Episode 4 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 4

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Philip Serrell and Jonathan Pratt continue their antique trail in Corbridge.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each

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-and one big challenge.

-Well, duck, do I buy you or don't I?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques

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-as they scour the UK.

-Yee-ha!

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The aim is trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

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But it's not as easy as it looks and dreams of glory

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-can end in tatters.

-60.

-Get out of here.

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So will it be the fast lane to success or the slow road

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to bankruptcy?

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I want to go and cry.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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JAZZY THEME

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Yeah!

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Today we're back on the road with Philip Serrell and Jonathan Pratt.

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Young Jonathan seems to be taking

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a lot of guidance from his older road tripper.

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-I am learning from the master.

-I don't know about that.

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You are my master, my guru.

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Steady.

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But when it comes to shopping

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Philip Serrell is a lover of all things daft and different

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and it is often the dustier the better.

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Those fit the Serrell bill, don't they?

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Jonathan Pratt prefers the more traditional items

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and has a real penchant for vases.

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Look at that baby!

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Philip's wacky strategy seems to be working a treat.

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From his original £200, Philip made a profit

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and now has £273.48 to play with.

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Sadly, by playing it safe, Jonathan's £200 has dwindled

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and he only has £161.90 for this leg of the game. Looking serious.

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This road trip sees the pair travelling in their 1965 Triumph TR4

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from Cockermouth in Cumbria all the way to Wilmslow.

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Today, they are off to Corbridge,

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with our final destination in Northallerton.

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During Roman times Corbridge was a supply town for Hadrian's Wall

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and is now well known for its quaint shops and boutiques.

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Which is very handy, because our chaps need to shop, shop, shop!

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This looks quite wealthy, JP.

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-I don't like wealthy areas!

-No, I think exactly that.

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-Wealthy areas have expensive shops.

-Yes.

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Better be prepared to dig deep, then.

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-Good stuff.

-Fantastico.

-Yeah.

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Right, boys. Off in separate directions, please.

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Philip, you go one way, Jonathan, you go the other.

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Right, Jonathan.

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The auction you are going to is a general sale,

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-so please bear that in mind.

-I buy whatever I see.

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Oh, dear. What have we got there?

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This is a copy of a Scottish stoneware chair.

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They made these highly fired glazed garden seats,

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which were made to look like rustic, cobbled-together branches.

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And normally, they are this sort of size.

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I have not seen one like this before, it's quite sweet.

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The downside is that the arms do not match.

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It has been broken, and lost its arm.

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Hence, the price is only £45.

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This could be an object that might be popular.

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Philip is not having any luck

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seeking out a real bargain in his shop.

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-So...

-See you in a bit.

-He makes a sharp exit.

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To join Jonathan. Matey, like.

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I did look at the little Scottish pottery chair.

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-Has it got a price on?

-It has.

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-20?

-Best price? You wouldn't take 15?

-I can't take 15, no. No.

-18?

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-Go on then, yes.

-'That was a rapid change of heart!'

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'What a pretty thing.'

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Philip has just arrived. Coming this way.

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Make sure you leave something, JP.

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Are you nursing something, JP?

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-I'm starting to model myself on you, Phil.

-Get out of here!

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Ha-ha! Right, Jonathan, it's time for you to settle up

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for what I think is a chair up your jumper.

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That's it. Now, zip up.

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That's one down. I'm going to leave Phil to it, and pop over the road.

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And Philip is not wasting any time.

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That little ashtray in the bottom, how much is he?

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It has got £78 on it.

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This is by Robert Thompson of Kilburn

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and he was known as Mouseman.

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He was known as Mouseman because when he started working,

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making furniture, he reckoned he was as poor as church mice

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and so his trademark was to put this little mouse carving

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on chairs and everything else he did.

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-What is this, 30 years old?

-Probably, yes.

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It is one of the slightly later ones,

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but a lot of people prefer that,

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because that is more accessible to them.

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It is not hundreds of pounds, is it?

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What is the very best you can do on that?

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£50 would be the absolute bottom line.

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While Philip has a think about the ashtray, a Mauchline ware inkwell

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with a jockey hat design has also caught his eye.

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Northallerton. Yorkshire.

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Yes, that's where the auction is.

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Not too far away from Midland.

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And Midland is a massive racehorse centre where they train racehorses.

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I'm thinking that that little jockey's cap,

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and that hoof, that might do OK there.

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It is hardly Philip Serrell wacky and weird, is it?

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-What's the best you could do it for, for me?

-What has it got on it?

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-You've got 75, which...

-50 would be the best.

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-The very best you can do on that is 50? No better at all?

-45?

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I am going to go for broke here.

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-Could you do the Mouseman for 45?

-OK. 45.

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All right, thank you very much. Let me get some money out.

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-Two more items bought then, Philip.

-Have I put all my eggs

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in one big wooden basket? Oh well, we will find out, won't we?

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We certainly will.

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Jonathan was also unsuccessful in the shop across the road,

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but he is still hiding his last purchase from the curious Philip.

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What have you bought?

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-Just some sandwiches.

-Sandwiches? I am feeling a bit peckish.

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Poor pickings in Corbridge, so back on the road.

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Sandwiches are in here, are they? Hello!

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Both chaps are now heading East

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to the Newcastle upon Tyne suburb of Jesmond

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18 miles away.

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Considered to be one of the more affluent residential suburbs,

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so where better for more buying?

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Jonathan, however, is not stopping here.

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He is off to the theatre, darling.

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But drops Philip off to carry on his spending.

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-Good luck, Philip.

-Yes.

-I'm off to tread the boards.

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-Enjoy the theatre, dear boy.

-Thank you very much.

-Bye, drive safely.

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Hello!

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Hello! Now, this shop doesn't exactly smack

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of the Serrell weird and wacky.

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Does that look familiar?

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Seen anything you like, Philip?

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Well, we've got five Royal Worcester plates.

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And the greatest exponent of painting these flowers

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on Worcester porcelain was a man called Edward Raby.

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And prior to 1900, the Worcester porcelain factory,

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they didn't let their painters sign their work. Edward Raby had a bit

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of an ego and he used to work his monogram in, ER, into the foliage.

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-When you've found that, it adds £100, doesn't it?

-Of course, yes.

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The flowers on this set are in the style

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of an Edward Raby design.

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But sadly, his trademark signature is nowhere to be seen.

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-What can you do it for?

-They average just over £30 each.

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I think I've go to try and buy that for £20.

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-You can have it for £22.50.

-I'm going to buy that one off you.

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Awfully traditional. Are you changing your game-plan, Phil?

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-Thank you.

-'While Philip is off to another shop,'

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Jonathan is heading two miles down the road

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to just outside Newcastle's city walls for a more theatrical affair.

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Newcastle began as a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall,

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but today it is one of the largest cities in England.

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Situated north of the River Tyne,

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one of its most iconic views is of the seven bridges.

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And the city wonderfully combines

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its industrial heritage with impressive modern architecture.

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The Journal Tyne Theatre,

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first known simply as the Tyne Theatre, opened its doors in 1867.

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One of the region's best-loved entertainment venues,

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and one of the oldest working Victorian theatres in the world.

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It is now looked after

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by the Tyne Theatre and Opera House Preservation Trust

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and their consultant, Brian Debnam, will show Jonathan around.

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-Hello, Brian. Jonathan Pratt.

-Good to see you. Come in.

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First time I've been through a stage door.

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On his arrival, Jonathan is soon following in some famous footsteps.

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-Oscar Wilde lectured here. William Gladstone...

-He lectured here? Wow.

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-Sarah Bernhardt.

-Oh, yes. Of course.

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All the great nineteenth-century stars. And behind you...

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is a picture of the theatre as it might have been during

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the 1880s, showing how they used to get 3,000 people in this theatre.

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-It seats 1,100 people today, for safety reasons.

-But you can see,

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on the top tier there, there are people hanging over the edge!

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There is a huge amount of standing at the back of each balcony level.

