Episode 10 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 10

Anita Manning and James Lewis begin the last leg of their journey in Dorchester. They then visit Portsmouth and Fareham before heading to their final auction in London.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

-All right, viewers?

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

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to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire!

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Sold! Going, going, gone.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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50p!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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You've had it a while, haven't you?

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Ooh!

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Oh, no!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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On this road trip, we're travelling with two auctioneering aces.

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They're also the best of pals.

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James, this is our last leg,

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and I'll be awful sad to finish it,

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because we have had a few laughs, haven't we?

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Anita Manning is a glamorous Glasgow girl,

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who has had her fair share of surprises on this trip.

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Argh!

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I still don't like spiders.

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Well, hopefully we won't find any on the last leg.

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Or maybe on the last eight legs.

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Very good, James.

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Whilst James Lewis is a Derbyshire lad

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who's really displayed the Midas touch.

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Give him a wee clap!

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They both began this trip with £200.

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In previous legs, Anita has managed

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to swell her coffers

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to a healthy £466.32.

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But James is currently Mr Moneybags,

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having accumulated a cash pot

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of an extraordinary £1,204.54.

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Today our twosome are driving a Swinging Sixties sweetheart -

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the 1969 Volkswagen Beetle.

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We've seen some wonderful counties in England.

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We've been to Herefordshire. No, Hertfordshire.

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Hertfordshire, Herefordshire and Hampshire,

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where hurricanes hardly ever happen.

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Huh!

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They started this whole road trip actually in Oxfordshire,

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and have toured the stately southern counties of England,

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heading for auction in London.

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On this last leg of their journey,

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they'll begin in Dorchester,

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with all eyes on their final auction in our nation's capital.

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Oxfordshire...

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Devon...

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Dorset...

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Yes, they've been all over.

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But this morning, they are indeed in Dorset

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and driving towards Dorchester,

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where they're both beginning their day's shopping.

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Oh, they've driven straight into the middle of a classic motorcycle meet.

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Trust you two! Probably try and buy one, James.

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Wow, look at this!

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Oh, James! Wow!

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An old Norton. Wow!

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-This is very much your era, isn't it?

-Yeah!

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-'30s and all that.

-Watch it, watch it!

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-Oh, dear!

-These are wonderful.

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Golly!

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-Anyway, less about the old bikes, more about antiques.

-OK.

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Indeed.

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They're splitting up to wander to their first shops.

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James is strolling off into De Danann Antiques,

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where he's meeting dealer John.

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-Hi there!

-All right.

-Is it John?

-Yeah.

-James. Nice to see you.

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Golly! You've got a big place.

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No need to be personal.

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It's a sizeable antiques centre, so he'll need to use his head

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if he's going to root out a bargain.

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Hello!

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Hello! He's shortly spotted another couple of animal-themed items.

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Crufts dog show.

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Oh, really?

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A pair of EPBM - electro-plated base metal - cups.

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Commemorating the Crufts dog show.

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When did Crufts start?

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1891, as it happens.

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These possibly date from the early years of the event.

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Ticket price is £45 for the pair.

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Not much.

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The style of them - this is very much in what we call the Rococo style.

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Very Victorian.

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Embossed with flowers and these giant C-scrolls.

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It says they're a pair, but they're not,

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because if you hold them together,

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one is about half an inch longer than the other,

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and also, different makers,

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so I reckon they'd have been different years.

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He's noting them and browsing on.

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Soon he spies something else which really speaks of its own history.

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That's quite interesting.

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Lt W Batty of the Royal Signals.

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So we've got an engineer's tool cabinet

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with precision instruments and chisels.

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I don't see any precision instruments,

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but the Royal Corps of Signals is a branch of the armed forces

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dedicated to telecommunications.

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This toolkit dates from the early 20th century.

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Well, maybe. Ticket price, £60.

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It's mahogany lined as well, which is nice.

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And brass locks and hinges.

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-John, could I...?

-Yeah.

-Thank you.

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I've got a couple of things I'm looking at up here.

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I thought they're quite interesting.

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-Yeah, Crufts.

-I thought they might be early Crufts trophies,

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but they're not a pair, though.

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-One's slightly bigger than the other.

-Good lord!

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-One for one year and one for another?

-Yes, that's what I think.

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Er...25.

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25. OK.

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And what about the signalman's toolkit?

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That could be 40.

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(40...)

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65.

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60 for the two.

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-50 the two?

-55?

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There you go. 55. Thank you.

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Excellent! A great deal done with military efficiency.

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And James has the Crufts vases and the toolkit for £55 the lot.

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Now, Anita's nearby at Dorchester Curiosity Centre,

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where she's meeting dealer Martin.

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Stand by, Martin.

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-Hello!

-Hi.

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-I'm Anita.

-I'm Martin. Nice to meet you.

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Anita's full of childlike wonder this morning.

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I love this type of place.

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It's a big warehouse and there is thousands and thousands of items

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of every type and every fashion.

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MUSIC: "Black Beauty" THEME

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And she's soon spotted something outside

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that she'd like to take for a ride.

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What's this wee soul doing out here all alone?

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He's a black beauty.

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Certainly is.

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It's a metal spring-mounted rocking horse.

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Ticket price is £65.

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He's a tin toy. He's from the 1940s,

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so he has a bit of age. He's a vintage item.

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He's resting on these springs,

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and it's a fairly tough and substantial toy.

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Of course, she's going to test that theory. Stand by.

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He would probably take my weight.

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Careful!

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TIM TITTERS

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My legs are too long!

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But he's a good strong creature.

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I think I'll have a go at him.

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Hmm. Better get Martin.

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Why has he been tethered outside?

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He loves the fresh air.

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What I'd be looking to buy him for

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is round about £25.

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HE INHALES SHARPLY Right.

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I'd like to look at 30.

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-At 30?

-Yeah.

