Episode 13 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 13

Beginning in the coastal town of Deal in Kent, antiques experts Mark Stacey and Will Axon head west to battle it out at their auction in Chiswick, London.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts

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with £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Going, going, gone!

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How do I look?

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat!

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Yes!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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I'm going to become a bin man.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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I like it when you're chasing me!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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The Garden of England awaits on the third leg of their Road Trip

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for our antiques experts Mark Stacey and Will Axon.

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There is some nice countryside around, isn't there?

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Yes. Let me know when you find it!

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Road Trip veteran and antiques expert Mark knows exactly how to uncover a bargain.

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And he has a great moral fibre, to boot.

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I promise not to nick anything!

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Newmarket newbie Will, though,

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has been suffering from a bit of cabinet fever so far

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and needs to get his head back in the game.

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It's bad. I need to focus.

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Both Mark and Will started the week with £200

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and despite making a profit at the last auction,

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they still find themselves in the red.

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Let's do the biz.

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Mark's opening losses were nearly offset by his second-leg profit.

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But he still only has £188.14 to start this leg.

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A disastrous beginning to Will's Road Trip means he'll need to get in gear

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to improve on his budget of £144.32.

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With such a poor start to their Road Trip,

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it seems ironic that they're sitting pretty in a classic Triumph!

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And this 1963 TR4 is certainly attracting some admiring attention.

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Wa-hey!

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What-ho, boys!

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"What-ho, boys"?!

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WILL LAUGHS

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Our travelling treasure-hunters

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are cruising through a whopping five counties.

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They started the week in Hastings, East Sussex,

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and will circumnavigate the south-east,

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before ending up at an auction in the London suburb of Ruislip.

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On this leg, they'll start in the coastal town of Deal

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and end up at an auction in Chiswick,

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clocking up nearly 130 miles along the way.

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Well, Mr Stacey, we have arrived.

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Well driven, I have to say. Can I make that absolutely clear?

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I've thrown off the mantle of driver error!

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Long may it continue, in my opinion.

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But please, please, Will, tell me - where are we?

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Allow me! Once the busiest port in England,

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Deal is now a quiet seaside resort town

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though its maritime history pervades the quaint surroundings.

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The coast of France is approximately 25 miles away and is visible on a clear day.

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-Mark, you're on that way.

-Am I? Good luck. Happy hunting.

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-Happy hunting, mate.

-Don't find too much!

-See you later!

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Thankfully, Mark's found an antiques shop, run by Mick,

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and he's hoping it's flush with bargains that get him back in the black.

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-Hello.

-Hello, there.

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-I'm Mark.

-Mick. How do you do?

-Nice to meet you, Mick.

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The shop seems well stocked with items to catch Mark's eye,

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and even has a canine security system,

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attack dog Jasper.

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The wagging tail's a bit of a giveaway, though!

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Heading for auction in Chiswick, the boys need to tailor their buys

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to the demands of that fussy London market.

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You've got to look for those quirky items that just might appeal there.

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Found something quirky, have you, Mark?

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It's a pottery garden seat.

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These were used in the Victorian period as conservatory seats.

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They're often made of majolica.

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This has got a nice high-fired blue glaze on it

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with bubbles on the top where the glaze has blistered.

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It's a lovely octagonal shape,

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in a sort of Chinese style.

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It's priced up at £55. It needs to be a lot less than that.

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So I might have a word with Mick.

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And right on cue...

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Go on, then. Make me an offer.

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What about 20 quid, Mick? Cash.

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-25.

-Oh, come on. You know you want me to win. You want me to win.

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-OK.

-Shall we shake hands at 20, then?

-Done.

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Thanks a lot. I'm really pleased with that.

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Well, it looks like there's a good deal to be had in Deal! Eh, Mark?

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Meanwhile, Will's arrived at Inside-Out Antiques.

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I wonder if he can make a quick deal, too.

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-Hello, there.

-Hiya.

-Hi. You must be Vince.

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-I am.

-I'm Will. How do you do?

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-What's that, a skull?

-Yes.

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Would have been the lid of something or other?

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-A poison bottle?

-I would say more of a walking stick.

-Cane handle.

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-Cane handle. Very interesting.

-That is quite interesting. Quite quirky.

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I've got 60 on that.

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Let's have a look in there. Why can't we get in there?

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Well, it's bronze.

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A sort of memento mori.

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Maybe to perhaps just remind you of your own mortality,

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every morning as you take your cane out of the cane stand.

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Yeah. I'm asking 75 for it.

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I thought it was 60 a minute ago!

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So did I!

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Play that back! I want proof!

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-I've got 60 on that.

-'I thought so!'

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Who said antiques was a fair game?

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Yeah. Might be.

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What sort of age do you think it's got? Early 20th, late 19th?

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Always difficult to tell on that type of thing. Very difficult to tell, in fact.

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Got a bit of wear on the... the "pateena" there. The patina.

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Potato, "potahto". Either way, looks like he's holding on to that one.

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That's got something about it. Where did that come from?

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China, I'd say.

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20th century. Looks like a bronze censer case, or incense burner, as it's better known.

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What's the ticket price?

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No price on it?

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-No.

-It must be cheap.

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55.

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SHARP INTAKE OF BREATH

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What if I came in, really cheeky, and said I could have them both for 50 quid?

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I'd say, "Bloomin' cheek!"

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Can't do it. Can't do it.

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75, you've got a deal.

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70 quid.

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70 quid, Vince. Go on. Five quid luck money.

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-Luck money?

-For me. 70 quid.

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Yeah! You're a man! You're a man! Good work.

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Crikey Moses! £70. That's nearly half your remaining budget, Will.

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Although they do say, "Go big or go home."

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-Whoa! What are you doing here?

-Hello, Mark.

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This is a fortuitous meeting.

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-Are you my lift?