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The Victorians were smaller.

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Obviously not as in love with health and safety as we are.

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I am yet to go in here so this is building it up now.

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I don't think you're going to be disappointed.

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Time to raise the curtain.

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And...there we go.

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Makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.

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The impressive, lavishly decorated auditorium within this Grade 1

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listed building was in fact the social hub for the local community.

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They built the theatre outside the city walls

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so that they did not need a licence from the city council.

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Built out here among the pubs and whorehouses,

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in the rough area of town. It has always been a people's theatre.

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The Theatre Royal was where the posh people went.

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The theatre still remains very much in its original condition

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despite its conversion into a cinema after the Second World War.

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In the '50s and '60s, the theatre went bad,

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there was more competition and they

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showed sleazy movies here. Which wouldn't be naughty at all, today.

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When the building reverted back to its roots as a theatre

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in the mid-1970s, new stars were born here.

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In the 1980s, it was a famous amateur theatre,

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with big amateur musicals of the stage.

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People like Ant and Dec started their career here

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playing munchkins in The Wizard of Oz.

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Perhaps it is Jonathan's time to tread the boards.

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To be, or not to be.

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That is the question. GROANS

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Oh dear. I think you're better off backstage, mate.

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So, it's time to get a real sense of how Victorian theatres were run.

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What this does, is it enables the stage above

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to stage spectacular and extraordinary shows.

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What you do is you pull back on this thing here.

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-It drops the stage surface.

-Right.

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You then pull this back quite violently across here,

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taking three or four guys to do so.

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And then wind this up and it has got a scene on it,

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or it had horses on it, or it had people on it, a whole chorus.

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-They all go up.

-Very clever.

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Sadly, despite still being in working condition,

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this original under-stage contraption

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is no longer licensed for use.

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And while Jonathan may not be exactly a theatre star,

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back up in Jesmond, Philip may be about to shine in his next shop.

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-Hiya.

-Hello there.

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Is it all right if I have a wander round, please?

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Yep. Not a problem.

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This place is much more your style, Philip.

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Rather random, eh?

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You've got a rack of woodworking tools around, I've noticed.

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Yes, we've got a few lying around. Do you want us to go and get some?

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Can we put all of them on there? Can I have a look at the whole lot?

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The whole lot actually involves digging them out of the basement.

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-They're over here.

-Will you have a look at those!

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-That's Geordie dust, you know.

-Geordie dust!

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-Oh! The glamour.

-They're moulding planes, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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So you'd get a piece of wood like that,

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and you'd run that down there, wouldn't you? And that...

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It would be for like a skirting board.

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I would guess they're somewhere

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-between 1890 and 1920, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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Are you a gambling man?

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-I'm definitely a gambling man.

-I'll make an offer for the lot.

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I've got to be looking at

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somewhere between 20 and 30 quid to buy. Is that ideal?

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I think we could do a deal on that.

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Let's take them all upstairs.

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The chaps head back into daylight so Philip can assess

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all the woodworking tools, including the rather dusty moulding planes.

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I'd like to buy the planes for 25 quid.

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It's been a hard week.

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Good man! Get in there.

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Is there somewhere I could go and give these a bit of a wipe over?

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I'll bring this one. I can manage this one.

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And the executive can show the way.

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Now, Philip's not a man afraid to get his hands dirty,

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but he's roped in some helpers.

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No woman allowed. Men-only club.

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Stop messing around! Get on with it.

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You never see Fiona Bruce doing this, you?

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Not in a gentlemen's lavatory, you don't.

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Fantastic, chaps. Those look all right, don't they?

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For £25, they look the business.

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Meanwhile, all's not well with Jonathan.

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But will something take his fancy here?

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I'm looking for a sort of little knickknacks, little bits and pieces.

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-Has anything caught your eye so far?

-There's a little table.

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-Yes, we can look at that.

-Sure.

-I can show you that.

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-This little table here?

-I mean, it's not the most stable, admittedly.

-No.

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-I just thought, it's made of mahogany.

-Uh-huh.

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It's got a little bit of age, it's early 20th century.

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-It's like making stuff when you're children.

-Yeah.

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-It's quite fun.

-It is.

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You have the princely sum of £25 on there.

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And I'm wondering how much...how much I might be able to persuade you?

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I'm Scottish. I don't discount that easily and it's discounted.

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-If you're Scottish, you paid very little money for it.

-Cheeky!

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-But it's working.

-Let's go upwards from where you start.

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-Make me an offer.

-Steady.

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I'm going to start low

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-and then we can haggle upwards, OK? £12.50.

-£12.50?

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-That's ridiculous. Come on, higher.

-I wouldn't want to go as far as £20,

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so, somewhere under £20.

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Have a think about it.

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Mm. I'd keep looking, if I were you, boy.

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-Oil of a watermill.

-Uh-huh.

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-It says £35. Would you take an offer on that?

-I certainly would.

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I like buying pictures. They can always surprise you.

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Early 20th century.

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It's not badly painted.

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It needs a clean.

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-Yes.

-When it's cleaned, the blue of the sky will come out.

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So it's like a little discovery.

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The person that buys it, cleans it, see how much it changes it.

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I'd only want to pay £15 for it.

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Right, put your best offers on the table, then.

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I'll do the painting for... 17.

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I will...

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Come on.

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-Take the picture.

-Right.

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And leave the table. As much as it pains me.

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-I think you're making a mistake.

-I know, of course you do.

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I'll do it for 15.

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-Go on then.

-Deal. Fantastic, thank you.

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Not bad. Her Scottish charms sold you two more items.

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Excellent, bye-bye.

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Time for the chaps to get back on the road together

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and head for more buying.

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But of a different kind.

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So, reunited,

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Philip and Jonathan are heading to a market in Tynemouth.

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-What I haven't told you, Phil...

-Yep.

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..is the market opens at 10 o'clock in the morning

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and it finishes at four o'clock.

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-What time's it now?

-It's about two.

-We'd better get on with it.

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THEY LAUGH

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Fingers crossed, there's something decent left for you to buy.

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Let's hope it's an undercover market, too.

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-This is just wet.

-Yeah, let's get inside. Come on.

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In fact, today's market is actually being held

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in the Victorian Tynemouth railway station

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and stalls here sell everything from food and plants,

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to valuable antiques.

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Good luck.

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The boys split up. So with only two hours of buying left,

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the pressure's on. Go get those real antique bargains, Jonathan.

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Hello.

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What is he doing?

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Rather sweet with little cut buckles.

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Victorian.

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You wouldn't take, you know... £25 or something for them?

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No, I paid more than that for them.

0:17:010:17:04

I think I'll say no to that chap.

0:17:040:17:06

-You wouldn't sell me a box of toy cars, would you?

-Absolutely.

0:17:090:17:13

-For?

-£10?

0:17:130:17:15

Call it a fiver.

0:17:150:17:16

Call it seven and you've got a deal.

0:17:160:17:18

-Call it six.

-OK.

0:17:200:17:21

JONATHAN LAUGHS

0:17:210:17:23

Thank you very much. Brilliant.

0:17:230:17:25

OK, I suppose there is a market for toy collecting.

0:17:250:17:29

Philip's also on the prowl for a bargain.

0:17:290:17:33

Love those clogs.

0:17:330:17:34

They look familiar.

0:17:340:17:36

-How old are they?

-Aren't they Victorian?

0:17:360:17:39

They've actually been worn.

0:17:390:17:41

They've been kitted out with things rubbing up against the heel

0:17:410:17:45

-and they're shod and everything.

-They're beautiful.

0:17:450:17:48

I'll have them if you sell them for 20 quid.

0:17:480:17:50

I can't because I paid 30 for them.

0:17:500:17:52

-I'll be back in a minute.

-Right, OK.

0:17:520:17:53

Might try to buy them off you for your money back,

0:17:530:17:56

but we'll see how we get on.