-Uh-huh.

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Could you come a wee bit sort of...

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halfway between the two?

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-Let's go £28, then. How's that?

-£28? That sounds absolutely wonderful.

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Thank you very much.

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One item safely stabled,

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and she's soon toying with the idea of another playful buy.

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We've got a whole army there. I'm not sure

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which army!

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I think it's second childhood, you know.

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100 lead toy soldiers,

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not all originating from the same set.

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Ticket price on the whole assortment is £108.

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Is she going gaga?

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I think we have Confederates,

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so it might be something to do...

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or some of them might be something to do with the American Civil War.

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I'm going to ask the dealer about them.

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The dealer who owns them is called Gary.

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Excuse me! Hello!

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-I'm Anita.

-Hello, Anita. Gary.

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What I do like about this is that you've got quite a quantity.

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You can have a good wee...war there.

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A good battle, yeah!

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And if all else fails,

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you've got these four Scotsmen with kilts on,

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who will come down and win the battle.

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And all this chat about brave Scots warriors

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has whetted Anita's appetite for a serious haggle. Look out, Gary!

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Can they be bought for in the region of,

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say, £30, £35?

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I think the best I could do really is 55.

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-55 on that?

-Yes.

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Could you take another tenner off of it?

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I'll met you halfway. 50.

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Shall we go for it?

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-If you're happy.

-Let's go with that. Thank you very much, Gary.

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-You're very welcome.

-That's smashing.

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I'm in a playful mood today.

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You certainly seem to be.

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So, she's got the rocking horse and the lead soldiers

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for a total of £78.

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And now she's trotting off to find a sandpit to play in, perhaps.

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Now, James is still in his first shop.

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That's ominous.

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That's quite interesting.

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It's a shot flask for...

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or powder flask

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for an 18th-century musket.

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Made from one whole cow horn.

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Mmm. It's designed to hold shot or gunpowder.

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Ticket price is £18

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and James is impressed with its quality.

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Just look at the way that's been heated

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and flattened. Very subtly done.

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Into these panels and then spiralled.

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£18.

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Well...it's not expensive at that.

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I'll just see what he can do on it.

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See what his best price is.

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Go for it.

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-Hi.

-Hi.

-What could you do on that for me?

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-9.

-9?

-Yeah.

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Deal. Thank you very much.

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That's grand.

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Golly, that deal was over like a shot.

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Swift work, chaps.

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And his magpie eye is soon caught by something shiny

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elsewhere in the shop.

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I'm thinking about useful things for the dining table.

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And there we've got a pair of

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Victorian Sheffield plate bottle coasters.

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Sheffield plate is clever stuff.

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It looks just like the real solid silver,

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except it's silver on top of a layer of copper.

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Popular in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Two pairs of the coasters, priced up at £30 each,

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so £60 the lot.

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But it's the damage, and the damage is key.

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We've got a boss missing off that one in the centre

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and we've got woodworm in the base there.

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HE INHALES

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Best see what John could do, then.

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John, what could they be?

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40 the lot.

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How about 35, then?

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-35, yeah?

-Is 35 all right?

-Yeah. That's fine.

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You've got a deal. Thank you very much.

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Thank you.

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Smashing.

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After a bumper browse in this shop,

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James has secured a whopping four items.

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Thank you, John!

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Now, Anita's also still in Dorchester.

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Continuing the playful theme she started this morning shopping with,

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she's now wandered on to the town's teddy bear museum.

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Fancy a hug?

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She's meeting the proprietor, Jackie Ridley.

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Hello! It's lovely to be here.

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-My name's Anita.

-I'm Jackie.

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-And I'm a teddy bear girl.

-I'm so glad!

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You've come to the right place.

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This enchanting museum grew out of

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Jackie's own enormous and quirky collection of teddy bears.

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Collecting bears is a personal passion

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that she's had since childhood.

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-Do you still have your first bear?

-I do.

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-And he's here today.

-Is he? Oh!

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-Can I have a wee cuddle?

-Oh, yes.

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Aw! He's very sweet.

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Jackie, I can't wait to see the rest of the collection.

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Well, come and have a look.

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Teddy bears are named after

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US President Theodore - or Teddy - Roosevelt.

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The story goes that Roosevelt spared the life of a bear

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when on a hunting trip,

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and this inspired a couple who owned as Brooklyn candy store

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to create a toy in tribute.

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The wife, Rose, Rose Michtom,

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would actually make a little tiny Teddy's bear.

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So she makes a Teddy's bear and pops it in her husband's shop window.

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-And that's how they started?

-That's how it all started.

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Though the teddy is as American as apple pie in its origins,

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it was a German company, Steiff,

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that really popularised it

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and remains the key name in collectable bears to this day.

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Well, Margarete Steiff had the capacity

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to key into this Teddy's bear.

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She had a huge factory and she was able to suddenly

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manufacture them in quantity,

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and by 1903, the Germans had virtually taken over

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the market for this new phenomenon which everyone wanted,

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which was a teddy bear.

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So they had the capacity. They did it. They got in first.

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The Steiff company has remained synonymous

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with valuable and collectable bears.

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Jackie's taking Anita to see a copy

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of the most valuable teddy in the world -

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a Steiff bear that sold at auction for an astonishing £110,000.

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In the museum, what we wanted to do, we wanted to show people

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what someone has bought for that kind of money.

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What are we looking for in an early Steiff bear?

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What are the characteristics that we need to look for?

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Look at the length of the arms.

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Look at this lovely hump.

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Look at the way the stitching is done,

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the way the nose is made, and the eyes.

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The eyes are glass eyes.

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They're not plastic eyes.

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I don't think it's only that,

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but it's the fact that this is just a gorgeous...thing.

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Well, I think this will send us all

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-searching in the attics for our old teddy bear.

-Absolutely.

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But it would have to be a very, very special teddy.

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It would.