-Yeah. Why, are we done here?

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-I think so, don't you?

-Yeah. Have any luck?

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-Shall we go to Margate?

-Yeah, come on, then!

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With items in their bag already,

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the chaps are making the short trip 16 miles up the Kent coast

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to Margate.

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For the last 250 years,

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the town of Margate has been a leading seaside resort in the UK,

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drawing Londoners to its beaches.

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But it's the antiques that have drawn our Mark here,

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starting with Paraphernalia.

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I suppose it's meant to look like a fan.

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Often fans are framed in frames like this.

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The frame is later, I think.

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But it suits it quite well. There's a little bit of damage on the frame.

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So I think it's a 19th-century engraving of an 18th-century scene.

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But I just think that's rather fun.

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If it was - how shall I put it delicately? - cheap.

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Well, it's one to bear in mind.

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But owner Andrew has a jasperware flask

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that's caught Mark's eye.

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Gosh, that's rather fun, isn't it? It's a Wedgwood-type thing.

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Yes, it is. And it's got a silver top.

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It's rather sweet, isn't it?

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Sweet, but not antique. '70s, I'd say.

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So it's really like a model of an 18th-century one?

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-That's correct, yes.

-They obviously did a little series here.

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"Jasperware perfume bottle collection."

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-It's a nice collector's piece.

-I rather like that, Andrew.

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Oh, dear! I've just seen the price!

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Really. Do tell.

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I'm disappointed cos it's got two figures.

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I'll put that over there. Can we?

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The two figures being 2 and 5.

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But knowing you, Mark, you can get that price down.

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Now, can we do a really good deal on those?

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Um... OK.

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I don't like the sound of that.

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There was a long pause and a very, very non-committal response.

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What kind of deal?

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Oh, I hate doing this, cos I don't like asking for anything off.

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What?!

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Cos I find it very hard to negotiate.

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Oh, here we go!

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Where do you need it to be?

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I need it to be £20, really.

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And then I would pay 15 for that.

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-OK. Let's do that.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah, yeah.

-Happy with that?

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-And I can come back and visit you again?

-You can any time, and I can eat tonight.

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-We've got a deal. Thank you, Andrew.

-You're welcome.

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Nice work. That's two items bought for just £35.

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Take note, Will.

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He's popped along the road to try and uncover the mystery

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surrounding one of Margate's top tourist attractions,

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where something quite extraordinary exists

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two metres under a garden.

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Will's meeting up with Sarah for the guided tour.

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Thanks very much. I'm really looking forward to this visit.

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I've read and seen a lot about The Grotto.

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-Nothing quite prepares you for the actual thing, though.

-I can imagine.

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The story goes that in 1835,

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James Newlove lowered his young son Joshua into a hole in the ground

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that had appeared during the digging of a duck pond.

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Joshua emerged describing tunnels adorned with shells.

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He had discovered the Shell Grotto.

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However he came upon it, James Newlove could see the commercial benefit of his find.

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The Grotto, with its 4.6 million shells, opened its doors to the public in 1838

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and came as something of a surprise to the people of Margate.

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How do you bring four-point-whatever million shells

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to a small garden or a small point,

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without anyone knowing or noticing or...?

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That's... That's a difficult question.

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I just don't know the answer to that.

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Maybe it was built long enough before the 1830s

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-for it just to have been forgotten.

-Forgotten in local folklore.

-Yeah.

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Or maybe it was built in secret. But that's difficult to imagine.

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In modern times, grottoes have served as chapels or shrines.

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But at first glance, the design here only adds to the confusion,

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with cockles, whelks, mussels and oysters

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creating an array of patterns.

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Since the first paying customers descended the chalk stairway,

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debate has raged about its origins,

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whether as an ancient temple or a meeting place for a secret sect.

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There's one theory that the grotto was meant to represent a journey through life and death.

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So you crawl down your chalk passage, that represents birth.

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-Yes.

-This rotunda, this circus, we're in a circular passage here,

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this has got lots of flowering forms,

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a couple of phallic symbols over there.

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The panel that I'm standing in front of is generally referred to as a womb.

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I can see it now, yes!

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And as you go further down, the bottom room becomes much more geometrical

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with suns and stars and moons.

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So the theory is that you travel through life and death to the afterlife.

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But people who think this was some kind of garden fancy or folly

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just see patterns.

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And with nearly 180 years' worth of embellishment,

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there seems little chance of discovering the truth behind its mysterious beginnings.

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For what it's worth,

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it might have been dug out for smugglers to hoard their secret stash of contraband,

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a practice rife for centuries along the south coast.

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But whatever its origins, it's certainly a magical, mysterious place.

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With three purchases already in the old bag,

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Mark's still scouring the shops at Margate before they close, looking for more bargains.

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Hello, Mark. Pleased to meet you. I'm Ron Scott. How are you?

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Well, I'm so underdressed!

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Nice hat! It's late in the day and it seems Mark has got his work cut out for him

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if he's going to get round this place!

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-How long have we got?

-We should have been closed half an hour ago, but I'll stick with it for you.

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I think I'll still be here on Series 12!

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Crikey! You'd best get looking, quick smart!

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Oh, gosh!

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It never ends! Look!

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It just carries on and carries on.

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Do you know, I'm beginning to absolutely hate antiques!

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Pull yourself together, man.

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There must be one item in here!

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Ooh, looks like he's found one.

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The smallest thing, possibly. A silver-topped dressing table jar.

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Now, this is broken.

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Probably beyond repair. But it is silver-topped, actually.

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And nicely, it still has its stopper in it, which is unusual.

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That's only priced at 15 quid.

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You must admit that is realistically priced.

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It is realistically priced, Ron.

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But it is broken!

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-Let's be honest.

-If 12 quid's good for you, it's good for me.

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-I think we're going to do that. Are you happy with that?

