Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 7

Antiques competition. There are some tactical shenanigans from rivals Philip Serrell and Catherine Southon, as they travel from Perth to Paisley.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each

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-and one big challenge!

-I'm here to declare war.

-Why?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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-This is hard.

-The aim is to trade up,

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-and hope each antique turns a profit.

-Come on!

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But it's not as easy as you might think,

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and things don't always go to plan.

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So, will they race off with a huge profit,

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-or come to a grinding halt?

-Whose side are you on?

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Travelling at speeds of almost 20 miles an hour,

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Catherine Southon and Philip Serrell are taking the high road through Scotland.

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Just to let you know, Phil, I have absolutely no sense of direction.

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Fantastic. That's going to work really well.

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-You're going to love having me.

-Oh, dear me!

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And while yesterday it was all blue skies and glorious countryside,

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today we're experiencing a slightly more traditional Scottish summer -

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grey skies and intermittent showers.

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-I just got some rain on my foot.

-No, that's the radiator leaking.

0:49:040:49:09

# The sun ain't gonna shine any more #

0:49:090:49:12

Still, at least it's not snowing,

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and nothing is going to dampen Catherine's desire

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to snatch the lead from Philip.

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My plan is to do a Phil Serrell.

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You have this amazing ability to home in on something pretty trashy,

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and you manage to turn it into gold.

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Well, she has a point.

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Despite being a fine-arts man,

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Philip's strategy seems to be "the dafter, the better".

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If you've got bunions, you put that in your shoe.

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I thought it was for doing unmentionable things to sheep or cattle.

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Catherine Southon, on the other hand, has an impeccable knowledge

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of scientific instruments and maritime art.

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-I haven't even seen the other side of that.

-You've bought it now.

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But as well as really knowing her stuff,

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she's also extremely fond of a hug.

0:49:590:50:02

Oh, you're so lovely!

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Our esteemed experts started the week with £200 each,

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but one auction later, it's a very different story.

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Come on!

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Having put most of her eggs in one basket,

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Catherine made a loss,

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and so starts this leg with just £186.90.

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I hate the way you're smiling now!

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Meanwhile, Philip's love of the daft and the different

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is making him a small fortune.

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He now has £339.54 to play with.

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-Oh, I'm sorry.

-No, you're not!

-I am, because I feel guilty now.

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SHE SIGHS

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This week's Road Trip takes us from the northeast of Scotland

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on to Glasgow and through the Lake District,

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final destination Liverpool.

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Today we're kicking off in Perth,

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and, all going according to plan, we should wind up in Paisley.

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Even without the sun, there's no denying

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Perth, on the banks of the River Tay,

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is one very striking city.

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It's the Parthenon, look! We're in Greece!

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I knew we'd been driving for a long time.

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It's here the whisky industry flourished,

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and the kings of Scotland were crowned,

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so, with such a rich history,

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you'd expect our next stop to be somewhere very grand indeed.

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Hey, here we are!

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But...no.

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For the second day in a row, we're off to a car-boot sale.

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I hope these two know what they're doing.

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You always find tomato plants, don't you?

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And second-hand foot spas. There we are.

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-Well done.

-Beautifully placed.

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That's a wonderful bit of car parking.

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Yeah, nice one. Well, having a quick scout around,

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it's not exactly overflowing with antiques and gorgeous collectables.

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I told you! You always find a second-hand foot spa at a boot sale.

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And as for the tomato plants, they're just over here -

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40p each or three for a pound.

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Though maybe I've been a bit harsh -

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after all, Philip's already uncovered a vintage tea service.

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One sugar in mine, please. How much is that, my love?

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-£10.

-Get out of here, you!

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My love, this can't be worth a tenner. This is just lunacy.

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This opens up. You can't... I mean, what a performance,

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if you want a cup of tea! I mean, look at it.

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Looks like Friar Tuck's head, that, doesn't it?

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-Does it all match, because...

-No, it doesn't.

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-Oh, there you are, you see.

-Only the teapot and the coffee pot.

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I don't know why I'm looking at it. It's horrible.

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-What's the best you can do that for?

-Ten!

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Oh, get out of here!

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I think Philip's finally met his match.

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Perhaps Catherine's having more luck.

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Bush radio. This is a collectable model, from the '60s to the '70s,

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and then they reproduced this later on.

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This is one of the original ones, but I think it's seen better days.

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Without a doubt, the Bush radio is a style icon.

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This particular model dates back to 1959,

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and owes its phenomenal success

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to a then newly identified demographic, the British teenager,

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though sadly this isn't a market Catherine can count on today.

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-Is it working?

-Before the battery ran out, it was working.

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And you're asking for ten?

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-And that's a bargain.

-Could you not do eight on that?

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-Ten's my... I'm really, really -

-Oh, you are mean!

0:53:310:53:35

-No, I'm not mean. I'm just -

-It's in a really bad way,

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-because it's a bit bashed here.

-Well, let's try nine, then.

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-How about the nine?

-Could you go to five?

-No.

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-Really?

-No, because I've already come down, you see.

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-Shall we say seven and be friends?

-7.50.

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-Ooh, 7.50!

-Buying a Bush radio,

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-an original Bush radio, for 7.50...

-Go on, then.

0:53:550:53:58

-This lady knows what she's doing.

-There we are.

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Oh, my gosh. It's all falling apart.

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I'll let you put it back together again before I take it.

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Oh, dear! And as for the teapot saga...

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-You won't take less than a tenner?

-I might, later on in the day.

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But I'll be gone then. The moment will have just evaporated.

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Ooh! Time to move on, I think,

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to four 19th-century box planes being sold as a set

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by guess who!

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-They're £4 each.

-Who gave...

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Where does this pricing structure come from?

0:54:290:54:31

If you're, you know, a carpenter,

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and you're working with something like that,

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isn't that a fantastic thing? That bit of wood there

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holds this blade in here,

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and if you look just where my finger is there,

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you can see that there's a maker's name on the blade.

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How much for them?

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-12.

-They're not worth £12, are they?

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I was thinking of a fiver for the lot.

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Oh, no way! No.

0:54:590:55:01

Try again, then.

0:55:010:55:04

-£12.

-No, no! You've got to move.

0:55:040:55:07

There has to be movement in this business.

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I'll give you my best deal. I'll give you eight quid for 'em,

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and I'll pay you now in hard Scottish cash.

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No!

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My goodness, they're a tough bunch up here in Perth!

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But can they resist a Philip Serrell sob-story?

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Listen, if I could tell you about my life...