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It's nearly time for Anita to hit the road,

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but first, she's going to have

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a last look around Jackie's collection.

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# If you go down in the woods today

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# You're sure of a big surprise... #

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Look out, Anita! Some of the locals are taking an interest in you.

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They'll want an autograph.

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# For every bear that ever there was

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# Will gather there for certain because

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# Today's the day the teddy bears have their picnic. #

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It's the end of a jolly packed first day.

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Night-night, chaps.

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But the fresh morning air greets them back in the car

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and they're as competitive as ever.

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-I bought some really wonderful things.

-Aw, no!

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-Wonderful.

-Aw, no!

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Don't despair, Anita.

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So far, James has spent £99 on four lots -

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the army engineer's toolbox,

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the Crufts vases,

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the 19th-century shot flask and the bottle coasters.

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Whilst Anita has spent only £78 on two lots -

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the rocking horse and the job lot of toy soldiers.

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What I want to do today, James, is to find something

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that's going to make me £3,000!

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Don't we all, Anita.

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Let's hope your luck's in, girl.

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They're driving to the city of Portsmouth in Hampshire.

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Portsmouth has for centuries

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been one of Britain's most vital naval ports.

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Its history is commemorated by the city's modern Spinnaker Tower.

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They're pulling up beside a naval hero.

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-There we go!

-Well done, James.

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Who is that?

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-It's Nelson, of course.

-Oh, yeah!

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Good-looking guy from the back.

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Hey, Anita, stop ogling a statue!

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She's going to drive onwards, though.

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But James is going to his first shop.

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-Have fun!

-Bye-bye, darling!

-Bye-bye.

0:16:550:16:57

He's marching off towards the Antiques Storehouse,

0:17:000:17:03

which is located right in the heart of Portsmouth's historic docks.

0:17:030:17:07

James has been here before, so already knows dealer Andrew.

0:17:070:17:11

-Hi, Andrew. How are you?

-Hi, James. Good to see you.

0:17:110:17:14

I've got to find something that's got a chance of making a profit.

0:17:200:17:24

Yep, that's the general idea.

0:17:240:17:26

But he's just found something with real historic interest.

0:17:260:17:30

One thing that almost everybody finds

0:17:300:17:33

when they're doing a house clearance,

0:17:330:17:35

stuck at the back of the bureau,

0:17:350:17:37

is Granny's death certificate, or Grandad's death certificate.

0:17:370:17:40

But...

0:17:400:17:42

..this one is slightly different.

0:17:430:17:45

Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill.

0:17:470:17:49

I mean, that...

0:17:490:17:52

is an incredible thing to see.

0:17:520:17:54

Churchill's death certificate.

0:17:540:17:57

There would be more than one.

0:17:590:18:00

You would have to prove to the tax office, to the Inland Revenue,

0:18:000:18:04

but also, you would have copies made

0:18:040:18:06

for the family as well, for the family records.

0:18:060:18:09

Yeah, there could be lots of copies knocking about.

0:18:090:18:11

It's priced at £1,100. Huh!

0:18:110:18:14

So James isn't sure he could make a profit on it.

0:18:140:18:17

But he's visited this shop on a previous road trip,

0:18:200:18:22

and he's remembered some stock of Andrew's he'd like to revisit.

0:18:220:18:26

One of the things you pointed out very kindly

0:18:260:18:29

were two very thick boxes, blue boxes of William Wyllie sketches.

0:18:290:18:34

-I haven't moved them since!

-Haven't you?!

0:18:340:18:37

Andrew has two boxes crammed full of works

0:18:370:18:40

that came from the studio of popular artist William Lionel Wyllie,

0:18:400:18:45

who painted in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

0:18:450:18:48

There you go.

0:18:510:18:52

Ah, brilliant! Where shall we go with these?

0:18:520:18:55

James did rather well from the last Wyllie sketch he bought here.

0:18:550:18:59

Can he repeat the trick?

0:18:590:19:01

Here we have a whole mass of prints and watercolours

0:19:010:19:05

and sketches by William Wyllie.

0:19:050:19:08

William Wyllie was really known for his etchings

0:19:080:19:11

of yachts and ships,

0:19:110:19:14

and there's the man himself.

0:19:140:19:16

There he is. That's William Wyllie,

0:19:160:19:18

painting a large-scale oil.

0:19:180:19:20

James has found one unusual sketch that he really likes.

0:19:200:19:23

I think that's quite smart.

0:19:230:19:25

And there's a bird sitting on a cat's head,

0:19:250:19:28

sharing a bowl of milk with mice.

0:19:280:19:32

"United Happy Family" he's called it.

0:19:320:19:34

That's bonkers!

0:19:340:19:37

Love it.

0:19:370:19:39

He's going to speak to Andrew about that one.

0:19:390:19:41

-Could that be 10?

-Yeah, that's fine.

0:19:410:19:44

And he's also selected another piece.

0:19:440:19:47

There's a yacht, which I thought would be more his sort of thing,

0:19:470:19:51

so, I mean, what would you want for that?

0:19:510:19:53

That's going to be getting...certainly £50 for that.

0:19:530:19:56

50. OK.

0:19:560:19:58

-Take 50 the two?

-I'll do them for 60.

0:19:580:20:00

That was 50 and that was 10 anyway!

0:20:000:20:03

Was it? I thought I said 20. OK, 50's fine.

0:20:030:20:05

-You've got a deal.

-That is really nice, actually.

0:20:050:20:08

It is. James gets his wily way with his Wyllie pictures for £50.

0:20:080:20:13

And he's sailing onwards. Hopefully upwards.

0:20:130:20:16

Now, Anita's driven on to the town of Fareham, Hampshire,

0:20:170:20:22

where she's visiting Antiques of Fareham.

0:20:220:20:24

Proprietor Nick has his stock in a rather unusual setting.