-I am. Good man.

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-Thank you.

-Thanks, Ron.

-Thank you very much, Mark.

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Finally! Thank goodness for that!

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Thanks very much, Mark. Let me get the door for you!

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-Thank you, Ron. See you again.

-Bye! Thanks very much.

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Oh, I need a lie-down!

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A spectacular day of seaside spending is at an end.

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Time to rest those purse strings.

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Nighty-night!

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Morning has broken, and the boys are back on the road.

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Scream if you want to go faster, Mark!

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So far, Will has only visited one shop

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and already he's offloaded half of his budget,

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spending £70 on two pieces.

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I'm sure he'd have bought the grotto, too, if he could have.

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He has £74.32 to part with...

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..whereas Mark's collected four pieces of bounty.

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With a thrifty bit of business,

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he got it all for just £67.

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So he still has £121.14 to spend accordingly.

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The boys are heading across Kent to the outskirts of the town of Westerham,

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where Mark is visiting a rather important house.

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When he wasn't in residence at Number 10, Downing Street,

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Chartwell House was the family home of arguably Britain's greatest prime minister, Sir Winston Churchill.

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Even at the height of World War II,

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this retreat was to be his sanctuary,

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living here between 1924 and the end of his life.

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That entranceway looks grand.

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Bit of a pile, isn't it?

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Have fun. Behave yourself!

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-Wish me luck.

-Good luck.

-And I hope at the end of this, I'll go like that!

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Victory! Take care, Mark.

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V is also for View,

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which Alice is providing Mark with, on their guided tour starting on the pink terrace.

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-This is an amazing view, isn't it?

-It is.

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It's one of the prime reasons that Churchill bought this property in the first place.

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I can understand. It looks out forever.

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What are we looking at here?

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We're looking over The Weald of Kent,

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and it's a view that Churchill once remarked was worth fighting for, and I agree.

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It represents England, doesn't it?

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It really does. And we are in the Garden of England.

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Inside, the rooms remain much as they were when he lived here,

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the pictures, books and personal mementos

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evoking the career and wide-ranging interests of a great statesman, writer and painter.

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An accomplished artist, part of the house was set aside for his passion,

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a creativity that yielded more than 500 pictures.

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Mark's attention has been drawn to a portrait of the great man,

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which hangs in Lady Churchill's sitting room.

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That's by Oswald Birley. He's wearing his iconic siren suit that he's very well known for.

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What I like about the portrait is that if you didn't know who it was,

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which is impossible of course, but if you didn't,

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that would just be a kindly grandfather, wouldn't it?

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Don't you think? The eyes are so warm.

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They are. It's a very nice portrait.

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-It's one of the family's favourite of him, summing him up.

-It's lovely.

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Churchill was also well known for his writing,

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and won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1953.

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Welcome to Sir Winston's study.

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This is really the beating heart of the house.

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This is where he would have written most of his works,

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History of the Second World War, History of Marlborough,

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and it was also a room that had to be quiet for him,

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so children not allowed in here.

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-If he was working, even Lady Churchill would slip notes under the door.

-Really?

0:18:020:18:06

And this is the desk he used? As you said, nothing has changed.

0:18:060:18:10

No. He would read at the desk

0:18:100:18:12

and perhaps open his correspondence,

0:18:120:18:14

-but he used to like working standing up.

-Really?

0:18:140:18:19

That's quite odd, isn't it?

0:18:190:18:21

Most writers, I would have thought, would prefer to be sitting down,

0:18:210:18:24

in these days of the laptop. Why did he like standing up?

0:18:240:18:27

He was a very natural orator,

0:18:270:18:29

and I think to really get into your stride, you have to be standing up.

0:18:290:18:33

The writing flows from that, I suppose, if you're standing up.

0:18:330:18:37

It's a wonderful room.

0:18:370:18:39

Alice, thank you so much for just a little glimpse of Chartwell.

0:18:410:18:44

-A pleasure.

-I hope some day I can come back and have a proper look round. Thank you.

0:18:440:18:49

We leave one great British hero

0:18:520:18:55

to join Will, another, who has made the short journey from Westerham to Brasted,

0:18:550:19:00

where he's checking out the wares at Courtyard Antiques.

0:19:000:19:03

That's quite interesting.

0:19:030:19:05

Stoneware. Blue and white. Obviously got a bit of age to it.

0:19:130:19:19

Probably mid-19th century.

0:19:190:19:21

Nicely decorated, and I love this sort of deep blue

0:19:210:19:26

contrasting with the lighter blue.

0:19:260:19:28

It gives a bit of depth to it.

0:19:280:19:30

You've got this almost stylised chinoiserie decoration,

0:19:300:19:33

and these have a slightly European slant on them, the flowers.

0:19:330:19:39

But it's sweet. Nice-shaped border.

0:19:390:19:42

And it looks in pretty... pretty good condition.

0:19:420:19:46

That's quite interesting.

0:19:480:19:49

It's obviously had a price on it.

0:19:490:19:51

He hasn't been able to sell it, so he's reduced it to 45,

0:19:510:19:54

which is kind of within my budget.

0:19:540:19:56

Well, only just.

0:19:560:19:58

Let's see what owner Barry has to say.

0:19:580:20:00

What really interested me was the fact that it looks like it's had a price on,

0:20:000:20:05

-it's been unsold.

-Yeah.

0:20:050:20:07

He's reduced it. It's still unsold.

0:20:070:20:10

So I was going to ask if I could make an offer for that of £20.

0:20:100:20:17

-I think I've got to make a phone call.

-That's fine.

0:20:180:20:22

Looks like Will's decided to have a one-to-one with the seller himself.

0:20:220:20:25

I was wondering if I might be able to take a punt on it as such

0:20:250:20:29

at sort of £20.

