:251:24:29

let's have a word with gavel-wielding Andrew Beeston.

1:24:291:24:32

The item that could do the best

1:24:321:24:35

is the William IV mahogany drum-head miniature time-piece.

1:24:351:24:39

Very nice. We will see.

1:24:391:24:42

My favourite has to be the propeller. Anything linked to aviation, very nice.

1:24:421:24:49

I'd love to have it on my wall.

1:24:491:24:51

Well, you can't have it. Ready for this?

1:24:511:24:53

-David, think lucky.

-I'll think lucky.

1:24:531:24:55

David Barby's fork.

1:24:561:24:58

With a crack.

1:24:581:25:00

£30. 30.

1:25:001:25:01

20, anywhere?

1:25:011:25:03

20? Ten. £10 bid. At 12 now.

1:25:031:25:06

At ten. Should be 12. £12.

1:25:061:25:09

12. 14. 16.

1:25:091:25:11

-18. 20. 22. £22. Four anywhere?

-It's so cheap.

1:25:111:25:16

At 22.

1:25:161:25:18

I'm surprised.

1:25:181:25:21

That tiny profit will be a loss after commission.

1:25:211:25:23

I'm concerned about the other lots.

1:25:241:25:26

David Harper's nice piece of parquetry.

1:25:261:25:29

Start the bidding. 50. 30 to start me. £30. 35.

1:25:291:25:34

-40. Five. 50. £50. Take the five.

-Come on!

1:25:341:25:39

£50 in the room now. At 50.

1:25:391:25:41

-Five now? We are selling at £50.

-No, David, no!

1:25:411:25:44

226.

1:25:441:25:46

Another loss. This ain't boding well.

1:25:461:25:49

That's a very bad start for me.

1:25:491:25:51

-You've got your Satsuma coming up.

-Yeah. Thank you very much(!)

1:25:511:25:55

Now, David B's picnic collection with child's bowl.

1:25:551:25:59

10 bid. £10 bid. Take the 12.

1:25:591:26:02

-At £10. Is there a 12? At £10. £12?

-Oh, God, this is terrible!

1:26:021:26:06

At £10.

1:26:061:26:08

-£10.

-What did that owe you? 15?

1:26:091:26:13

A familiar outcome today.

1:26:131:26:16

-You're smiling.

-I'm trying not to.

-I wish you wouldn't!

1:26:161:26:19

Now, what will Shrewsbury make of David H's prized Satsuma?

1:26:191:26:24

Start the bidding. Should be straightaway £40. 40. 40 bid.

1:26:241:26:27

£40. Take the five now. At £40. 45.

1:26:271:26:31

50. Five.

1:26:311:26:33

-55.

-Come on.

-£55 bid. 60?

1:26:331:26:36

At £55. Selling at £55.

1:26:361:26:41

-You've made a profit.

-It's a profit.

-It's a profit.

1:26:411:26:44

Yes. Be very grateful!

1:26:441:26:46

They may be rare, today.

1:26:461:26:48

I'm happy with that, just to make a profit.

1:26:481:26:50

The auctioneer likes David's propeller, but will anybody else?

1:26:501:26:54

30 bid. £30 I'm bid.

1:26:541:26:56

30. Five now. At £30.

1:26:561:26:58

Who's got the five? At 30. Starter's bid. 35.

1:26:581:27:02

40. Five.

1:27:021:27:03

50. £50 at the back there.

1:27:031:27:07

At 50. We shall sell. Make no mistakes.

1:27:071:27:10

-Oh, well.

-How do you feel about that?

-It's OK.

1:27:101:27:13

Another profit, minus commission.

1:27:131:27:16

Give me a smile.

1:27:161:27:17

Neck and neck. What can these do?

1:27:191:27:22

30. £30. There we go.

1:27:221:27:25

-Label your bottles. 30 bid.

-Come on, baby.

1:27:251:27:29

32 now? At 30. Who's got the two?

1:27:291:27:31

Bid's in front at £30. Maiden bid.

1:27:311:27:34

At 30.

1:27:341:27:36

-Ten quid.

-£10. That's all right.

1:27:361:27:38

No matter who made them. They made a profit.

1:27:381:27:41

That's the spirit!

1:27:411:27:42

Next, David Barby's what-not bottom bit.

1:27:431:27:47

Straightaway 10, 25, £30.