0:20:260:20:30

-Hello.

-Hello! I'm Anita Manning.

0:20:300:20:33

Hi. I'm Nick.

0:20:330:20:34

-I'm looking to buy some antiques. Am I in the right place?

-Yes, you are.

0:20:340:20:39

Tell you what, if you just stand over there,

0:20:390:20:41

I'll open up the door and reveal all to you.

0:20:410:20:44

Sounds interesting.

0:20:440:20:45

It does!

0:20:450:20:47

What are you up to, Anita?

0:20:500:20:52

-Hello again!

-Hello!

0:20:550:20:57

Nick and his wife used to have a shop in town,

0:20:570:21:00

but now mainly deal online and at antique fairs,

0:21:000:21:03

so they've generously allowed Anita into their garage,

0:21:030:21:06

where they keep their stock.

0:21:060:21:08

Best behaviour, now, Anita.

0:21:080:21:10

Ah, terrific!

0:21:100:21:13

-Can I have a wee look around?

-You can.

0:21:130:21:15

And she's soon unearthed something that she likes the look of.

0:21:190:21:22

I rather like this little purse.

0:21:220:21:25

Late 19th, early 20th century.

0:21:250:21:29

If you open it up, it's in absolutely perfect condition.

0:21:290:21:34

But it has a faintly Art Deco look about it.

0:21:340:21:39

As if it was blowing a kiss to the Art Deco period.

0:21:390:21:43

Hmm. You do have a way with words, Anita.

0:21:430:21:46

Ticket price is £35.

0:21:460:21:48

The purse is made of ivory,

0:21:500:21:52

but of course it's illegal to trade in ivory items made after 1947.

0:21:520:21:56

But this little purse here was made well before that time.

0:21:570:22:02

And there's something else from a similar period

0:22:020:22:04

that's also caught her fancy.

0:22:040:22:05

I like this. I find it very appealing.

0:22:050:22:09

It's a little evening purse.

0:22:090:22:11

Now, the body of the purse is made of the finest kid leather.

0:22:110:22:16

It's very soft, so there's a sort of slight Art Deco look about that.

0:22:160:22:22

This is probably the type of purse

0:22:220:22:25

that a fine stylish lady would have carried on a night out

0:22:250:22:30

at the turn of the century in Shanghai.

0:22:300:22:33

Ooh! Ticket price on the leather purse is £18.

0:22:330:22:37

She's going to ask Nick about both her Art Deco-influenced items.

0:22:370:22:41

What they've both got is probably more style

0:22:410:22:46

-than quality. Would you agree with me on that?

-Yes, absolutely.

0:22:460:22:50

They were made at the turn of the century when style was at its height.

0:22:500:22:53

What will Anita offer on the ivory purse?

0:22:530:22:57

I would be thinking of that probably in the region of...

0:22:570:23:01

£12 to £15.

0:23:010:23:04

And what about the leather one?

0:23:040:23:05

I'd be maybe in the region of £8, round about that.

0:23:050:23:11

-Hmm.

-Am I anywhere near where it may be possible to buy these?

0:23:110:23:16

I think we might be able to do something.

0:23:160:23:19

I don't know if I can do it quite as low as that,

0:23:190:23:22

but for me to cover my costs and just make a little bit,

0:23:220:23:25

I think what I'd be looking at would be about 25, 27 for the pair.

0:23:250:23:29

Is there any possibility of coming near 20 on it?

0:23:290:23:32

Um...

0:23:320:23:33

I think just to make a little bit in it for me,

0:23:330:23:38

if I said 22?

0:23:380:23:39

That's absolutely fine with me.

0:23:390:23:42

I'm happy with that.

0:23:420:23:43

So Anita's got her stylish buys and she's off.

0:23:430:23:46

Now, James has driven on to the Southsea area of Portsmouth.

0:23:510:23:54

He's going to spend the afternoon

0:23:540:23:56

visiting the area's Royal Marines Museum,

0:23:560:23:59

where he's going to learn the dashing, eccentric

0:23:590:24:02

and terribly British story

0:24:020:24:03

of one Royal Marine who served in World War II

0:24:030:24:06

and put his artistic skills to use as a spy.

0:24:060:24:09

He's meeting the museum's curator, Ian Main.

0:24:090:24:13

-Ian.

-Welcome to the Royal Marines Museum.

-Thank you very much.

0:24:130:24:17

What a spot!

0:24:170:24:18

-I'd love to see more. Shall we go in and have a look?

-After you.

0:24:180:24:21

Ian's taking James into the museum's medal room,

0:24:210:24:24

which houses their vast collection of decorations

0:24:240:24:27

awarded to Royal Marines.

0:24:270:24:29

The stories of over 2,500 brave servicemen are celebrated here,

0:24:290:24:33

but James has come to learn about

0:24:330:24:35

one particular charismatic Marines officer.

0:24:350:24:38

So, a huge number of stories represented in the museum,

0:24:380:24:41

a lot of them quite unexpected.

0:24:410:24:43

This chap here is Major Guy Griffiths

0:24:430:24:47

and he was actually a Royal Marines pilot,

0:24:470:24:50

just before the Second World War.

0:24:500:24:52

Guy Griffiths served in the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Marines -

0:24:520:24:55

a flying unit deployed at sea.

0:24:550:24:58

Guy Griffiths was actually on board

0:24:580:25:00

the aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal in 1939.

0:25:000:25:02

He was one of the very first Fleet Air Arm pilots

0:25:040:25:08

to attempt to sink a submarine.

0:25:080:25:12

In September 1939,

0:25:120:25:14

Griffiths, along with his observer colleague,

0:25:140:25:18

took off from the Ark Royal on a mission to bomb a German U-boat.

0:25:180:25:21

He caught sight of the U-boat

0:25:210:25:25

and he released his bombs onto the U-boat.