0:17:560:17:57

With nothing else catching his eye,

0:18:060:18:09

Philip's mind is still on those clogs

0:18:090:18:12

and he's going to offer £30 for them. You watch.

0:18:120:18:15

I've got to be quick, I've got a train to catch.

0:18:150:18:17

-Look, there you are.

-OK.

-30 quid.

0:18:170:18:20

-All right.

-I love you, you're an angel.

0:18:200:18:23

-Yes.

-You are, you're ever so kind. They're fantastic. I love those.

0:18:230:18:28

-Enjoy. They're gorgeous.

-Who would buy these? A doll collector?

0:18:280:18:31

No, just, sort of, women who've got, sort of, dresses

0:18:310:18:34

and they get little bits to put on.

0:18:340:18:35

Can I just say, I've not bought these because I collect dresses,

0:18:350:18:39

I have no dresses in my wardrobe.

0:18:390:18:40

Huh, the gentleman doth protest too much, methinks.

0:18:400:18:44

-Thank you my love, you're an angel.

-Enjoy your day.

0:18:440:18:47

Jonathan will be mad that he's bagged those.

0:18:470:18:49

What's he up to, anyway?

0:18:490:18:52

Hornsea dog.

0:18:520:18:54

-Really?

-Two quid.

0:18:540:18:56

-Go on then.

-Hey! There we go.

0:18:580:19:00

JONATHAN LAUGHS

0:19:000:19:02

There you go. Thank you very much.

0:19:020:19:05

Five items bought!

0:19:050:19:07

And I've spent about, how much, 60 quid. Get in there!

0:19:070:19:11

This wasn't exactly the kind of buying I had in mind.

0:19:110:19:14

Dear, oh, dear.

0:19:140:19:15

I quite like this pair here, to be honest.

0:19:150:19:19

A pair of decanters, blown glass, with little...

0:19:190:19:24

a nice rib declaration on it. People don't use these things like they used to.

0:19:240:19:27

-Ten each.

-A tenner each?

-Yeah, and that's a bargain.

0:19:270:19:33

I'll be generous.

0:19:330:19:34

-Eight pounds.

-For each.

0:19:340:19:36

No, for the two.

0:19:360:19:37

SELLER LAUGHS

0:19:370:19:38

I'll do 15 for the pair. Just because you're...

0:19:380:19:43

you're one of the boys.

0:19:430:19:44

Do you know what?

0:19:440:19:46

I'm on fire.

0:19:460:19:48

If you say so.

0:19:480:19:49

15 quid. Thank you very much. OK.

0:19:490:19:51

-That's it.

-There we go.

-Shopping complete,

0:19:510:19:55

Let's jog our memories on what each expert has bought.

0:19:550:19:58

Philip snuffled up five lots - a Royal Worcester plate,

0:19:580:20:01

a box of woodworking tools, the Mauchline inkwell,

0:20:010:20:04

a Mouseman ashtray and a pair of 19th-century children's clogs

0:20:040:20:07

totalling £167.50.

0:20:070:20:10

Jonathan parted with only £73 for his five lots -

0:20:130:20:16

An early 20th-century painting, a Scottish pottery chair,

0:20:160:20:21

a mahogany plywood table, a box of toys,

0:20:210:20:24

a pair of glass decanters and the Hornsea pottery terrier.

0:20:240:20:28

The loss of time - and what do they make of each other's items?

0:20:280:20:32

I think this is really, really interesting now because JP -

0:20:320:20:36

he's gone out there and he spent no money, he's clearly

0:20:360:20:41

disciplined himself not necessarily to buy his taste what he likes.

0:20:410:20:44

He's got a real plan and strategy.

0:20:440:20:46

I don't know whether it's going to work or not,

0:20:460:20:49

but that's what he set out to do.

0:20:490:20:50

The chair, the little chair, I think that's a really interesting lot

0:20:500:20:54

and if he hits the right market he could do well with that.

0:20:540:20:57

What about the clogs, Jonathan?

0:20:570:20:59

-To be honest, I don't really want to talk about the shoes.

-Go on.

0:20:590:21:03

Well, you know. I get asked obviously round

0:21:030:21:06

to go and soften up the clients

0:21:060:21:08

and then he goes on and takes the stuff afterwards.

0:21:080:21:10

So I am annoyed, absolutely.

0:21:100:21:11

She should have said, "You can't have them."

0:21:110:21:13

Oh, Lord. On this leg of their road trip the pair have travelled

0:21:130:21:17

from Corbridge to Newcastle Upon Tyne

0:21:170:21:20

stopping off in the suburb of Jesmond and then on to Tynemouth.

0:21:200:21:24

Their last stop is the auction in the town of Northallerton.

0:21:240:21:28

Set between two national parks, Northallerton, the county town

0:21:290:21:32

of North Yorkshire, is the largest market town in the district.

0:21:320:21:37

Northallerton auctions Ltd are a long-established firm

0:21:380:21:41

holding livestock markets and antique sales.

0:21:410:21:44

Settle down, everyone. It's auction time.

0:21:460:21:49

-Here we go, here we go.

-Crikey.

0:21:490:21:50

First up, Philip's Royal Worcester blush ivory plate.

0:21:510:21:55

Start me £20, straight in.

0:21:550:21:57

10 bid, £10 only bid. 10 bid all out.

0:21:570:22:01

Little money for a good bit of Royal Worcester.

0:22:010:22:04

At 10 only bid, 12 off the rail, at £12, 12, 12, selling at 12.

0:22:040:22:10

That's done well, then.

0:22:100:22:13

Whoopsy! That supposedly safe buy hasn't paid off.

0:22:140:22:18

Now for Jonathan's early 20th-century painting of a mill.

0:22:200:22:23

Start me £50 for it straight in. 50? 30?

0:22:230:22:27

Well, 20, for a start. 10 bid...

0:22:270:22:30

You've got a bidder there.

0:22:300:22:32

15... Keep going, keep going.

0:22:320:22:35

At 15, 18 bid, little money at 18.

0:22:350:22:39

Only bid all out in the ring now. At 18. At 18 bid, at £18.

0:22:390:22:44

And selling at 18.

0:22:440:22:45

I have worked it out, you know, that the less he sells stuff for,

0:22:450:22:49

the less commission you have to pay. That is the one bonus.

0:22:490:22:52

Ooh! After commission's deducted, that's not even a profit.

0:22:520:22:57

Let's hope Philip's box of woodworking tools serve him well.

0:22:570:23:02

-30 bid. At £30.

-A fiver a plane.

0:23:020:23:07

50, 55, all out in the ring.

0:23:070:23:10

60, 70, 70 bid? I'll take five. At 70 bid.

0:23:100:23:15

Only 70 bid, £70 and selling at 70.

0:23:150:23:19

-That's a bit of a relief.

-Good man, well done.

0:23:190:23:22

A classic Serrell.

0:23:220:23:23

Dusty lot turned him in a handsome profit.

0:23:230:23:26

Another of Philip's items,

0:23:260:23:28

the Mauchline Ware horse hoof and jockey cap inkwell.

0:23:280:23:31

Quite a bit of interest in this. £40 for a straight in? 30 bid. £30.

0:23:310:23:36

See, that's a result.

0:23:360:23:38

58. 50. All out in the ring now. 55.

0:23:380:23:44

60, 65, 65 with me.

0:23:440:23:47

I'll definitely take that.

0:23:470:23:49

Are you all done and finished at 65?

0:23:490:23:51

Ah, Philip.

0:23:520:23:55

-You're good at this, aren't you?

-No, lucky.

0:23:550:23:58

Lucky, lucky, lucky.

0:23:580:24:00

Well, that trotted out at the auction, didn't it?

0:24:000:24:03

Next is Jonathan's mahogany plywood table.

0:24:040:24:08

The occasional table. Where will you start me? £5?

0:24:080:24:11

5, 10, 15, 20, 20 with me on the rail.

0:24:110:24:17

Flabbergasted.