0:20:290:20:31

That's really kind of you. Thanks very much. I'll pass you back to Barry to say goodbye.

0:20:330:20:37

Cheers. Thank you. Bye!

0:20:370:20:39

Result!

0:20:390:20:41

Hello, Chris? Is that all right?

0:20:410:20:44

I wish I'd known you were that accommodating!

0:20:440:20:48

I'd have bought it myself a long time ago!

0:20:480:20:50

That man is making a move now! Too late, Barry, I'm having it! Thank you!

0:20:500:20:54

Well, I never! I'd pay up quick, if I were you!

0:20:560:20:59

Uh-oh. Something tells me he's not finished yet.

0:21:000:21:03

Elaine's the lady to talk to.

0:21:050:21:07

I've been looking at your canes. Some very nice ones there.

0:21:070:21:11

But yesterday, I bought a cane handle but without a cane.

0:21:110:21:15

You wouldn't happen to have in your workshop or knocking around anywhere

0:21:150:21:19

a cane without a handle?

0:21:190:21:21

-Actually, I do have an ebony one.

-Really?

0:21:210:21:25

-Any chance I could have a look at that?

-Actually, yes.

0:21:250:21:28

Elaine's gone off for a rummage.

0:21:280:21:30

But where's Will going?

0:21:300:21:32

Now what's he up to?

0:21:330:21:35

Come on, mate.

0:21:390:21:40

This is interesting.

0:21:400:21:42

Do you know what? I've got a good feeling about this.

0:21:440:21:46

-He seems to fit on there pretty well.

-Very nice. Yes.

0:21:510:21:54

What sort of money are you asking on the cane?

0:21:560:21:58

25.

0:22:000:22:01

£18.

0:22:010:22:03

-Then at least you know it's gone to...

-20.

0:22:040:22:06

20...

0:22:060:22:07

You shook my hand before I could even think about it.

0:22:070:22:10

Elaine, I'm not going to quibble over a couple of quid with you.

0:22:100:22:13

I think £20 is a fair price,

0:22:130:22:15

because together, they stand a chance.

0:22:150:22:18

Do you know, Will, I think you might be right.

0:22:200:22:22

And while you were attempting to blow your entire budget,

0:22:220:22:25

Mark's travelled the seven-mile journey ahead to Otford.

0:22:250:22:29

Located on the River Darent,

0:22:300:22:33

it was voted Village of the Year in 2006

0:22:330:22:36

and the sort of place where you can find a bargain on the street.

0:22:360:22:39

Otford Antiques.

0:22:390:22:40

These are quite funky.

0:22:440:22:46

As soon as you see this type of shape,

0:22:460:22:47

you're imagining the 1960s, '70s.

0:22:470:22:52

It's got that sort of '70s look about it.

0:22:520:22:55

When we look underneath,

0:22:560:22:58

yes, we've got a maker's name here.

0:22:580:23:00

"Uldum Mobelfabrik. Made in Denmark."

0:23:000:23:05

A lot of the value in this type of retro vintage furniture

0:23:050:23:08

is who the designer is.

0:23:080:23:10

If it's a really good designer,

0:23:100:23:12

then they can be worth quite a lot of money.

0:23:120:23:15

If it's just run-of-the-mill mass-produced, not so good.

0:23:150:23:19

If you're going to do these things, you've got to go on your own gut feeling.

0:23:190:23:23

But we'll go in and find out and see whether we can pick up four chairs.

0:23:230:23:27

-They belong to this place, do they?

-Yes, they belong to Jackie here.

0:23:270:23:30

-They're mine.

-Oh, Jackie is my favourite girl's name!

0:23:300:23:33

Oh, he's a smooth operator.

0:23:330:23:35

Jackie, how much do you really want for them?

0:23:350:23:39

-60 would be the price.

-If I could get them for about 50 quid...

0:23:390:23:43

-Can't do 60?

-I'd love them for 50, honestly.

0:23:430:23:46

That look tells me Elaine has an opinion on this, too.

0:23:460:23:49

If you add another £10 onto that, you can have them. That gives Jackie a little profit

0:23:500:23:56

and gives you a good chance of a profit as well.

0:23:560:23:58

-Ooh. We've got a businesslady here!

-It's like the Mafia!

0:23:590:24:02

We've got a "Donness", here, not a Don!

0:24:030:24:06

I can't believe this!

0:24:060:24:08

-I'm being... I'm... I'm...

-She's my friend!

0:24:080:24:11

I'm being mugged! What's the number for Crimewatch... Crime Fighters?

0:24:110:24:14

-Could we split in the middle?

-Tell you what... Yes.

0:24:180:24:20

So we'll say 55.

0:24:200:24:22

-Would you be happy at 55? Promise me, Jackie?

-Yes, fine.

0:24:220:24:25

-Cos I don't want to go away if you don't say...

-It's fine.

0:24:250:24:29

If you then say, "That horrible Mark Stacey was over"...

0:24:290:24:32

-If you do think I'm horrible, I'm James Lewis!

-I won't talk about you.

0:24:320:24:35

Or somebody like that!

0:24:350:24:36

Thank you very much. We'll call that a deal, but I'm going to keep on looking, if that's all right.

0:24:360:24:41

Look out! The opposition has arrived,

0:24:410:24:44

but with £34.32 left in his pocket,

0:24:440:24:47

he'll have to dig deep to find a bargain here.

0:24:470:24:50

Will's heading upstairs to see what Mark has overlooked.

0:24:520:24:55

What's this buried?

0:24:570:24:58

That's quite nice, you know.

0:24:590:25:01

Buried under the books, for good reason, is a book slide.

0:25:010:25:06

Hello.

0:25:060:25:07

I think we may have hit a minor jackpot here.

0:25:130:25:17

Make sure Mark's not around.

0:25:170:25:18

Look at this. This is a book slide, yeah?