0:25:250:25:28

Unfortunately, he was actually too close,

0:25:280:25:30

and as the bombs went off,

0:25:300:25:33

they actually blew the tailplane off his aircraft.

0:25:330:25:35

He ditched in the sea.

0:25:350:25:37

His observer had been killed.

0:25:370:25:39

And he had the rather embarrassing prospect

0:25:390:25:42

of actually being rescued by the people he tried to sink.

0:25:420:25:46

He was actually one of the first people to become a POW

0:25:460:25:49

during the Second World War.

0:25:490:25:51

As this amazing cine footage shows,

0:25:510:25:54

the early days in POW camps

0:25:540:25:55

could actually be quite civilised for the officer class.

0:25:550:25:59

But of course, he ended up in one of the more well-known camps,

0:25:590:26:05

-which was Stalag Luft III.

-Oh, blimey.

0:26:050:26:07

Which was, of course, the one that was made famous

0:26:070:26:10

in the film The Great Escape.

0:26:100:26:13

And the real-life story

0:26:130:26:14

also inspired a specific character in the famous film.

0:26:140:26:18

Griffiths was actually a very keen artist and illustrator

0:26:180:26:21

and so what Griffiths actually did during his time in captivity

0:26:210:26:25

was he did a lot of drawing and painting.

0:26:250:26:28

But he was also involved in the forging team,

0:26:280:26:31

-so the character that's played by Donald Pleasence is...

-Yes!

0:26:310:26:35

-Faking the passports and things and then the travel documents.

-Yes.

0:26:350:26:39

As well as forging documents and creating cartoons

0:26:390:26:42

with which to amuse his fellow internees,

0:26:420:26:44

the dashing Griffiths also put his artistic skills to good use

0:26:440:26:48

in a rather more cunning way.

0:26:480:26:50

He actually started drawing types of aircraft

0:26:500:26:53

that didn't exist,

0:26:530:26:54

and then sending them in letters,

0:26:540:26:56

which of course he knew would be opened,

0:26:560:26:58

and describing the latest, you know, new-fangled invention,

0:26:580:27:02

which of course didn't exist,

0:27:020:27:04

but it got the German intelligence machine working overtime.

0:27:040:27:08

He acted as a spy for British military intelligence

0:27:080:27:10

whilst inside the camp.

0:27:100:27:12

So through the simple expedient of a few drawings and watercolours,

0:27:120:27:15

he started to create confusion and havoc.

0:27:150:27:20

How fantastic!

0:27:200:27:22

What Griffiths did was a very, very clever use of his talent.

0:27:220:27:26

Near the end of the war, Griffiths led his fellow POWs

0:27:260:27:30

out of the camp to freedom.

0:27:300:27:32

He went on to be a test pilot,

0:27:320:27:34

the first Marine ever to fly a helicopter

0:27:340:27:36

and served in the Korean War.

0:27:360:27:38

I think my favourite piece,

0:27:380:27:40

which goes back to my own childhood,

0:27:400:27:43

is that he ends up running a tea shop in Chichester.

0:27:430:27:45

And I just love the idea of going into a tea shop in Chichester

0:27:450:27:49

in the sort of 1970s

0:27:490:27:51

and, you now, you're there

0:27:510:27:52

with this guy who's done all this remarkable stuff.

0:27:520:27:55

Cor, that is an incredible story!

0:27:550:27:57

And only one of thousands that could be told in this room.

0:27:570:28:01

But it's time for James to fly.

0:28:010:28:03

Anita's also made her way to Southsea,

0:28:090:28:11

where she's heading into Parmiters Antiques

0:28:110:28:14

to meet sharply dressed dealer Ian.

0:28:140:28:16

-Hello.

-Hello. I'm Anita.

-Hello, Anita. Welcome to Southsea.

0:28:160:28:20

Oh, nice jacket, sir!

0:28:200:28:22

Ian's shop is stuffed to the gunwales

0:28:220:28:24

with eye-catching and eccentric items,

0:28:240:28:27

which plays right into Anita's wheelhouse.

0:28:270:28:30

This is so visually exciting!

0:28:300:28:32

It all seems so...mad and unusual.

0:28:320:28:38

-It's probably a bit like me.

-Is it?

0:28:380:28:40

You two should get along swimmingly, then.

0:28:400:28:42

Time for a browse, Anita.

0:28:420:28:44

Shortly she's fallen for something

0:28:490:28:51

redolent of the great British seaside.

0:28:510:28:53

Isn't he adorable?

0:28:530:28:55

Not another one!

0:28:550:28:57

This is Puck the magic dragon.

0:28:570:28:59

Ah, Puff's brother, is he?

0:28:590:29:01

I think that this is a fairground animal.

0:29:010:29:06

I think this is off one of the rides of maybe the 1940s

0:29:060:29:11

or 1950s.

0:29:110:29:13

And it appeals to me because it is so colourful.

0:29:130:29:16

I wonder how much it is?

0:29:160:29:18

Best ask Ian.

0:29:180:29:19

Ian.

0:29:190:29:21

Yes, Anita?

0:29:210:29:22

I've fallen in love with Puck the magic dragon.

0:29:240:29:27

I suppose you want to know how much it is?

0:29:270:29:29

She sure does.

0:29:290:29:30

I'm asking 150, but I'm open to an offer.

0:29:300:29:33

-We can do a wee bit of bargaining.

-Yeah.

0:29:330:29:35

-Without falling out.

-I won't fall out with you, Anita.

0:29:350:29:39

-Cos you're nice.

-That's good!

0:29:390:29:40

Say I come in at...

0:29:400:29:43

£80?

0:29:430:29:44

-How does that sound?

-120.

0:29:440:29:47

100.

0:29:490:29:50

-Go on, then.

-Thank you very much!

0:29:510:29:53

Cor, she's splashing her cash today.

0:29:530:29:56

But she'll have to be bold

0:29:560:29:57

if she's going to stand any chance against James. Hello!