0:24:170:24:18

I'm going to cry because it's more than my Worcester plate.

0:24:180:24:21

At £20 only bid at 20, and selling at 20.

0:24:210:24:23

And he's elated with his first decent-ish profit.

0:24:260:24:31

-I've made profit overall so far.

-Don't rub it in.

0:24:310:24:34

Up now is the Mouseman ashtray, bought for £45 by Philip.

0:24:360:24:40

-£20 for it straight in.

-Go on.

0:24:400:24:43

£20 bid, bid at 20, bid 22, 22, 25, all out in the ring now.

0:24:430:24:49

28, 30. 30 I'm bid.

0:24:490:24:53

At £30 bid, a harmless price for a good Mouseman piece. At 30.

0:24:530:24:57

That failed, then on, didn't it?

0:24:570:25:00

Still going.

0:25:000:25:01

32, only bid at 32, bid and selling at 32.

0:25:010:25:04

Sorry, Phil.

0:25:050:25:07

Eek, a loss.

0:25:070:25:10

It's time to see how the assorted box of toys goes.

0:25:100:25:15

10 bid, at £10.

0:25:150:25:17

-Profit, JP.

-Yeah.

0:25:170:25:19

-No, no, no. Come on.

-12.

0:25:190:25:21

15. 15 bid.

0:25:210:25:23

At 15, only bid at 15.

0:25:230:25:26

Take 18 where? At 15, bid and selling at 15.

0:25:260:25:31

-Well done, mate.

-Steady, great.

0:25:310:25:34

I like your positive attitude.

0:25:350:25:39

-You're racing away.

-I am.

0:25:390:25:41

Uh-oh, it's Philip's pair of 19th-century children's clogs next.

0:25:410:25:46

-Don't look, Jonathan.

-Bit of interest in these.

0:25:460:25:49

Start me £50 straight in. 20 bid.

0:25:490:25:51

I have £20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45.

0:25:510:25:55

All out in the ring now at £45. 45 bid. 48.

0:25:550:26:02

48 with me. At 48 I am bid. At 48 I am bid. Are you all done...?

0:26:020:26:05

And 50. 50 bid. Take two.

0:26:050:26:08

50 I am bid. 52. 52. 52.

0:26:080:26:11

54, 56, against you on the rail, 58 I am bid. At 58 I am bid, 60.

0:26:110:26:18

At 60 against you. 60 against you, try another one.

0:26:180:26:21

At 60 I'm bid and selling at £60.

0:26:210:26:25

-How about that, eh?

-So, if you'd have bought those,

0:26:250:26:27

you would have made a tenner profit.

0:26:270:26:29

I didn't want to make a tenner profit,

0:26:290:26:32

I wanted to make £30 profit, Philip.

0:26:320:26:34

You owe me commission for my services.

0:26:340:26:38

They were a very clever buy, Philip.

0:26:380:26:42

Next, the rather random lot of a pair of glass decanters

0:26:420:26:47

and the Hornsea pottery terrier.

0:26:470:26:50

-A fiver for them.

-He's got confidence in them, hasn't he?

0:26:500:26:54

Three, three, five, five bid.

0:26:540:26:56

-At five, eight, eight against you, 10.

-go on.

0:26:560:27:01

12. 12 with me.

0:27:010:27:03

15, someone 15, come on!

0:27:030:27:05

£12, 12 bid and selling at 12.

0:27:050:27:09

So, where are you now, JP?

0:27:090:27:11

Oh, Philip, do you know, I'm in the doldrums.

0:27:110:27:15

Aha, Philip did warn you, they might not do well.

0:27:150:27:19

Last lot, although it's unlikely

0:27:200:27:22

the 19th-century Scottish pottery chair will make the profit

0:27:220:27:25

that Jonathan needs.

0:27:250:27:28

10. 10 bid. At 10, 10 only bid for it,

0:27:280:27:31

all out, left or right. Ten only. All out on the rails.

0:27:310:27:35

That's only because people don't understand it. Really.

0:27:350:27:38

At £10 only for it.

0:27:380:27:40

Are you all done and finished at £10?

0:27:400:27:44

A dreadful state of affairs!

0:27:440:27:48

Oh dear. Ending on a low with a final loss.

0:27:480:27:52

I want to go cry.

0:27:520:27:54

I can't believe it!

0:27:540:27:56

And without stating the obvious, today's winner is Philip Serrell.

0:27:570:28:02

So, let's crunch the numbers.

0:28:020:28:04

Jonathan started this leg of the trip with £161.90

0:28:040:28:08

and after deducting auction costs,

0:28:080:28:11

ends today with an even less £150.40.

0:28:110:28:15

Philip started with £273.48,

0:28:160:28:20

and after auction costs, now has £301.96 p.

0:28:200:28:25

No wonder he's smiling.

0:28:250:28:26

Oh, JP, where do we go from here?

0:28:260:28:28

Look, Philip, YOU made money.

0:28:280:28:31

You made money. You did very, very well.

0:28:310:28:34

I am still trying to learn here.

0:28:340:28:36

I'm sure you'll have better luck next time, Jonathan.

0:28:360:28:40

as Jonathan's being somewhat outshone by his rival,

0:28:450:28:49

what's his game plan?

0:28:490:28:51

I'm going to ignore the fact that I didn't do well in the last auction,

0:28:510:28:55

or the one before and I'm going to go in

0:28:550:28:58

in my normal haphazard and jovial approach.

0:28:580:29:01

Ignorance may not be bliss, Jonathan.

0:29:030:29:05

This week's trip sees the chaps travelling 140 miles

0:29:060:29:10

from Cockermouth all the way to Wilmslow.

0:29:100:29:14

On this leg, they're heading first to the market town of Darlington in the Tees Valley

0:29:140:29:19

and eventually on to their auction in Doncaster.

0:29:190:29:23

Darlington was originally an Anglo-Saxon village.

0:29:250:29:28

The Stockton and Darlington Railway was opened in 1825

0:29:280:29:32

and the town is proud to be home of the world's first passenger railway.

0:29:320:29:36

And there it is. Ha!

0:29:360:29:38

(AS RAILWAY ANNOUNCER) These two passengers are pulling in to their first stop.

0:29:380:29:43

Jonathan will alight at Darlington

0:29:430:29:45

and Philip will continue on to his first shop.

0:29:450:29:48

Mind the gap.

0:29:490:29:51

Time for the spending to begin.

0:29:540:29:57

-Good morning.

-Good morning, Gordon.

-Jonathan, how are you doing?

-Very well, thank you.

0:29:590:30:03

Look at this, isn't is a wonderful place? Jam-packed.

0:30:030:30:06

Used to drive a Mini. Nothing like this, though.

0:30:080:30:11

-Sorry, I'm skitting around like a grasshopper.

-Maybe Gordon has got an idea.

0:30:130:30:17

-Walk this way.

-Like that?!

0:30:180:30:20

Ooh, it's an oak bureau with a price tag of £80.

0:30:200:30:24

-Nice little thing here.

-From the 19...yes '20s.

-'20s again.

0:30:260:30:31

Nice thing, tidy.

0:30:310:30:32

Even has a little...

0:30:340:30:35

..inside here we've got the manufacturer's tag in it somewhere.

0:30:350:30:40

-What does that say, then?

-If you can read it.

0:30:400:30:43

-It's made by Lebus.

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:30:440:30:46

-Nice one.

-I've heard of Lebus. They made a lot of desks.

0:30:460:30:50

They did a lot of roll-tops. So made by Lebus.

0:30:500:30:53

It's all there. Forget the ticket price.

0:30:530:30:55

£35 to you today. I'll be disappointed

0:30:550:30:59

if you don't double your money on this in that auction.

0:30:590:31:03

-I would take it.

-Did you hear that?

-I did!

-JONATHAN CHUCKLES

0:31:050:31:08

How about 25, just to really help you out and take it away?

0:31:080:31:12

Do 27 and you've got a deal.

0:31:120:31:14

Oh, what the heck.