0:25:180:25:22

Blimey, he's excited.

0:25:220:25:23

It's obvious what it does. You put your books, it can go left or right.

0:25:230:25:29

But what has got me quite excited about this,

0:25:290:25:33

it's cracking quality.

0:25:330:25:36

It's actually in coromandel wood,

0:25:370:25:39

which is a family of the rosewood.

0:25:390:25:42

It's similar to my cane, actually.

0:25:420:25:45

And this I have not seen very often.

0:25:450:25:49

It has got a cracking little label,

0:25:490:25:52

"Farthing & Thornhill, Makers. Cornhill", in London.

0:25:520:25:55

To put a maker's mark on a book slide,

0:25:550:25:58

you know this has got to be super quality.

0:25:580:26:00

And do you know the best bit?

0:26:000:26:03

It's 28 quid!

0:26:030:26:05

Whoo! And look at the dust!

0:26:070:26:09

It's been there for months, years, perhaps.

0:26:090:26:13

I'll tell you, it just goes to show.

0:26:130:26:16

Just dive in and have a look.

0:26:160:26:18

I couldn't see it because of the books,

0:26:180:26:20

but a little bit of effort, a little bit of searching,

0:26:200:26:23

and that, my friends, I think is a super little lot.

0:26:230:26:28

I'm not even going to guesstimate what it could make at auction,

0:26:300:26:33

but I've seen them make a lot more than £28 and they're nowhere near as good as this.

0:26:330:26:38

So, I don't think that's even a maybe. That's a definite.

0:26:380:26:42

Now, what's this Mark's got his eye on?

0:26:440:26:46

Looks like Denby pottery.

0:26:460:26:48

Denby's striking designs graced the 1970s with flair.

0:26:480:26:52

Although typically painted in browns and oranges, the bulb pattern is somewhat unusual.

0:26:520:26:57

Do you know, I'm rather taken with this vase.

0:26:570:27:00

But I don't know why, really...

0:27:000:27:02

..because I don't know anything about it.

0:27:030:27:05

And it's a heck of a lump, really, for... It's got £28 on it at the moment.

0:27:060:27:11

It goes... CLANGING

0:27:110:27:13

Careful!

0:27:130:27:14

Who did that?

0:27:140:27:16

It goes quite nicely with the chairs.

0:27:160:27:17

Yes, put it down!

0:27:170:27:19

It's time to do battle with our Jackie again. Stand by!

0:27:190:27:22

-Hello, Jackie. I don't know what it is, but I'm in a '70s mood today.

-Good! Retro.

0:27:230:27:29

I'm looking back. Looking back, you know.

0:27:290:27:31

-Of course, I wasn't around in the

-'70s(!) Of course not!

0:27:310:27:35

-What about 15?

-No, can't do 15.

0:27:350:27:37

-You're adamant!

-It's far too cheap.

-Adamant.

-Yes.

0:27:370:27:40

-What about 14?

-No. 18?

0:27:400:27:43

We're very close.

0:27:430:27:45

-We want to do a deal on this, don't we?

-We do.

0:27:450:27:48

How much did we say? 16?

0:27:490:27:51

No. 17.

0:27:510:27:53

-Are you going to be determined on 17?

-Mm.

0:27:540:27:57

-Really?

-Yes.

0:27:570:27:59

-It's a good price.

-Go on, then. 17. Thanks, Jackie.

0:27:590:28:03

£17.

0:28:030:28:05

If I can't make a profit on that...

0:28:050:28:07

..I'm going to become a bin man!

0:28:110:28:13

Oh, you do talk a lot of tosh!

0:28:140:28:16

But whilst Mark's tipping over the edge,

0:28:160:28:19

Will's on the slide.

0:28:190:28:20

-I found a little book slide upstairs.

-OK.

0:28:200:28:23

Buried under... Now,

0:28:230:28:25

28 that's got on it.

0:28:250:28:26

What's the absolute death on this?

0:28:260:28:29

A sliding book... We've got 28.

0:28:290:28:32

-20 quid?

-20? ..Yes.

0:28:350:28:37

OK. So that's a deal. That's a deal, £20.

0:28:370:28:41

He's still not finished, yet, don't you know?

0:28:420:28:45

Chinese rice paper paintings.

0:28:460:28:48

They're usually for export, and they show traditional Chinese customs,

0:28:500:28:54

traditional Chinese costumes,

0:28:540:28:56

and the really sought-after ones traditional Chinese tortures and crime punishment.

0:28:560:29:01

There's no...

0:29:020:29:04

no price on it...

0:29:040:29:06

..which might be a good thing.

0:29:070:29:09

That's worth an ask. I'm going to go and say, "Can that be 15 quid?"

0:29:110:29:14

I reckon that's worth a go.

0:29:140:29:16

Hey, Will! You do know you only have £14.32 left, don't you?

0:29:160:29:21

Beryl's calling the painting's owner, so fingers crossed.

0:29:210:29:25

OK. Thank you. Bye.

0:29:250:29:27

-All done. 14.

-Ooh, thank you very much!

0:29:280:29:31

-What did he say the price was on it, ten?

-15.

0:29:310:29:33

Was it?

0:29:330:29:35

Well, it's better to be lucky than good.

0:29:370:29:39

Will's finished shopping, with a whole 32p warming his pocket,

0:29:390:29:43

which wouldn't even buy a drink, but nevertheless, the boys have gone to the pub to reveal their lots.

0:29:430:29:48

-Shall I show you?

-Yeah.

0:29:500:29:52

Ta-da!

0:29:520:29:54

Ooh.

0:29:540:29:55

It's quite odd, isn't it? It's an odd selection.

0:29:550:29:59

It's an eclectic mix, Mark!

0:29:590:30:02

-I know. I think this is amazing.

-Let's have a look.

0:30:020:30:05

It's an engraving.