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I'm having a terrible time of it, right? I'm a long way from home.

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I'm struggling to find anything.

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It's... It's been really tough, really.

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If I could buy those for £8, I could just see myself coming out of it.

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It would just help me on the way to recovery.

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-Oh, you are mean!

-I'm not mean. I'm shrewd.

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Is she ever! And now Catherine's come to rub salt in Philip's wounds.

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He is so mean, this chap.

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What you should do, when Philip comes up, is double your prices.

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-This lady, trust me...

-Stick to your guns!

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She needs no advice. I can feel myself getting kippered

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-before I start.

-You love it!

0:56:040:56:06

Right, you... Off you go, you.

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There's four of 'em. Four into 12 is £3 each, isn't it?

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I'll give you a fiver for two, and I promise I'm going to get out of your life for good.

0:56:130:56:18

-OK.

-You're an angel!

0:56:180:56:20

-There you are, my love. Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

0:56:200:56:23

You're an angel.

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Just when it looks as though Phil's come out on top,

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-there's treachery afoot.

-Right, where were those planes?

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Aha! How much could you sell those two for?

0:56:310:56:34

For a bit of fun, could you do them for two?

0:56:340:56:37

Oh!

0:56:370:56:39

If I can get them at a cheaper price then have a competition,

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because they're nowhere near as good, and they're split and damaged...

0:56:420:56:46

-Three.

-Oh, go on. Two. It would be such fun!

0:56:460:56:49

Go on!

0:56:490:56:51

Oh, OK, just so I don't have to take them home.

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That's good. You don't want these at home.

0:56:540:56:56

Thank you so much. Wonderful. Thank you. Love it!

0:56:560:57:00

Oh, Catherine, you are awful! But I like you.

0:57:000:57:03

Are you ready? Here we go.

0:57:030:57:05

Come along, baby. Yay! Whoo!

0:57:050:57:09

That was quite smooth, for you.

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And with that we say a fond farewell to Perth,

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and head towards the coastal village of South Queensferry.

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This quaint little place sits at the foot

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of one of Scotland's best-known icons, the Forth Railway Bridge,

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which officially opened in 1890

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thanks to 4,000 workers, 54,000 tons of steel

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and six and a half million rivets.

0:57:340:57:36

Look at that! That is magnificent.

0:57:360:57:39

So, where does it actually stretch from?

0:57:390:57:41

-From here to there.

-I knew you'd give me a decent answer.

0:57:410:57:45

South Queensferry also boasts a unique collection of buildings,

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some of which date back as far as the 15th century.

0:57:500:57:53

Oh, sweet! Oh, I like this.

0:57:530:57:56

-HE GIBBERS

-# I'm all shook up #

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-Have a good one, my love.

-And you. I'll see you later. Bye!

0:58:000:58:03

It's on this cobbled high street

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that you'll find Sea Kist, an antiques store

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which reflects the village's seafaring past,

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and it's owned by Jenny, who has a love of anything

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and everything with a nautical connection.

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-Can I have a look round?

-Certainly.

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There's a big maritime theme going on here.

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Catherine's first pick, this rather impressive sextant.

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Got the filters, and you would use this to find your way at sea.

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-How much do you want for this?

-That one's £650.

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-650.

-They're very difficult to get with the lenses in good condition.

0:58:360:58:41

Oh, dear. Too much.

0:58:410:58:44

Jenny, I do like that. A box for cigarettes.

0:58:440:58:48

-How much is that one?

-That one's 40.

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SHE GASPS £40. That's quite a lot of money.

0:58:500:58:53

I don't think I'd pay any more than £15, to be honest,

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because it is a cardboard box.

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In other words, too risky.

0:58:580:59:01

Jenny, I'm interested in this games set here.

0:59:010:59:04

Oh, dear.

0:59:040:59:06

-How long has that been there for?

-A few years, I think.

0:59:060:59:10

I know how to spot a bargain, don't I?

0:59:100:59:13

And so, too dusty?

0:59:130:59:15

Oh, Jenny, I don't think this is going to be a winner.

0:59:150:59:18

As it turns out, this South Queensferry girl

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is a lifelong collector of anything to do with the Forth Bridge.

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She even lives next door to it,

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so Catherine, ever on the lookout for a bargain,

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has now wangled her way into Jenny's home.

0:59:300:59:32

Wow. I am loving your kitchen!

0:59:340:59:37

This is funky.

0:59:370:59:39

-Different.

-It's different, but it's great.

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Jenny has more than 200 pieces in her collection,

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and claims she can spot a Forth Bridge collectable at 50 paces.

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I was born and brought up just along the coast a little bit,

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-so it's also always said "home" to me.

-Right.

0:59:540:59:57

-You know, and...

-That's lovely.

-Yeah, it's great.

0:59:571:00:01

You've got a fantastic view of it from your kitchen window.

1:00:011:00:04

You are really passionate about this.

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I'm passionate about the bridge,

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but I'm passionate about the human aspect of the bridge.

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It's more than just the girders.

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It's the fact that other people come down here,

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they see the bridge, and all these things that I collect

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are little things that people want to take away with them.

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They want to take something home of the bridge,

1:00:241:00:27

with that image on it, and that's the bit that fascinates me.

1:00:271:00:31

Jenny's favourite pieces commemorate Thomas Bouch,

1:00:311:00:34

who was originally employed to design the Forth Bridge,

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but early into construction was fired

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when another of his designs, the iconic Tay Bridge, collapsed

1:00:411:00:45

and killed 75 people.

1:00:451:00:47

He'd started the construction of his Forth Bridge,

1:00:471:00:50

and you can just see a small part of it

1:00:501:00:53

under the middle cantilever where the little light is.

1:00:531:00:57

-That's all that remains of Bouch's bridge.

-Oh, really?

1:00:571:01:00

As soon as the Tay Bridge disaster happened...

1:01:001:01:03

-They moved it on to someone else.

-He was taken off the project.

1:01:031:01:06

-I'm glad, or this might have...

-It would have looked different.

1:01:061:01:10

It wouldn't have been the bridge we have. The bridge we see today,

1:01:101:01:14

at that time, after that disaster happening,

1:01:141:01:17

they had to build something that not only was strong

1:01:171:01:22

but had to look strong, so that you had the confidence of the public

1:01:221:01:26

to use it. I think it was a much slimmer bridge.

1:01:261:01:29

Much slimmer.