0:31:160:31:18

So one deal down.

0:31:180:31:20

But Jonathan quickly has his eye on more furniture.

0:31:200:31:23

-This is 19 sort of '60s, '70s.

-About '76.

0:31:230:31:27

And the style is... I thought was quite fashionable.

0:31:270:31:30

Would you take £20 for them?

0:31:300:31:33

I would like to see them going somewhere.

0:31:330:31:37

-Put your hand there. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-Two lots bought.

0:31:370:31:42

Not bad going, he's now bagged a trio of G Plan tables for £20,

0:31:420:31:45

as well as the bureau.

0:31:450:31:48

Jonathan's buying is under way and Philip's off to his shop in Yarm.

0:31:490:31:54

11 miles east of Darlington.

0:31:540:31:56

Yarm began to thrive as a town during the Georgian period,

0:31:560:32:00

nestled on the south bank of the River Tees,

0:32:000:32:05

it has an old-world charm, with its quaint, cobbled streets and historic buildings -

0:32:050:32:10

like the 18th-century town hall.

0:32:100:32:13

Let's hope the shops Philip's heading to our as appealing as the town.

0:32:130:32:18

-How are you my dear, is it all right if I have a look round?

-Probably a good idea.

0:32:230:32:27

That might hit the right note. Could be a squeeze, though! Ha.

0:32:330:32:37

This is a squeeze box that was made in London in about, what?

0:32:390:32:44

About 1891, something like that.

0:32:440:32:47

SCREECHING NOTE

0:32:470:32:49

Ooh, that's terrible, isn't it?

0:32:490:32:53

Clearly it's not just my ears that are tone deaf.

0:32:530:32:56

If you look there, there's a paper label

0:32:560:32:59

that gives you the maker's mark.

0:32:590:33:01

And this is fret cut and the think you want to look at

0:33:010:33:05

when you see this is to make sure there is no damages

0:33:050:33:10

to any of the frets, which there doesn't appear to be.

0:33:100:33:13

You just open it and squeeze it.

0:33:130:33:15

If life were that easy, Sandy.

0:33:150:33:18

Clearly, my fingers and thumbs are too fat.

0:33:180:33:20

How often do you come across these?

0:33:220:33:25

And especially complete with box.

0:33:250:33:28

And I can do you little deal on that.

0:33:290:33:32

-Sandy, you'll have to do me a fantastic deal.

-Well...

0:33:320:33:35

-This has been a long time hasn't it?

-It has.

0:33:350:33:37

-So you probably want to get rid of this, don't you?

-I do really, yes.

0:33:370:33:41

I do.

0:33:410:33:42

How did you know it'd been in a long time?

0:33:430:33:45

-Was it the dust?

-No, my love, you've got it originally marked up at 195.

0:33:470:33:51

Then you've knocked 70 quid off it

0:33:510:33:53

and you might have to knock another 70 quid off it and then who knows?

0:33:530:33:58

Philip!

0:33:580:33:59

-I'm going to have a look upstairs but hang on to that for me.

-OK.

-Thank you, my love.

0:33:590:34:04

I like that.

0:34:040:34:05

All this is is a little cane picnic hamper.

0:34:060:34:10

But I said.. Agh! Cor!

0:34:110:34:13

A little cane picnic hamper with a sharp nail sticking out of it!

0:34:130:34:17

Gordon Bennett!

0:34:170:34:20

I'm going to speak to Sandy and see if I can buy this.

0:34:200:34:23

Sandy, have you got your best dealing hat on?

0:34:230:34:26

Yes.

0:34:260:34:28

I'd like to give you 60 quid for that.

0:34:280:34:29

And I'd like to give you 10 quid for that. 70 quid for the two.

0:34:290:34:33

How much?!

0:34:330:34:35

-Watch my lips.

-My God, she's a strong lady, this one.

-Right.

0:34:350:34:39

I was thinking, and I'm really being generous here, 110.

0:34:390:34:46

What about if I gave you 80 quid for the two?

0:34:480:34:50

90.

0:34:510:34:52

-Come on, get your hand out.

-I'll give you 85 for the two. Split difference.

0:34:550:34:59

-Go on. Put your hand out.

-Go on, then.

0:34:590:35:01

-You're an angel.

-Deal.

-Thank you, my love.

0:35:010:35:04

So that works out at £75 for the squeezebox and £10 for the hamper.

0:35:040:35:09

Music to everyone's ears.

0:35:090:35:10

So the auction's in Doncaster. Doncaster is in Yorkshire.

0:35:130:35:17

If I buy Yorkshire produce and put it in there,

0:35:170:35:20

some jams and chutneys and cheese.

0:35:200:35:22

-That would be unique.

-Off we go.

0:35:220:35:23

Sandy, you've been an angel. Love you lots. Speak to you soon.

0:35:230:35:26

-And you.

-See you.

-Thank you for everything.

-Thank you, bye-bye.

0:35:260:35:30

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:35:300:35:33

Time for a spot of lunch.

0:35:330:35:35

This is my best deal, because I'm really hungry.

0:35:350:35:38

-I tell you what, are these lobster pots?

-I believe so, yes.

-Really?

0:35:380:35:43

They are made out of cane.

0:35:430:35:45

Only Philip could find an item for auction in a chippy.

0:35:450:35:49

-Um, how much is fish and chips?

-4.90.

0:35:490:35:53

So could I buy fish, chips and a lobster pot is, can I do that?

0:35:540:35:59

-How much?

-I'll give you £7.50. Fish, chips and a lobster pot.

0:36:010:36:07

-No.

-Go on then, how much?

0:36:070:36:10

15 quid?

0:36:100:36:12

-How much?

-15.

-No, no, no.

0:36:120:36:14

I tell you what, this is my best deal, because I'm really, really hungry.

0:36:140:36:18

Fish, chips, and a lobster pot, £10 and there is a "but" coming.

0:36:180:36:23

-Mushy peas.

-Mushy peas, as well?

0:36:240:36:26

Yeah, yeah, yeah. A tenner.

0:36:260:36:28

-£10, yeah, mushy peas.

-You're an angel. Thank you so much.

0:36:280:36:33

First prize for the most random catch of the day,

0:36:330:36:36

a lobster pot for £5.10.

0:36:360:36:40

About the same price as the plaice.

0:36:400:36:42

And these have got to be the best fish and chips in the north, haven't they?

0:36:420:36:46

-You're an angel, thank you.

-You're welcome.

0:36:460:36:50

Gosh, I'm feeling hungry now.

0:36:500:36:52

It's really good this is.

0:36:520:36:55

He's at it again, but with a full tummy.

0:36:550:36:58

Philip is now on a mission to fill his hamper.

0:36:580:37:00

# Shopping, shopping, shopping

0:37:000:37:03

# When mommy takes me shopping #

0:37:030:37:06

I'll have some home-made jam, as well.

0:37:060:37:08

That's all right. I wanted to buy some Wensleydale, Gromit. Rambler's chutney.

0:37:100:37:14

Yorkshire biscuits. That's got be good stuff.

0:37:140:37:17

Now, I wonder if there's a Yorkshire beer? Captain Cook.

0:37:170:37:21

-I've got to buy that.

-Yes. It would be rude not to.

0:37:210:37:24

I've got to be mean on price. Can I make you an offer for this stuff?

0:37:240:37:28

You can have a go.

0:37:280:37:30

Are you really haggling in a deli?!

0:37:300:37:33

-Will a tenner buy that?

-Go on then, seeing as you've asked so nicely.

0:37:330:37:38

-Thank you, bye!

-Bye-bye.

0:37:380:37:40

So, with a weird and wonderful combination of buys,

0:37:400:37:44

time for the boys to get back on the road.

0:37:440:37:47

How did your shop go?

0:37:470:37:48

-I did three shops.

-You did how many?

-Three.

0:37:480:37:52

How did you manage three?

0:37:520:37:54

-Well...