0:29:570:30:00

Not my type.

0:30:000:30:02

No, but there's someone outside who does take her fancy.

0:30:040:30:07

This is one of the things that I noticed

0:30:120:30:14

when I came in at the beginning.

0:30:140:30:16

A footballer.

0:30:160:30:17

It's a piece of a fairground attraction. Ticket price is £120.

0:30:170:30:22

I'm not the biggest of fans of football,

0:30:230:30:27

but I'm a great fan of the fairground.

0:30:270:30:29

I'm still feeling very, very playful!

0:30:290:30:33

I'm going to have a go at that. I think that's great.

0:30:330:30:36

And he's got fabulous thighs.

0:30:360:30:39

Yeah, footballer's!

0:30:390:30:41

-I want to ask you about something else.

-OK.

0:30:410:30:43

What can you give him to me for?

0:30:430:30:45

Well, again...,what am I asking? 120.

0:30:450:30:48

120. Could I come in at 60?

0:30:480:30:51

Um...go on, give me 60 for him.

0:30:510:30:53

Oh, 60 quid - that's wonderful!

0:30:530:30:55

Absolutely wonderful.

0:30:550:30:57

-He can be my new boyfriend.

-Yeah!

0:30:570:31:00

Yes! You've scored, Anita.

0:31:000:31:02

She's got both her final items, and now everyone's all bought up.

0:31:020:31:06

So it's time for both our auction aces

0:31:080:31:10

to unveil their purchases.

0:31:100:31:12

I'm quite excited to see what you've got.

0:31:120:31:15

OK, let's have a look.

0:31:150:31:17

Right.

0:31:170:31:19

James, an interesting lot, but when I look at these drawings here...

0:31:190:31:23

I'm drawn to them!

0:31:230:31:25

Well, have a look.

0:31:250:31:27

They look wonderful.

0:31:270:31:29

-A Wyllie watercolour?

-Yeah.

0:31:290:31:31

They came from Wyllie's sketchbook.

0:31:310:31:32

Wow!

0:31:320:31:34

You must have paid a lot of money for those, James.

0:31:340:31:36

-I got them for a very reasonable price.

-How much?

0:31:360:31:39

-£50 the two.

-£50?!

0:31:390:31:41

-James!

-For the two.

0:31:410:31:43

For a Wyllie watercolour?

0:31:430:31:45

She's impressed.

0:31:450:31:46

That, I loved.

0:31:480:31:49

-Because it's so early.

-How much?

0:31:490:31:51

What would you put on that?

0:31:510:31:53

-80 quid?

-Yeah. 80, 120, I thought.

0:31:530:31:55

-Uh-huh?

-Nine.

0:31:550:31:57

You must have put on your very, very best smile.

0:31:580:32:02

It was a really cheap lot.

0:32:020:32:03

Anita's turn now.

0:32:030:32:05

I'm dying to show you my stuff!

0:32:050:32:07

You know, James, we're on this wonderful south coast.

0:32:070:32:11

I've got this marvellous holiday, frivolous feeling!

0:32:110:32:15

Oh, my goodness!

0:32:150:32:17

But wait!

0:32:170:32:19

And it continues.

0:32:200:32:22

No way!

0:32:220:32:23

Oh, my goodness!

0:32:230:32:26

Colourful, James!

0:32:260:32:28

Holiday feeling!

0:32:280:32:30

You've lost it completely!

0:32:320:32:34

I think she has, you know.

0:32:340:32:35

How much?

0:32:350:32:36

28 for the wee horsey.

0:32:360:32:39

-That's cheap.

-That's not bad.

0:32:390:32:40

-60 for the footballer.

-Yeah.

0:32:400:32:42

-I paid 100 for him.

-Did you?

0:32:420:32:44

But I couldn't resist him!

0:32:440:32:46

Anita, that's brave.

0:32:460:32:48

Or foolhardy.

0:32:480:32:50

James, it has been the most wonderful,

0:32:500:32:52

wonderful, wonderful, wonderful fun!

0:32:520:32:55

I've enjoyed every minute. I really have.

0:32:550:32:57

Come on. Let's stroll into the sunset.

0:32:570:32:59

You two are so sweet when you're face-to-face.

0:32:590:33:03

Wyllie is just absolutely marvellous

0:33:030:33:06

on that type of marine drawing or watercolour or etching.

0:33:060:33:10

So I think he'll do well on that.

0:33:100:33:13

No great surprises, no great thrills,

0:33:130:33:16

but good solid work.

0:33:160:33:18

I think Anita's suffering from too much sun.

0:33:180:33:21

What a mad lot!

0:33:210:33:23

The little night-rider horse - see them all the time.

0:33:230:33:26

The little dragon...

0:33:260:33:28

£100?

0:33:280:33:29

No.

0:33:310:33:32

Don't mince your words, eh?

0:33:320:33:33

On this final leg of the road trip,

0:33:330:33:35

Anita and James began in Dorchester, Dorset,

0:33:350:33:39

and they're now aiming for auction in grand old London town.

0:33:390:33:42

Today's auction is in Wandsworth,

0:33:420:33:45

on the banks of old Father Thames,

0:33:450:33:47

and not too far from the iconic edifice of Battersea Power Station,

0:33:470:33:51

which they passed earlier on this trip.

0:33:510:33:55

They're driving to Criterion Auctions.

0:33:550:33:58

Hang on! Something's different.

0:33:590:34:01

Have you changed your hair, Anita?

0:34:020:34:04

Oh, no! Silly me.

0:34:070:34:09

Unfortunately, James has been taken ill

0:34:090:34:11

and won't be able to attend this auction.

0:34:110:34:13

But fortunately, I've got a stand-in!

0:34:130:34:16

He's a cracking guy! He looks a bit like James as well.

0:34:160:34:20

He does a bit, actually.