1:01:291:01:30

Whilst none of this collection is for sale,

1:01:301:01:33

Jenny does have a few items

1:01:331:01:35

that might satisfy Catherine's desire for something nautical.

1:01:351:01:39

This is stuff that is heading towards the shop eventually.

1:01:391:01:43

My eye is drawn to these.

1:01:431:01:45

Nice iron dividers. I would say they're probably...

1:01:451:01:49

for a map or something like that.

1:01:491:01:51

Well, unlike Catherine, I'm no maritime expert,

1:01:511:01:55

but I can tell you that, simply put, dividers measure distance.

1:01:551:02:00

I would say that once upon a time there would have been a screw there,

1:02:001:02:04

-but I like them.

-Yeah. They're nice.

1:02:041:02:07

And then this parallel rule, I love the hinges on that.

1:02:071:02:11

They're really nicely made.

1:02:111:02:13

I would say that something like this is really, again, for mapping.

1:02:131:02:18

I love the way you can see how it's been folded down,

1:02:181:02:21

and it's got a lovely mark, a nice sign of wear there.

1:02:211:02:24

This particular parallel rule was produced by Captain Fields,

1:02:241:02:28

who in the 19th century improved on the 300-year-old design

1:02:281:02:31

by marking degrees on its outer edges.

1:02:311:02:34

How much are you wanting for these?

1:02:341:02:36

I was thinking about £25 each for them.

1:02:361:02:40

Each?

1:02:401:02:42

Bit of damage there.

1:02:421:02:44

Could we do a bit of a deal on these,

1:02:441:02:46

-bearing in mind they've both got problems?

-They have, yes.

1:02:461:02:50

-Um...

-Quite major problems.

-Quite major problems.

1:02:501:02:53

Right, right.

1:02:531:02:54

I think we could come down to 35 for the two of them.

1:02:541:02:58

Hmm. Would you take 20 on them?

1:02:581:03:01

25 would be better.

1:03:011:03:04

Can we do 20?

1:03:041:03:06

22?

1:03:061:03:08

Ooh!

1:03:081:03:10

-20?

-I think 22 would be fair.

1:03:101:03:13

-22 is very fair.

-OK.

-I'll be happy with that.

1:03:131:03:15

Thank you so much.

1:03:151:03:17

While Catherine has three auction lots under her polka-dot belt,

1:03:171:03:22

Philip is lagging behind with just one.

1:03:221:03:25

-Hi, lovely, how you doing?

-Lovely.

1:03:251:03:28

Look at that. Wing mirrors! They're not for lipstick after all, are they?

1:03:281:03:32

SHE LAUGHS

1:03:321:03:34

But as they say, tomorrow is another day.

1:03:341:03:37

Day two kicks off with what was once reputed to be

1:03:391:03:43

the second city of the empire.

1:03:431:03:46

Where else but the robust and exciting Glasgow,

1:03:461:03:49

where our experts will continue to shop till they drop?

1:03:491:03:52

Though currently they're taking a leisurely drive along the Clyde,

1:03:521:03:57

which was once home to 38 shipyards and 100,000 working men.

1:03:571:04:01

Today it can be just as lively,

1:04:011:04:03

as this is where some of the world's most famous musicians come to perform.

1:04:031:04:08

-That is amazing, isn't it?

-We're not in Sydney, are we?

1:04:081:04:12

So far Philip's barely opened his wallet.

1:04:121:04:14

So, nothing new there, then! He's spent just £5

1:04:141:04:17

on two box planes, which leaves him with over £330

1:04:171:04:22

burning a hole in his pocket.

1:04:221:04:24

I want you to spend a decent amount of money today.

1:04:241:04:27

No, you don't. You just want me to lose a decent amount of money.

1:04:271:04:30

-Well, that would be quite handy.

-Crash And Burn Serrell, that's all you want.

1:04:301:04:34

As for Catherine, she's making every penny count

1:04:341:04:38

in order to seize the lead. So far she's picked up three auction lots

1:04:381:04:42

for just £31.50,

1:04:421:04:44

and has £150 still in the kitty.

1:04:441:04:46

-Are you going to do some serious buying?

-Might do.

1:04:481:04:50

Might do? Ooh!

1:04:501:04:52

Philip's next port of call is a hidden gem

1:04:521:04:56

on a quiet industrial street next to the Clyde.

1:04:561:04:59

It's called the Glasgow Antiques Centre.

1:04:591:05:01

So you're treading the boards, and I'm off to an antiques centre.

1:05:011:05:05

-Aren't you going to drop me off?

-No! The walk can keep you warm.

1:05:051:05:09

Thanks a lot! Make sure you buy something decent.

1:05:091:05:12

-It's up that hill somewhere.

-Thanks.

1:05:121:05:15

John, how are you? Are you sure this place is big enough?

1:05:151:05:19

Blimey O'Riley!

1:05:191:05:21

With more than 30 different antique dealers

1:05:211:05:24

exhibiting under one roof, there's everything here,

1:05:241:05:27

from the finest of Victorian furniture

1:05:271:05:29

to a tartan travel blanket.

1:05:291:05:31

The girl I'm travelling with is getting very cold in the car,

1:05:311:05:34

so this will be great over her knees. Will a fiver buy that?

1:05:341:05:38

Cos that's all I've got.

1:05:381:05:40

-It would have to be a tenner.

-Oh, I can't do that.

1:05:401:05:43

She's going to get pneumonia, and that's going to be your fault now.

1:05:431:05:47

Suffice to say, our hero is in the right place

1:05:471:05:49

to find something unusual. But what to choose, Philip?

1:05:491:05:52

What to choose?

1:05:521:05:54

Oh, I love that. It's a kettle drum.

1:05:541:05:56

But these things make great coffee tables, you know?

1:05:561:06:00

But you can imagine that with either a glass top

1:06:001:06:03

or even a copper top... It would be fantastic.

1:06:031:06:06

And the way you tune it is not by just whacking it in the middle,

1:06:061:06:10

but you...go all the way round the outside.

1:06:101:06:13

John?

1:06:131:06:15

How much is this old thing in the corner?

1:06:151:06:18

Would it be as much as a hundred quid?

1:06:181:06:20

-Definitely.

-It would be?

-Yes.

1:06:201:06:23

Do you think there's a maker's name on it anywhere?

1:06:231:06:26

It looks like Liverpool. This is clearly Ringo Starr's first drum.

1:06:261:06:30

-HE LAUGHS

-Look. Absolutely clear.

1:06:301:06:32

Look. Liverpool! What's the best price you could do for this?

1:06:321:06:36

What's the very best?