-Hang on a minute. You do three times as many shops as me.

0:37:540:37:58

This is a conspiracy. There is going to be further investigation into this!

0:37:580:38:02

Little does Jonathan know that only one was actually from an antiques shop.

0:38:020:38:06

The boys are now travelling 37 miles east of Yarm

0:38:080:38:11

to Whitby in North Yorkshire.

0:38:110:38:13

It's a fantastic place. I really like it.

0:38:130:38:16

Ah, I'm off to see Captain Cook.

0:38:160:38:19

Whitby is famed for being where 18th-century British explorer and voyager Captain James Cook

0:38:210:38:28

began his life as an ordinary seaman.

0:38:280:38:31

Still dominated by its ancient abbey ruins,

0:38:320:38:34

Whitby lies at the mouth of the River Esk.

0:38:340:38:37

In Cook's time, the port was a centre for shipbuilding and whaling

0:38:370:38:41

and, today, a small fishing industry still exists.

0:38:410:38:45

Cook is renowned for charting and mapping the Pacific,

0:38:450:38:49

New Zealand and the east coast of Australia.

0:38:490:38:52

It was this harbour-side house where he started his apprenticeship.

0:38:520:38:56

Sophie Forgan, chair of the Trustees of the Captain Cook Memorial Museum,

0:38:560:39:01

will take Philip on the journey to this remarkable man.

0:39:010:39:04

-Hi.

-Good to meet you.

-I'm Philip. How are you?

-Very well, thanks.

-This is lovely, isn't it?

0:39:060:39:12

-Isn't it gorgeous?

-Cook is famous for being an explorer.

-He is.

0:39:120:39:18

Like a sort of a latter-day Neil Armstrong, I suppose.

0:39:180:39:23

I think that's a good comparison,

0:39:230:39:25

because not only did he discover lots of new places,

0:39:250:39:30

-he placed them on the map.

-Did he?

-He charted them.

0:39:300:39:33

And he charted all sorts of places that had never been charted before,

0:39:330:39:37

and he did it so accurately

0:39:370:39:39

that they were still using his charts 200 years later.

0:39:390:39:42

Time to find out more.

0:39:420:39:45

In 1768, the British admiralty wanted to explore unknown territory

0:39:450:39:50

and observed the transit of Venus from the Pacific,

0:39:500:39:53

which was to be useful for navigation.

0:39:530:39:56

They chose Cook to lead the expedition in a Whitby-built ship called the Endeavour.

0:39:560:40:01

This was to be his first of three major voyages of discovery across the globe.

0:40:010:40:07

-What was Cook's first voyage?

-The first voyage starts in Plymouth.

0:40:070:40:12

Yeah.

0:40:120:40:13

And they call at Madeira

0:40:130:40:16

-and then we swap around to the other side.

-Right.

0:40:160:40:21

And they go round Cape Horn and then across the Pacific

0:40:210:40:26

until they get to Tahiti.

0:40:260:40:28

Then he has secret orders from the Admiralty, which he opens,

0:40:280:40:33

and the Admiralty say go and search

0:40:330:40:35

for the great undiscovered southern continent,

0:40:350:40:39

if there be such a continent, and so he sails south, due south.

0:40:390:40:43

Doesn't find anything much,

0:40:430:40:47

so he turns westward and they hit New Zealand.

0:40:470:40:53

Discovering that it is two islands, not one.

0:40:530:40:57

Then they go westward again

0:40:570:41:00

and they hit the east coast of Australia,

0:41:000:41:04

which no-one had seen before.

0:41:040:41:06

Cook embarked on a second exploration

0:41:060:41:09

and became the first man to sail around the world

0:41:090:41:11

in both directions. But it was his third voyage,

0:41:110:41:14

to find the Northwest Passage, that would prove to be his last.

0:41:140:41:19

He was killed in Hawaii in a fracas over a stolen boat with the natives.

0:41:190:41:25

A misjudgement.

0:41:250:41:26

He didn't have enough men with him, he was killed

0:41:260:41:29

and committed to the deep, as was normal with sailors,

0:41:290:41:32

in Kealakekua Bay in Hawaii.

0:41:320:41:35

Cook was stabbed to death by islanders in 1779

0:41:350:41:39

and so the man who radically changed our view of the world for ever

0:41:390:41:44

was never to sail again.

0:41:440:41:46

After a long day,

0:41:480:41:49

it's time for Philip to bid farewell to the museum.

0:41:490:41:52

Jonathan's also in Whitby and still on the hunt for a bargain.

0:41:540:41:58

Will he be able to seek out the truly bizarre?

0:41:580:42:02

I'm looking up at this hull of a boat and inside it you've got what

0:42:030:42:09

I can only assume is the remains of possibly a steam

0:42:090:42:12

or petrol-fired engine, so it would have had a cover and a mast.

0:42:120:42:17

People collect these things,

0:42:170:42:19

because people who are engineers like to repair these things, make these things better.

0:42:190:42:24

I might ask him about that.

0:42:240:42:26

This model of a World War II torpedo boat is priced at £85,

0:42:260:42:32

but with missing bits, I'm sure there's a deal to be done.

0:42:320:42:35

I bet you that is built to scale. Give me £50 and we'll have a deal.

0:42:350:42:40

OK. I'm going to be brave

0:42:420:42:45

and I'm going to say...

0:42:450:42:48

..all right.

0:42:480:42:50

Thank you very much.

0:42:500:42:51

-I've no idea what it's worth, but I'll say thank you. 50 quid.

-OK, then.

-Great.

0:42:510:42:56

That's a bold move for someone who is trailing behind.

0:42:560:42:59

Anything else worth a, er, punt?

0:42:590:43:02

-I saw the green glass vase with a silver collar.

-This one.

0:43:020:43:06

Yeah.

0:43:090:43:11

I like this iridescent glass, it's like Austrian glass.

0:43:140:43:17

A bit like the Loetz factory.

0:43:170:43:19

-That's a word, I remember that one.

-Silver mounting, 1905.

0:43:190:43:23

Little bit thin, but the neck's quite good.

0:43:230:43:27

I would be happy to offer you

0:43:270:43:29

not 10,

0:43:290:43:31

not 15,

0:43:310:43:33

£18. JONATHAN CHUCKLES

0:43:330:43:36

I tell you what, you give me 20 and you can have it.

0:43:360:43:40

All right?

0:43:400:43:42

What the heck, go on then. I'll take that as well.

0:43:420:43:45

Philip's now going for a spot of shopping

0:43:460:43:48

just down the road in Sleights.

0:43:480:43:52

Much of the small village sits on hillsides

0:43:520:43:56

on either side of the pretty River Esk.

0:43:560:43:59

Philip's gone to see what Eskdale Antiques have to offer

0:44:000:44:03

and immediately he can see that things here are right up his street.

0:44:030:44:07

Where else other than the antiques world can you get old quarry tiles

0:44:090:44:13

an anchor or a cartwheel?

0:44:130:44:15

-Hi, how are you, I'm Phil.

-Hi. Phil Smith.

-Phil, Phil. It's like an echo. How you doing?

0:44:160:44:22

All right, thanks.

0:44:220:44:23

Philip's absolutely chomping at the bit to buy something here,

0:44:230:44:27

just look at all these big, old lumps.

0:44:270:44:29

I love that spice box. What I love about that

0:44:320:44:35

is in the middle you've got a nutmeg grater and you just grate your nutmeg like that.

0:44:350:44:42

Smell that, that's absolutely lovely.

0:44:420:44:46

Mm. Spicy.

0:44:460:44:49

-Could I have a look at that one?

-Yes.

-How much is it first?

0:44:510:44:54

What's the ticket price on it? The ticket price is...

0:44:560:44:59

-..30.

-30 quid.

0:45:030:45:04

Your pony's head goes in there.

0:45:050:45:08

-And then?

-Packed out with straw with leather back to cushion it

0:45:080:45:12

and fasten your straps there and then fasten onto the cart behind.