0:34:200:34:22

Our new friend is a bull mastiff by the name of Nelson.

0:34:220:34:25

But today, he'll be playing the part of James Lewis.

0:34:250:34:29

At least Anita won't be lonely.

0:34:290:34:31

You never know what's going to happen

0:34:310:34:34

until the hammer falls.

0:34:340:34:36

That's never been truer than today, Anita.

0:34:360:34:39

They're arriving at the auction house. Look at that.

0:34:390:34:42

Here we are, darling. Here we are.

0:34:420:34:44

OK, Jamesy, we've got stuff to sell.

0:34:460:34:49

Here we go, kid. Here we go.

0:34:490:34:51

Careful!

0:34:520:34:54

C'mon, darling!

0:34:540:34:55

There we are. Hold on a sec. Hold on a sec.

0:34:550:34:58

Wait a minute!

0:34:580:35:00

He's keener than you are today, Anita!

0:35:010:35:04

Today's auctioneer is Daniel Webster.

0:35:070:35:09

Before this highly irregular sale kicks off,

0:35:110:35:13

what does he make of Anita and James's buys?

0:35:130:35:16

Good boy!

0:35:160:35:18

A few sort of fun pieces in there, with Puck the magic dragon

0:35:180:35:21

and the footballer,

0:35:210:35:23

so that should provide a bit of entertainment.

0:35:230:35:26

We've got a Wyllie painting in.

0:35:260:35:28

Wyllie sketch, rather.

0:35:280:35:30

Wyllie's always popular, so hopefully that should do OK.

0:35:300:35:34

Anita started this leg with £466.32.

0:35:340:35:37

She spent £260 exactly,

0:35:370:35:40

and has five lots in today's sale.

0:35:400:35:42

While James began with £1,204.54.

0:35:440:35:48

He spent £149 and also has five lots.

0:35:480:35:52

The saleroom's looking a little sparse today,

0:35:540:35:57

but will be accepting bids over the telephone and online.

0:35:570:36:00

The sale's about to begin.

0:36:000:36:02

Sit!

0:36:030:36:05

There's a good girl.

0:36:050:36:06

First up is James's 18th-century shot flask.

0:36:080:36:11

Will it go off with a bang?

0:36:110:36:12

At £30. The money's with me at 30.

0:36:120:36:15

Surely worth more. At 30, and 5 now.

0:36:150:36:18

At £35, are we all sure, then?

0:36:180:36:20

At 35...

0:36:200:36:22

-BANGS GAVEL

-Yes!

0:36:220:36:25

A tidy profit for James.

0:36:250:36:27

Who's a clever boy, then?

0:36:270:36:29

Well done, darling! Well done.

0:36:290:36:31

Next, Anita's job lot

0:36:310:36:33

of ivory purse and early 20th-century leather bag.

0:36:330:36:36

At £30, are we sure?

0:36:360:36:38

-35.

-35, darling!

0:36:380:36:41

-40.

-You're not interested in this one.

0:36:410:36:44

Of course he's not. It's more of a lady's lot, to be fair.

0:36:440:36:47

-£40, are we all sure?

-For 40...

0:36:470:36:49

BANGS GAVEL

0:36:490:36:51

Anita's eye for vintage style sees her clear to a profit.

0:36:510:36:55

Now it's James's set of four Sheffield plated bottle coasters.

0:36:550:36:59

We have 40 and 5.

0:36:590:37:01

At 45, money's here.

0:37:010:37:03

At 45...are we done and sure at 45?

0:37:030:37:07

-BANGS GAVEL

-Well, that was short and sweet.

0:37:070:37:10

Indeed it was.

0:37:100:37:12

Another £10 profit to James,

0:37:120:37:14

whose attention seems to be wandering.

0:37:140:37:17

James! James.

0:37:170:37:19

Hey, are you listening? You made a profit.

0:37:190:37:22

Now it's Anita's job lot of toy soldiers.

0:37:220:37:25

Will they prove victorious?

0:37:250:37:27

At £30, someone, surely? 30 is bid.

0:37:270:37:30

And 5.

0:37:300:37:32

40.

0:37:320:37:33

Come on, come on!

0:37:330:37:34

And 5. 50.

0:37:340:37:36

50!

0:37:360:37:38

5. 60.

0:37:380:37:40

5. 70.

0:37:400:37:42

75, back in.

0:37:420:37:44

80.

0:37:440:37:45

£80!

0:37:450:37:47

At 85.

0:37:470:37:49

Are you listening?

0:37:490:37:51

Going for 85...

0:37:510:37:53

-BANGS GAVEL

-Did you hear that?

0:37:530:37:56

£85.

0:37:560:37:57

Ho ho ho!

0:37:570:37:59

I think he's jealous of your profit, Anita.

0:37:590:38:02

Now it's James's Royal Signal engineer's toolbox.

0:38:020:38:05

We have 35. 40 now.

0:38:050:38:09

At £40, the money's with me. And 5. We're in the room.

0:38:090:38:12

At £45 in the room. A neat thing at 45. Are we done?

0:38:120:38:16

At 45...I'll sell, then, at 45.

0:38:160:38:19

BANGS GAVEL

0:38:190:38:21

That manages to carve out a little profit for James.

0:38:210:38:24

See, you're getting all excited when it's your lots,

0:38:240:38:28

and when it's my lots,

0:38:280:38:29

you're lying down there and you don't give a damn!

0:38:290:38:32

I mean, what is this? Don't you love me?

0:38:320:38:34

I'm cheering on your lots.

0:38:340:38:37

Certainly are.

0:38:370:38:38

Next it's Anita's 1970s footballer.

0:38:380:38:42

With the thighs.

0:38:420:38:44

50, if you like, surely. 50 is bid.

0:38:440:38:46

-50 bid!

-55, 60.

0:38:460:38:49

60 now.