1:06:361:06:38

Bottom? £100.

1:06:381:06:40

Is that it? Finished? It's not even worth offering him 90 for it?

1:06:401:06:44

No, definitely not.

1:06:441:06:45

I think it's a cool thing. The thing is,

1:06:451:06:48

there's every chance that everybody else will think I'm stark raving bonkers.

1:06:481:06:53

-What can I say?

-100 quid. Go on.

1:06:531:06:55

Steady, Philip. I think I can see the dust coming out of your wallet.

1:06:551:06:58

Having travelled on foot,

1:07:021:07:04

Catherine's finally reached her next destination -

1:07:041:07:07

the world's oldest surviving music hall,

1:07:071:07:10

right here in Glasgow's Merchant City.

1:07:101:07:13

This important piece of our history is called the Britannia Panopticon,

1:07:131:07:18

although for 60 years it was closed and virtually forgotten.

1:07:181:07:21

Wow! Here we are!

1:07:211:07:23

So, it all happened here.

1:07:231:07:25

Its restoration, even its very survival,

1:07:251:07:28

is thanks to this woman, Judith Bowers.

1:07:281:07:31

This, all round here, it makes me think of a ship.

1:07:311:07:35

This is almost like a galleried stern up here.

1:07:351:07:38

It certainly has a lot of shipbuilding behind it,

1:07:381:07:41

because it was moonlighting shipbuilders that built the balcony.

1:07:411:07:45

Oh, right. Aha!

1:07:451:07:47

Founded in 1857, the Britannia was an instant success,

1:07:471:07:52

with more than a thousand of Glasgow's east-enders

1:07:521:07:56

crammed in four times a day to see saucy dancing girls,

1:07:561:08:00

singers and comic turns.

1:08:001:08:02

It was closed temporarily in 1905,

1:08:021:08:04

because everybody was leaving the old Victorian music halls

1:08:041:08:08

to go to the new-fangled variety theatres.

1:08:081:08:10

-Right.

-And during its closure, they modified the building

1:08:101:08:14

by converting the attic into a rooftop carnival, waxworks

1:08:141:08:18

and freak show, and the basement under the public house into a zoo.

1:08:181:08:22

Oh, right, to try and get a wider audience.

1:08:221:08:26

And that's why it become known as Panopticon,

1:08:261:08:29

"pan" meaning "everything", "opti", "to see",

1:08:291:08:31

-in one building.

-That was very clever thinking, wasn't it?

1:08:311:08:34

The noisy crowds would make their opinion known of every act,

1:08:341:08:38

cheering the good and pelting the bad

1:08:381:08:40

with whatever ammunition came to hand,

1:08:401:08:42

including fish heads and shipyard rivets,

1:08:421:08:45

giving the music hall a reputation for leaving no turn un-stoned.

1:08:451:08:49

One third of our audience was boys aged between nine and 13,

1:08:491:08:55

and their favourite sport was to try and wee over the top of the balcony

1:08:551:08:58

-and hit the comic on the stage below.

-Oh, my word!

1:08:581:09:02

There's a great story from 1904 about the ladies' orchestra

1:09:021:09:05

that used to sit underneath the balcony,

1:09:051:09:08

and they used to pray, before going into the orchestra bar,

1:09:081:09:11

that the boys above had full bladders,

1:09:111:09:13

because if they didn't they didn't have enough pressure to hit the act.

1:09:131:09:16

-It would trickle down their...

-Oh, that's ghastly!

-Pretty rough house.

1:09:161:09:20

But one performer not intimidated by this tough Glasgow audience

1:09:201:09:25

was the 16 year old Stan Laurel,

1:09:251:09:28

who made his world debut right here.

1:09:281:09:31

Stan managed to make it through one joke,

1:09:311:09:33

and apparently the audience thought it was pretty awful,

1:09:331:09:37

so Stan apparently started to make his exit from the stage.

1:09:371:09:41

So he took off his dad's best hat to take a bow,

1:09:411:09:45

but as he did so, he fumbled it and dropped it

1:09:451:09:47

in a kind of familiar-today Stan Laurel fashion,

1:09:471:09:51

and the audience started to titter.

1:09:511:09:53

He stepped forward to collect the hat,

1:09:531:09:55

and kicked it into the orchestra bar.

1:09:551:09:57

Audience tittered louder. He's now sidestepping off the stage,

1:09:571:10:01

and the stage manager, George, came on with the stage hook

1:10:011:10:05

to get the trapeze bar down.

1:10:051:10:06

The hook caught in Stan's dad's best frock coat

1:10:061:10:09

and tore it clean up the back.

1:10:091:10:12

And that was it. The audience was in absolute hysterics,

1:10:121:10:16

and the rest, as they say, is history.

1:10:161:10:18

By the 1930s, music halls were closing,

1:10:181:10:21

and cinema was taking its place.

1:10:211:10:24

In fact, Glasgow had more cinemas per head of population

1:10:241:10:27

than any other European city.

1:10:271:10:30

But 60 years on, Judith began restoring the Britannia,

1:10:311:10:34

and soon discovered 3,000 pieces of history

1:10:341:10:37

literally under the seats.

1:10:371:10:40

I just love these little Edwardian toffee boxes.

1:10:401:10:43

You've got someone sitting up there watching the comedy act,

1:10:431:10:48

munching away on their cream caramel toffees,

1:10:481:10:51

and then just tossing the box behind. It's just wonderful.

1:10:511:10:54

Great little piece of history, isn't it?

1:10:541:10:57

Now, this is a really nicely pristine cigarette packet,

1:10:571:11:02

-but inside there is still...

-Oh, a cigarette!

-..one left.

1:11:021:11:06

So, this was like a real working man's...

1:11:061:11:10

You did occasionally get what they called the mashers in

1:11:101:11:13

-with their Judys.

-The mashers!

1:11:131:11:16

The posh men, who would bring in a certain class of lady

1:11:161:11:20

-to hide up in the balcony with.

-Oh, really?

1:11:201:11:23

-Oh, yes.

-Say no more!

1:11:231:11:24

Having been closed since 1938, the venue finally re-opened its doors

1:11:241:11:30

in 2003 as the Britannia Panopticon.

1:11:301:11:34

So, really this is all down to you?

1:11:341:11:36

Well, and a stalwart bunch of volunteers as well.

1:11:361:11:40

You should be extremely proud of this,

1:11:401:11:42

because this is a wonderful piece of Glasgow's heritage.