0:45:120:45:18

Right. Deal time.

0:45:180:45:20

I'll give you 15 quid for that.

0:45:200:45:22

Go on, then.

0:45:240:45:26

-Have a deal.

-I like that a lot.

0:45:260:45:28

Let's just hope somebody in Doncaster has got a pony with no harness for it.

0:45:280:45:34

Time to trot on. Trot on!

0:45:340:45:37

Reunited, the chaps are off to the seaside town of Scarborough.

0:45:380:45:43

I do want to go to the promenade, or whatever it is, in Scarborough.

0:45:430:45:47

Let's drive through the promenade first.

0:45:470:45:49

There's no point of coming to the seaside and not seeing the sea.

0:45:490:45:52

We should buy one another a stick of rock, JP.

0:45:520:45:55

Scarborough, known as the Queen of the Yorkshire coast,

0:45:550:45:58

is full of attractions.

0:45:580:46:01

The historic and dramatic looking Scarborough Castle for one,

0:46:010:46:05

but it's been a booming seaside resort for the last 360 years

0:46:050:46:09

and is still as popular as ever.

0:46:090:46:13

Sadly, there's no strolling beside the seaside for these two.

0:46:130:46:17

There's a competition to continue.

0:46:170:46:19

Let's hope Philip's last shop looks promising.

0:46:250:46:29

-You've got some good things in here, haven't you?

-Lots of things.

-Yeah.

0:46:290:46:33

-Just going to look at that fish. Can we get the fish down, please?

-Yes, you can.

0:46:350:46:41

-I'll pop it down here.

-Thank you.

0:46:410:46:43

Now the first thing we want to do is is there a label on the back?

0:46:430:46:46

There's absolutely nothing.

0:46:460:46:48

I mean, the big exponent of doing these was a man called Cooper

0:46:480:46:52

and Cooper was a great taxidermist.

0:46:520:46:56

-Is that some sort of a trout?

-I think it is.

-Is it the old trout?!

-LAUGHTER

0:46:580:47:03

But what bothers me is condition.

0:47:030:47:06

If you look here, you can just see that he's starting to flake away.

0:47:060:47:12

What someone is going to have to do is take this out of its case

0:47:120:47:17

and remount it and re-glaze it

0:47:170:47:18

and that's going to cost what this thing is worth, really.

0:47:180:47:22

Typically, Philip's drawn to the only thing in the shop that's not theirs.

0:47:220:47:27

It's being sold for a friend who wants £150 for it.

0:47:270:47:31

-Does your man definitely want to sell this?

-Yes.

0:47:310:47:34

He doesn't want it back in his house.

0:47:350:47:38

I like that and I'd like to buy it off you.

0:47:380:47:40

I am worried about condition.

0:47:400:47:42

Um, can I give you £40 for it and that's my best?

0:47:420:47:47

-Yes, sir.

-You're an angel.

0:47:470:47:49

Blimey!

0:47:490:47:51

Is Jonathan having similar bargaining power next door?

0:47:510:47:54

That conjures up a strong image, doesn't it?

0:47:560:47:59

Perhaps that's something I should put in the sale.

0:47:590:48:02

Our militaria always tends to, in any sale, whether it's a general or specialist sale,

0:48:020:48:07

it always tends to do OK.

0:48:070:48:09

It's obviously depicting a battle scene in the Boer War.

0:48:090:48:13

That's a Scottish regiment.

0:48:130:48:14

It's a colour print, signed and dated in the print as 1900

0:48:140:48:18

and this is probably a reproduction not long after that.

0:48:180:48:22

What would you sell that for?

0:48:220:48:24

-The best I could do today, Jonathan, is a tenner.

-Oh, crikey.

0:48:240:48:28

How's that?

0:48:280:48:30

-Oof.

-HE LAUGHS

0:48:300:48:32

Didn't expect that, did you?

0:48:320:48:35

-I'll take it for a tenner.

-Yes?

-Why not?

0:48:350:48:37

Jonathan's keeping his last buy under wraps.

0:48:370:48:42

So let's jog our memories as to what each expert has purchased.

0:48:420:48:48

Phillip bought five lots.

0:48:480:48:50

A Victorian squeezebox,

0:48:500:48:51

a hamper filled with Yorkshire goodies, a cane lobster pot,

0:48:510:48:54

a pony harness and a stuffed fish

0:48:540:48:57

totalling £155.10.

0:48:570:49:00

Jonathan forked out

0:49:000:49:03

a wee bit less than his rival,

0:49:030:49:06

£127 for his five items. An oak bureau,

0:49:060:49:10

a nest of G-Plan tables,

0:49:100:49:12

a model torpedo boat,

0:49:120:49:14

a Loetz-style green vase

0:49:140:49:17

and a Scottish military print from the 1900s.

0:49:170:49:20

Time to get the knives out and find out what they really think.

0:49:200:49:26

For me, the Achilles heel in the whole operation is the boat.

0:49:260:49:30

Because he paid £50 for that and I just don't see that.

0:49:300:49:34

On a bad day, it could really make, I don't know, £15 to £30,

0:49:340:49:39

something like that.

0:49:390:49:41

For me, I'd be really nervous if I owned that.

0:49:410:49:44

Crikey! I mean, Phil's gone off his rocker buying a hamper

0:49:440:49:49

and buying some jam from down the road.

0:49:490:49:52

For goodness' sake.

0:49:520:49:53

On this leg of their road trip, the pair have travelled

0:49:530:49:56

from Darlington to Yarm, Whitby, Sleights, Coxwold and Scarborough.

0:49:560:50:03

Let's see how their buys fare at auction in Doncaster

0:50:030:50:07

in South Yorkshire.

0:50:070:50:10

Oh, this must be St George's. Is this a cathedral or a church?

0:50:100:50:14

I don't know.

0:50:140:50:15

Is Doncaster a city?

0:50:150:50:17

I know a man who will tell us. OK, Tim, tell us what it is.

0:50:170:50:21

Well, chaps, St George's may look impressive,

0:50:210:50:24

but it's a church, not a cathedral,

0:50:240:50:26

and Doncaster is in fact an historic market town

0:50:260:50:30

founded in AD71 by the old Romans.

0:50:300:50:33

Sitting on the River Don, it has a rich horse-racing and railway heritage

0:50:330:50:37

and some famous faces were born there,

0:50:370:50:39

including Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson.

0:50:390:50:43

Hear we are, this is it. Excellent. We've got a spot just outside.

0:50:430:50:47

Tudor Auction Rooms are house clearance specialists

0:50:470:50:51

and have been doing business in Doncaster for over 30 years.

0:50:510:50:55

I know Jonathan's trailing, but I've got a good feeling in my waters for him about this auction,

0:50:550:51:00

which auctioneer George Allen is running today.

0:51:000:51:03

Here we go.

0:51:030:51:05

First, one of Philip's more randomly acquired items from the fish-and-chip shop.

0:51:060:51:11

The cane lobster pot. 5 anywhere? 5 bid. Any advance on five?

0:51:110:51:17

Any more? All done. Tenner bid. £10.

0:51:170:51:21

-Get in there, George!

-I'll have to sit down.

0:51:210:51:26

15 bid. £15. Any more? All out. Done at 15.

0:51:260:51:32

If I'd known that, I could have had another portion of chips!

0:51:320:51:35

I'm aghast.

0:51:370:51:39

He knows what he's doing, our Philip.

0:51:390:51:41

A decent profit on the lobster pot.

0:51:410:51:43

Second is Jonathan's 1900

0:51:430:51:46

Scottish military scene print.

0:51:460:51:50

Rather nice. Very collectable. War memorabilia. 5, surely. 5 bid.

0:51:500:51:54

Any advance on 5? All done.

0:51:540:51:57

7.50 on the book. 7.50 bid.

0:51:570:52:00

-Going.

-10 bid.

-Oh!

-12.50.

-Yes!

-15.

0:52:000:52:05

£15 bid. Have you all done? At £15.