0:38:490:38:50

At £60 we're away.

0:38:500:38:52

£60 and we're not away!

0:38:520:38:55

Fair warning at 60...

0:38:550:38:58

BANGS GAVEL

0:38:580:39:00

Aw, £60! £60.

0:39:000:39:03

It makes what she paid for it.

0:39:030:39:05

But that's a loss after auction costs are deducted,

0:39:050:39:08

so a bit of an own goal.

0:39:080:39:10

Let's hope Anita's next playful lot does better -

0:39:100:39:14

the tin plate rocking horse.

0:39:140:39:16

Waiting for the horse, surely?

0:39:160:39:18

Rock away for £20.

0:39:180:39:21

20 is bid.

0:39:210:39:22

You're the one that looks rocked, Anita.

0:39:220:39:24

At £20, no money. Are we done?

0:39:240:39:27

£20!

0:39:270:39:29

-Selling at 20.

-BANGS GAVEL

0:39:290:39:31

It refuses at the first fence.

0:39:310:39:34

What a pity.

0:39:340:39:35

The bidders in this room today

0:39:350:39:38

are not in a playful mood.

0:39:380:39:41

Now it's James's vases,

0:39:410:39:43

commemorating an early Crufts championship.

0:39:430:39:46

£50 for them? At 50. 30, if you like.

0:39:460:39:49

At £30...

0:39:490:39:51

NOW you're interested!

0:39:510:39:53

Crufts!

0:39:530:39:54

At £20 now.

0:39:540:39:56

25, internet.

0:39:560:39:57

30, we're in the room. £35, internet's money, then.

0:39:570:40:00

-£35.

-BANGS GAVEL

0:40:000:40:03

£35. That was a profit. That was a profit, darling.

0:40:030:40:07

That was a profit.

0:40:070:40:09

Well done. Do you want a biscuit?

0:40:090:40:11

You never offer me a biscuit.

0:40:110:40:13

Did you like that one? Did you get excited?

0:40:130:40:15

I don't think he's that fussed, actually.

0:40:150:40:18

Now, all Anita's hopes rest on her dragon.

0:40:180:40:22

It was a bold buy, in an attempt to chase James.

0:40:220:40:26

But will it pay off?

0:40:260:40:27

And £40?

0:40:270:40:29

20.

0:40:290:40:31

Oh, 20! Oh, no!

0:40:310:40:33

-10 is bid.

-10!

0:40:330:40:36

10!

0:40:360:40:37

At £10 now.

0:40:370:40:39

Oh, lordy!

0:40:390:40:42

At £10, then.

0:40:420:40:44

BANGS GAVEL

0:40:440:40:46

10 quid!

0:40:480:40:49

Well, that went up in flames, didn't it?

0:40:490:40:52

That was tough to take. Tough to take.

0:40:520:40:55

Certainly on your own. Now, James's last lot of the day -

0:40:550:40:58

his two William Wyllie pictures.

0:40:580:41:01

100 is bid.

0:41:010:41:02

He's doubled the money already.

0:41:020:41:05

30. 40.

0:41:050:41:07

140.

0:41:070:41:08

50.

0:41:080:41:10

£150.

0:41:100:41:12

150, are we all done?

0:41:120:41:15

150. We'll sell, then, at 150.

0:41:150:41:18

-BANGS GAVEL

-The hammer's down. £150.

0:41:180:41:21

£150, darling!

0:41:210:41:23

They sail away.

0:41:230:41:25

Well done, James.

0:41:250:41:26

Well done, darling. Well done.

0:41:260:41:28

So a terrible pity that the real James had to miss his last auction,

0:41:290:41:33

but he ends this road trip triumphant

0:41:330:41:36

and swimming in lashes of lolly nevertheless.

0:41:360:41:38

What a result, eh?

0:41:380:41:40

Anita began this final leg with £466.32

0:41:400:41:45

and after auction costs, she made an unfortunate loss

0:41:450:41:48

of £83.70,

0:41:480:41:50

leaving her with a total of £382.62.

0:41:500:41:54

Just lay off the dragons in future, Anita.

0:41:540:41:57

But James has beaten all comers.

0:41:580:42:00

He began this leg with £1,204.54.

0:42:000:42:03

He made a smart profit of £105.20

0:42:030:42:07

and ends the road trip high on the hog

0:42:070:42:10

with £1,309.74.

0:42:100:42:14

Well, I'm doggone!

0:42:140:42:16

Anita may be Cinderella

0:42:170:42:19

to James's Rockefeller,

0:42:190:42:21

but if there's one thing this trip's proven,

0:42:210:42:24

it's that there's a lot of affection betwixt these two.

0:42:240:42:28

Aww!

0:42:280:42:29

# You're the lady, you're the lady... #

0:42:290:42:32

Anita's shown she buys with her romantic heart.

0:42:320:42:35

Too exotic.

0:42:350:42:37

# You're the fella, you're the fella... #

0:42:370:42:40

While James has displayed his eagle eye for profit.

0:42:420:42:46

Give him a wee clap!

0:42:460:42:47

Yes!

0:42:500:42:52

# I love you

0:42:520:42:53

# I love you... #

0:42:530:42:55

But they've supported each other through all the highs and lows.

0:42:550:42:59

# I love you... #

0:42:590:43:01

Bon voyage, you two.

0:43:040:43:06

Don't forget to write, eh?

0:43:060:43:07

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:100:43:12

we have two new travelling treasure hunters - Mark Stacey and Will Axon.

0:43:120:43:17

You're a naughty man, Mr Stacey! A naughty man.

0:43:170:43:21

Mark will be unveiling his new look.

0:43:210:43:23

I don't think it's me, really, do you?

0:43:230:43:25

And Will makes his road trip debut.

0:43:270:43:29

It all seems a lot easier when you're watching it on the telly.

0:43:290:43:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:400:43:42