1:11:421:11:45

Judith, thank you so much. It's been such a treat.

1:11:451:11:49

Our experts' next and final stop on this leg

1:11:501:11:54

is Glasgow's west end, and with the auction looming,

1:11:541:11:56

they haven't a moment to lose.

1:11:561:11:59

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. That looks pretty impressive.

1:11:591:12:04

-How are you feeling?

-It's a bit cold. That's how I'm feeling.

1:12:041:12:08

Fortunately, Ruthven Mews is 11 individual antique stores

1:12:081:12:12

in one arcade, selling a range of collectables

1:12:121:12:15

from the last two centuries,

1:12:151:12:17

so our duo should be spoiled for choice here.

1:12:171:12:20

There's a lot of what I would call vintage stuff in here,

1:12:201:12:23

but I'm not sure it's me.

1:12:231:12:26

I think I'm probably veteran rather than vintage.

1:12:261:12:29

Catherine, on the other hand, wants to spend a maximum of £50

1:12:291:12:33

out of her £150 kitty.

1:12:331:12:36

Tell me what you think of this.

1:12:361:12:38

Oh, my word, isn't that fabulous?

1:12:381:12:40

We sent a picture to Tiffany UK, and they cannot find a design anywhere.

1:12:401:12:45

That's brilliant!

1:12:451:12:48

So they think it may have been a commission.

1:12:481:12:51

-Watch how the light changes.

-That is beautiful.

1:12:511:12:53

-It could be worth about £1,000.

-Here's hoping.

1:12:531:12:56

-You sure you don't want to sell that?

-Positive.

1:12:561:12:59

Now, as for Philip's quest to find something even older than himself,

1:13:011:13:06

thanks to Steven here, it seems to be going rather well.

1:13:061:13:09

What I wanted to look at was the truncheon, which is that.

1:13:091:13:14

I think that's police, because it's had a painted handle.

1:13:141:13:18

And it's had VR there, which is Victoria Regina.

1:13:181:13:22

In the Victorian era, the policeman's truncheon

1:13:221:13:25

was essentially his warrant card, as the royal crest attached to it

1:13:251:13:29

indicated his authority, and when said truncheon left official service,

1:13:291:13:34

often with the person who used it, the crest was sometimes removed.

1:13:341:13:38

I sort of quite like that, really.

1:13:381:13:41

But I'm thinking... Can I have a look at the bell as well,

1:13:431:13:46

and I'll tell you what I'm thinking. This would be the same date as this.

1:13:461:13:51

I think it could be a similar date. 100 years ago, anyway.

1:13:511:13:54

-Sort of 1880, something like that?

-I would think so.

1:13:541:13:57

I think at auction that that is between £15 and £25 worth,

1:13:571:14:02

and I think that is between £30 and £50 worth.

1:14:021:14:05

I'd like to give you 50 quid the two.

1:14:051:14:07

-I wouldn't like to take it, though.

-Well, I appreciate that,

1:14:071:14:10

but life's full of the imponderable negotiations.

1:14:101:14:14

I'll take 55 for the two.

1:14:141:14:17

Can I toss you for it?

1:14:171:14:19

-Cos I always win if I toss for it.

-OK. 50 or 60.

1:14:201:14:24

My goodness, Philip's lost for words!

1:14:251:14:28

Though not for long.

1:14:281:14:30

You and I are in a very lucky position now,

1:14:301:14:32

because you don't have to sell, I don't have to buy,

1:14:321:14:35

but you'd like to sell and I'd like to buy.

1:14:351:14:38

-Does that work out all right?

-That sounds right.

1:14:381:14:41

I think that's going to make £30 to £50 at auction,

1:14:411:14:43

and I think this is going to make between 15 and 25.

1:14:431:14:46

So the best I can give you is 50 quid.

1:14:461:14:50

I'd love to buy it for that, but I can't give you any more.

1:14:501:14:52

Call it 55. It's a good reduction on them.

1:14:521:14:56

If you can say 50, I'll have them off you now.

1:14:561:14:58

-Go on, then.

-You're a gentleman, sir.

1:14:581:15:00

Can you count that out? I think there's probably just 50 quid there.

1:15:001:15:04

-Exactly. You had it all planned.

-Right. Thank you.

1:15:041:15:08

Catherine needs something that will absolutely kill at auction,

1:15:081:15:12

and thanks to young Bob here, I think she's found it.

1:15:121:15:16

Now, I am going straight for this.

1:15:161:15:20

This is absolutely gorgeous!

1:15:201:15:22

It's a little Gladstone bag, a little doctor's Gladstone bag,

1:15:221:15:27

with an inkwell inside. Can you open it up for me,

1:15:271:15:30

cos I'm just...

1:15:301:15:32

-There you are.

-Isn't that cute?

1:15:321:15:35

-It's all there.

-That is just the sweetest thing.

1:15:351:15:38

I love things like this. This is probably - what, late Victorian?

1:15:381:15:42

-I've just said 1800s.

-1800s, 1890?

1:15:421:15:45

So it probably would have belonged to a doctor at one time.

1:15:451:15:48

He would have had this on his... Now, on your ticket...

1:15:481:15:51

..you are asking a staggering 155 for it.

1:15:531:15:56

What would you be able to do on that?

1:15:561:15:59

Not an awful lot. It was expensive.

1:15:591:16:01

Best I could do would be 130.

1:16:011:16:04

I'll be totally honest. I don't think I could pay more than 100.

1:16:071:16:10

I don't think I could let it go for that.

1:16:101:16:13

-I'd need more than that for it.

-It would make me so happy,

1:16:131:16:16

because I just absolutely love this.

1:16:161:16:20

Genius. It's wonderful. It just...

1:16:201:16:23

Ooh!

1:16:231:16:25

Nothing compares to this now.

1:16:251:16:27

Even at £130, that's almost every penny Catherine has.

1:16:271:16:32

It's a bit of a gamble!

1:16:321:16:34

Once I've got something in my head,

1:16:341:16:37

like the inkwell, something really beautiful,

1:16:371:16:40

I find it really hard to think about anything else,

1:16:401:16:43

to look at anything else, cos I'm constantly thinking,

1:16:431:16:46

"beautiful inkwell", and I can't concentrate on anything else.

1:16:461:16:49

But I've got to really focus.

1:16:491:16:52

But Catherine's not the only one tempted

1:16:521:16:54

by Bob's gorgeous but rather expensive knickknacks.

1:16:541:16:58

Philip's gone and found himself a naval sector.