1:27:471:27:49

At £30. Take the five. At £30. Five now.

1:27:491:27:52

At £30. And five. 35.

1:27:521:27:55

At 35. 40. Five.

1:27:551:27:57

50. £50. Where's the five? Five.

1:27:571:28:00

-60. Five. £65 in the back.

-Should be worth more than that.

1:28:001:28:06

At 65.

1:28:061:28:08

-That made a profit.

-A profit, yes.

1:28:081:28:10

I think today's going to be who gets away with it day.

1:28:101:28:13

Next, David Harper's fountain pen.

1:28:141:28:17

20? No? Ten. Give me a start. Ten bid. 12. 15.

1:28:171:28:21

18 at the back? £18, gentleman's bid. 20 now.

1:28:211:28:26

At 18. Should be 20.

1:28:261:28:27

At £18.

1:28:271:28:29

-You've made a profit.

-At £18.

-Come on.

-Now selling at £18.

1:28:291:28:35

You've made a profit.

1:28:351:28:37

I made a profit. I know!

1:28:371:28:39

Yes, he has. Just.

1:28:391:28:41

I'm trying to tell myself, "Be happy."

1:28:411:28:44

But it's not a great profit, is it?

1:28:441:28:47

Now for David Barby's big risk.

1:28:471:28:50

The time-piece and the box.

1:28:501:28:52

Start the bidding straightaway with me. Commission bid. 180 I'm bid.

1:28:521:28:57

180.

1:28:571:28:58

190. At £190. Do I see 200?

1:28:581:29:02

At 190.

1:29:021:29:04

200. At £200. Commission bid against you now.

1:29:041:29:07

At £200, commission bid.

1:29:071:29:10

200.

1:29:101:29:12

Could that loss give David Harper an overall lead?

1:29:121:29:16

Very disappointing. But it's what I thought.

1:29:161:29:19

Finally the watch that reminded David Harper of his misspent youth.

1:29:191:29:22

20. Where are you? £20.

1:29:221:29:24

No? £20.

1:29:241:29:25

Ten to start it. Ten bid. £10 bid.

1:29:251:29:28

Take the 12. At £10.

1:29:281:29:29

At £10. Should be a 12.

1:29:291:29:33

-At £10.

-Should be 12.

-12 to sell.

-Come on!

1:29:331:29:37

At £10.

1:29:371:29:39

At £10.

1:29:391:29:41

-I'm trying! At £10.

-Try harder!

1:29:411:29:44

At ten. It's in Australia, though, it's upside-down.

1:29:441:29:47

-£10.

-It works.

1:29:471:29:49

£10.

1:29:491:29:50

For God's sake, I can't believe it.

1:29:501:29:54

David, don't worry. Don't worry.

1:29:541:29:58

I can't believe it.

1:29:581:30:00

That Swiss miss means a loss

1:30:001:30:03

but nothing like what David Barby suffered on his time-piece.

1:30:031:30:07

Somebody is one or two pounds ahead,

1:30:071:30:10

but I don't know who because my maths is so poor!

1:30:101:30:13

Good news, David Harper, because after a so-so day in Shropshire for both of them,

1:30:131:30:19

he's just crept into the lead.

1:30:191:30:21

David Harper began with £726.05

1:30:211:30:26

and made a loss of £70.46 after auction costs today.

1:30:261:30:31

So he has just £655.59 to spend tomorrow.

1:30:311:30:36

While David Harper started this round with £674.98,

1:30:361:30:41

and made a loss of £6.34 after auction costs,

1:30:411:30:44

leaving him today with £668.64 to spend tomorrow.

1:30:441:30:50

A lead of little more than £10.

1:30:501:30:53

-I am so relieved.

-You're so relieved.

-Absolutely.

1:30:541:30:57

-A victory for me, but not a great victory. A weak victory.

-£10!

1:30:571:31:02

It could have been substantially more, David Barby,

1:31:021:31:05

if you had failed on that clock and I had won on my Satsuma or my pen.

1:31:051:31:11

Quality will out!

1:31:111:31:13

Join us tomorrow to see David B sniff out a bargain

1:31:131:31:17

and David H create quite a stink.

1:31:171:31:21

Can you smell my aftershave?

1:31:211:31:22

-Slightly.

-I poured loads on!

1:31:221:31:25

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

1:31:471:31:50