0:30:050:30:06

But it's actually framed as a fan and printed as a fan.

0:30:060:30:11

I like the frame as well.

0:30:110:30:13

-How much was that?

-20.

0:30:130:30:15

-Not a lot, is it?

-I thought it was quite sweet.

0:30:150:30:17

From the sweet to the swirly.

0:30:180:30:21

-You've gone a bit retro today.

-I love this. Don't you?

0:30:210:30:25

Denby Ware. Have you ever seen it?

0:30:250:30:26

-Not in that pattern.

-I love it.

0:30:260:30:29

And this was only 17 quid.

0:30:290:30:32

-That's not a lot, is it?

-It's not a lot of money, really.

0:30:320:30:34

-And Denby's on the way up, isn't it?

-It is.

0:30:340:30:36

I think it's quite collectable.

0:30:360:30:38

And these are Danish, with the maker's name underneath.

0:30:380:30:40

-It's a set of four.

-So two more. I could see those retailing for 80 quid.

0:30:400:30:46

If they retail for 80 quid, I'm going to lose money.

0:30:460:30:49

-How much did you pay?

-55.

0:30:490:30:51

You could make a small profit!

0:30:510:30:53

I've shown you mine. Now show me yours.

0:30:530:30:56

No funny faces to camera!

0:30:560:30:57

-You little fibber! You're jumping around inside!

-No, I'm not!

0:31:030:31:07

I'm just looking. Oh, this is nice.

0:31:070:31:09

-That is an absolute belter.

-That's lovely, isn't it?

0:31:090:31:12

Coromandel.

0:31:120:31:13

Oh, that's lovely, actually.

0:31:140:31:16

It's just the sort of thing I like.

0:31:160:31:18

-I mean, it was cheap, wasn't it?

-Yeah.

0:31:180:31:20

-It had 28 quid on the ticket.

-No money at all.

-I got it for £20.

-Oh, that's nothing.

0:31:200:31:25

There's got to be a profit in that.

0:31:250:31:27

-Got to be. A little Chinese rice paper painting.

-That's pretty.

0:31:270:31:32

-Sweet, isn't it?

-Of a little junk.

-You'd estimate that 20 to 30 quid whatever, wouldn't you?

0:31:320:31:36

-Would you?

-I would.

-I don't think you would. It would be a job lot.

0:31:360:31:40

-For crying out loud!

-These are very collectable if you have a set of them.

0:31:400:31:43

-Yes.

-A single one on its own is, I think, difficult to sell.

-We shall see.

0:31:430:31:48

A Chinese...

0:31:480:31:50

Oh, you and your Chinese! You're desperate to find something that will make a lot of money!

0:31:500:31:55

-I just like it!

-You are, Will!

-I just like it!

0:31:550:31:57

-Put it away.

-Thank you. That wasn't a lot of money.

-Jolly good.

0:31:570:32:00

Now, this...

0:32:000:32:02

-In one shop I bought the bronze head.

-Yes.

0:32:020:32:07

-Da-da-da!

-Oh, you've glued it?

0:32:070:32:09

-No!

-Is this allowed in the rules?

0:32:090:32:11

And in the other shop, the lady had a cane with no head.

0:32:110:32:14

Here's one I made earlier!

0:32:140:32:16

I stuck it together with double-sided sticky tape!

0:32:160:32:18

-But you don't think it's modern?

-Look at that.

-I do.

0:32:180:32:22

# There may be trouble ahead... #

0:32:220:32:24

It's like Fred and Ginger, isn't it?

0:32:240:32:26

So the total price of this?

0:32:260:32:28

55.

0:32:300:32:31

-It's a specky little lot. Someone might give me 60...

-"Specky little lot"?

0:32:320:32:35

-Ooh, gosh.

-It's the technical term.

-This time next year, we'll be millionaires!

0:32:350:32:39

We'll be millionaires, Mark!

0:32:390:32:41

-Listen, well done.

-Good work, mate.

0:32:410:32:43

I've enjoyed it again and I look forward to the auction.

0:32:430:32:46

-I'm looking forward to it. Thanks.

-Good work.

0:32:460:32:48

Listen, we're fun, and we're still friends.

0:32:480:32:51

They might well say that, but what do they really think?

0:32:510:32:53

Looking at the table on the reveal,

0:32:530:32:55

I was kind of more happy with my items than his.

0:32:550:32:59

The walking stick is genius. Absolute genius.

0:32:590:33:01

To marry a 19th-century cane

0:33:010:33:04

with what I think is a very modern cast skull is genius!

0:33:040:33:10

I'm fairly confident that this auction will be mine!

0:33:100:33:15

It's time to get back on the road and head to the den of antiquity, Chiswick Auctions.

0:33:150:33:21

On the third leg of their Road Trip, our doughty dealers

0:33:220:33:26

have crossed the breadth of Kent and into London,

0:33:260:33:29

starting in Deal and ending in Chiswick for the auction.

0:33:290:33:32

But the main thing is we are having fun.

0:33:330:33:35

We are having fun, and we're round and round the round-around!

0:33:350:33:38

I know. Or even the roundabout!

0:33:380:33:40

Around about the roundabout!

0:33:400:33:42

Don't worry, guys. I'll do the talking!

0:33:440:33:46

Chiswick, a well-to-do suburb of west London

0:33:470:33:50

and the birthplace of Dame Helen Mirren,

0:33:500:33:52

provides the end to the third leg of our Road Trip.

0:33:520:33:56

-This is it.

-Here we are, Mark.

0:33:560:33:58

Let's rock this saleroom!

0:33:580:34:00

Rock something, anyway! Come on.

0:34:000:34:02

Chiswick Auctions have been in business for only 15 years,

0:34:020:34:06

but have gained an excellent reputation,

0:34:060:34:09

and are frequently featured on TV.