1:16:581:17:01

Now, I can't sell ivory unless it's pre-1947.

1:17:031:17:07

-It's 19th century.

-I would think it's 1850, 1860.

1:17:071:17:09

-Something like that.

-It's basically where you plot a map.

1:17:091:17:13

A 19th-century sailor's satnav, isn't it,

1:17:131:17:16

is the simplest way of putting it. You'd have been on your vessel,

1:17:161:17:19

going around Cape Horn or wherever, and you'd have had your charts out,

1:17:191:17:24

and this would have been used to work out or plot

1:17:241:17:28

-where you were and what your route is.

-That's right.

1:17:281:17:31

It's 75, is it? What's the best you can do on that?

1:17:311:17:33

I could do a bit more. I could do it for 45.

1:17:331:17:36

For this game, I've got to try and give you 30 quid for it.

1:17:361:17:39

-Why don't we split the difference and make it 35?

-I'll give you 30,

1:17:391:17:43

-cos I think it's fascinating.

-OK.

-And the real fun thing about this,

1:17:431:17:47

it's really Catherine's thing. It'll be quite nice.

1:17:471:17:50

It'll be really nice just to whip that from under her nose.

1:17:501:17:53

I've only got one worry, and that's, like...

1:17:531:17:57

Catherine Southon is a well known expert

1:17:571:18:02

in marine and scientific instruments,

1:18:021:18:04

and this was six inches under her nose.

1:18:041:18:07

Why didn't she buy it?

1:18:071:18:09

I hope it's not worrying time.

1:18:091:18:11

Thank you ever so much. Bye-bye, now. Bye-bye.

1:18:121:18:15

Actually, Catherine has other things weighing heavy on her mind.

1:18:151:18:20

I absolutely love that little Gladstone-bag inkwell.

1:18:201:18:24

It's beautiful. But I don't know whether to buy it

1:18:241:18:27

and gamble with it, or just quit while I'm kind of ahead.

1:18:271:18:33

Or you could always buy something else.

1:18:331:18:36

Steven, hello. I'm just wondering about this, here.

1:18:361:18:40

I'm interested in your little hip flask there.

1:18:401:18:43

-Is that silver plate on the top?

-I think it is,

1:18:431:18:46

but it's a little cup, a telescopic cup.

1:18:461:18:49

-That intrigues me.

-Quite unusual.

-So when you say it's telescopic...

1:18:491:18:52

Oh, that's quite nice, isn't it? So you could have more

1:18:521:18:56

than you bargained for. THEY LAUGH

1:18:561:18:58

-What could you do on that?

-£20, if you wanted to get that.

1:18:581:19:03

Nice thing, nice condition.

1:19:031:19:05

-Can you do 15 on it?

-I'll stick on 20.

1:19:051:19:09

-Can we meet halfway and say 18?

-No, I'll stick on 20 on that.

1:19:101:19:14

-It's a nice thing.

-I'm happy with that.

1:19:141:19:16

-Thank you.

-I think that's a fair price.

1:19:161:19:19

Thanks, Steven.

1:19:191:19:21

Right, then. Time for our experts to reveal to each other

1:19:211:19:24

what they've bought. The venue, a former parish church,

1:19:241:19:27

now called Oran Mor, which means "the melody of life".

1:19:271:19:30

This is a bit left-field, this,

1:19:301:19:34

but I bought this kettle drum.

1:19:341:19:36

Oh, my word!

1:19:361:19:39

And it's by a Liverpool maker, and I just think it's wicked.

1:19:391:19:42

My big question was, "Why?"

1:19:421:19:45

-I think you can do a hundred and one things with it.

-You can play it.

1:19:451:19:48

But you can convert it into a table.

1:19:481:19:51

I think that's fabulous, Philip.

1:19:511:19:53

What I love is that you home in on something

1:19:531:19:56

-that nobody else...

-In their right mind.

1:19:561:19:58

..in the whole world would look at.

1:19:581:20:01

I think I pinched it, because it was £100.

1:20:011:20:03

-I'd never buy it myself...

-Would you not?

1:20:031:20:06

-..but I think it's brilliant.

-Come on. Show me yours.

1:20:061:20:09

Carrying on the music theme, this is an original.

1:20:091:20:11

It's not your repro. It's 1960s. It's in terrible condition,

1:20:111:20:15

-but for £7.50...

-Does it work?

-Course it does!

1:20:151:20:19

-You mean -

-We'll move on.

1:20:191:20:21

If we're going to do the car-boot sale...

1:20:211:20:23

-Oh, yeah. I saw this.

-They're fairly "plane".

1:20:231:20:26

-THEY LAUGH

-And these were a fiver.

1:20:261:20:30

-What do you think they'll make?

-Ten to 20 quid.

1:20:301:20:33

-Well, that's nice you say that, Phil.

-Why's that, my love?

1:20:331:20:36

-Because...

-Oh, here we go. I think they're quite nice.

1:20:361:20:39

What did you pay for these? Let me guess - £4.

1:20:391:20:42

-Two, I think.

-£2. Yeah, well.

1:20:421:20:44

-You bought the better two.

-I think I did.

1:20:441:20:47

When you're not looking, I'm hoping to swap them over.

1:20:471:20:50

-Why does that not surprise me?

-Go on, then. What's next?

1:20:501:20:53

HE RINGS BELL

1:20:531:20:56

-That is loud!

-But isn't that a great handle?

1:20:561:20:59

If you're going to buy a bell, that's the one to buy.

1:20:591:21:02

You are too young to remember, but when I started,

1:21:021:21:04

-all auctioneers had a bell.

-Oh, gosh!

1:21:041:21:07

They'd ring it five minutes before the start of the sale. 20 quid!

1:21:071:21:11

I like that. That is a loud clapper, though.

1:21:111:21:13

Let's hope it goes like the clappers. What's next?

1:21:131:21:16

-I bought these...

-Yeah.

1:21:161:21:18

..with these.

1:21:181:21:20

Those have got "Southon" written all over them. Oh, those are lovely.

1:21:201:21:24

-Isn't that nice?

-Yeah.

-Parallel rule,

1:21:241:21:26

-but just look at those lovely hinges.

-You're the expert.

1:21:261:21:30

-I paid £22 for the two.

-You completely robbed this poor person.

1:21:301:21:34

-No, I haven't!

-How do you sleep at night?

1:21:341:21:36

Oh, you are... SHE SIGHS

1:21:361:21:38

I bought this primarily because I thought,

1:21:381:21:40

-if you do give me any trouble...