0:52:050:52:09

-There you go.

-That's cheap.

0:52:100:52:13

Yes, it's a couple for me.

0:52:130:52:15

Ha. Not a bad buy. The print served him well.

0:52:150:52:18

Next is Philip's pony hame.

0:52:200:52:23

Highly collectable, ladies and gentlemen. 5 bid.

0:52:230:52:27

Any advance on 5? 10.

0:52:270:52:28

15. 20. 5. 30.

0:52:280:52:32

£30 lady's in at 30. 35. New bidder. 40 bid.

0:52:320:52:36

£40 bid.

0:52:360:52:38

£40 bid. I'll take 2.50, if it will help you.

0:52:380:52:42

42.50 is back in. 45.

0:52:420:52:46

45 bid. All done at £45.

0:52:460:52:50

-The drinks are on you tonight, Phil.

-They certainly are.

0:52:500:52:54

Another profit for Philip and mine's a Campari and soda.

0:52:540:52:58

Next, Philip's been at it again. It's a bad case of stuffed fish. Ha.

0:52:580:53:02

10 bid. £10. Any more?

0:53:020:53:05

15, 20, 5, 30, £30, still cheap.

0:53:050:53:10

-£30 bid. Any advance on 30? 2.50, if you like.

-It's crashed and burned.

0:53:100:53:16

35, she's back in. 37.50.

0:53:160:53:19

New bidder. 40 bid.

0:53:190:53:21

£40 bid. Any advance on 40? Have you all done? At £40.

0:53:210:53:28

No complaints at all.

0:53:280:53:29

I'm quite happy now. You can give the rest away.

0:53:290:53:32

Minus commission, the fish floundered and was actually a loss for Philip.

0:53:320:53:38

Now for Jonathan's Loetz-style green vase.

0:53:390:53:44

10 bid. £10 bid. 15 bid. 20 bid. 25, 30 bid.

0:53:440:53:50

35 bid. 35 on the side.

0:53:500:53:53

35 bid. Any advance on 35? Still cheap is this.

0:53:530:53:57

-35 bid.

-It is cheap, it's a great vase.

-Any more? All done.

0:53:570:54:03

42.50.

0:54:030:54:04

At £42.50. Another chance.

0:54:040:54:07

At 42.50.

0:54:070:54:09

Go on, go on!

0:54:090:54:11

-That's all right, JP.

-Yeah.

-So after commission that's...

0:54:110:54:15

I'm on the way back!

0:54:150:54:16

You'll need a bit more than that to put you in the lead, Jonathan, or even to get you back

0:54:160:54:21

to where you started. Oh, dear.

0:54:210:54:23

It's time to see if anyone's in the mood for a picnic.

0:54:230:54:28

It's going to be red-hot tomorrow. It's the picnic basket

0:54:280:54:31

and it is full.

0:54:310:54:33

5 anywhere? 2 bid. £2 bid. £6 bid.

0:54:330:54:39

He's going to work the room.

0:54:390:54:40

8 bid on the front row. Any advance on 8, have you all done?

0:54:400:54:44

10. Very cheap that. That jam must be worth 20! 10 bid.

0:54:440:54:48

You buy it, George!

0:54:480:54:51

Any more? A bit of cake, as well!

0:54:510:54:54

12 bid. 14. We're getting better.

0:54:540:54:58

16. 18.

0:54:580:55:01

18 bid, we've got her. Any more? Done at 18.

0:55:010:55:07

See you down by the riverside.

0:55:070:55:08

-He did really well.

-Tell you what, old George works them well, doesn't he? Bless him.

0:55:080:55:14

Maybe so, but you still made a loss, Philip.

0:55:140:55:16

Aha. It's the 1920s Lebus oak bureau up now.

0:55:180:55:22

10 bid. £10 bid. 15.

0:55:220:55:26

20. 25.

0:55:260:55:28

-25 bid.

-Keep going.

0:55:280:55:29

25, 7.50. 20, please? 30 bid.

0:55:290:55:34

£30 bid. £30 bid. Any advance on 30? Have you all done?

0:55:340:55:38

-At £30. 43.

-Oh, goodness.

0:55:380:55:42

So what are the tables going to make now?

0:55:420:55:45

They've got to make about £100 for me go in a profit, I think!

0:55:450:55:50

Well, it's not over yet, Jonathan.

0:55:500:55:53

So let's see what his nest of 1970s G plan tables make.

0:55:550:56:00

£10 bid Any advance on 10?

0:56:000:56:02

That is ridiculously cheap.

0:56:020:56:04

Are you sure? 15 bid. 20 bid.

0:56:040:56:07

Lady's in at 20. 25 bid.

0:56:070:56:09

25 bid. Any more?

0:56:090:56:11

All done at £25.

0:56:110:56:15

-Good night.

-You were hard done by. I'll shake you by the hand.

0:56:160:56:19

You were hard done by, old mate.

0:56:190:56:20

He was a bit. Not a whopping profit when he needs it most.

0:56:200:56:25

Time for Philip's rosewood concertina to face the music.

0:56:250:56:29

30, 40, 50.

0:56:290:56:31

60. 70. £70 bid, lady's in at 70.

0:56:310:56:36

£80. 90, 100.

0:56:360:56:40

£100 bid. £100 bid.

0:56:400:56:43

110. 120.

0:56:430:56:44

130.

0:56:440:56:46

130. The yellow cap in at 130.

0:56:460:56:50

140. 150.

0:56:500:56:52

-£150 bid.

-I feel a bit better, JP.

-Are we all done?

0:56:520:56:56

At £150.

0:56:560:57:00

JONATHAN CLAPS

0:57:000:57:02

Well done, George.

0:57:020:57:03

You doubled your money, Phil.

0:57:030:57:04

And that's a fantastic profit for Philip.

0:57:040:57:08

He's got a hard act to follow.

0:57:080:57:10

Last, but by no means least,

0:57:100:57:13

Jonathan's slightly incomplete model boat.

0:57:130:57:17

This is a rather nice craft, ladies and gentlemen(!) A gunboat.

0:57:170:57:21

5 anywhere on the gunboat? 5 bid. Any advance on 5?

0:57:210:57:27

7.50 can I see? 7.50 bid. Lady's in at 7.50.

0:57:270:57:33

-A lady's going to buy it.

-Interesting project. 10 bid.

0:57:330:57:37

£10 bid. 12.50 new bidder. 13.50 bid.

0:57:370:57:41

13.50, have you all done?

0:57:420:57:45

At £13.50.

0:57:450:57:49

I don't quite know what to say now, JP.

0:57:490:57:53

LAUGHTER I'll go down with my ship.

0:57:530:57:55

SPLASH!

0:57:550:57:57

And he's sunk. Ha-ha.

0:57:570:57:58

GURGLE!

0:57:580:58:00

So, with that final lot, it's safe to say

0:58:010:58:04

it's a hat-trick for Philip Serrell,

0:58:040:58:07

who has now won his third auction on the trot.

0:58:070:58:10

Jonathan started this leg of the trip with £140.40

0:58:110:58:14

and, sadly, after auction costs,

0:58:140:58:17

ends today with even less, £126.70, to be precise.

0:58:170:58:23

Oh, dear.

0:58:230:58:25

Philip started with a healthier sum, £301.96.

0:58:260:58:30

But even minus commission, has increased that even further

0:58:300:58:33

and now has a decent £366.62.

0:58:330:58:37

Steady Eddie.

0:58:370:58:39

Surely now it's time for Jonathan to change tactics.

0:58:410:58:45

Have you got a plan for the next leg?

0:58:450:58:47

Um, as always, Philip, my plan is to have no plan.

0:58:470:58:50

-That's good enough, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:58:500:58:51

Just get in the car and drive.

0:58:530:58:55

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:59:140:59:17

Philip Serrell and Jonathan Pratt continue their antique trail in Corbridge and finish up at auctions in Northallerton and Doncaster.