0:34:090:34:12

They specialise in fine art, antiques and collectables.

0:34:120:34:15

The man at the helm of today's auction with his gavel at the ready is William Rouse.

0:34:150:34:19

We've got a set of four rosewood dining chairs

0:34:190:34:22

which is just the thing that's in vogue at the moment.

0:34:220:34:25

People like retro items.

0:34:250:34:27

There's also a very nice coromandel book slide.

0:34:270:34:29

It isn't always necessarily the most commercial of items in terms of practicality,

0:34:290:34:34

but it's a really nice-quality thing.

0:34:340:34:36

And quality tends to sell.

0:34:360:34:38

Quite right.

0:34:380:34:40

Mark Stacey set out on this leg with £188.14

0:34:400:34:44

and forked out 139 smackers on six items for his five lots.

0:34:440:34:49

Will Axon began this leg with a lowly £144.32

0:34:490:34:54

and once again spent all but a few pennies also on six items that comprise five lots.

0:34:540:35:01

-Are you fluttering?

-No.

-No?

-Confident.

0:35:010:35:04

Really?

0:35:040:35:06

Right, chaps, let battle commence.

0:35:060:35:08

First up is Will's chinoiserie platter, circa 1840.

0:35:090:35:14

I've got interest on this on the book,

0:35:150:35:17

I'm sure you'll be pleased to know. And I'm straight in at £15.

0:35:170:35:21

-Oh, well, that's good.

-£15.

0:35:210:35:23

18. 20. 22. 25.

0:35:230:35:26

25 is bid. 28 I'll take.

0:35:260:35:28

28. 30. 32.

0:35:280:35:32

In the doorway, then, at £32.

0:35:320:35:34

£32. Are you all done and finished at £32?

0:35:340:35:37

32.

0:35:370:35:39

Well done. I'm surprised at that.

0:35:400:35:43

A steady £12 profit for Will's platter. Good start.

0:35:430:35:46

It's Mark's garden seat next,

0:35:480:35:50

with pierced decoration.

0:35:500:35:52

-Interest in this on the book. I'm straight in at £35.

-That's good.

0:35:530:35:57

35. 40. 45.

0:35:570:36:00

45 is bid, then. At £45.

0:36:000:36:02

Anybody else, then? At £45 I'm going to sell it. 45.

0:36:020:36:07

A healthy £25 profit for Mark. This is going rather well!

0:36:070:36:11

45. I thought it might be more. They'd just started to bid then.

0:36:110:36:15

Then they realised what they were doing!

0:36:150:36:18

Now, now, boys!

0:36:190:36:21

It's time for Will's bronze censer case.

0:36:210:36:25

What's it worth? Start me. £30 for this lot.

0:36:250:36:27

-Speculative lot. I'm bid 30.

-This is worth 30.

0:36:270:36:30

35. 38. 40.

0:36:300:36:33

42. 45. 48.

0:36:330:36:36

50. £50.

0:36:360:36:37

£50 in the middle of the room. At 50.

0:36:380:36:40

Anybody else? All done and finished at £50. I'm going to sell.

0:36:400:36:44

At 50 it goes.

0:36:440:36:46

-You were lucky with that one.

-I was not!

0:36:470:36:50

I'm not sure about luck,

0:36:500:36:51

but I do know it's another profit for Will.

0:36:510:36:55

Told you we'd have a good day!

0:36:550:36:56

Cheer up, Mark. It's your fan-shaped engraving next.

0:36:560:37:00

What's it worth? Start me at £30.

0:37:020:37:04

£20, the lot to go for £20, surely?

0:37:040:37:07

For this framed fan, anybody?

0:37:070:37:10

-Oh, dear. £10 start me.

-Oh, no!

-Start me at ten here.

0:37:100:37:14

12. 14. 16.

0:37:140:37:17

18. 20. 22.

0:37:170:37:19

-£22 in front of me. Anybody else at £22?

-It's another shame.

0:37:190:37:25

25 there. 28. 30.

0:37:250:37:27

32. 35. 38.

0:37:270:37:30

40. 42. 45.

0:37:300:37:33

45 there. Away there at 45. Bit more respectable. £45.

0:37:330:37:39

-That was close!

-I hope you brought a change of trousers!

0:37:390:37:42

Fear not, Mark. You're on a roll.

0:37:420:37:45

Another £25 profit.

0:37:450:37:47

I thought that was going to struggle.

0:37:480:37:49

-You hoped it was going to struggle!

-I did not!

-Of course not, Will(!)

0:37:490:37:53

-45...

-Let the viewers make up their own mind.

0:37:530:37:56

That's you told, Will.

0:37:570:37:59

Handbags at the ready,

0:37:590:38:01

let's see if the auction room gets as excited about the book slide

0:38:010:38:05

as you did, Will.

0:38:050:38:06

Nice-quality object.

0:38:070:38:09

And I'm straight in at £60.

0:38:090:38:11

£60 I'm bid. 65. 70.

0:38:110:38:14

75. 80 is my last. 85 in the room.

0:38:140:38:17

-That's very good.

-Need someone to go with him, now.

0:38:170:38:20

At £85 in the room. Anybody else want to come in?

0:38:200:38:22

I can sell the lot. 85 it goes, then.

0:38:220:38:25

I think that's a jolly good price.

0:38:260:38:28

Well, how sporting of you, Mark.

0:38:290:38:31

A cracking result for Will there.

0:38:310:38:33

Do I smell a profit here?

0:38:340:38:36

It's Mark's scent flask and dressing table jar.

0:38:360:38:39

Must be worth £30. £15 each for them.

0:38:410:38:43

-30 I'm bid. 32.

-That's good.

-32 I'm bid.

0:38:430:38:46

At £32. Come along.

0:38:460:38:48

£32 is all I'm bid.

0:38:480:38:50

Seems so cheap. Can't believe it.