-You going to whack me round the head?

1:21:401:21:45

I'm going to beat you about the head and body with my truncheon.

1:21:451:21:48

-OK. That's quite nice, actually.

-Yeah.

1:21:481:21:51

You probably paid about 40 quid for that.

1:21:511:21:53

-I paid 30.

-That's lovely.

1:21:531:21:55

-You ready for this next one?

-Go on, then.

1:21:551:21:58

Don't you lean on my thing! It's an ivory sector.

1:21:581:22:02

It would be used for plotting a chart if you were a naval officer.

1:22:021:22:07

I can't see that there's a name on it.

1:22:071:22:09

-Not yet.

-Not yet!

1:22:091:22:11

Give me time.

1:22:111:22:12

-I think I saw this with about £70 on it.

-You did.

1:22:121:22:15

You saw it with £75 on it. And what bothers me...

1:22:151:22:18

-Why did you not buy it?

-Because it said £75 on it.

1:22:181:22:22

-What do you think that will make?

-About 40, 50 quid, probably.

1:22:221:22:26

Oh, that's all right. I paid £30 for it.

1:22:261:22:28

And you said I robbed this person?

1:22:281:22:31

I haven't finished, because this is my favourite thing.

1:22:311:22:34

Oh, that's sweet. Little hip flask, and the top opens up.

1:22:341:22:37

-I've got one of these at home.

-Do you like that?

-I do. I love it.

1:22:371:22:40

-I loved the quality of that.

-What did you pay? 30, 40 quid?

1:22:401:22:45

-20.

-And I think that's absolutely fantastic.

1:22:451:22:48

-But is Paisley ready for that?

-Mmm.

1:22:481:22:51

It's been a hard-fought contest, but let's take the gloves off

1:22:521:22:56

and find out what our experts really think.

1:22:561:22:59

The radio - it's not my sort of thing.

1:22:591:23:02

I was probably born a bit too soon to appreciate the finer points of the Bush radio.

1:23:021:23:06

He's a little bit concerned about the kettle drum.

1:23:061:23:10

-It is a completely risky item.

-I could be in trouble,

1:23:101:23:13

and if it doesn't do well, it's all back to square one.

1:23:131:23:16

This could be my chance to take over.

1:23:161:23:19

After teeing off in Perth, the second leg of this Road Trip

1:23:191:23:22

comes to an end in Paisley. In the 19th century, it was renowned

1:23:221:23:27

for being the centre of Britain's weaving industry,

1:23:271:23:30

which is where Paisley, the fabric, gets its name.

1:23:301:23:32

This is where it was originally produced.

1:23:321:23:36

-That is stunning!

-Looks like Thunderbird 4 up on the roof.

1:23:361:23:40

But our next and final stop is the auction house

1:23:401:23:44

of Collins & Paterson.

1:23:441:23:46

I know you so well, and I know that with that drum,

1:23:461:23:49

somehow that is probably going to double its money.

1:23:491:23:53

-Oh, get in!

-And then I will cry.

1:23:531:23:55

I'll lend you my handkerchief.

1:23:551:23:57

With a room full of canny Scots looking for a bargain,

1:23:571:24:01

auctioneer Stephen Maxwell is about to kick things off,

1:24:011:24:04

but first, how does he rate the chances of our experts?

1:24:041:24:08

The star lot, for me, would have to be the kettle drum,

1:24:081:24:11

a wee surprise. The most unusual item would be that flask

1:24:111:24:14

with the telescopic lid. Haven't seen that one before.

1:24:141:24:17

The vintage planes should sell at a price,

1:24:171:24:20

albeit I wouldn't go booking a holiday

1:24:201:24:22

off the back of the proceeds.

1:24:221:24:24

Philip began this leg with £339.54,

1:24:241:24:29

and has since spent £185 on five auction lots.

1:24:291:24:33

As for Catherine, our Road Trip newcomer,

1:24:331:24:37

she's been watching the pennies, and has spent just £51.50

1:24:371:24:41

on four auction lots.

1:24:411:24:43

So, without any more ado, let the auction begin.

1:24:431:24:46

First up, it's Philip's naval sector.

1:24:491:24:51

I got a horrible feeling of impending doom about this.

1:24:511:24:54

We'll start here straight in. At £25, I have with me.

1:24:541:24:57

That's only losing about eight quid.

1:24:571:25:00

£30 with me. 32. 35 with me.

1:25:001:25:03

Any advance at £35? We're selling, then.

1:25:031:25:07

Fair warning at £35... Gone.

1:25:071:25:10

A £5 profit before commission. Not the most promising of starts.

1:25:101:25:14

Well done.

1:25:141:25:16

-Oh, thanks for that!

-SHE LAUGHS

1:25:161:25:19

Next, it's Catherine's hip flask.

1:25:191:25:22

Has she had a nip, do you think, or is she just dropping off?

1:25:221:25:25

-Nice wee item, this.

-Nice wee item!

1:25:251:25:28

We'll start on commission at £20. I have with me £20.

1:25:281:25:31

22. Thank you. 25. 28. 30 with me.

1:25:311:25:34

-Come on!

-You're out. With me at 30.

1:25:341:25:37

-My commission bid at £30. Any advance on £30?

-Come on!

1:25:371:25:40

At 32 now for the hip flask. At 32.

1:25:401:25:42

At £32...

1:25:421:25:45

Not quite the price Catherine was hoping for,

1:25:451:25:48

but a very respectable start.

1:25:481:25:51

Philip's next lot is up, and I have to say, it certainly rings a bell!

1:25:521:25:57

£20 I have with me. At £20.

1:25:571:25:59

With me at 22. 25's on the net. With me at 28.

1:25:591:26:03

28. Well done, Philip!

1:26:031:26:05

And we're selling it at £28.

1:26:051:26:08

Mmm! Maybe Philip's lucky streak is coming to an end.

1:26:091:26:12

Could you wipe that really nasty smile off your face? We're in this together.

1:26:121:26:17

Putting Catherine's maritime smarts to the test now,

1:26:171:26:21

her dividers and parallel rule are coming up.

1:26:211:26:24

A fair age, I would say, to the dividers, I have to say.

1:26:241:26:27

We start here, on commission again, at £25.

1:26:271:26:30

With me at £25.

1:26:301:26:32

-£28 with me. At £28.

-Come on!

1:26:321:26:35

-It seems cheap at that, at 28.

-Very cheap!

1:26:351:26:38

£30, thank you. And £32. 35's on the net.

1:26:381:26:41

-At £40. 42.

-Keep going!

1:26:411:26:44

-It's with me at £42.

-Any more? Any more?

1:26:441:26:48

We're selling, then. Fair warning, at £42...

1:26:481:26:52

Ah, well, it's still a profit. So come on, Catherine.

1:26:521:26:55

Pull yourself together, love.

1:26:551:26:57

Time to see what the crowd make of Philip's truncheon.

1:26:571:27:01

-I'm a bit nervous now.

-It's nice condition, I have to say.

1:27:011:27:04

We'll come straight in here.

1:27:041:27:06

One commission at £25.

1:27:061:27:09

With me at £25. 30's on there.

1:27:091:27:12

32. Back with me. 35 now.

1:27:121:27:14

38 with me. £38 here with me for the baton.

1:27:141:27:18

At £38...

1:27:181:27:20

I give up.

1:27:201:27:23

-SHE LAUGHS

-You are horrid to me!

1:27:231:27:26

Now, this should be interesting.

1:27:261:27:29

Both Philip and Catherine have bought a pair of box planes.

1:27:291:27:33

But who will make the most money?

1:27:331:27:35

Catherine's up first.

1:27:351:27:37

I really hope they've got them muddled up,

1:27:371:27:39

because yours were far better than mine, the junky ones I bought.

1:27:391:27:43

-What can we say about these?

-This will be funny.

1:27:431:27:45

Do I have £18? Do I have 15?

1:27:451:27:47

-18. Come on!

-18, thank you.

1:27:471:27:49

I'd love it if mine make more than yours.

1:27:491:27:52

25's on them. 28 with me.

1:27:521:27:55

30 now. That has it, at £30.

1:27:551:27:58

At £30...

1:27:581:28:00

A £28 profit. Not bad at all,

1:28:001:28:03

but can our resident jammy old devil do better?

1:28:031:28:06

Watch and learn, Philip Serrell. Watch and learn.

1:28:061:28:09

-£20 I have. With me at £20.

-I don't want them to make 30.

1:28:091:28:14

-Do I have 25? I have £28.

-Oh, please don't make 30.

1:28:141:28:18

-Back in, £30.

-SHE SIGHS

1:28:181:28:21

I still make more profit than you.

1:28:211:28:23

At £30...

1:28:231:28:25

-PHILIP LAUGHS

-Don't look at me like that.

1:28:251:28:28

-You're really horrible.

-Well, you started it.

1:28:281:28:31

So far Catherine has the lead at this auction,

1:28:311:28:34

but how will the bidders react to her worse-for-wear Bush radio?

1:28:341:28:39

-Still in working order...

-Working order.

1:28:391:28:41

It's in fine condition, as well. With me at £20 on commission.

1:28:411:28:45

22. Thank you. 25 with me.

1:28:451:28:48

-And 30. With me at 30.

-30. Come on, bit more.

1:28:481:28:51

-35. At £35.

-Well done, love.

1:28:511:28:55

At £35...

1:28:551:28:57

Well, that's the last time I pooh-pooh a car-boot sale.

1:28:571:29:01

Gosh! Before commission, Catherine's just made £27.

1:29:011:29:04

-That's good.

-You, my love, are right back up there, aren't you?

1:29:041:29:09

Last, but certainly not least, it's Philip's quirkiest purchase yet,

1:29:091:29:14

the kettle drum.

1:29:141:29:16

If your drum does really well, I am just going to be so cross!

1:29:161:29:21

-Why?

-Because it doesn't deserve to.

1:29:211:29:24

How dare you?

1:29:241:29:26

A very attractive item here is the kettle drum here.

1:29:261:29:31

-Again, a lot of interest here.

-A lot?!

1:29:311:29:33

310. At £150 with me.

1:29:331:29:35

-SHE GROANS

-150 I have.

1:29:351:29:37

Do I have 160? 160.

1:29:371:29:39

-He's going to turn it.

-180's on the net.

1:29:391:29:42

190's with me. 200 is on the net.

1:29:421:29:44

-220 is with me.

-How do you do it?

1:29:441:29:48

Still with me at 220. I think we're all done. We're selling, then.

1:29:481:29:52

-Well done, Philip.

-Fair warning at £220...

1:29:521:29:56

Cor, Philip Serrell - a man marching to the beat of his own drum,

1:29:561:30:00

and making a profit of £120.

1:30:001:30:03

Inside I'm crying, but outside I'm smiling.

1:30:031:30:08

Well, what an auction, eh?

1:30:081:30:10

Catherine started with £186.90,

1:30:101:30:13

and after auction costs has made a profit of £62.48,

1:30:131:30:18

giving her £249.38 to spend tomorrow.

1:30:181:30:23

Philip, meanwhile, started with £339.54,

1:30:231:30:27

and after auction costs, he's up £102.82.

1:30:271:30:32

So with £442.36 now in the kitty, he's still firmly in the lead.

1:30:321:30:39

I would take it off to you, Phil Serrell.

1:30:391:30:41

-You are one cool cookie.

-Not a gun to shoot me, eh?

1:30:411:30:45

-Not a gun.

-You'll be fine.

1:30:451:30:47

Listen, this can just turn in one moment.

1:30:471:30:50

It ain't over till it's over, and there's a long way to go yet.

1:30:501:30:53

Well, the fat man hasn't started singing yet.

1:30:531:30:56

-Ready?

-Left.

-Whoo!

1:30:561:30:58

-I don't know why I'm so happy.

-I don't, either.

1:30:581:31:00

You just made mincemeat out of me.

1:31:001:31:03

Must be tablet. Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

1:31:031:31:05

we're headed to the Borders, where Phil's watching the pennies.

1:31:051:31:09

There's 5p on the floor. I'll toss you for it.

1:31:091:31:11

-It's superglued down.

-THEY LAUGH

1:31:111:31:14

-Catherine's...

-SHE MOANS

1:31:141:31:17

..paralysed with indecision.

1:31:171:31:19

-I might turn away and regret this.

-You probably will.

1:31:191:31:22

Oh, don't say that!

1:31:221:31:24

And the competition reaches fever pitch!

1:31:241:31:28

It's mine. I said I'd have it, and I've got it.

1:31:281:31:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

1:31:341:31:38

E-mail [email protected]

1:31:381:31:43

.

1:31:431:31:43

Antiques experts travel across the UK as they compete with each other to make the most money from buying and selling antiques.

There are some tactical shenanigans from rivals Philip Serrell and Catherine Southon, as they travel from Perth to Paisley.