0:38:500:38:51

35. Thank you.

0:38:510:38:53

35 there. In the middle of the room.

0:38:530:38:56

38. It's amazing where they come from.

0:38:560:38:58

40. 42.

0:38:580:39:00

£42. Here we are.

0:39:000:39:02

At £42. Are you all done and finished?

0:39:020:39:05

£42.

0:39:050:39:06

I was very lucky with that one.

0:39:060:39:08

A £15 profit, Mark. But you'll need to do better to win this auction.

0:39:080:39:12

Eyes up. It's Will's pith painting next.

0:39:140:39:18

Somebody likes it. I've got a start-off bid of £30 with me.

0:39:180:39:21

-That's all right.

-I'm pleased with that.

-32 I'll take in the room.

0:39:210:39:24

It's with me, then, on a commission bid of 30.

0:39:240:39:26

Anybody else want to come in against commission?

0:39:260:39:28

With me, then, at £30. I'm going to sell it at 30. Sold.

0:39:280:39:32

A commission bid is a bid left by someone

0:39:320:39:35

who can't be at the auction.

0:39:350:39:37

How will the Chiswick bidders react to Mark's big purchase,

0:39:370:39:41

the Danish dining chairs?

0:39:410:39:43

Somebody offer me £20 to start me.

0:39:430:39:45

£20 for the four chairs.

0:39:450:39:47

That's absolutely... £10, then?

0:39:470:39:51

Uh-oh!

0:39:510:39:52

Bruno can't resist a bargain.

0:39:520:39:54

12. OK. Suddenly things are beginning to move.

0:39:540:39:57

Someone's had a go...

0:39:570:39:58

Too much. Dear, oh, dear. £12.

0:39:580:40:01

£14 in the blue.

0:40:010:40:03

16. £16 standing, then.

0:40:030:40:06

At £16. Oh, dear!

0:40:060:40:08

£16. I'm going to sell them.

0:40:080:40:10

Oh, dear, indeed. The dining chairs were a sitting duck.

0:40:110:40:14

That's a loss of £39.

0:40:140:40:17

Mark, you were unlucky with them.

0:40:170:40:19

Well, that's the way it goes. It's life.

0:40:190:40:21

Now, how will the bidding go on Will's last lot of the day,

0:40:240:40:27

his cleverly amalgamated skull and cane?

0:40:270:40:30

-This is a nice bit of fun.

-Yes, it is!

0:40:320:40:34

Somebody likes it. I'm straight in at £40. With me at £40.

0:40:340:40:38

I've got bids everywhere.

0:40:380:40:40

Leaping to bid on it. 45.

0:40:400:40:43

-50.

-They all want it.

-55. 60.

0:40:430:40:45

65. 70.

0:40:450:40:47

75. 80.

0:40:470:40:49

85. 90.

0:40:490:40:50

95. 100.

0:40:500:40:52

-110. 120.

-This is ridiculous!

-130.

0:40:520:40:55

-140.

-Go on!

-150.

0:40:550:40:57

160. 170. 180.

0:40:570:40:59

-190.

-Oh, it's a good thing, Mark.

0:40:590:41:02

-It's not a good thing!

-£200 there.

0:41:020:41:04

Thanks for the bid. At £200. Anybody else want to come in?

0:41:040:41:07

Unusual lot. £200. I'm going to sell it.

0:41:070:41:09

Ooh!

0:41:090:41:11

Now I know what it feels like!

0:41:110:41:13

I think it's brilliant, Will.

0:41:130:41:15

Say it like you mean it, Mark!

0:41:150:41:17

A stonking profit for Will. Bravo!

0:41:170:41:20

It's Mark's last chance to catch up.

0:41:220:41:25

But his Denby pottery vase will have to go some

0:41:250:41:27

for him to stand a chance of victory at today's auction.

0:41:270:41:30

-There we go. £20 for this. The Denby vase for 20.

-Come on!

0:41:300:41:34

20 I'm bid here.

0:41:340:41:36

22. 25. 28. 30 in front of me here.

0:41:360:41:40

At £30. Still at 30.

0:41:400:41:42

-It's a profit at least.

-£30. I'm going to sell it for 30.

0:41:420:41:46

Well, it's a profit, Will.

0:41:470:41:49

Little consolation there for Mark.

0:41:490:41:50

After auction costs, that's a small profit

0:41:500:41:53

and nowhere near enough to win today

0:41:530:41:55

as Will takes the spoils.

0:41:550:41:57

It's been a tremendous auction for our new boy of knick-knacks

0:41:570:42:01

against the Titan of treasure.

0:42:010:42:04

So, the tables have turned.

0:42:040:42:05

Mark started this leg with £188.14

0:42:050:42:09

and after costs made a disappointing £6.96 profit,

0:42:090:42:14

giving him £195.10 to play with on the next leg.

0:42:140:42:18

Will Axon, though, went forth and multiplied.

0:42:200:42:23

He kicked off this leg with £144.32

0:42:230:42:27

and after auction costs made a whopping £181.54

0:42:270:42:32

and starts next time with a bumper £325.86.

0:42:320:42:36

Well done!

0:42:360:42:38

What a contrast, William.

0:42:380:42:40

My first taste of victory, Mark!

0:42:400:42:43

It was quite a taste of victory as well, you know.

0:42:430:42:46

-But it's raining. Shall we go?

-Get in the car.

0:42:460:42:48

So, we've got a real contest now.

0:42:510:42:53

In your own time, Will!

0:42:530:42:56

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:000:43:03

..Mark Stacey can't refuse an "amuse-bouche".

0:43:040:43:07

Ooh, lovely! I'll come back here again!

0:43:070:43:10

Whilst Will Axon's just easily amused!

0:43:100:43:13

COW MOOS

0:43:130:43:15

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:360:43:39